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  • 1. Alter, George
    et al.
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Family Effects on Mortality in Nineteenth-century Northern Sweden2002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Aström, Daniel Oudin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Ageing & Living Condit Programme, Umeå University.
    Rocklöv, Joacim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Acute Fatal Effects of Short-Lasting Extreme Temperatures in Stockholm, Sweden: Evidence Across a Century of Change.2013In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 24, no 6, 820-829 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Climate change is projected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events. Short-term effects of extreme hot and cold weather and their effects on mortality have been thoroughly documented, as have epidemiologic and demographic changes throughout the 20th century. We investigated whether sensitivity to episodes of extreme heat and cold has changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until the present.

    METHODS: We collected daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901-2009 for present-day Stockholm County, Sweden. Heat extremes were defined as days for which the 2-day moving average of mean temperature was above the 98th percentile; cold extremes were defined as days for which the 26-day moving average was below the 2nd percentile. The relationship between extreme hot/cold temperatures and all-cause mortality, stratified by decade, sex, and age, was investigated through time series modeling, adjusting for time trends.

    RESULTS: Total daily mortality was higher during heat extremes in all decades, with a declining trend over time in the relative risk associated with heat extremes, leveling off during the last three decades. The relative risk of mortality was higher during cold extremes for the entire period, with a more dispersed pattern across decades. Unlike for heat extremes, there was no decline in the mortality with cold extremes over time.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the relative risk of mortality during extreme temperature events appears to have fallen, such events still pose a threat to public health.

  • 3.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    From the past to the present: dramatic improvements in public health2000In: Public health and health care:  Themebook in: National atlas of Sweden / [ed] Gudrun Lindberg and Måns Rosén, Stockholm: SNA Publ. [Sveriges nationalatlas] , 2000, 22-44 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Från dåtid till nutid: dramatiska förbättringar i folkhälsan2000In: Folkhälsa och sjukvård: Temaband, Sveriges nationalatlas / [ed] Gudrun Lindberg och Måns Rosén, Stockholm: Sveriges Nationalatlas , 2000, 22-43 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, SörenUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.Ericsson, TomUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.Sköld, PeterUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift till Lars-Göran Tedebrand2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Rogers, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Clustering across generations: a comparative analysis of infant mortality in 19th century Sweden2007In: ESSHC Conference in Lisbon, 26 February-1 March, 2008, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies in the past have emphasized the positive correlation between infant mortality and fertility, but how this operates remain unclear. In this paper, we investigate these interdependent processes using data from the Demographic Data base at Ume{\aa} University. More specifically, we have data from regions in the northern part of Sweden, starting in the fifteenth century and ending around the year 1900. In an earlier paper, we have studied the intergenerational aspects of infant mortality and in this paper we incorporate fertility. We investigate the interaction between the two processes and how patterns are tranferred from generation to generation.

  • 7.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Roger, John
    Daughters, mothers and grandmothers: exploring the relationship between birth intervals and fertility across generations2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Rogers, John
    Across generations: Birth-control through spacing and stopping in Skellefteå, Sweden, 1750-19002005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Rogers, John
    Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Infant mortality in Sweden: creating regions from 19th century parish data2000In: Historical Methods, ISSN 0161-5440, E-ISSN 1940-1906, Vol. 33, no 2, 105-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base (DDB).
    Rogers, John
    Successful Families: How did families in Skellefteå during the nineteenth century avoid infant deaths?2006In: 31th Annual Meeting of the Social Science History Association: Minneapolis 2-5 November 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base (DDB).
    Rogers, John
    Who were the winners boys or girls?: A study of infant and child mortality in late nineteenth century Sweden.2006In: Sixth European Social Science History Conference: Amsterdam den 22-25 mars 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Rogers, John
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    High risk families: The unequal distribution of infant mortality in nineteenth century Sweden2005In: Population Studies, ISSN 0032-4728, E-ISSN 1477-4747, Vol. 59, no 3, 321-337 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Brändström, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Vikström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Longitudinal databases - sources for analyzing the life course: Characteristics, difficulties and possibilities2006In: History and computing, ISSN 0957-0144, Vol. 14, no 1 and 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bygren, Lars Olov
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Kaati, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Longevity determined by parental ancestors' nutrition during their slow growth period2001In: Acta Biotheoretica, ISSN 0001-5342, E-ISSN 1572-8358, Vol. 49, no 1, 53-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social circumstances often impinge on later generations in a socio-economic manner, giving children an uneven start in life. Overfeeding and overeating might not be an exception. The pathways might be complex but one direct mechanism could be genomic imprinting and loss of imprinting. An intergenerational "feedforward" control loop has been proposed, that links grandparental nutrition with the grandchild's growth. The mechanism has been speculated to be a specific response, e.g. to their nutritional state, directly modifying the setting of the gametic imprint on one or more genes. This study raises the question: Can overnutrition during a child's slow growth period trigger such direct mechanisms and partly determine mortality? Data were collected by following-up a cohort born in 1905 in Överkalix parish, northernmost Sweden. The probands were characterised by their parents' or grandparents' access to food during their own slow growth period. Availability of food in the area was defined by referring to historical data on harvests and food prices, records of local community meetings and general historical facts.If there was a surfeit of food in the environment when the paternal grandfather was a 9–12 year old boy a shortening of the proband survival could be demonstrated. The influence of parents', maternal grandparents' and paternal grandmothers' access to food during their slow growth period was discounted in a multivariable analysis. The results are indicative of very early programming mechanisms in human adaptation to the social environment.

