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  • 1.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ganceviciene, Ruta
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    McDowell, Andrew
    Patrick, Sheila
    Zouboulis, Christos
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Pattern of tissue invasion by Propionibacterium acnes in acne vulgaris2012In: Journal of dermatological science (Amsterdam), ISSN 0923-1811, E-ISSN 1873-569X, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 63-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Andersen, Mette K.
    et al.
    Autio, Kirsi
    Barbany, Gisela
    Borgstroem, Georg
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johannsson, Johann H.
    Johansson, Bertil
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Nordgren, Ann
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(1;19)(q23;p13): clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 47 cases from the Nordic countries treated according to NOPHO protocols2011In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 155, no 2, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13)/der(19) t(1;19) is a risk stratifying aberration in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP ALL) in the Nordic countries. We have identified 47 children/adolescents with t(1;19)/der(19) t(1;19)-positive BCP ALL treated on two successive Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) protocols between 1992 and 2007 and have reviewed the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of these cases, comprising 1.8% of all cases. The translocation was balanced in 15 cases (32%) and unbalanced in 29 cases (62%). The most common additional chromosome abnormalities were del(9p), i(9q), del(6q), and del(13q). The median age was 7 years, the median white blood cell (WBC) count was 16 x 10(9)/l, and the female/male ratio was 1.2. The predicted event-free survival (EFS) at 5 and 10 years was 0.79, whereas the predicted overall survival (OS) at 5 and 10 years was 0.85 and 0.82, respectively. Nine patients had a bone marrow relapse after a median of 23 months; no patient had a central nervous system relapse. Additional cytogenetic abnormalities, age, gender, WBC count or whether the t(1;19) was balanced or unbalanced did not influence EFS or OS. Compared to cases with t(12,21) and high hyperdiploidy, EFS was similar, but overall survival was worse in patients with t(1;19)/der(19) t(1;19) (P = 0.004).

  • 3.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Reduction in WT1 Gene Expression During Early Treatment Predicts the Outcome in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia2012In: Diagnostic molecular pathology (Print), ISSN 1052-9551, E-ISSN 1533-4066, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) expression has been suggested as an applicable minimal residual disease marker in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We evaluated the use of this marker in 43 adult AML patients. Quantitative assessment of WT1 gene transcripts was performed using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assay. Samples from both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow were analyzed at diagnosis and during follow-up. A strong correlation was observed between WT1 normalized with 2 different control genes (beta-actin and ABL1, P < 0.001). WT1 mRNA level at diagnosis was of no prognostic relevance (P > 0.05). A >= 1-log reduction in WT1 expression in bone marrow samples taken < 1 month after diagnosis significantly correlated with an improved overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.010) when beta-actin was used as control gene. Furthermore, a reduction in WT1 expression by >= 2 logs in peripheral blood samples taken at a later time point significantly correlated with a better outcome for overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.012). This result was achieved when normalizing against both b-actin and ABL1. These results therefore suggest that WT1 gene expression can provide useful information for minimal residual disease detection in adult AML patients and that combined use of control genes can give more informative results.

  • 4. Barbany, Gisela
    et al.
    Andersen, Mette K
    Autio, Kirsti
    Borgström, Georg
    Franco, Lucia Cavalier
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johansson, Bertil
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Nordgren, Ann
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Additional aberrations of the ETV6 and RUNX1 genes have no prognostic impact in 229 t(12;21)(p13;q22)-positive B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemias treated according to the NOPHO-ALL-2000 protocol2012In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 936-938Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Burstedt, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Central Retinal Findings in Bothnia Dystrophy Caused by RLBP1 Sequence Variation2010In: Archives of ophthalmology (1960), ISSN 0003-9950, Vol. 128, no 8, p. 989-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the central retinal findings early in the course of Bothnia dystrophy caused by the homozygous missense R234W sequence variation in the RLBP1 gene. Methods: In 8 young patients with Bothnia dystrophy (aged 9-34 years), high- and low-contrast distance visual acuity and visual fields were measured with Humphrey central (24-2) threshold testing and Goldmann perimetry. Central retinal thickness was measured with optical coherence tomography. Cross-sectional images were analyzed and a linear scanning protocol was applied to examine retinitis punctata albescence in the posterior pole. Results: Affected visual acuity (4 of 8 cases) and poor low-contrast visual acuity (8 of 8 cases) were found. Significant foveal depression and visual field loss were evident with Humphrey threshold testing at all ages, and paracentral and central scotomata in the second decade of life advanced in adulthood as verified with Goldmann perimetry. Optical coherence tomography showed generalized retinal thinning in the central foveal, foveal (innermost ring diameter [empty set], 1 mm), and inner ring (empty set, 3 mm) areas in all ages, and early retinal thinning was found in the inferior areas of the outer macula (empty set, 6 mm). Foveal and extrafoveal thinning of the retinal layers and outer nuclear layer were found. Homogeneous retinitis punctata albescence changes were visualized in and/or adjacent to the retinal pigment epithelium choriocapillaris complex with high reflectance. Conclusions: In the RLBP1 Bothnia dystrophy phenotype, a loss of function and thinning of the central macula are found, indicating early damage of the cone photoreceptors in this disease of the visual cycle. Retinitis punctata albescence spots in the posterior pole are situated close to or in the retinal pigment epithelium-choriocapillaris complex.

  • 6.
    Burstedt, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Jonsson, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Köhn, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Burstedt, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Kivitalo, Markus
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Genotype-phenotype correlations in Bothnia dystrophy caused by RLBP1 gene sequence variations2013In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 437-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate phenotypes caused by different RLBP1 mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa of Bothnia type. Methods: Compound heterozygotes for mutations in the RLBP1 gene [c.677T>A]+[c.700C>T] (p.M226K+p.R234W), n=10, aged 7-84years, and homozygotes c.677T>A (p.M226K), n=2, aged 63 and 73years, were studied using visual acuity (VA), low-contrast VA, visual fields (VFs) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retrospective VA and VFs, standardized dark adaptation and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were analysed and prolonged dark adaptometry and ERG (at 24hr) were performed. Results: Progressive decline of VA and VF areas was age-dependent. Retinal degenerative maculopathy, peripheral degenerative changes and retinitis punctata albescens (RPA) were present. Early retinal thinning in the central foveal, foveal (O 1mm), and inner ring (O 3mm) in the macular region, with homogenous, high-reflectance RPA changes, was visualized in and adjacent to the retinal pigment epithelium/choriocapillaris using OCT. Reduced dark adaptation and affected ERGs were present in all ages. Prolonged dark adaptation and ERG (at 24hr), an increase in final threshold, and ERG rod and mixed rod/cone responses were found. Conclusions: The two RLBP1 genotypes presented a phenotypical and electrophysiological expression of progressive retinal disease similar to that previously described in homozygotes for the c.700C>T (p.R234W) RLBP1 mutation. The uniform phenotypical expression of RLBP1 mutations is relevant information for the disease and of importance in planning future treatment strategies.

