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  • 1.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Zarrinkoob, Laleh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Birgander, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Blood flow of ophthalmic artery in healthy individuals determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging2013In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 2738-2745Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Recent development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new possibilities to assess ocular blood flow. This prospective study evaluates the feasibility of phase-contrast MRI (PCMRI) to measure flow rate in the ophthalmic artery (OA) and establish reference values in healthy young (HY) and elderly (HE) subjects.

    METHODS: Fifty HY subjects (28 females, 21-30 years of age) and 44 HE (23 females, 64-80 years of age) were scanned on a 3-Tesla MR system. The PCMRI sequence had a spatial resolution of 0.35 mm per pixel, with the measurement plan placed perpendicularly to the OA. Mean flow rate (Qmean), resistive index (RI), and arterial volume pulsatility of OA (ΔVmax) were measured from the flow rate curve. Accuracy of PCMRI measures was investigated using a vessel-phantom mimicking the diameter and the flow rate range of the human OA.

    RESULTS: Flow rate could be assessed in 97% of the OAs. Phantom investigations showed good agreement between the reference and PCMRI measurements with an error of <7%. No statistical difference was found in Qmean between HY and HE individuals (HY: mean ± SD = 10.37 ± 4.45 mL/min; HE: 10.81 ± 5.15 mL/min, P = 0.655). The mean of ΔVmax (HY: 18.70 ± 7.24 μL; HE: 26.27 ± 12.59 μL, P < 0.001) and RI (HY: 0.62 ± 0.08; HE: 0.67 ± 0.1, P = 0.012) were significantly different between HY and HE.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that the flow rate of OA can be quantified using PCMRI. There was an age difference in the pulsatility parameters; however, the mean flow rate appeared independent of age. The primary difference in flow curves between HE and HY was in the relaxation phase of the systolic peak.

  • 2.
    Beckman Rehnman, Jeannette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Increased corneal hysteresis after corneal collagen crosslinking: a study based on applanation resonance technology2014In: JAMA ophthalmology, ISSN 2168-6165, E-ISSN 2168-6173, Vol. 132, no 12, p. 1426-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: A reliable tool for quantification of the biomechanical status of the cornea in conjunction with corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) treatment is needed.

    Objective: To quantify the biomechanical effects of CXL in vivo.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective, open, case-control study was conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Participants included 28 patients (29 eyes) aged 18 to 28 years with progressive keratoconus and corresponding age- and sex-matched healthy individuals serving as controls. All participants were monitored during a 6-month period between October 13, 2009, and November 5, 2012.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: Corneal hysteresis after CXL for keratoconus.

    Results: A difference in corneal hysteresis between the control group and the patients with keratoconus was found at baseline, both with an applanation resonance tonometer (ART) and an ocular response analyzer (ORA), at mean (SD) values of -1.09 (1.92) mm Hg (99% CI, -2.26 to 0.07; P = .01) and -2.67 (2.55) mm Hg (99% CI, -4.05 to -1.32; P < .001), respectively. Increased corneal hysteresis was demonstrated with an ART 1 and 6 months after CXL, at 1.2 (2.4) mm Hg (99% CI,-0.1 to 2.5; P = .02) and 1.1 (2.7) mm Hg (99% CI, -0.3 to 2.6; P = .04), respectively, but not with ORA. A decrease in corneal thickness was seen 1 and 6 months after treatment (-24 [26] µm, P < .001; and -11 [21] µm, P = .01, respectively), and a corneal flattening of -0.6 (0.7) diopters was seen at 6 months (P < .001). No significant change in intraocular pressure was identified in patients with keratoconus with any method, except for an increase at 1 month with Goldmann applanation tonometry (P = .005).

    Conclusions and Relevance: To our knowledge ART is the first in vivo method able to assess the increased corneal hysteresis after CXL treatment. Given the large-scale use of CXL in modern keratoconus treatment, a tool with this capacity has a great potential value. Refinement of the ART method of measuring and quantifying corneal biomechanical properties will be a subject of further studies.

  • 3.
    Beckman Rehnman, Jeannette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Initial results from mechanical compression of the cornea during crosslinking for keratoconus2014In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 92, no 7, p. 644-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare refractive changes after corneal crosslinking with and without mechanical compression of the cornea.