  • 15.
    Bygren, Lars Olov
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Kaati, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Pembrey, Marcus E.
    Clinical and Molecular Genetics Unit, Institute of Child Health, University College London, UK.
    Epigenetics or ephemeral genetics?: Reply to Senn2006Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bygren, Lars Olov
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tinghög, Petter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Carstensen, John
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Kaati, Gunnar
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden .
    Pembrey, Marcus E.
    Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Change in paternal grandmothers' early food supply influenced cardiovascular mortality of the female grandchildren2014In: BMC Genetics, ISSN 1471-2156, E-ISSN 1471-2156, Vol. 15, 12- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study investigated whether large fluctuations in food availability during grandparents' early development influenced grandchildren's cardiovascular mortality. We reported earlier that changes in availability of food - from good to poor or from poor to good - during intrauterine development was followed by a double risk of sudden death as an adult, and that mortality rate can be associated with ancestors' childhood availability of food. We have now studied transgenerational responses (TGR) to sharp differences of harvest between two consecutive years' for ancestors of 317 people in Overkalix, Sweden. Results: The confidence intervals were very wide but we found a striking TGR. There was no response in cardiovascular mortality in the grandchild from sharp changes of early exposure, experienced by three of the four grandparents (maternal grandparents and paternal grandfathers). If, however, the paternal grandmother up to puberty lived through a sharp change in food supply from one year to next, her sons' daughters had an excess risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.05-6.92). Selection or learning and imitation are unlikely explanations. X-linked epigenetic inheritance via spermatozoa seemed to be plausible, with the transmission, limited to being through the father, possibly explained by the sex differences in meiosis. Conclusion: The shock of change in food availability seems to give specific transgenerational responses.

  • 17. Bygren, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Change in food availability during pregnancy, Is it related to adult sudden death from cerebro- and cardiovascular disease in offspring?2000In: American Journal of Human Biology, ISSN 1042-0533, E-ISSN 1520-6300, Vol. 12, 447-453 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    A country doctor: health care in a Mid-Nineteenth-Century Swedish remote area2011In: Medicine in the remote and rural North, 1800-2000 / [ed] J. T. H. Connor and Stephan Curtis, London: Pickering & Chatto , 2011, 93-114 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Adult mortality and childhood conditions: Long-term effects of urban life in 19th century Sweden2001In: Nordic demography in history and present-day society / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand and Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet, Demografiska databasen , 2001, 247-268 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Att ha omsorg om sina barn: Traditionens och miljöns betydelse för spädbarnsdödlighet2004In: Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift till Lars-Göran Tedebrand / [ed] Anders Brändström, Sören Edvinsson, Tom Ericsson och Peter Sköld, Umeå: Demografiska databasen, Umeå universitet , 2004, 59-84 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Den osunda staden: sociala skillnader i dödlighet i 1800-talets Sundsvall1992Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the topic of social class and mortality. In particular, the analyses are concentrated on the question of how social differences developed in an era which was characterised by industrialisation, urbanisation and sanitary improvements. This work also discusses how the problems of social class and health were dealt with in the nineteenth Century. The development of medicai care and public health are especially studied. The development of mortality in different social classes is analysed on micro level in the town of Sundsvall during the 19th century, for which the parish registers for the period 1803-1894 have been transferred on to data. This town became the centre of an expansive saw mill area from the middle of the Century.