  • 7.
    Burstedt, Marie S I
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    Wachtmeister, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Effects of prolonged dark adaptation in patients with retinitis pigmentosa of Bothnia type: an electrophysiological study.2008In: Doc Ophthalmol, ISSN 0012-4486, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 193-205Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bothnia dystrophy (BD) is a variant of recessive retinitis punctata albescens (RPA), caused by the missense mutation R233W in cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), which is localized in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Müller cells of the retina. The purpose of this study was, by examining the electrophysiological responses of the retina, to evaluate the capacity of recovery of the whole retinal area and different cell types induced by extremely prolonged dark adaptation (DA) in BD disease and to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of BD. Six young patients underwent bilateral full-field ERGs after 24 h of DA in one eye and standard DA in the fellow eye. The results were also compared with the effect of prolonged DA (10 h), previously studied in the same patients. After extremely prolonged DA (24 h) the rod b-wave and the mixed rod-cone a-wave responses reached normal though delayed amplitudes. An increase, up to normal level, in the oscillatory response was found. There was no obvious recovery of the cone response. We conclude that in young BD patients during extremely prolonged DA there is a significant additional capacity of recovery of rod function and also significant gain of activity in the inner retinal layer. A continuous but slow regeneration of rod photopigment seems to occur at least up to 24 h. The visual process in the RPE is retarded and CRALBP acts in this process; also, the Müller cells of the retina seem to be involved. The findings also support an extremely slow synthesis of photopigments and irreversibly disturbed cone function early in BD.

  • 8.
    Burstedt, Marie S I
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Wachtmeister, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Retinal function in Bothnia dystrophy. An electrophysiological study.2003In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 43, no 24, p. 2559-2571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using prolonged dark adaptometry, standard dark adaptation (DA) and prolonged DA full-field electroretinograms (ERGs), we analysed the retinal function in patients with Bothnia dystrophy (BD), a variant of recessive retinitis punctata albescens (RPA). A compromised rod and cone function, a likely dysfunction of the Müller cells, and indications of disturbed neuronal function of the inner retina, were found. With prolonged DA, a gradual increase in retinal sensitivity to light and an improvement of the ERG components occurred. The findings indicate a prolonged synthesis of photopigments, retardation of the visual process in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and a loss of retinal cells, probably starting at a relatively early age in BD.

  • 9.
    Cederquist, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Emanuelsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Göransson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Holinski-Feder, Elke
    Müller-Koch, Yvonne
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Mutation analysis of the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes in patients with double primary cancers of the colorectum and the endometrium: a population-based study in northern Sweden2004In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 370-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes to predominantly colorectal and endometrial cancers due to germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, mainly MLH1, MSH2 and in families with excess endometrial cancer also MSH6. In this population-based study, we analysed the mutation spectrum of the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes in a cohort of patients with microsatellite unstable double primary tumours of the colorectum and the endometrium by PCR, DHPLC and sequencing. Fourteen of the 23 patients (61%) had sequence variants in MLH1, MSH2 or MSH6 that likely affect the protein function. A majority (10/14) of the mutations was found among probands diagnosed before age 50. Five of the mutations (36%) were located in MLH1, 3 (21%) in MSH2 and 6 (43%) in MSH6. MSH6 seem to have larger impact in our population than in other populations, due to a founder effect since all of the MSH6 families originate from the same geographical area. MSH6 mutation carriers have later age of onset of both colorectal cancer (62 vs. 51 years) and endometrial cancer (58 vs. 48 years) and a larger proportion of endometrial cancer than MLH1 or MSH2 mutation carriers. We can conclude that patients with microsatellite unstable double primary cancers of the colorectum and the endometrium have a very high risk of carrying a mutation not only in MLH1 or MSH2 but also in MSH6, especially if they get their first cancer diagnosis before the age of 50. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 10.
    Entesarian, Miriam
    et al.
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Birgit
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mansouri, Mahmoud Reza
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Holmberg, Eva
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/East, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Stefansson, Hreinn
    CNS Division, deCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Klar, Joakim
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A chromosome 10 variant with a 12 Mb inversion [inv(10)(q11.22q21.1)] identical by descent and frequent in the Swedish population2009In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0148-7299, E-ISSN 1096-8628, Vol. 149A, no 3, p. 380-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We identified a paracentric inversion of chromosome 10 [inv(10)(q11.22q21.1)] in 0.20% of Swedish individuals (15/7,439) referred for cytogenetic analysis. A retrospective analysis of 8,896 karyotypes from amniocenteses in Sweden revealed a carrier frequency of 0.079% (7/8,896) for the inversion. Cloning and detailed analysis of the inversion breakpoint regions show enrichment for interspersed repeat elements and AT-stretches. The centromeric breakpoint coincides with that of a predicted inversion from HapMap data, which suggests that this region is involved in several chromosome 10 variants. No known gene or predicted transcript are disrupted by the inversion which spans approximately 12 Mb. Carriers from four non-related Swedish families have identical inversion breakpoints and haplotype analysis confirmed that the rearrangement is identical by descent. Diagnosis was retrieved in 6 out of the 15 carriers referred for cytogenetic analysis. No consistent phenotype was found to be associated with the inversion. Our study demonstrates that the inv(10)(q11.22q21.1) is a rare and inherited chromosome variant with a broad geographical distribution in Sweden.

  • 11.
    Forestier, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Andersen, Mette K
    Autio, Kirsi
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Borgström, Georg
    Golovleva, Irina
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Kerndrup, Gitte
    Nordgren, Ann
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Swolin, Birgitta
    Johansson, Bertil
    Cytogenetic patterns in ETV6/RUNX1-positive pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Nordic series of 245 cases and review of the literature.2007In: Genes Chromosomes Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 440-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1992 and 2004, 1,140 children (1 to<15 years) were diagnosed with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the Nordic countries. Of these, 288 (25%) were positive for t(12;21)(p13;q22) [ETV6/RUNX1]. G-banding analyses were successful in 245 (85%); 43 (15%) were karyotypic failures. The modal chromosome numbers, incidence, types, and numbers of additional abnormalities, genomic imbalances, and chromosomal breakpoints in the 245 karyotypically informative cases, as well as in 152 previously reported cytogenetically characterized t(12;21)-positive ALLs in the same age group, were ascertained. The most common modal numbers among the 397 cases were 46 (67%), 47 (16%), 48 (6%), and 45 (5%). High-hyperdiploidy, triploidy, and tetraploidy were each found in approximately 1%; none had less than 40 chromosomes. Secondary chromosomal abnormalities were identified by chromosome banding in 248 (62%) of the 397 ALLs. Of these, 172 (69%) displayed only unbalanced changes, 14 (6%) only balanced aberrations, and 26 (10%) harbored both unbalanced and balanced abnormalities; 36 (15%) were uninformative because of incomplete karyotypes. The numbers of secondary changes varied between 1 and 19, with a median of 2 additional aberrations per cytogenetically abnormal case. The most frequent genomic imbalances were deletions of 6q21-27 (18%), 8p11-23 (6%), 9p13-24 (7%), 11q23-25 (6%), 12p11-13 (27%), 13q14-34 (7%), loss of the X chromosome (8%), and gains of 10 (9%), 16 (6%), and 21 (29%); no frequent partial gains were noted. The chromosome bands most often involved in structural rearrangements were 3p21 (2%), 5q13 (2%), 6q12 (2%), 6q14 (2%), 6q16 (2%), 6q21 (10%), 6q23 (6%), 6q25 (3%), 9p13 (2%), 11q13 (2%), 11q23 (2%), 12p11 (6%), 12p12 (7%), 12p13 (25%), 21q10 (6%), and 21q22 (6%). Considering that the t(12;21) is known to arise in utero and that the postnatal latency period is protracted, additional mutations are most likely necessary for overt ALL. The frequently rearranged chromosome regions may harbor genes of importance for the transformation and/or progression of an initial preleukemic t(12;21)-positive clone. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  • 12.
    Forestier, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Heyman, Mats
    Andersen, Mette K
    Autio, Kirsi
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Borgström, Georg
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Kerndrup, Gitte
    Nordgren, Ann
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Swolin, Birgitta
    Johansson, Bertil
    Outcome of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO-ALL-1992 protocol: frequent late relapses but good overall survival.2008In: Br J Haematol, ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 140, no 6, p. 665-72Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Ghasimi, Soma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wibom, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Dahlin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Andersson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Genetic risk variants in the EGFR regions are associated with copy number variation in the EGFR gene as well as IDH1, and p53 protein expressionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Golovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Bhattacharya, Sanjoy
    Wu, Zhiping
    Shaw, Natacha
    Yang, Yanwu
    Andrabi, Khurshid
    West, Karen A
    Burstedt, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Forsman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Holmgren, Gösta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Noy, Noa
    Quin, Jun
    Crabb, John W
    Disease-causing mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein tighten and abolish ligand interactions2003In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 278, no 14, p. 12397-12402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in the human cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) gene cause retinal pathology. To understand the molecular basis of impaired CRALBP function, we have characterized human recombinant CRALBP containing the disease causing mutations R233W or M225K. Protein structures were verified by amino acid analysis and mass spectrometry, retinoid binding properties were evaluated by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy and substrate carrier functions were assayed for recombinant 11-cis-retinol dehydrogenase (rRDH5). The M225K mutant was less soluble than the R233W mutant and lacked retinoid binding capability and substrate carrier function. In contrast, the R233W mutant exhibited solubility comparable to wild type rCRALBP and bound stoichiometric amounts of 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinal with at least 2-fold higher affinity than wild type rCRALBP. Holo-R233W significantly decreased the apparent affinity of rRDH5 for 11-cis-retinoid relative to wild type rCRALBP. Analyses by heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR demonstrated that the R233W protein exhibits a different conformation than wild type rCRALBP, including a different retinoid-binding pocket conformation. The R233W mutant also undergoes less extensive structural changes upon photoisomerization of bound ligand, suggesting a more constrained structure than that of the wild type protein. Overall, the results show that the M225K mutation abolishes and the R233W mutation tightens retinoid binding and both impair CRALBP function in the visual cycle as an 11-cis-retinol acceptor and as a substrate carrier.

