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  • 1. Häggström, Anna
    et al.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    The complexity of participation in daily life: a qualitative study of the experiences of persons with acquired brain injury.2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 40, no 2, 89-95 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Luleå University of Technology.
    Ability to manage everyday technology after acquired brain injury2013In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 27, no 13-14, 1583-1588 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate and describe how persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) manage everyday technology (ET) in their daily activities and to explore whether the ability to manage ET was related to the severity of the disability. Method: Eighty-one persons with ABI were observed while managing ET by using the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META). The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) was used to assess the severity of disability after the ABI. A computer application of a Rasch measurement model was used to generate measures of the participants' ability to manage ET and the measures were compared groupwise with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: The degree of severity of disability had a significant main effect on the ability to manage ET. The groups with severe and moderate disability exhibited a significantly lower ability to manage ET compared to the group with good recovery. Conclusion: The result indicates that the ability to manage ET in daily activities can be related to the global severity of disability after ABI. This demonstrates the importance of considering the ability to manage ET to support the performance of activities at home, at work and in society in persons with ABI.

  • 3. Kassberg, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Prellwitz, Maria
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    The challenges of everyday technology in the workplace for persons with acquired brain injury2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 4, 272-281 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore and describe how persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) managed the everyday technology (ET) that they needed to use in their workplace and how this use influences their opportunities to work. Methods: Nine persons with an ABI were interviewed and observed when managing ET in their workplace. The data were analysed qualitatively with a constant comparative method. Results: The main category, "The challenge of managing ET in the workplace", consisted of three categories, all of which reflected different kinds of discrepancies between the participants' ability to manage ET and the demands that ET imposes on them in work: "Struggling with ET to be able to continue to work; "Depending on strategies to cope with ET to continue in a particular profession", and "Managing ET at work but concerned about keeping up with the changes". Conclusions: The result revealed discrepancies between the abilities of the persons with ABI to manage ET in relation to the demands that technology imposed on them in their work setting. This indicated that professionals need to consider the role of ET when designing interventions supporting a person's return to work after an ABI.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Luleå Tekinska Universitet/Enheten för Arbetsterapi.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Developing social contact and participation in social activities: Seniors experiences from a social Internet-based intervention processManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Department of Health Science, Lulea˚ University of Technology, Lulea˚ , Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Ageing and Living Conditions Program (ALC), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Internet Based Activities (IBAs): Seniors' experiences of the conditions required for the performance of and the influence of these conditions on their own participation in society2013In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 39, no 3, 155-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digital gap is a threat to the participation of senior citizens in society, as a large proportion of seniors are not involved in Internet based activities (IBAs). To be able to overcome this disadvantage for seniors, there is a need to both learn more about the conditions that make seniors start performing IBAs and to be able to provide them with the most beneficial professional interventions. The aim of this study was to explore and describe seniors' experiences with IBAs. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 seniors (aged: 66-82 years) with a variety of experiences with IBAs, and the interviews were analyzed with the constant comparative method. The results reveal three categories that describe the experiences of the established performers, the new performers of IBAs in the process of starting out, and the nonperformers. The variations in performance were influenced by the meaning that the performance of IBAs had for the seniors. In addition, the seniors were affected by several other conditionssuch as the support available in their environment, including access to knowledgeas this could encourage them to develop their performance. Basic aspects, such as having access to a computer and to the Internet had been arranged for the performers of IBAs. The different ways of performing IBAs, revealed in the three categories, influenced how the seniors viewed their opportunities to participate in society. The conclusion highlights the finding that professionals should consider a multitude of conditions when introducing seniors to the performance of meaningful IBAs.