    In contrast to the view of contemporary witnesses, inequality seems to have been fairly small in some age groups, but the pattems diverged between them. Mortality among adults was largely dependent on cultural variables such as life style and attitudes, and social differences played a minor role. Men had much higher mortality than women. The development does not seem to have been primarily affected by industrialisation, urbanisation or sanitary improvements. For children 1-14 years old, on the other hand, conditions created by industrialisation and urbanisation seem to have been of the utmost importance. Child mortality increased from 1860, affecting first of all working class children. Overcrowding increased the spread of infectious diseases. Sanitary improvements may have had an effect on the mortality level from around 1880, but more definitely in the 1890's. The same is also the case regarding infant mortality. They may have had some impact on the initial decline in infant mortality, but the connection appears to be stronger in the 1890's. The social inequality in infant mortality was insignificant until late 19th centuiy, but increased at that time. Among infants, feeding practises were also of importance.

  • 22.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Dödlighet och familjebildning under 1600- och 1700-talet: Daniel Larsson, Den dolda transitionen: om ett demografiskt brytningsskede i det tidiga 1700-talets Sverige.2007In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 127, no 1, 78-86 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under några decennier har den historie-demografiska forskningen varit livaktig såväl i Sverige som i andra länder. För en tid var forskningsinriktningen representerad vid de flesta svenska lärosäten. Under senare år har emellertid mycket av forskningen koncentrerats till några få ställen i Sverige, framför allt Lund och Umeå. Det är därför glädjande att det nu kommit en avhandling från Göteborg med denna inriktning, nämligen Daniel Larssons Den dolda transitionen. Han tillhör en grupp som inriktar sig på befolkningshistoriska studier vid Göteborgs historiska institution. Det är också glädjande att Larssons avhandling handlar om äldre demografisk historia. Visst har en hel del gjorts, bland annat av Eli F. Heckscher och Nils Friberg, men det som karakteriserat den senare svenska historie-demografiska forskningen har med några undantag varit koncentrationen på tidsperioden efter 1750. En förklaring torde vara att källäget för den perioden har varit så pass mycket bättre. Tabellverket och kyrkobokföringen gör det svenska befolkningshistoriska källmaterialet världsunikt, och informationen i kyrkböckerna har varit lämplig att överföra till databaser. Svensk forskning har, helt naturligt, skördat frukterna där vinsterna varit mest givande. Nackdelen är att man varit alltför ängslig att gå till äldre material som krävt betydligt mer arbete och lösningar av många metodologiska problem. Svenska forskare har inte i tillräcklig utsträckning utnyttjat de källor för äldre tider som ändå finns. Vi har också endast i begränsad omfattning utvecklat metoder för att analysera dessa data. I andra länder har man av nödtvång drivits till att utveckla sina analysmetoder för att över huvud taget kunna säga något om befolkningen i äldre tid.