  • 15.
    Golovleva, Irina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Köhn, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Daiger, Stephen
    The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Human Genetics Center.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Mutation spectra in autosomal dominant and recessive retinitis pigmentosa in northern sweden.2010In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 664, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retinal degenerations represent a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting the function of the retina. The frequency of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is 1/3500 worldwide, however, in northern Sweden it is 1/2000 due to limited migration and a 'founder' effect. In this study we identified genetic mechanisms underlying autosomal dominant and recessive RP present in northern Sweden. Several novel mutations unique for this region were found. In an autosomal recessive form of RP, Bothnia dystrophy caused by mutations in the RLBP1 gene, bi-allelic mutations R234W, M226K and compound heterozygosity, M226K+R234W was detected.In dominant form of RP mapped to 19q13.42 a 59 kb genomic deletion including the PRPF31 and three other genes was found.These data provide additional information on the molecular mechanisms of RP evolvement and in the future might be useful in development of therapeutic strategies. Identification of the disease-causing mutations allowed introducing molecular genetic testing of the patients and their families into the clinical practice.

  • 16.
    Holmlund, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Guo, Dongsheng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Starefeldt, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Characterization and tissue-specific expression of human LRIG22004In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 332, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have recently identified and cloned the human LRIG1 gene (formerly LIG1). LRIG1 is a predicted integral membrane protein with a domain organization reminiscent of the Drosophila epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor antagonist Kekkon-1. We have searched for additional members of the human LRIG family and identified LRIG2 (KIAA0806). The LRIG2 gene was localized to chromosome 1p13 and had an open reading frame of 1065 amino acids. The LRIG2 protein was predicted to have the same domain organization as LRIG1 with a signal peptide, an extracellular part containing15 leucine-rich repeats and three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. The LRIG2 amino acid sequence was 47% identical to human LRIG1 and mouse Lrig1 (also known as Lig-1). Northern blotting and RT-PCR revealed LRIG2 transcripts in all tissues analyzed. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed the most prominent RNA expression in skin, uterus, ovary, kidney, brain, small intestine, adrenal gland, and stomach. Immunoblotting of COS-7 cell lysates demonstrated that heterologously expressed human LRIG2 had an apparent molecular weight of 132 kDa under reducing gel-running conditions. N-glycosidase F treatment resulted in a reduction of the apparent molecular weight to 107 kDa, showing that LRIG2 was a glycoprotein carrying N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal fluorescence laser microscopy demonstrated expression of LRIG2 both at the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. LRIG2 was detected in tissue lysates from stomach, prostate, lung, and fetal brain by immunoblotting. In conclusion, LRIG2 was found to be a glycoprotein which was encoded by a gene on human chromosome 1p13 and its mRNA was present in all tissues analyzed.

  • 17.
    Jahns, Anika C
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Spatial distribution of bacterial-fungal communities in facial skin2013In: Journal of dermatological science (Amsterdam), ISSN 0923-1811, E-ISSN 1873-569X, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 71-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Jahns, Anika C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine.
    Berg, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine.
    Jonsson, Rebecca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine.
    McDowell, Andrew
    Patrick, Sheila
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Palmer, Ruth H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Microbiology of folliculitis: a histological study of 39 cases2014In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 25-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Folliculitis is a common inflammatory skin syndrome. Several microbial organisms have been put forward as causative agents, but few studies visualized microbes directly in inflamed hair follicles. This retrospective study investigated bacterial and fungal colonization of inflamed hair follicles in patients with clinically diagnosed non-infectious folliculitis. Skin biopsies from 39 folliculitis patients and 27 controls were screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using broad-range bacterial and fungal probes and by immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody towards Gram-positive bacteria. Specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies towards Staphylococcus spp. and Propionibacterium acnes were applied for further species identification. Inflamed follicles were associated with bacterial colonization in 10 samples (26%) and fungal colonization in three samples (8%). Staphylococcus spp. were observed in inflamed follicles in seven samples (18%). Two samples were positive for P. acnes, which were identified as either type II or type IB/type III. Both Staphylococcus spp. and P. acnes were seen in macrocolonies/biofilm structures. In conclusion, one-third of patients with clinically diagnosed, non-infectious folliculitis exhibited microbial colonization with predominance of Staphylococcus spp.

  • 19.
    Jahns, Anika C
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ganceviciene, R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Zouboulis, C C
    McDowell, A
    Patrick, S
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    An increased incidence of Propionibacterium acnes biofilms in acne vulgaris: a case-control study2012In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 167, no 1, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary Background  Acne vulgaris is a disorder of the sebaceous follicles. Propionibacterium acnes can be involved in inflammatory acne. Objectives  This case-control study aimed at investigating the occurrence and localization of P. acnes in facial biopsies in acne and to characterize the P. acnes phylotype in skin compartments. Methods  Specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were applied to skin biopsies of 38 patients with acne and matching controls to localize and characterize P. acnes and to determine expression of co-haemolysin CAMP factor, a putative virulence determinant. Results  Follicular P. acnes was demonstrated in 18 (47%) samples from patients with acne and eight (21%) control samples [odds ratio (OR) 3·37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·23-9·23; P = 0·017]. In 14 (37%) samples from patients with acne, P. acnes was visualized in large macrocolonies/biofilms in sebaceous follicles compared with only five (13%) control samples (OR 3·85, 95% CI 1·22-12·14; P = 0·021). Macrocolonies/biofilms consisting of mixed P. acnes phylotypes expressing CAMP1 were detected in both case and control samples. Only four samples tested positive for the presence of Staphylococcus spp. and fungi were not observed. Conclusions  We have for the first time visualized different P. acnes phylotypes in macrocolonies/biofilms in sebaceous follicles of skin biopsies. Our results support the hypothesis that P. acnes can play a role in the pathogenesis of acne as acne samples showed a higher prevalence of follicular P. acnes colonization, both in terms of follicles containing P. acnes and the greater numbers of bacteria in macrocolonies/biofilms than in control samples.