  • 6.
    Larsson, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Ageing and Living Conditions Program (ALC).
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Participation in social internet-based activities: Five seniors' intervention processes2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, 471-480 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how client-centred occupational therapy intervention processes for participation in meaningful Social Internet-Based Activities (SIBAs) can be designed, and to explore the influences of participation in SIBAs on seniors' social activities and social contacts. Method. A qualitative, descriptive, multiple-case study was conducted, and an intervention was provided to the five participants, who were aged 65-85. Data were collected through assessment tools, field notes, and interviews. Results: The participants' needs and challenges related to SIBAs varied during the intervention processes. Individual-adapted support was provided for the seniors (by the occupational therapist) to managing the introduction to different SIBAs, their appearance on the internet, and the lack of privacy. The association between the seniors' participation in SIBAs and their satisfaction with these activities, as well as their social contacts, requires further exploration. Conclusions: Client-centred occupational therapy interventions can support seniors' participation in SIBAs and their self-reliance when performing these activities.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Ellinor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet/Enheten för Arbetsterapi.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Effects of a social Internet-based intervention program for older adults: An explorative randomized crossover studyArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Living with physical disability: experiences of the rehabilitation process, occupations and participation in everyday life2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive understanding is lacking of the experiences persons with acquired physical disabilities have of changes in their engagement in occupations and of the conditions influencing these experiences Furthermore, little is known about the experiences these people have of the rehabilitation process and whether the rehabilitation services satisfy their needs. Access to such knowledge would significantly add to the ability to design rehabilitation services intended to enhance participation in everyday life. The overall aim of this thesis was, therefore, to illuminate and enhance the understanding of how persons with acquired physical disabilities experienced their rehabilitation process and their possibilities to engage in occupations in everyday life.

    The thesis is comprised of five studies. The planning of the clients’ rehabilitation at hospital was explored through interviews with the clients (n=57) and the professionals (n=50). Interviews exploring how persons with physical disabilities experienced their rehabilitation process (n=15), their occupational lives in their homes (n=13) and the use of assistive devices (n =17) were analysed qualitatively. Data was also collected from persons with spinal cord injury (n =161) by the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire.

    The findings showed that the professionals used different strategies to encourage the clients to participate in the planning of the rehabilitation and that the strategies were based on traditions rather than on the individual clients’ desires to participate. The informants’ experiences reflected three parallel chains of rehabilitation over a period of time, a medical, a psychological and a social one. The influence of the different rehabilitation chains on how the clients’ lives turned out varied over time, and the professionals were predominantly involved in the medical rehabilitation chain. The informants’ experiences showed that their engagement in occupations in the home differed profoundly. Access to social support, which was provided under different conditions, was of decisive importance for their occupational engagement. The findings also showed that changes in the informants’ occupations in the home setting transformed the meaning of the home in general. The meaning of using assistive devices was experienced as manifold and double-edged. The incorporation of or resistance to assistive devices was understood as different approaches to adaptation with the same intention: to achieve desired occupational self-images. The majority of the informants perceived their participation in the life situation as sufficient but more than half reported one or more severe problems with participation. Access to social support in everyday occupations had a greater impact on predicting severe problems with participation than certain traditional health related factors or aspects related to the individual.

    To conclude, the findings indicate that the rehabilitation services need to be better able to adapt to clients’ desires to participate in the planning of their rehabilitation, and designed to satisfy the various needs the clients experience throughout the rehabilitation process. It was revealed that the societal and social environment, as manifested through social interactions, are of central importance in understanding the consequences of and possibilities to engage in occupations supporting participation in everyday life.

  • 9.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Fisher, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lexell, Jan
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Impact on participation and autonomy questionnaire: Internal scale validity of the Swedish version for use in people with spinal cord injury.2007In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 39, no 2, 156-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lexell, Jan
    A positive turning point in life: How persons with late effects of polio experience the influence of an interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme2010In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 42, no 6, 559-565 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe and enhance our understanding of how persons with late effects of polio experience the influence of an interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme. Participants: Twelve persons with clinically verified late effects of polio who had participated in an individualized, goal-oriented, comprehensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme. Methods: Qualitative research interviews analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. Results: The rehabilitation programme was experienced as a turning point in the participants' lives. Before rehabilitation they felt they were on a downward slope without control. Rehabilitation was the start of a process of change whereby they acquired new skills, which, over time, contributed to a different but good life. After approximately a year, they had a sense of control and had accepted life with late effects of polio. They had also established new habits, taken on a changed valued self and could look to the future with confidence. Conclusion: This qualitative study has shown that persons with late effects of polio can benefit from an individualized, goal-oriented, comprehensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme and experience positive changes in their management of daily activities and in their view of their late effects of polio, their future and their self.