    Methods: In a prospective, open, randomized case-control study conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, sixty eyes of 43 patients with progressive keratoconus aged 18-28 years planned for corneal crosslinking and corresponding age- and sex-matched control subjects were included. The patients were randomized to conventional corneal crosslinking (CXL; n = 30) or corneal crosslinking with mechanical compression using a flat rigid contact lens sutured to the cornea during treatment (CRXL; n = 30). Subjective refraction and ETDRS best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), axial length measurement, keratometry and pachymetry were performed before and 1 and 6 months after treatment.

    Results: The keratoconus patients had poorer BSCVA, higher refractive astigmatism and higher keratometry readings than the control subjects at baseline (p < 0.01). In the CXL group, BSCVA increased from 0.19 ± 0.26 to 0.14 ± 0.18 logMar (p = 0.03), and the spherical equivalent improved from -1.9 ± 2.8 D to -1.4 ± 2.4 D (p = 0.03). Maximum keratometry readings decreased after CXL from 53.1 ± 4.9 D to 52.6 ± 5.2 D (p = 0.02), and the axial length decreased in the CXL group, likely due to post-treatment corneal thinning (p = 0.03). In the CRXL group, all the above variables were unaltered (p > 0.05).

    Conclusion: At 6 months, the refractive results from CRXL did not surpass those of conventional CXL treatment. Rather, some variables indicated a slightly inferior effect. Possibly, stronger crosslinking would be necessary to stabilize the cornea in the flattened configuration achieved by the rigid contact lens.

  • 4.
    Beckman Rehnman, Jeannette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Treatment Effect and Corneal Light Scattering With 2 Corneal Cross-linking Protocols: A Randomized Clinical Trial2015In: JAMA ophthalmology, ISSN 2168-6165, E-ISSN 2168-6173, Vol. 133, no 11, p. 1254-1260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: We describe and evaluate a complementary method to indirectly quantify the treatment effect of corneal cross-linking (CXL). Additional methods to indirectly quantify the treatment effect of CXL are needed.

    Objective: To assess the spatial distribution and the time course of the increased corneal densitometry (corneal light backscatter) seen after CXL with riboflavin and UV-A irradiation.

    Design, Setting, and Participants: Open-label randomized clinical trial of 43 patients (60 eyes) who were 18 to 28 years of age and had progressive keratoconus and a plan to be treated with CXL at Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. The patients were randomized to receive conventional CXL (n = 30) using the Dresden protocol or CXL with mechanical compression of the cornea using a flat rigid contact lens sutured to the cornea during the treatment (CRXL) (n = 30). All participants were followed up during a 6-month period from October 13, 2009, through May 31, 2012.

    Interventions: Corneal cross-linking according to the Dresden protocol or CRXL.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: Change in corneal densitometry after CXL and CRXL for keratoconus.

    Results: Of the original 60 eyes included, 4 had incomplete data. A densitometry increase was seen after both treatments that was deeper and more pronounced in the CXL group (difference between the groups at 1 month in the center layer, zone 0-2 mm, 5.02 grayscale units [GSU], 95% CI, 2.92-7.12 GSU; P < .001). This increase diminished with time but was still noticeable at 6 months (difference between the groups at 6 months in the center layer, zone 0-2 mm, 3.47 GSU; 95% CI, 1.72-5.23 GSU; P < .001) and was proportional to the reduction in corneal steepness (R = -0.45 and -0.56 for CXL and CRXL, respectively).

    Conclusions and Relevance: The degree of corneal light backscatter relates to the reduction in corneal steepness after cross-linking and may become a relevant complement to other methods in evaluating the cross-linking effect, for example, when comparing different treatment regimens.

    Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02425150.