  • 20.
    Jahns, Anika C
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Oprica, Cristina
    Karolinska Institute, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Vassilaki, Ismini
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Simultaneous visualization of Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum with immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization2013In: Anaerobe, ISSN 1075-9964, E-ISSN 1095-8274, Vol. 23, p. 48-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) and Propionibacterium granulosum (P. granulosum) are common skin colonizers that are implicated as possible contributing factors in acne vulgaris development. We have established direct visualization tools for the simultaneous detection of these closely related species with immunofluorescence assay and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). As proof of principle, we were able to distinguish P. acnes and P. granulosum bacteria in multi-species populations in vitro as well as in a mock skin infection model upon labelling with 16S rRNA probes in combinatorial FISH as well as with antibodies. Furthermore, we report the co-localization of P. acnes and P. granulosum in the stratum corneum and hair follicles from patients with acne vulgaris as well as in healthy individuals. Further studies on the spatial distribution of these bacteria in skin structures in various skin disorders are needed.

  • 21.
    Jernberg, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundberg, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Molecular features of prostate cancer bone metastases harboring androgen receptor gene amplificationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between AR amplification and other mechanisms behind castration-resistance in prostate cancer, such as increased expression of AR splice variants and steroid-converting enzymes in CRPC metastases, has been poorly examined. Specific aims of this study were therefore to examine AR amplification in hormone-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) bone metastases and to explore molecular and functional consequences of this, with the long-term goal of identifying molecular targets for treatment of CRPC bone metastases. AR amplification was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and verified in 16 (53 %) of the CRPC bone metastases (n=30), and in none of the untreated bone metastases (n=10). AR amplification was associated with increased expression of AR and its constitutively active AR-V7 splice variant as well as with co-amplification of genes in the AR proximity at Xq12, such as of YIPF6. Furthermore, gene expression pattern pointed at decreased osteoclast activity, and consequently decreased bone resorption and increased bone mineral density in AR amplified metastases. In conclusion, our results indicated a sclerotic phenotype in CRPC bone metastases with AR amplification that may be of both biological and clinical relevance. This is a novel hypothesis that requires to be thoroughly examined.

  • 22.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Burstedt, Marie S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Norberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Genetic heterogeneity and clinical outcome in a Swedish family with retinal degeneration caused by mutations in CRB1 and ABCA4 genes2014In: Retinal Degenerative Diseases: Mechanisms and Experimental Therapy, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, Vol. 801, p. 177-183Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic mechanisms underlying severe retinal dystrophy in a large Swedish family presenting two distinct phenotypes, Leber congenital amaurosis and Stargardt disease were investigated. In the family, four patients with Leber congenital amaurosis were homozygous for a novel c.2557C>T (p.Q853X) mutation in the CRB1 gene, while of two cases with Stargardt disease, one was homozygous for c.5461-10T>C in the ABCA4 gene and another was a compound heterozygous for c.5461-10T>C and a novel ABCA4 mutation c.4773+3 A>G. Sequence analysis of the entire ABCA4 gene in patients with Stargardt disease revealed complex alleles with additional sequence variants.Our results provide evidence of genetic complexity causative of different clinical features present in the same family, which is an obvious challenge for ophthalmologists, molecular geneticists and genetic counsellors.

  • 23.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Norberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Novel mutations in CRB1 and ABCA4 genes cause Leber congenital amaurosis and Stargardt disease in a Swedish family2013In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1266-1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to identify genetic mechanisms underlying severe retinal degeneration in one large family from northern Sweden, members of which presented with early-onset autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and juvenile macular dystrophy. The clinical records of affected family members were analysed retrospectively and ophthalmological and electrophysiological examinations were performed in selected cases. Mutation screening was initially performed with microarrays, interrogating known mutations in the genes associated with recessive retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis and Stargardt disease. Searching for homozygous regions with putative causative disease genes was done by high-density SNP-array genotyping, followed by segregation analysis of the family members. Two distinct phenotypes of retinal dystrophy, Leber congenital amaurosis and Stargardt disease were present in the family. In the family, four patients with Leber congenital amaurosis were homozygous for a novel c.2557C>T (p.Q853X) mutation in the CRB1 gene, while of two cases with Stargardt disease, one was homozygous for c.5461-10T>C in the ABCA4 gene and another was carrier of the same mutation and a novel ABCA4 mutation c.4773+3A>G. Sequence analysis of the entire ABCA4 gene in patients with Stargardt disease revealed complex alleles with additional sequence variants, which were evaluated by bioinformatics tools. In conclusion, presence of different genetic mechanisms resulting in variable phenotype within the family is not rare and can challenge molecular geneticists, ophthalmologists and genetic counsellors.

  • 24.
    Jonsson, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Byström, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Davidson, Alice E.
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK.
    Backman, Ludvig J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Kellgren, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Tuft, Stephen J.
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK; Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK.
    Koskela, Timo
    Koskelas Eye Clinic, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ryden, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Danielson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Anatomy.
    Hardcastle, Alison J.
    UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mutations in Collagen, Type XVII, Alpha 1 (COL17A1) Cause Epithelial Recurrent Erosion Dystrophy (ERED)2015In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corneal dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that bilaterally affect corneal transparency. They are defined according to the corneal layer affected and by their genetic cause. In this study, we identified a dominantly inherited epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED)-like disease that is common in northern Sweden. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of a novel mutation, c.2816C>T, p.T939I, in the COL17A1 gene, which encodes collagen type XVII alpha 1. The variant segregated with disease in a genealogically expanded pedigree dating back 200 years. We also investigated a unique COL17A1 synonymous variant, c.3156C>T, identified in a previously reported unrelated dominant ERED-like family linked to a locus on chromosome 10q23-q24 encompassing COL17A1. We show that this variant introduces a cryptic donor site resulting in aberrant pre-mRNA splicing and is highly likely to be pathogenic. Bi-allelic COL17A1 mutations have previously been associated with a recessive skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, with recurrent corneal erosions being reported in some cases. Our findings implicate presumed gain-of-function COL17A1 mutations causing dominantly inherited ERED and improve understanding of the underlying pathology.

  • 25.
    Karrman, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Heyman, Mats
    Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersen, Mette K
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Autio, Kirsi
    Department of Pathology and Clinical Genetics, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgström, Georg
    Department of Pathology and Clinical Genetics, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ehrencrona, Hans
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Heinonen, Kristiina
    Genetic Laboratory, ISLAB, Kuopio, Finland.
    Hovland, Randi
    Center of Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Helse-Bergen HF, Norway.
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Department of Clinical Genetics and Cytogenetics, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Kerndrup, Gitte
    Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Nordgren, Ann
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bertil
    Department of Clinical Genetics, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Clinical and cytogenetic features of a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias: rare T-cell receptor gene rearrangements are associated with poor outcome2009In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, ISSN 1045-2257, E-ISSN 1098-2264, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 795-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical characteristics and cytogenetic aberrations were ascertained and reviewed in a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 in the Nordic countries. Informative karyotypic results were obtained in 249 (87%) cases, of which 119 (48%) were cytogenetically abnormal. Most (62%) of the aberrant T-ALLs were pseudodiploid. Structural changes were more common than numerical ones; 86% displayed at least one structural abnormality and 41% at least one numerical anomaly. The most frequent abnormalities were T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (20%) [TCR;11p13 (10%), TCR;10q24 (3%), TCR;other (8%)], del(9p) (17%), +8 (14%), del(6q) (12%), and 11q23 rearrangements (6%). The TCR;other group comprised the rare rearrangements t(X;14)(p11;q11), t(X;7)(q22;q34), t(1;14)(p32;q11), ins(14;5)(q11;q?q?), inv(7)(p15q34), t(8;14)(q24;q11), t(7;11)(q34;p15), and t(12;14)(p13;q11). The clinical characteristics of this Nordic patient cohort agreed well with previous larger series, with a median age of 9.0 years, male predominance (male/female ratio 3.1), median white blood cell (WBC) count of 66.5 x 10(9)/l, and a high incidence of mediastinal mass and central nervous system involvement (59% and 9.5%, respectively). These features did not differ significantly among the various genetic subgroups. 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival for all patients were 0.61 (+/-0.03) and 0.67 (+/-0.03), respectively. In a multivariate analysis, two factors affected negatively the EFS, namely a WBC count of > or =200 x 10(9)/l (P < 0.001) and the presence of rare TCR rearrangements (P = 0.001). In conclusion, in this large series of childhood T-ALLs from the Nordic countries, the cytogenetic findings were not associated with risk of therapy failure with the exception of the TCR;other group. However, further prospective and collaborative investigations of this genetically heterogeneous entity are needed to confirm these results.