  • 11.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund.
    Associations between perceptions of environmental barriers and participation in persons with late effects of polio2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 4, 194-204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Life Satisfaction in Persons with Late Effects of Polio2011In: Applied Research in Quality of Life, ISSN 1871-2584, E-ISSN 1871-2576, Vol. 6, no 1, 71-80 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess satisfaction with life as a whole and with ten domains of life satisfaction in Swedish persons with late effects of polio, to describe the relationship with sex, age, marital status, use of mobility aids and self-perceived needs of instrumental support, and to compare the level of life satisfaction with a Swedish reference sample. A cross-sectional study of 160 persons with verified late effects of polio answered a postal questionnaire including the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11). A majority were to some degree satisfied with life as a whole and with all the ten domains of life satisfaction. Satisfaction with life as whole was not related to any of the sociodemographic or disability related factors and these factors had few relations to the ten domains of life satisfaction. The respondents were significantly less satisfied with life as a whole and with vocation, leisure, sexual life, activities of daily living, and somatic and psychological health compared to the Swedish reference sample, but were significantly more satisfied with economy and contacts with friends. Men and women with late effects of polio, regardless of age, marital status or disability, can experience a reduced life satisfaction. This emphasises the need to identify potential gaps between these persons' aspirations and achievements in life and carry out appropriate rehabilitation interventions to enhance their life satisfaction.

  • 13.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Perceived participation in life situations in persons with late effects of polio2008In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 40, no 8, 659-664 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate how persons with late effects of polio perceive their participation and problems with participation in life situations and to determine the association between perceived problems with participation and sex, age, marital status, use of mobility aids and access to instrumental support.

    Design: Cross-sectional.

    Subjects: A total of 160 persons with prior polio 6-30 months after an individualized, goal-oriented, comprehensive inter-disciplinary rehabilitation programme.

    Methods: All subjects answered the Swedish version of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire.

    Results: A majority of the respondents perceived their participation as sufficient in most activities and 65% of the respondents perceived no severe problems with participation. The remaining 35% perceived 1-6 severe problems with participation. All 5 domains of participation were positively correlated with the 9 items for problem experience. Most restrictions in participation were reported in the domains of Family role, Autonomy outdoors, and Work and education. Insufficient instrumental support was most strongly associated with the perception of severe problems with participation.

    Conclusion: Rehabilitation programmes for persons with late effects of polio need to focus on areas of participation that are perceived as a problem by these persons and to promote access to a supportive environment to enhance their participation.

  • 14.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Relationship between participation in life situations and life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 19, 1592-1597 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To assess the relationship between participation and problems with participation in life situations, and life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio.

    Methods. One hundred fifty-eight persons with late effects of polio responded to a postal questionnaire including the Swedish versions of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire (IPA-S) and Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11).

    Results. The persons' perceived participation in the five domains of participation in the IPA-S was significantly correlated with their satisfaction with life as a whole and with most of the 10 domains of life satisfaction. Significant differences in satisfaction with life as a whole and with eight of the 10 domains in LiSat-11 were found between groups of increasing severe problems with participation. Greater number of reports of severe problems with participation corresponded with gradually decreased satisfaction with life as a whole and with satisfaction in the eight domains in LiSat-11.

    Conclusions. Perceived participation and problems with participation in life situations are determinants of life satisfaction in persons with late effects of polio. This implies that addressing participation and problems with participation in the rehabilitation of persons with late effects of polio may lead to an enhanced life satisfaction.

  • 15.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lövgren Engström, Ann-Louice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lexell, Jan
    Response actions to difficulties in using everyday technology after acquired brain injury2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 2, 164-175 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: People with acquired brain injury (ABI) have difficulties using everyday technology (ET) in daily tasks at home and in society. To support them in managing the demands imposed by using ET, knowledge is needed concerning their response actions to the difficulties. The aim of this study was to explore and describe what characterizes response actions to difficulties using ET, their conditions, and how they influence the experiences of tasks in daily life among people with ABI. Methods: Interviews and observations were undertaken with 13 persons with an ABI. Data were analysed qualitatively using the constant comparative method. Results: The participants' response actions were categorized as (i) deliberate and organized planning, (ii) random and inflexible repeating (iii), re-evaluating tasks, (iv) explaining difficulties related to others, and (iv) proving and protecting capability. Certain conditions were decisive for the different response actions to be applied and also for their effectiveness in enabling engagement in tasks in daily life. Each participant used several types of response actions and the same action could be applied in several situations. Conclusion: To support people with an ABI to manage the demands imposed by using ET, it is important to identify the uniqueness of each client and his or her response actions to difficulties using ET and thereafter adjust the interventions accordingly.