  • 5.
    Brändström, Helge
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Grönlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Giesbrecht, Gordon G
    Hand cold recovery responses before and after 15 months of military training in a cold climate2008In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 904-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The ability of fingers to rapidly rewarm following cold exposure is a possible indicator of cold injury protection. We categorized the post-cooling hand-rewarming responses of men before and after participation in 15 mo of military training in a cold environment in northern Sweden to determine: 1) if the initial rewarming category was related to the occurrence of local cold injury during training; and 2) if cold training affected subsequent hand-rewarming responses. METHODS: Immersion of the dominant hand in 10 degrees C water for 10 min was performed pre-training on 77 men. Of those, 45 were available for successful post-training retests. Infrared thermography monitored the dorsal hand during 30 min of recovery. Rewarming was categorized as normal, moderate, or slow based on mean fingertip temperature at the end of 30 min of recovery (TFinger,30) and the percentage of time that fingertips were vasodilated (%VD). RESULTS: Cold injury occurrence during training was disproportionately higher in the slow rewarmers (four of the five injuries). Post-training, baseline fingertip temperatures and cold recovery variables increased significantly in moderate and slow rewarmers: TFinger30 increased from 21.9 +/- 4 to 30.4 +/- 6 degrees C (Moderate), and from 17.4 +/- 0 to 22.3 +/- 7 degrees C (Slow); %VD increased from 27.5 +/- 16 to 65.9 +/- 34% (Moderate), and from 0.7 +/- 2 to 31.7 +/- 44% (Slow). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the cold recovery test were related to the occurrence of local cold injury during long-term cold-weather training. Cold training itself improved baseline and cold recovery in moderate and slow rewarmers.

  • 6.
    Eklund, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    An applanation resonator sensor for measuring intraocular pressure using combined continuous force and area measurement2003In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 3017-3024Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Hallberg, Per
    et al.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Clinical evaluation of applanation resonance tonometry: a comparison with Goldmann applanation tonometry.2007In: Journal of glaucoma, ISSN 1057-0829, E-ISSN 1536-481X, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 88-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to calibrate and evaluate the precision of the new applanation resonance tonometry (ART) in a clinical study designed in accordance with the International Standard Organization's requirements. METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, single-center study, where healthy volunteers and patients participated. A total of 153 eyes were divided into 3 groups with respect to their intraocular pressure (IOP) at screening: <16 mm Hg, 16 to 23 mm Hg, and >23 mm Hg. IOP was measured with Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) as reference method and by ART in both a biomicroscope (ARTBiom) and a handheld (ARTHand) setup with a 10-minutes pause between methods. The mean of 6 readings was regarded as one measurement value. RESULTS: Mean age of the subjects was 59 years (range 20 to 87 y). GAT showed a mean IOP of 20.0 mm Hg (range 8.5 to 43.5 mm Hg, n=153). The precision was 2.07 mm Hg for ARTBiom and 2.50 mm Hg for ARTHand, with a significant dependency for age as compared with GAT. Measurement order produced a decreasing IOP with a mean of 2.3 mm Hg between the first and last method. CONCLUSIONS: The precision obtained in both ARTBiom and ARTHand was within the limits set by the International Standard Organization standards for tonometers. The standardized procedure and the stability of the biomicroscope setup resulted in a slightly better precision as compared with the handheld setup. Despite a 10-minutes pause between measurements, the order was a significant factor, possibly because the patients were more apprehensive at the first measurement.

  • 8.
    Hallberg, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Santala, Kenneth
    Koskela, Timo
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Underestimation of intraocular pressure after photorefractive keratectomy - a biomechanical analysisArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hallberg, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Symmetric sensor for applanation resonance tonometry of the eye2006In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 44, no 1-2, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Applanation resonance tonometry (ART) has been shown in a number of studies to be useful for measuring intraocular pressure (IOP). Data from in vitro laboratory bench testing, where the sensor was carefully centralised onto the cornea, has been very consistent with good precision in the determination of IOP. However, in a clinical study the unavoidable off-centre placement of the sensor against the cornea resulted in a reduced precision. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new design of the sensor with a symmetric sensor probe and a contact piece with a larger diameter. Two in vitro porcine eye experimental set-ups were used. One bench-based for examining position dependence and one biomicroscope-based set-up, simulating a clinical setting, for evaluating IOP(ART) precision at seven different pressure levels (1040 mmHg), set by connecting a saline column to the vitreous chamber. The reference IOP was recorded using a pressure transducer. There was no significant difference between four positions 1 mm off centre and the one centre position. The precision of the ART as compared with the reference pressure was +/- 1.03 mmHg (SD, n = 42). The design improvement has enhanced the precision of the ART in the biomicroscope set-up to be in parity with bench test results from a set-up using perfect positioning. This indicates that off-centre positioning was no longer a major contributor to the deviations in measured IOP. The precision was well within the limits set by ISO standard for eye tonometers. Therefore, a larger in vivo study on human eyes with the ART should be performed.