  • 26.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bowne, Sara J
    The University of Texas Health Science Center, Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases, Human Genetics Center .
    Daiger, Stephen P
    The University of Texas Health Science Center, Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases, Human Genetics Center .
    Burstedt, Marie SI
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Breakpoint characterization of a novel ~59 kb genomic deletion on 19q13.42 in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with reduced penetrance2009In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 651-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms in autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) with incomplete penetrance in two Swedish families. An extended genealogical study and haplotype analysis indicated a common origin. Mutation identification was carried out by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and sequencing. Clinical examinations of adRP families including electroretinography revealed obligate gene carriers without abnormalities, which indicated incomplete penetrance. Linkage analysis resulted in mapping of the disease locus to 19q13.42 (RP11). Sequence analyses did not reveal any mutations segregating with the disease in eight genes including PRPF31. Subsequent MLPA detected a large genomic deletion of 11 exons in the PRPF31 gene and, additionally, three genes upstream of the PRPF31. Breakpoints occurred in intron 11 of PRPF31 and in LOC441864, 'similar to osteoclast-associated receptor isoform 5.' An almost 59 kb deletion segregated with the disease in all affected individuals and was present in several asymptomatic family members but not in 20 simplex RP cases or 94 healthy controls tested by allele-specific PCR. A large genomic deletion resulting in almost entire loss of PRPF31 and three additional genes identified as the cause of adRP in two Swedish families provide an additional evidence that mechanism of the disease evolvement is haploinsufficiency. Identification of the deletion breakpoints allowed development of a simple tool for molecular testing of this genetic subtype of adRP.

  • 27.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bowne, Sara J
    Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases, Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
    S Sullivan, Lori
    Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases, Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
    Daiger, Stephen P
    Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases, Human Genetics Center, School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
    Burstedt, Marie S I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Breakpoint characterization of a novel approximately 59 kb genomic deletion on 19q13.42 in autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa with incomplete penetrance.2009In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 651-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms in autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) with incomplete penetrance in two Swedish families. An extended genealogical study and haplotype analysis indicated a common origin. Mutation identification was carried out by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and sequencing. Clinical examinations of adRP families including electroretinography revealed obligate gene carriers without abnormalities, which indicated incomplete penetrance. Linkage analysis resulted in mapping of the disease locus to 19q13.42 (RP11). Sequence analyses did not reveal any mutations segregating with the disease in eight genes including PRPF31. Subsequent MLPA detected a large genomic deletion of 11 exons in the PRPF31 gene and, additionally, three genes upstream of the PRPF31. Breakpoints occurred in intron 11 of PRPF31 and in LOC441864, 'similar to osteoclast-associated receptor isoform 5.' An almost 59 kb deletion segregated with the disease in all affected individuals and was present in several asymptomatic family members but not in 20 simplex RP cases or 94 healthy controls tested by allele-specific PCR. A large genomic deletion resulting in almost entire loss of PRPF31 and three additional genes identified as the cause of adRP in two Swedish families provide an additional evidence that mechanism of the disease evolvement is haploinsufficiency. Identification of the deletion breakpoints allowed development of a simple tool for molecular testing of this genetic subtype of adRP.

  • 28.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie SI
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Jonsson, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Haamer, Eneli
    Asper Biotech, Tartu, Estonia.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Carrier of R14W in carbonic anhydrase IV presents Bothnia dystrophy phenotype caused by two allelic mutations in RLBP12008In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 3172-3177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Bothnia dystrophy (BD) is an autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) associated with the c.700C>T mutation in the RLBP1 gene. Testing of patients with BD has revealed the c.700C>T mutation on one or both alleles. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the underlying genetic mechanisms along with a clinical evaluation of the heterozygous patients with BD.

    Methods: Patients with BD heterozygous for the RLBP1 c.700C>T were tested for 848 mutations by arrayed primer-extension technology. Further mutation detection was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), sequencing, denaturing (d)HLPC and allelic discrimination. The ophthalmic examinations were performed in all c.700C>T heterozygotes.

    Results: The clinical findings in 10 BD heterozygotes were similar to those in the homozygotes. The presence of a second mutation, c.677T>A, corresponding to p.M226K was detected in all 10 cases. Segregation analysis showed that the mutations were allelic, and the patients were compound heterozygotes [c.677T>A]+[c.700C>T]. One of those patients was also a carrier of the c.40C>T corresponding to the p.R14W change in carbonic anhydrase IV (CAIV) associated with autosomal dominant RP, RP17. His mother, a carrier of the identical change was declared healthy after ophthalmic examination. This sequence variant was found in 6 of 143 tested blood donors.

    Conclusions: The high frequency of arRP in northern Sweden is due to two mutations in the RLBP1 gene: c.677T>A and c.700C>T. BD is caused by the loss of CRALBP function due to changed physical features and impaired activity of retinoid binding. The CAIV p.R14W sequence variant found in one of the patients with a BD phenotype is a benign polymorphism in a population of northern Sweden.

  • 29.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie S I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Haraldsson, Susann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families.2008In: Recent Advances in Retinal Degeneration / [ed] Robert E. Anderson, Matthew M. LaVail, Joe G. Hollyfield, Springer , 2008, Vol. 613, p. 229-234Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

     

  • 30.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Kadzhaev, Konstantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Burstedt, Marie SI
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Haraldsson, Susann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Hallberg, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mutation in the PYK2-binding domain of PITPNM3 causes autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) in two Swedish families2007In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 664-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autosomal dominant cone dystrophy (CORD5) (MIM 600977) is a rare disease predominantly affecting cone photoreceptors. Here we refine the CORD5 locus previously mapped to 17p13 from 27 to 14.3 cM and identified a missense mutation, Q626H in the phosphatidylinositol transfer (PIT) membrane-associated protein (PITPNM3) (MIM 608921) in two Swedish families. PITPNM3, known as a human homologue of the Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB), lacks the N-terminal PIT domain needed for transport of phospholipids, renewal of photoreceptors membrane and providing the electroretinogram (ERG) response to light. In our study, the mutation causing CORD5 is located in the C-terminal region interacting with a member of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases, PYK2. Our finding on the first mutation in the human homologue of Drosophila rdgB indicates novel pathways and a potential important role of the PITPNM3 in mammalian phototransduction.