  • 16.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Lexell, Jan
    Perceived participation and problems in participation are determinants of life satisfaction in people with spinal cord injury.2007In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 29, no 18, 1417-22 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Nygård, Louise
    Lexell, Jan
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Perceptions of participation and predictors of perceived problems with participation in persons with spinal cord injury2005In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 37, no 1, 3-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe how persons with spinal cord injury perceived their participation in life situations and to determine the relationship between their participation and perceived problems therewith. The purpose was also to evaluate the influence of age, sex, level of injury, time since injury, marital status and access to social support on perceived problems with participation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SUBJECTS: One hundred sixty-one persons with spinal cord injury. METHODS: A postal questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and a Swedish version of the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire. RESULTS: A majority of the respondents perceived their participation as sufficient in most activities addressed. Still, a majority of the respondents perceived one or more severe problems with their participation. Access to social support was the most influencing variable in predicting perceived severe problems with participation as compared with certain personal and health-related factors. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that it is important to consider access to social support along with other factors in the person-environment interaction and their influence on severe problems with participation in enhancing clients' participation in rehabilitation.

  • 18.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Nygård, L
    Occupational life in the home environment: The experiences of people with disabilities2004In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 71, no 4, 243-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is a need to empirically explore the occupational engagement of people with disabilities to support the development of occupational therapy interventions. PURPOSE: This study describes how people with disabilities experience their occupational lives in their home environment. METHOD: Thirteen people with physical disabilities living at home were interviewed and data were subsequently analysed using a constant comparative method. RESULTS: The findings showed that interactions between the individuals and their environment influenced their experiences of engaging in occupations and the meaning of their home. Occupations formed three categories: always performed with others, occasionally disrupted or deprived. These were particularly related to the social support that was provided under different conditions. This condition formed a central category: access to social support for occupations. Their experiences of performing occupations in the home also formed another central category: transformed meaning of the home. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: By understanding enabling conditions as well as barriers to occupational engagement, effective occupational therapy interventions can be developed to support the occupational lives of people with disabilities.

  • 19.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Nygård, Louise
    Incorporating or resisting assistive devices: Different approaches in achieving a desired occupational self-image2003In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 23, no 2, 67-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the understanding of how people with disabilities experience the meaning of their assistive devices in their occupations and how they act on their experiences. Seventeen participants were interviewed and data were analyzed using a qualitative approach. The participants’ experiences showed that they reacted differently to the manifold and often contradictory meaning of assistive devices. The analysts organized the participants’ reactions into three categories: pragmatic users, ambivalent users, and reluctant users. The differences between the participants were understood as representing different adaptive approaches to achieve desired occupational self-images. Thus, the assistive devices were not in themselves important, but were merely a means to achieve a desired self-image. The findings reflect that the participants’ experiences of using assistive devices reveal meanings about their use that go beyond the traditional medical perspective that focuses on the role of assistive devices as compensation for physical impairment.

  • 20.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Tamm, Maare
    How a group of disabled persons experience rehabilitation over a period of time2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 2, 96-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe how a group of mainly elderly disabled persons experienced their rehabilitation over a period of time focusing on their interactions with professionals, relatives and the community. Fifteen persons who had suddenly been taken ill and who had received rehabilitation were interviewed. The interview transcripts were analysed qualitatively. The results showed that the informants' experiences could be described in a form of three rehabilitation chains, each one consisting of a number of phases. First, a medical rehabilitation chain that started at the onset of the informants' disability. This chain was relatively short and reflected the informants' interactions with the professionals. A psychological rehabilitation chain that represented the informants' internal struggle towards a new meaningful life. The third was labelled a social rehabilitation chain. This chain became visible later in the rehabilitation process and reflected the informants' interactions with their relatives and their experiences of a stigmatizing society. Although rehabilitation in Sweden is claiming to apply a holistic perspective encompassing medical, psychological and social aspects, the results of the study showed that it is not perceived so by the informants in the study, who experienced rehabilitation mainly in the medical rehabilitation chain.