  • 10.
    Hallberg, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindahl, Olof A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Applanation resonance tonometry for intraocular pressure in humans2004In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 1053-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glaucoma is a group of diseases associated with optic nerve damage and loss of visual field. The aetiology is not completely understood, but one of the major risk factors is elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Reliable methods for measuring the IOP are therefore important. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of the applanation resonance tonometry (ART) system, based on continuous force and area recording, to measure IOP in humans. Both the phase of initial indentation (IOPIndentation) and the phase when the sensor was removed (IOPRemoval) from the cornea were analysed. The Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) was used as reference method. The study included 24 healthy volunteers with normal IOP and 24 patients with elevated IOP. The correlation and standard deviation (SD) between IOPIndentation and IOPGAT was R = 0.92 (p < 0.001), SD = 3.6 mmHg, n = 104, and between IOPRemoval and IOPGAT R = 0.94 (p < 0.001), SD = 3.1 mmHg, n = 104. In conclusion, resonance sensor technology has made it possible to introduce a new multi-point method for measuring IOP, and the method is relevant for measuring IOP in humans. The study indicates that with further development towards elimination of position dependence, the ART has the potential to become a useful clinical instrument for IOP measurement.

  • 11.
    Hallberg, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Santala, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindahl, Olof A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Comparison of Goldmann applanation and applanation resonance tonometry in a biomicroscope-based in vitro porcine eye model2006In: J Med Eng Technol, ISSN 0309-1902, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 345-352Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Age-dependency of ocular parameters - a cross sectional study of young and old healthy subjects2015In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 56, no 7, article id Meeting Abstract: 116Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate aging effect on ocular parameters inkluding intraocular pressure (IOP) measured with different tonometry methods in healthy young (HY) and elderly (HE) subjects.

    Methods: Fifty eyes of 50 HY subjects (28 females, 22-31 years of age) and 43 eyes of 43 HE subjects (22 females, 64-79 years of age) were included. IOP was measured with four tonometry methods in a standardized order: Ocular Response Analyser (ORA), Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT), Applanation Resonance Tonometry (ART) and Goldmann Applanation Tonometry (GAT). Other measurements included axial length (AL), central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal curvature (CC), ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) and aqueous humor (aq).

    Results: The mean IOP (HY/HE; mmHg ± standard deviation) was 13.9 ± 2.7/16.4 ± 3.4 with ORA, 15.1 ± 2.1/16.3 ± 3.1 with DCT, 12.3 ± 2.0/13.7 ± 2.8 with GAT and 13.1 ± 2.2/12.1 ± 2.5 with ART. IOP was significantly higher (difference ± standard error) in HE compared to HY measured with ORA (+2.5 mmHg ± 0.6), GAT (+1.4 ± 0.5) and DCT (+1.2 ± 0.6). There was a trend towards lower IOP in HE when measured with ART (-1.0 ± 0.5, p=0.05). There was no difference between HE and HY in CCT, CC, AL or OPA.

    Conclusions: Tonometry methods are affected differently by age. IOP was measured higher in elderly people with ORA, DCT and GAT in this Scandinavian population. This effect was not seen in measurements with ART. Other ocular parameters did not differ between the age groups indicating that these measured parameters are not influenced by age in this population.

  • 13.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Age-dependency of ocular parameters: a cross sectional study of young and elderly healthy subjects2015In: Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 0721-832X, E-ISSN 1435-702X, Vol. 253, no 11, p. 1979-1983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the effect of aging on ocular parameters, including intraocular pressure (IOP), measured with different tonometry methods in healthy young (HY) and healthy elderly (HE) subjects and to study the effect of corneal parameters on tonometry methods. In this prospective, cross-sectional study, fifty eyes of 50 HY subjects (28 females, 22-31 years of age) and 43 eyes of 43 HE subjects (22 females, 64-79) were included. IOP was measured with four tonometry methods in a standardized order: ocular response analyser (ORA), dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), applanation resonance tonometry (ART) and Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT). Other measurements included axial length (AL), central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal curvature (CC), anterior chamber volume (ACV), corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF). The mean IOP (HY/HE; mmHg +/- standard deviation (SD)) was 12.2 +/- 2.2/14.1 +/- 3.5 with GAT. IOP was significantly higher (difference +/- standard error) in HE compared to HY measured with an ORA (+3.1 mmHg +/- 0.6), GAT (+1.9 +/- 0.6) and DCT (+1.6 +/- 0.6). No significant difference was found in IOP measured with ART. CH and ACV were significantly lower in HE compared to HY. There was no difference between the groups in CCT, CC, AL or CRF. No tonometry method was dependant on CCT or CC. IOP measured with an ORA and via DCT and GAT was higher in HE compared to HY Swedish subjects, while IOP measured with ART did not differ between the groups. In these homogeneous groups, tonometry methods were independent of CCT and CC.