  • 31.
    Köhn, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Kohl, Susanne
    Bowne, Sara J
    Sullivan, Lori S
    Kellner, Ulrich
    Daiger, Stephen P
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    PITPNM3 is an uncommon cause of cone and cone-rod dystrophies.2010In: Ophthalmic Genetics, ISSN 1381-6810, E-ISSN 1744-5094, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 139-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first mutation in PITPNM3, a human homologue of the Drosophila retinal degeneration (rdgB not not) gene was reported in two large Swedish families with autosomal dominant cone dystrophy. To establish the global impact that PITPNM3 has on retinal degenerations we screened 163 patients from Denmark, Germany, the UK, and USA. Four sequence variants, two missence mutations and two intronic changes were identified in the screen. Thus, mutations in PITPNM3 do not appear to be a major cause of cone or cone-rod dystrophy.

  • 32.
    Liljeholm, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Irvine, Andrew F
    Vikberg, Ann-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Norberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Month, Stacy
    Sandström, Herbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Mishima, Masanori
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III (CDA III) is caused by a mutation in kinesin family member, KIF23.2013In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Haplotype analysis and targeted next-generation resequencing allowed us to identify a mutation in the KIF23 gene and to show its association with an autosomal dominant form of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III (CDA III). The region at 15q23 where CDA III was mapped in a large Swedish family was targeted by array-based sequence capture in a female diagnosed with CDA III and her healthy sister. Prioritization of all detected sequence changes revealed 10 variants unique for the CDA III patient. Among those variants, a novel mutation c.2747C>G (p.P916R) was found in KIF23, which encodes mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1). This variant segregates with CDA III in the Swedish and American families but was not found in 356 control individuals. RNA expression of the 2 known splice isoforms of KIF23 as well as a novel one lacking the exons 17 and 18 was detected in a broad range of human tissues. RNA interference-based knock-down and rescue experiments demonstrated that the p.P916R mutation causes cytokinesis failure in HeLa cells, consistent with appearance of large multinucleated erythroblasts in CDA III patients. We conclude that CDA III is caused by a mutation in KIF23/MKLP1, a conserved mitotic kinesin crucial for cytokinesis.

  • 33. Lindstrand, Anna
    et al.
    Malmgren, Helena
    Verri, Annapia
    Benetti, Elisa
    Eriksson, Maud
    Nordgren, Ann
    Anderlid, Britt-Marie
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Schoumans, Jacqueline
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Molecular and clinical characterization of patients with overlapping 10p deletions2010In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 152A, no 5, p. 1233-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromosome 10p terminal deletions have been associated with DiGeorge phenotype, and within the same genomic region haploinsufficiency of GATA3 causes the HDR syndrome (hypoparathyroidism, sensorineural deafness, renal dysplasia). We have performed detailed molecular analysis of four patients with partial overlapping 10p deletions by using FISH-mapping, array-CGH, and custom-designed high-resolution oligonucleotide array. All four patients had mental retardation and speech impairment and three of them showed variable signs of HDR syndrome. In addition, two patients had autistic behaviors and had similar dysmorphic features giving them a striking physical resemblance. A review of the literature identified 10 previously published cases with similar 10p deletions and reliable molecular or molecular cytogenetic mapping data. The combined information of present and previous cases suggests that partial deletions of 10p14-p15 represent a syndrome with a distinct and more severe phenotype than previously assumed. The main characteristics include severe mental retardation, language impairment, autistic behavior, and characteristic clinical features. A critical region involved in mental retardation and speech impairment is defined within 1.6 Mb in 10p15.3. In addition, deletion of 4.3 Mb within 10p14 is associated with autism and characteristic clinical findings.

  • 34.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Co-incidental increase in gene copy number of ERBB2 and LRIG1 in breast cancer2009In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 403-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Malmer, Beatrice
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Thomasson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Höckenström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Emdin, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jonsson, Yvonne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Increased copy number at 3p14 in breast cancer2005In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 7, no 5, p. R719-R727Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Lundin, Catarina
    et al.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Andersen, Mette Klarskov
    Autio, Kirsi
    Barbany, Gisela
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristiina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johannsson, Johann H.
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Nordgren, Ann
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Johansson, Bertil
    Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries2014In: Journal of Hematology & Oncology, ISSN 1756-8722, E-ISSN 1756-8722, Vol. 7, p. 32-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL.

    Methods:

    To address clinical and genetic differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL and to identify prognostic factors in DS-ALL, we ascertained and reviewed all 128 pediatric DS-ALL diagnosed in the Nordic countries between 1981 and 2010. Their clinical and genetic features were compared with those of the 4,647 B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cases diagnosed during the same time period.

    Results:

    All 128 DS-ALL were BCP ALL, comprising 2.7% of all such cases. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were significantly (P = 0.026 and P = 0.003, respectively) worse for DS-ALL patients with white blood cell counts >= 50 x 10(9)/l. The age distributions varied between the DS and non-DS cases, with age peaks at 2 and 3 years, respectively; none of the DS patients had infant ALL (P = 0.029). The platelet counts were lower in the DS-ALL group (P = 0.005). Abnormal karyotypes were more common in non-DS-ALL (P < 0.0001), and there was a significant difference in the modal number distribution, with only 2% high hyperdiploid DS-ALL cases (P < 0.0001). The 5-year EFS and 5-year OS were significantly worse for DS-ALL (0.574 and 0.691, respectively) compared with non-DS-ALL (0.783 and 0.894, respectively) in the NOPHO ALL-1992/2000 protocols (P < 0.001).

    Conclusions:

    The present study adds further support for genetic and clinical differences between DS-ALL and non-DS-ALL.

  • 37. Mackay, Donna S
    et al.
    Borman, Arundhati Dev
    Sui, Ruifang
    van den Born, L Ingeborgh
    Berson, Eliot L
    Ocaka, Louise A
    Davidson, Alice E
    Heckenlively, John R
    Branham, Kari
    Ren, Huanan
    Lopez, Irma
    Maria, Maleeha
    Azam, Maleeha
    Henkes, Arjen
    Blokland, Ellen
    Andreasson, Sten
    de Baere, Elfride
    Bennett, Jean
    Chader, Gerald J
    Berger, Wolfgang
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Greenberg, Jacquie
    den Hollander, Anneke I
    Klaver, Caroline C W
    Klevering, B Jeroen
    Lorenz, Birgit
    Preising, Markus N
    Ramsear, Raj
    Roberts, Lisa
    Roepman, Ronald
    Rohrschneider, Klaus
    Wissinger, Bernd
    Qamar, Raheel
    Webster, Andrew R
    Cremers, Frans P M
    Moore, Anthony T
    Koenekoop, Robert K
    Screening of a Large Cohort of Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients Identifies Novel LCA5 Mutations and New Genotype-Phenotype Correlations2013In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1537-1546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of sequence variants in LCA5 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), early-onset retinal dystrophy (EORD), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP); to delineate the ocular phenotypes; and to provide an overview of all published LCA5 variants in an online database. Patients underwent standard ophthalmic evaluations after providing informed consent. In selected patients, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence imaging were possible. DNA samples from 797 unrelated patients with LCA and 211 with the various types of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened by Sanger sequence analysis of all LCA5 exons and intron/exon junctions. Some LCA patients were prescreened by APEX technology or selected based on homozygosity mapping. In silico analyses were performed to assess the pathogenicity of the variants. Segregation analysis was performed where possible. Published and novel LCA5 variants were collected, amended for their correct nomenclature, and listed in a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). Sequence analysis identified 18 new probands with 19 different LCA5 variants. Seventeen of the 19 LCA5 variants were novel. Except for two missense variants and one splice site variant, all variants were protein-truncating mutations. Most patients expressed a severe phenotype, typical of LCA. However, some LCA subjects had better vision and intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions on OCT imaging. In two families with LCA5 variants, the phenotype was more compatible with EORD with affected individuals displaying preserved islands of retinal pigment epithelium. One of the families with a milder phenotype harbored a homozygous splice site mutation; a second family was found to have a combination of a stop mutation and a missense mutation. This is the largest LCA5 study to date. We sequenced 1,008 patients (797 with LCA, 211 with arRP) and identified 18 probands with LCA5 mutations. Mutations in LCA5 are a rare cause of childhood retinal dystrophy accounting for ∼2% of disease in this cohort, and the majority of LCA5 mutations are likely null. The LCA5 protein truncating mutations are predominantly associated with LCA. However, in two families with the milder EORD, the LCA5 gene analysis revealed a homozygous splice site mutation in one and a stop mutation in combination with a missense mutation in a second family, suggesting that this milder phenotype is due to residual function of lebercilin and expanding the currently known phenotypic spectrum to include the milder early onset RP. Some patients have remaining foveal cone structures (intact IS/OS junctions on OCT imaging) and remaining visual acuities, which may bode well for upcoming treatment trials.