  • 23.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Fattiga stadsflyttares livsöden: Victoria Nygren, Mellan två samhällen: inflyttat arbetsfolk i Linköping under det förindustriella 1800-talet, Linköping Studies i Arts and Science, 57 (Linköping: Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Linköpings universitet 2009).2010In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 130, no 4, 779-785 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Folkhälsans utveckling i Sverige: En historisk översikt. Kunskapsunderlag till 1987 års folkhälsorapport1987Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Hälsoreformer, livsmedelskontroll och hälsoutveckling i svenska städer 1850-19302015In: Mot ett modernt livsmedelssystem: Livsmedelshygien och livsmedelskontroll i Sverige och Norden 1850-1930 / [ed] Per Eriksson, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademien, 2015, 1, 65-81 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Mortality and the urban environment: Sundsvall in the 1880's1995In: Swedish Urban Demography during Industrialization / [ed] Brändström, Anders och Lars.Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Demografiska databasen, Umeå universitet , 1995, 93-113 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Mortality in old age: The epidemiologic transition among elderly in Sweden 1911-20102012In: European Population Conference: Special theme: Gender, Policies and Population, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Recension av "Life under Pressure": T. Bengtsson, C. Campbell and J. Lee (eds)2006In: Historisk tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, no 2, 371-373 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Recension av Robert W. Fogel, "The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700-2100"2006In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 54, no 3, 324-325 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Reumatiker och kroniskt sjuka – en anomali i sjukvården?: recension av avhandlingen Vården av de arbetsoförmögna : reumatikervårdens framväxt i den tidiga välfärdsstaten, av Henrik Karlsson, Örebro2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 2, 280-286 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Social differences in infant and child mortality in 19th century Sweden2004In: The determinants of infant and child mortality in past European populations / [ed] Marco Breschi and Lucia Pozzi, Udine: Forum , 2004, 67-88 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Stor syskonskara avskräcker inte2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    The Demographic Data Base at Umeå University: A resource for historical studies2000In: Handbook of International Historical Microdata for Population Research / [ed] Patricia Kelly Hall, Robert McCaa, Gunnar Thorvaldsen, Minneapolis: Minnesota Population Center , 2000, 231-248 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    The history of health and mortality. What can micro-data tell us?2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Urban health and social class1993In: Health and Social Change: Disease, health and public care in the Sundsvall district 1750-1950 / [ed] Brändström, Anders och Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Demografiska databasen, Umeå universitet , 1993, 55-110 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Är barns liv tryggare nu?2009In: Populär historia, ISSN 1102-0822, no 11, 56-57 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    A parametric model for old age mortality in mediation analysis2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Old age, health and social inequality: exploring the social patterns of mortality in 19th Century Northern Sweden2012In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 26, 23- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Social position is one of the major determinants of health. Less is known about its effect in historical contexts. Previous studies have shown surprisingly small effects of social class in working age populations. Not much is known about social differences in health among the elderly in history.

    OBJECTIVE

    The present paper analyses social differences in health among the elderly (60+) in the Sundsvall region in northern Sweden during the 19th century. We investigate whether social mortality differences are particularly apparent in old age when unpropertied groups lost their most important asset for survival: their capacity to work.

    METHODS

    The data, representing 9,535 fatal events, are analysed using a Cox regression model, assuming proportional hazards.

    RESULTS

    Social class had no significant effect for women during the pre-industrial period, while only those with unknown social position had higher mortality among men. During the industrial period female mortality was lowest in the skilled working class and highest in the upper class. Social position was not significant for men in the full model. Urban mortality was 30% higher for women and 59% higher for men during the pre-industrial period compared to the peripheral parishes.

    CONCLUSIONS

    The results lead us to question the accepted 'fact' of social health differences as a historical constant. Higher social position did not lead to better survival, and social differences in mortality did not increase in old age, despite the fact that the elderly were a highly vulnerable group. Instead, the spatial aspects of mortality were important, particularly during the pre-industrial period.

  • 39.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Folkhälsans historia från 1870 till nutid1997In: Sundsvalls historia del 2 / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Sundsvall: Stadshistoriska Kommittén , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Folkhälsans utveckling - tiden före 18701996In: Sundsvalls historia del 1 / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Sundsvall: Stadshistoriska kommittén , 1996Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies.
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies.
    Rogers, John
    Uppsala universitet.
    Did Midwives Make a Difference?: A study of infant mortality in nineteenth century Sweden2008In: Se människan: Demografi, rätt och hälsa - en vänbok till Jan Sundin, Linköping, 2008, 131-150 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Rogers, John
    Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Illegitimacy, infant feeding practices and infant survival in Sweden, 1750-1950: A regional analysis2002In: Hygiea Internationalis, ISSN 1403-8668, E-ISSN 1404-4013, Vol. 3, no 1, 13-52 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Rogers, John
    Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Introduction2002In: Hygiea Internationalis, ISSN 1403-8668, E-ISSN 1404-4013, Vol. 3, no 1, 7-11 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Rogers, John
    Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Regional variations in infant mortality in Sweden during the first half of the 19th century2001In: Nordic demography in history and present-day society / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand and Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet, Demografiska databasen , 2001, 145-164 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Gardarsdottir, Olöf
    University of Iceland.
    Thorvaldsen, Gunnar
    Universitetet i Tromsö.
    Infant Mortality in the Nordic Countries 1780-19302008In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 23, no 2, 457-485 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Do unequal societies cause death among the elderly?: a study of the health effects of inequality in Swedish municipalities, 20062013In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, no 1, 19116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A lively public and academic debate has highlighted the potential health risk of living in regions and nations characterized by inequality. However, previous research provides an ambiguous picture, with positive association mainly having been found on higher geographical levels. One explanation for this could be that the effect of living in more heterogeneous social settings differs between levels of aggregation. 