  • 14.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Effects of topical anaesthetics and repeated tonometry on intraocular pressure2014In: Acta Ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-375X, E-ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 111-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:

    To investigate the effects of repeated measurements of intraocular pressure (IOP) using Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and applanation resonance tonometry (ART) to identify mechanisms contributing to the expected IOP reduction.

    Methods:

    A prospective, single-centre study with six healthy volunteers. Consecutive repeated series (six measurements/serie/method) were made alternately on both eyes for 1 hr with oxybuprocaine/fluorescein in the right eye and tetracaine in the left. The left eye was Pentacam((R)) photographed before and repeatedly for 20 min after the IOP measurements. On a separate occasion, the same volunteers received the same amount of anaesthetic drops for 1 hr but without repeated IOP measurements.

    Results:

    A significant IOP reduction occurred with both ART and GAT in the oxybuprocaine-treated eye, -4.4 mmHg and -3.8 mmHg, respectively and with ART in the tetracaine eye, -2.1 mmHg. There was a significant difference in IOP reduction between the oxybuprocaine and tetracaine eyes with ART. There was a significant drop in anterior chamber volume (ACV) immediately after the IOP measurements, -12.6 mu l that returned to pretrial level after 2 min. After 1 hr of receiving anaesthetic eye drops (without IOP measurements), the IOP decreased significantly in the oxybuprocaine eye for both ART and GAT, -3.1 and -1.7 mmHg, respectively, but not in the tetracaine eye (p = 0.72).

    Conclusion:

    The IOP reduction cannot be explained solely by aqueous humor being pressed out of the anterior chamber. While significant IOP reduction occurred with both tetracaine and oxybuprocaine after repeated mechanical applanation, the IOP reduction was significantly greater with oxybuprocaine.

  • 15.
    Johannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskela, Timo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Change in intraocular pressure measurement 2 years after myopic laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy2012In: Journal of cataract and refractive surgery, ISSN 0886-3350, E-ISSN 1873-4502, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 1637-1642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements 24 months after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) with 3 tonometry methods-Goldmann applanation tonometry (DCT), Pascal dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), and applanation resonance tonometry (ART)-and to compare them with measurements taken preoperatively and 3 and 6 months postoperatively. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, Umea University, lima Sweden. DESIGN: Prospective randomized single-center. METHODS: One randomized eye per person from myopic healthy individuals who had LASEK was included. Visual acuity, central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal curvature, and IOP were measured at all time points. Six IOP measurements were performed per method, with a 5-minute lapse between methods. RESULTS: The study evaluated 38 eyes. Two years after LASEK, dynamic ART was the only method that did not measure significantly lower IOP than before LASEK (mean -0.2 mm Hg +/- 1.6 [SD]). The greatest difference was with GAT (mean -1.9 +/- 1.7 mm Hg) followed by static ART (mean -1.2 +/- 1.6 mm Hg) and then DCT (mean -0.9 +/- 1.3 mm Hg). All methods measured significantly lower IOP at 3 months and 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Dynamic ART, which analyses IOP measurement during indentation, showed no significant difference in measured IOP after 24 months. The convex tip of the ART device and the continuous sampling of data during corneal indentation seem to be factors in why dynamic ART was less affected by corneal properties and therefore more suitable for IOP measurement in LASEK-treated eyes, although this must be confirmed in larger trials.

  • 16.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Koskela, Timo
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Change in intraocular pressure measurement after myopic LASEK: a study evaluating Goldmann, Pascal and applanation resonance tonometry2012In: Journal of glaucoma, ISSN 1057-0829, E-ISSN 1536-481X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate 3 tonometry methods-the gold standard, Goldmann applanation tonometry, a new method, Pascal dynamic contour tonometry (PDCT), and a method under development, applanation resonance tonometry (ART)-with respect to intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements before, 3 and 6 months after laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: One randomly assigned eye of each of 53 healthy individuals, who underwent LASEK surgery for myopia was studied. Visual acuity, central corneal thickness, corneal curvature, and IOP were measured at each visit. Six IOP measurements/methods with 5 minutes pause between methods were performed.