  • 38. Mansouri, Mahmoud Reza
    et al.
    Schuster, Jens
    Badhai, Jitendra
    Stattin, Eva-Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lösel, Ralf
    Wehling, Martin
    Carlsson, Birgit
    Hovatta, Outi
    Karlström, Per Olof
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Toniolo, Daniela
    Bione, Silvia
    Peluso, John
    Dahl, Niklas
    Alterations in the expression, structure and function of progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) in premature ovarian failure.2008In: Human molecular genetics, ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 17, no 23, p. 3776-3783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is characterized by hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and amenorrhea before the age of 40. The condition has a heterogeneous background but genetic factors are demonstrated by the occurrence of familial cases. We identified a mother and daughter with POF both of whom carry an X;autosome translocation [t(X;11)(q24;q13)]. RNA expression studies of genes flanking the X-chromosome breakpoint revealed that both patients have reduced expression levels of the gene Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1). Mutation screening of 67 females with idiopathic POF identified a third patient with a missense mutation (H165R) located in the cytochrome b5 domain of PGRMC1. PGRMC1 mediates the anti-apoptotic action of progesterone in ovarian cells and it acts as a positive regulator of several cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed reactions. The CYPs are critical for intracellular sterol metabolism, including biosynthesis of steroid hormones. We show that the H165R mutation associated with POF abolishes the binding of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) to PGRMC1. In addition, the missense mutation attenuates PGRMC1's ability to mediate the anti-apoptotic action of progesterone in ovarian cells. These findings suggest that mutant or reduced levels of PGMRC1 may cause POF through impaired activation of the microsomal cytochrome P450 and increased apoptosis of ovarian cells.

  • 39.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Vallbo, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Guo, Dongsheng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Hallberg, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology.
    Henriksson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hedman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Cloning, characterization and expression of human LIG12001In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 284, no 5, p. 1155-1161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth factor receptors are frequently amplified and over-expressed in various human cancers. Recently, a Drosophila cell surface protein, Kekkon-1, was found to participate in an epidermal growth factor (EGF) driven negative feedback loop. Kekkon-1 is induced by EGF, binds to the EGF-receptor, and inhibits receptor-mediated signaling. Here, we have searched for human genes with homologies to Kekkon-1 and identified human LIG1. The gene is the human homologue of mouse Lig-1 and is located on chromosome band 3p14, a region frequently deleted in various human cancers. It is predicted to encode a transmembrane cell-surface protein with extracellular leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains. LIG1 mRNA was detected in all tissues analyzed. The highest and lowest relative expression levels were found in brain and spleen, respectively, and differed by more than 200-fold. Taken together, our data are compatible with a role for LIG1 as a growth and tumor suppressor in human tissues.

  • 40.
    Norén-Nyström, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Heyman, Mats
    Frisk, Per
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Sundström, Christer
    Porwit, Anna
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Vascular density in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia correlates to biological factors and outcome.2009In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 146, no 5, p. 521-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of angiogenesis and its clinical relevance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is controversial. In the present study, microvessel density (MVD), analysed in 185 diagnostic bone marrow biopsies, was higher in T-cell ALL compared to B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL (P = 0.013). In the BCP group, cases with t(12;21) were characterized by a low MVD while patients with high-hyperdiploid leukaemia (HeH, 51-61 chromosomes) showed a high MVD compared to other BCP patients (P = 0.001 and 0.002 respectively). There was a correlation between MVD and white blood cell (WBC) count in high-risk BCP patients (P = 0.021). In addition, BCP patients with a high marrow reticulin fibre density and high MVD had an unfavourable outcome compared to the other BCP patients (P = 0.002). The fraction of vessels in which lumina were filled with blasts (blast congested vessel fraction) correlated strongly with WBC count (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that the angiogenic process interacts with other stroma-factors, such as reticulin fibre density, in its effect on outcome, and is coupled to both the ALL genotype and phenotype. One possible implication is that different subtypes of childhood ALL may respond differently to anti-angiogenic drugs as a supplement in first-line treatment.

  • 41. Ofverholm, I. Ivanov
    et al.
    Olsson, L.
    Norén-Nyström, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Nordlund, J.
    Sjogren, H.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Heyman, M.
    Zachariadis, V.
    Nordgren, A.
    Johansson, B.
    Barbany, G.
    PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF IKZF1 DELETIONS IN PEDIATRIC B-CELL PRECURSOR ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA TREATED ACCORDING TO NOPHO PROTOCOLS - THE SWEDISH EXPERIENCE2014In: Haematologica (online), ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 99, no Suppl 1, p. 9-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, IKZF1 deletions have been shown to be associated notonly with the leukemogenic process but also to confer a poor prognosis in allrisk groups of B-cell precursor ALL. In a previous study, we used Multiplex Ligation-dependentProbe Amplification (MLPA) to investigate the presence ofIKZF1 deletions in bone marrow DNA from 116 children diagnosed with BCPALL in a single center and treated according to NOPHO protocols. Deletionswere detected in 16% of cases; both event free survival and overall survivalwere significantly reduced in the IKZF1-deleted group compared to the groupwith intact IKZF1.

  • 42.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zhang, Anju
    Department of Oncology and Pathology, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xu, Dawei
    Department of Medicine, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gruber, Astrid
    Department of Medicine, Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    hTERT gene copy number is not associated with hTERT RNA expression or telomerase activity in colorectal cancer2005In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 395-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a majority of malignant human tumors telomerase activity can be detected, suggesting an immortal phenotype. Expression of the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, in the human telomerase complex is required for telomerase activity. The regulation of hTERT, from gene level to a fully functional protein, is still a poorly understood process. Increased copy number of the hTERT gene has been demonstrated in a significant portion of established cell lines and tumors of different origin but its relevance for telomerase activity levels is unclear. In the present study, we examined the hTERT gene copy number using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in samples from 64 colorectal carcinomas and an increased copy number (≥ 3 hTERT gene copies/nucleus) was observed in 31 cases (48%). No statistical association existed between hTERT gene copy number and hTERT RNA expression or telomerase activity. However, a significant relationship was found between an increase in hTERT gene copy number and p53 protein accumulation (p = 0.002) and aneuploidy (p = 0.036). Only 4 tumors showed microsatellite instability, 3 of which had a normal hTERT gene copy number. The data indicated that the increased copy number of the hTERT gene in colorectal carcinoma was a result of genomic instability with no obvious consequence for telomerase activity levels.