    Methods: We examine the association between income inequality (using the Gini coefficient) and all-cause mortality in Swedish municipalities in the age group 65-74. A multi-level analysis is applied and we control for e.g. individual income and average income level in the unicipality. The analyses are based on individual register data on all residents born between 1932 and 1941, and outcomes are measured for the year 2006.

    Results: Lower individual income as well as lower average income level in the municipality of residence increased mortality significantly. We found an association between income inequality and mortality with excessive deaths in unequal municipalities even after controlling for mean income level and personal income. The results from the analysis of individual data differed substantially from analyses using aggregate data.

    Conclusions: Income inequality has a significant association with mortality in the age groups 65 to 75 at municipality level. The association is small compared to many other variables, but it is not negligible. Even in a comparatively equal society like Sweden, we need to consider possible effects of income inequality on mortality at the local level. 

  • 47.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Neighbourhood inequality as a health risk: Empirical evidence from Swedish registers2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the impact on mortality of income inequality in residential neighbourhoods and municipalities among elderly 65-84 years in the year 2004, using Swedish longitudinal micro-data covering the entire Swedish population for the period 1970 – 2006. Preliminary cross-sectional multi-level analyses are now complemented by longitudinal analyses of long-term residential histories with exposure to equal/unequal municipalities and neighbourhoods and the long-term impact on mortality. We investigate the association between mortality and income inequality at place of residence at different time lags and the effect of a summary measure of previous exposures to environments characterised by different inequality levels. We also compare groups that have different experiences of residential characteristics, i.e. those that have resided in unequal or equal places and those that have changed from equal to unequal residences or vice versa. Preliminary results from a cross-sectional analysis on 2006, show that income inequality in the municipality of residence had an independent effect on mortality in the age group 65-74 years

  • 48.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Janssens, Angelique
    Radboud university Nijmegen.
    Clustering of deaths in families: Infant and child mortality in historical perspective2012In: Biodemography and Social Biology, ISSN 1948-5565, E-ISSN 1948-5573, Vol. 58, no 2, 75-86 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction surveys the field of family clustering of deaths and discusses the contributionsin this special issue. The main focus is on mortality in historical contexts.Clustering of deaths in families has been found both in historical and contemporarypopulations, and we argue that the ‘family approach’ to infant and child mortality yieldsimportant and interesting insights for our understanding of different mortality patternsand the mortality transition. The articles in this issue, representing different but complementaryapproaches to the problem of death clustering, demonstrate that we shouldbe aware of the strong family effects on child health, but also that we need to developadequate methods for the analysis of this complex phenomenon. Here we discuss severalexplanations for death clustering, such as different biodemographic factors andthose focusing on socioeconomic and cultural variables. We also discuss some of themethodological challenges in studying family clustering, and emphasize the need forcomparison and the adoption of common measures.

  • 49.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Karlsson, Johnny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Recoding occupations in the Demographic Data Base into HISCO1998In: Historical International Standard Coding of Occupations: Status Quo after coding 500 frequent male occupations / [ed] Marco van Leeuwen, Ineke Maas and Andrew Miles, Berlin: Max Planck Institute , 1998, 137-167 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Edvinsson, Sören
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Kling, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    The practice of birth control and historical fertility change: Introduction2010In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 15, no 2, 117-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction discusses the contributions in the special issue. The articles present results concerning the practice of birth control, mainly at the family level. They represent different analytical approaches where both interviews, letters, surveys and micro-level data have been used. The European fertility decline has made a fundamental change to the societies in the 20th and 21st centuries. Birth control spreads rapidly. Research in this field requires both qualitative and quantitative studies, where both approaches contribute to different perspectives on the transition. The articles in the issue discuss several themes in relation to birth control, of which three are developed in the introduction. These are gender and fertility, gender and health and finally how to control fertility. The presented results demonstrate the importance of including gender in the analyses of the fertility decline. A gender perspective makes it natural to consider historical persons as agents. It is also necessary to acknowledge that we should not treat the married couple as a single unit. They may have conflicting interests, something that several of the articles illustrate. One aspect we would like to emphasize is how health problems can influence the will to have more children and this affects birth control. This is a theme that in different forms is taken up by several of the authors. Finally, families practiced birth control with several different methods that also changed throughout the married years, thus demonstrating a flexibility that is often overlooked in conventional methods for the analysis of fertility.

12 1 - 50 of 66
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