    RESULTS: All tonometry methods measured a significantly lower IOP after LASEK correction by a mean of -3.1 diopters. The IOP reduction was largest after 6 months for Goldmann applanation tonometry (-1.7±1.8 mm Hg) followed by ARTstat (-1.2±1.5 mm Hg), PDCT (-1.1±1.6 mm Hg), and ARTdyn (-1.0±1.5 mm Hg). The reduction of IOP did not differ significantly between different methods (P=0.11). There was a significant further reduction of measured IOP for PDCT between 3 and 6 months (-0.5±1.0 mm Hg). Uncorrected visual acuity improved significantly between 3 and 6 months postoperatively from 1.32±0.28 to 1.43±0.27.

    CONCLUSIONS: All tonometry methods measured a significant, but low, reduction of IOP 3 and 6 months after LASEK. Further change in visual acuity and IOP measurements between 3 and 6 months suggest a still ongoing postoperative process.

  • 17.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Introduction and clinical evaluation of servo-controlled applanation resonance tonometry2012In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 90, no 7, p. 677-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:  In recent years, Applanation Resonance Tonometry (ART) has been suggested for intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. The manual version of ART (ARTmanual) has been further developed, and to improve usability, an automatic servo-controlled prototype (ARTservo) has been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess the limits of agreement (LoA) of ARTmanual and ARTservo as compared with the reference method, Goldmann Applanation Tonometry (GAT).

    Methods:  This was a prospective single-centre study on 152 eyes from 77 subjects. It was designed according to International Standard Organization’s (ISO) requirements for tonometers (ISO 2001). Intraocular pressure was measured six times/method in a standardized order. The ART technique has two available analysis procedures: a dynamic one that measures IOP during the indentation phase and a static one that causes a Goldmann-like measurement during two seconds of full applanation. The 95% LoA was defined as ±1.96 × standard deviation of difference against GAT.

    Results:  Mean IOP for GAT was 19.1 mmHg (range: 10–37 mmHg). The 95% LoA of ARTmanual was ±4.5 mmHg for both dynamic and static analyses. The 95% LoA of ARTservo was ±5.7 mmHg for dynamic and ±4.9 mmHg for static analyses.

    Conclusions:  This study confirms that the ART methodology is feasible. The further developed ARTmanual fulfilled the ISO standard with both the dynamic and the static analysis techniques. ARTservo with static analysis was close to fulfilling the standard but failed to do so in the highest IOP range. ARTservo has the potential to greatly improve usability if further development is completed.

  • 18.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Pascal, ICare and Goldmann applanation tonometry: a comparative study2008In: Acta ophthalmologica, ISSN 1755-3768, Vol. 86, no 6, p. 614-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements by Pascal, ICare and Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), to evaluate the effects of central corneal thickness (CCT) and curvature on IOP measurement and to estimate the intra-observer variability.

    METHODS: A prospective, single-centre study of 150 eyes with a wide range of pressures. Six masked IOP measurements/method; corneal thickness and curvature were studied for each eye. GAT was the reference.

    RESULTS: IOPPascal and IOPICare correlated with IOPGAT (r = 0.91, 0.89). Mean ICare measurement exceeded GAT by 2 mmHg. Pascal measured higher than GAT at low IOPs and lower at high IOPs. For every 10 mmHg increase in IOP above 31 mmHg, Pascal measured 2 mmHg lower than GAT and vice versa. CCT was correlated significantly with IOPGAT (r = 0.23) and IOPICare (r = 0.43) but not with IOPPascal (P = 0.12). CCT was correlated with age. In a subgroup (>50 years), ICare and the difference between IOPGAT and IOPPascal were affected significantly by the CCT, whereas IOPGAT and IOPPascal were not. Corneal curvature was correlated significantly with IOPGAT (r = -0.27) and IOPPascal (r = -0.26) but not with IOPICare (P = 0.60). Intra-observer variability within each set of six measurements was approximately 2 mmHg, irrespective of method.