  • 43. Paulsson, Kajsa
    et al.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Andersen, Mette K
    Autio, Kirsi
    Barbany, Gisela
    Borgström, Georg
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Heim, Sverre
    Heinonen, Kristiina
    Hovland, Randi
    Johannsson, Johann H
    Kjeldsen, Eigil
    Nordgren, Ann
    Palmqvist, Lars
    Johansson, Bertil
    High modal number and triple trisomies are highly correlated favorable factors in childhood B-cell precursor high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the NOPHO ALL 1992/2000 protocols2013In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 98, no 9, p. 1424-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1992 and 2008, 713 high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children aged 1-15 years were diagnosed and treated according to the Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1992/2000 protocols. Twenty (2.8%) harbored t(1;19), t(9;22), der(11q23), or t(12;21). The median age of patients with "classic" high hyperdiploidy was lower than that of patients with translocation-positive high hyperdiploidy (P<0.001). Cases with triple trisomies (+4, +10, +17), comprising 50%, had higher modal numbers than the triple trisomy-negative cases (P<0.0001). The probabilities of event-free survival and overall survival were lower for those with white blood cell counts ≥ 50 × 10(9)/L (P=0.017/P=0.009), ≥ 5% bone marrow blasts at day 29 (P=0.001/0.002), and for high-risk patients (P<0.001/P=0.003), whereas event-free, but not overall, survival, was higher for cases with gains of chromosomes 4 (P<0.0001), 6 (P<0.003), 17 (P=0.010), 18 (P=0.049), and 22 (P=0.040), triple trisomies (P=0.002), and modal numbers >53/55 (P=0.020/0.024). In multivariate analyses, modal number and triple trisomies were significantly associated with superior event-free survival in separate analyses with age and white blood cell counts. When including both modal numbers and triple trisomies, only low white blood cell counts were significantly associated with superior event-free survival (P=0.009). We conclude that high modal chromosome numbers and triple trisomies are highly correlated prognostic factors and that these two parameters identify the same subgroup of patients characterized by a particularly favorable outcome.

  • 44.
    Reinis, Ainars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Köhn, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sandgren, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Ocular phenotype of CORD5, an autosomal dominant retinal dystrophy associated with PITPNM3 p.Q626H mutation2013In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 259-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe in detail the phenotype of CORD5 in two families segregating a mutation c.1878G > C (p.Q626H) in the PITPNM3 gene. Methods: The study included 35 individuals from two different families of Swedish origin, all heterozygous for a PITPNM3 p.Q626H mutation. All participants underwent ophthalmological examination including kinetic perimetry, and in selected cases adaptometry, colour vision tests and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Electrophysiological studies were also performed. In some cases, the data were obtained from medical records. Results: The majority of patients showed subnormal visual acuity and light sensitivity from childhood. Early signs of macular degeneration were also observed. There was a progressive decrease in visual acuity leading to legal blindness in early adulthood. Electrophysiological testing showed a progressive loss of photoreceptor function restricted mainly to the cones. OCT revealed decreased macular thickness with flattened and enlarged fovea. Conclusion: Our observations of the PITPNM3 p.Q626H mutation carriers confirm that CORD5 is a disease not to mix with other retinal degenerations mapped to 17p13. The results of our clinical evaluation so far indicate that CORD5 is characterized by predominant cone dysfunction without signs of general involvement of the retinal pigment epithelium. The rod system also seems to be unaffected. In this sense, CORD5 is different from other autosomal dominant CORDs where rod involvement is present to some degree in a late phase of the disease. Some intra-and inter-familial differences regarding the severity of the clinical picture were observed.

  • 45. Safavi, S.
    et al.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Barbany, G.
    Nord, K. H.
    Moorman, A. V.
    Harrison, C. J.
    Johansson, B.
    Paulsson, K.
    Loss of chromosomes is the primary event in near-haploid and low-hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia2013In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 248-250Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Schoumans, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Johansson, Bertil
    Corcoran, Martin
    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Grandíer, Dan
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Staaf, Johan
    Borg, Åke
    Gustafsson, Britt
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Nordgren, Ann
    Characterisation of dic(9;20)(p11-13;q11) in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by tiling resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridisation reveals clustered breakpoints at 9p13.2 and 20q11.2.2006In: Br J Haematol, ISSN 0007-1048, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 492-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Wahlin, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Markevärn, Berit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Improved outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia is almost entirely restricted to young patients and associated with stem cell transplantation2002In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 54-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prognostic factors were studied in a series of 318 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 17-90 yr old, treated at a single centre during 1982-98, and representing 79% of the total number of cases registered in the area during this period. Risk group stratification based on cytogenetics, occurrence of antecedent hematological disorder, and leukocyte count could be performed in 93%. Five percent were allocated to the favourable risk group, 40% to standard risk, and 55% to adverse risk. Complete remission (CR) was attained in 52%. The CR rate was higher in the favourable (80%) and standard risk groups (69%) than in the adverse risk group (37%). The CR rate increased from 44% in the 1980s to 60% in the 1990s. The 5-yr survival rate for all patients was only 12%. Low age, promyelocytic leukaemia, treatment in the 1990s, high induction treatment intensity, and non-adverse risk group were favourably associated with survival. The median survival time increased from 115 to 349 d between the 1980s and the 1990s, but the 5-yr survival rate was only 11% for patients over 55 yr of age even in the last decade. For the younger patients, the 5-yr overall survival rate increased from 9% to 35% in the last decade. The median time in first remission was 365 d. Age below 56 yr, allogeneic and autologous transplants, and non-adverse risk group were associated with prolonged response duration. The duration of response among all patients increased from 250 d in the 1980s to 451 d in the 1990s, but event-free survival time did not improve significantly in patients above 55 yr of age. Among patients below 56 yr of age, overall survival and event-free survival were significantly better for those who received allogeneic or autologous transplants in first remission than for those who were treated with chemotherapy only. Overall survival times did not improve from the 1980s to the 1990s among those patients below 56 yr who were treated with chemotherapy only in first remission, in spite of the use of transplants in second remission.

  • 48.
    Zachariadis, V
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gauffin, F
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kuchinskaya, E
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Heyman, M
    Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schoumans, J
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blennow, E
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, B
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barbany, G
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Ehrencrona, H
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cavelier, L
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, L
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lönnerholm, G
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, M
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, B
    Department of Clinical Genetics, University and Regional Laboratories, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Forestier, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Nordgren, A
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The frequency and prognostic impact of dic(9;20)(p13.2;q11.2) in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the NOPHO ALL-2000 trial2011In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 622-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dic(9;20)(p13.2;q11.2) is reported to be present in ∼2% of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP ALL). However, it easily escapes detection by G-banding analysis and its true prevalence is hence unknown. We performed interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses-in a three-step manner-using probes for: (i) CDKN2A at 9p21, (ii) 20p and 20q subtelomeres and (iii) cen9 and cen20. Out of 1033 BCP ALLs diagnosed from 2001 to 2006, 533 were analyzed; 16% (84/533) displayed 9p21 deletions, of which 30% (25/84) had dic(9;20). Thus, dic(9;20)-positivity was found in 4.7% (25/533), making it the third most common genetic subgroup after high hyperdiploidy and t(12;21)(p13;q22). The dic(9;20) was associated with a female predominance and an age peak at 3 years; 18/25 (72%) were allocated to non-standard risk treatment at diagnosis. Including cases detected by G-banding alone, 29 dic(9;20)-positive cases were treated according to the NOPHO ALL 2000 protocol. Relapses occurred in 24% (7/29) resulting in a 5-year event-free survival of 0.69, which was significantly worse than for t(12;21) (0.87; P=0.002) and high hyperdiploidy (0.82; P=0.04). We conclude that dic(9;20) is twice as common as previously surmised, with many cases going undetected by G-banding analysis, and that dic(9;20) should be considered a non-standard risk abnormality.

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