  • 21.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Tamm, Maare
    Bränholm, Inga-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Patients’ perceptions of their participation in rehabilitation planning and professionals’ view of their strategies to encourage it2001In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, Vol. 8, no 3, 151-167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purposes of this descriptive study were threefold: first, to describe how patients perceived their participation in the planning of their rehabilitation; second, to describe nurses' and occupational therapists' view of the strategies they used to encourage patients' participation; and third, to compare the perceptions of the two groups. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with 57 hospitalized patients, 39 nurses and 11 occupational therapists. On the basis of the data patients were categorized as (a) 'relinquishers', (b) 'participants', and (c) 'occasional participants'. Professionals were categorized as 'information providers' and 'rehabilitation practitioners'. The strategies used by the professionals to encourage patient participation were approximately the same irrespective of patient category. It is suggested that professionals need to be sensitive to the patient's desire to participate in the planning of a rehabilitation programme. Further research is recommended to investigate circumstances affecting patients' participation and which strategies professionals can use to encourage their participation.

  • 22. Linden, Anita
    et al.
    Lexell, Jan
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: influence on activity and participation2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 4, 267-275 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.

  • 23. Lövgreen Engström, Ann-Louice
    et al.
    Lexell, Jan
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Difficulties in using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: a qualitative analysis2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 3, 233-243 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify and describe the characteristics of the difficulties using everyday technology in persons with an aquired brain injury (ABI), and their experiences of how these difficulties influenced their life. Thirteen persons with an ABI were interviewed about their difficulties in using everyday technology and were observed in their use of technology. Data were analysed qualitatively with a constant comparative method. The results showed that the persons' experiences formed two categories: "A variety of combinations of difficulties in the use of everyday technology" and "Restrictions in life". The difficulties identified were related not only to everyday technology itself but also to the interaction between the technology, the task, the person, and the environment. These difficulties influenced their experiences of restrictions in occupational performance, personal identification, and participation in society. The results emphasize that occupational therapists who design interventions for people with an ABI need to accommodate both the technology and other interacting aspects in order to overcome difficulties in using everyday technology.

  • 24. Månsson Lexell, Eva
    et al.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Occupational Adaptation in People With Multiple Sclerosis2011In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 31, no 3, 127-134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to gain an enhanced understanding of how people with multiple sclerosis experience their occupational adaptation. Ten people with multiple sclerosis were interviewed and the constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. Their occupational adaptation was experienced as a constant struggle and non-linear, and served as the means of achieving either a desired self or a desired family life. Adaptations of occupations differed according to the evolving goals of the participants. The findings showed that the participants often selected occupational adaptations to meet their family needs over their own. These findings can help professionals to establish where their clients with multiple sclerosis are in the adaptation process and offer appropriate client-centered interventions.

  • 25.
    Månsson Lexell, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Iwarsson, Susanne
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Constantly changing lives: experiences of people with multiple sclerosis2009In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 63, no 6, 772-781 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to gain an enhanced understanding of how people with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience their engagement in occupations. We interviewed 10 people and then analyzed the data gathered using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. The findings encompassed the cothe category “essentials of a constantly changing life,” showing that along a continuum of change, the participants experienced a decreasing engagement in occupations that forced them to continuously struggle to maintain engagement. This struggle changed them and required them to construct a different life than before. Our findings suggest that professionals working in MS rehabilitation need to broaden   their repertoire of interventions relevant to conditions in clients' social environment, with the intention of influencing those occupations that are individually most meaningful. Occupational therapists should focus on the client's engagement in occupations and its consequences for the client's life and self-identity.

  • 26. Nyman, Anneli
    et al.
    Larsson Lund, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Influences of the social environment on engagement in occupations: The experience of persons with rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, Vol. 14, no 1, 63-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 26 of 26
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