    CONCLUSION: This study showed a reasonable overall correlation and concordance between the IOP obtained with the three instruments. None of the methods were completely independent of the biomechanical properties of the cornea. ICare showed a significant dependency upon CCT, whereas GAT and Pascal showed a significant dependency on corneal curvature. All methods showed intra-observer variability, which leaves room for further improvement of methods.

  • 19.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Lindén, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Can we trust intraocular pressure measurements in eyes with intracameral air?2014In: Graefe's Archives for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, ISSN 0721-832X, E-ISSN 1435-702X, Vol. 252, no 10, p. 1607-1610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of intracameral air on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements using Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and applanation resonance tonometry (ART) in an in-vitro porcine eye model.

    METHODS: IOP was measured on thirteen freshly enucleated eyes at three reference pressures: 20, 30, and 40 mmHg. Six measurements/method were performed in a standardized order with GAT and ART respectively. Air was injected intracamerally in the same manner as during Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet's membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), and the measurements were repeated.

    RESULTS: Measured IOP increased significantly for both tonometry methods after air injection: 0.7 ± 2.1 mmHg for GAT and 10.6 ± 4.9 mmHg for ART. This difference was significant at each reference pressure for ART but not for GAT.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although slightly affected, this study suggests that we can trust GAT IOP-measurements in eyes with intracameral air, such as after DSEK/DMEK operations. Ultrasound-based methods such as ART should not be used.

  • 20.
    Kristiansen, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Linden, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Qvarlander, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Jóhannesson, Gauti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Blood flow rate of ophthalmic artery in patients with normal tension glaucoma and healthy controls2018In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 59, no 9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine the blood flow rate of the ophthalmic artery (OA) in patients with Normal Tension Glaucoma (NTG) compared to age-matched healthy controls using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI).

    Methods: Seventeen patients with treated NTG (11 female; mean age: 70±9 years) and 16 age-matched healthy controls (10 female; mean age: 71±9 years) underwent PCMRI using a 3-Tesla scanner as well as ophthalmological examinations including visual acuity, Goldmann Applanation Tonometry, Humphrey perimetry and fundoscopy. Ophthalmic blood flow was acquired using a 2D PCMRI sequence set to a spatial resolution of 0.35mm/pixel. Mean flow rate and cross-sectional area was calculated using Segment Software. The eye with the most severe glaucomatous damage classified by visual field index (VFI) was chosen for comparison. The primary outcome was blood flow rate of OA.

    Results: The mean VFI was 41% ± 26 (mean±SD) for the worse NTG eyes. The intraocular pressure was 13.6±2.6 mmHg for NTG eyes and 13.8±2.1 mmHg for control eyes. The blood flow rate in the NTG group was 9.6±3.7 ml/min compared to 11.8±5.5 ml/min in the control group. The area was 1.7±0.3 mm2 and 2.0±0.6 mm2 respectively. No statistical significance was found between NTG and the control group regarding blood flow rate (p=0.07) or OA area (p=0.12).

    Conclusions: Despite OA being an anastomosis between the intracranial and extracranial circulation, possibly generating an eye unrelated variability in blood flow, we found a trend level reduction of approximately 2 ml/min in NTG. The finding warrants blood flow rate analysis of smaller arteries specifically supplying the eye, e.g. the central retinal artery.

  • 21.
    Lindahl, O A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Constantinou, C E
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Murayama, Y
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Omata, S
    Tactile resonance sensors in medicine.2009In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 263-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tactile sensors in general are used for measuring the physical parameters associated with contact between sensor and object. Tactile resonance sensors in particular are based on the principle of measuring the frequency shift, Deltaf, defined as the difference between a freely vibrating sensor resonance frequency and the resonance frequency measured when the sensor makes contact to an object. Deltaf is therefore related to the acoustic impedance of the object and can be used to characterize its material properties. In medicine, tactile resonance sensor systems have been developed for the detection of cancer, human ovum fertility, eye pressure and oedema. In 1992 a Japanese research group published a paper presenting a unique phase shift circuit to facilitate resonance measurements. In this review we summarize the current state-of-the-art of tactile resonance sensors in medicine based on the phase shift circuit and discuss the relevance of the measured parameters for clinical diagnosis. Future trends and applications enabled by this technology are also predicted.

  • 22. Nilsson, Mats
    et al.
    Rasmark, Ulf
    Nordgren, Helena
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Skönevik, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Westman, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    The physician at a distance: the use of videoconferencing in the treatment of patients with hypertension2009In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluated the feasibility and quality of uncomplicated hypertension care based on telemedicine in a rural area of northern Sweden. The intervention subjects were 91 consecutive patients with primary hypertension. For comparison, 182 age- and sex-matched patients with hypertension were randomly selected from a similar health centre. The telemedicine equipment consisted of a video link between the physician and the patients, supported by a system for accessing medical data via the Internet. During a 21-month study period, telemedicine was used in 270 (91%) of the 297 consultations in the intervention group. All health personnel involved in the telemedicine treatment rated the method as feasible. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure improved in the two groups during the study period. In the intervention group, a higher proportion had their blood pressure within treatment goals (systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) both at baseline and at follow-up than in the comparison group. An adjusted multivariate model (adjustment for sex, age, time between visits, change in number of drugs between first and last visit, blood pressure at first visit) showed that the intervention group had a higher probability (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.2) of reaching the target blood pressure levels than the reference group. Treatment of hypertension by means of telemedicine was quite feasible and at least as effective as face-to-face consultations with a physician.

  • 23.
    Schedin, Staffan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Analysis of long-term visual quality with numerical 3D ray tracing after corneal crosslinking treatment2017In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 56, no 35, p. 9787-9792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A numerical 3D ray tracing model was used to evaluate the long-term visual effects of two regimens of corneal crosslinking (CXL) treatment of 48 patients with the corneal degeneration keratoconus. The 3D ray tracing analyses were based on corneal elevation data measured by Scheimpflug photography. Twenty-two patients were treated with standard CXL applied uniformly across the corneal surface, whereas 26 patients underwent a customized, refined treatment only at local zones on the cornea (photorefractive intrastromal CXL; PiXL). Spot diagrams, spot root-mean-square (RMS) values, and Strehl ratios were evaluated for the patients prior to and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. It was found that the group of patients treated with PiXL, on average, tended to attain a long-term improvement of the corneal optical performance, whereas only minor changes of the optical parameters were found for group treated with standard CXL. Our results confirmed that standard CXL treatment stabilizes the corneal optical quality over time, and thus halts the progression of the corneal degeneration. In addition to stabilization, the results showed that a significantly higher proportion of subjects treated with PiXL improved in RMS, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, compared to with CXL (p&lt;0.05). This finding indicates that the PiXL treatment might improve optical quality over time.

  • 24.
    Schedin, Staffan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Behndig, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology.
    Three-dimensional ray-tracing model for the study of advanced refractive errors in keratoconus2016In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a numerical three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing model for the analysis of advanced corneal refractive errors. The 3D modeling was based on measured corneal elevation data by means of Scheimpflug photography. A mathematical description of the measured corneal surfaces from a keratoconus (KC) patient was used for the 3D ray tracing, based on Snell's law of refraction. A model of a commercial intraocular lens (IOL) was included in the analysis. By modifying the posterior IOL surface, it was shown that the imaging quality could be significantly improved. The RMS values were reduced by approximately 50% close to the retina, both for on-and off-axis geometries. The 3D ray-tracing model can constitute a basis for simulation of customized IOLs that are able to correct the advanced, irregular refractive errors in KC.

  • 25.
    Skönevik, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Nyström, Leif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Olsén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    A technical platform for remote monitoring of biosignals in real time2008In: A technical platform for remote monitoring of biosignals in real time, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Wadbro, Eddie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Hallberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Optimization of an intraocular lens for correction of advanced corneal refractive errors2016In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 55, no 16, p. 4378-4382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on numerical 3D ray tracing, we propose a new procedure to optimize personalized intra-ocular lenses (IOLs). The 3D ray tracing was based on measured corneal elevation data from patients who suffered from advanced keratoconus. A mathematical shape description of the posterior IOL surface, by means of a tensor product cubic Hermite spline, was implemented. The optimized lenses provide significantly reduced aberrations. Our results include a trade-off study that suggests that it is possible to considerably reduce the aberrations with only minor perturbations of an ideal spherical lens. The proposed procedure can be applied for correction of aberrations of any optical system by modifying a single surface.

1 - 26 of 26
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