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  • 1.
    Griffin, Gabriele
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hamberg, KatarinaUmeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.Lundgren, BrittaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    The social politics of research collaboration2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Framing post-pandemic preparedness: comparing eight European plans2018In: Global Public Health, ISSN 1744-1692, E-ISSN 1744-1706, Vol. 13, no 1, 99-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Framing has previously been studied in the field of pandemic preparedness and global health governance and influenza pandemics have usually been framed in terms of security and evidence-based medicine on a global scale. This paper is based on the pandemic preparedness plans, published after 2009, from eight European countries. We study how pandemic preparedness is framed and how pandemic influenza in general is narrated in the plans. All plans contain references to ‘uncertainty’, ‘pandemic phases’, ‘risk management’, ‘vulnerability’ and ‘surveillance’. These themes were all framed differently in the studied plans. The preparedness plans in the member states diverge in ways that will challenge the ambition of the European Union to make the pandemic preparedness plans interoperable and to co-ordinate the member states during future pandemics.

  • 3.
    Kalman, Hildur
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Öhman, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Challenges to Interdisciplinarity: Development of Arena Work in Gender Research Collaborations2012In: International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, ISSN 2220-8488, E-ISSN 2221-0989, Vol. 2, no 13, 58-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the challenges of working with hybrid teams within the overarching programme ChallengingGender, with its interdisciplinary theme groups and its arena for joint reflection and theoretical development. Theintellectual exchange over concepts with heterogeneous meanings across hybrid themes may lead to manydebates and controversies over allegedly joint concepts and be experienced as time-consuming exercises that givemeagre results. The article analyses the interaction within hybrid themes and between themes on the arena. Theanticipated dynamics in the process of arena work required both flexibility and adaptability, and the work wasdeveloped in several stages. Two important steps were the outlining of core statements and core questions at theheart of each theme, and letting themes actively challenge the research questions of other themes. The articlestresses the importance of exposure to methodological and theoretical pluralism to create scientific developmentand intellectual excitement.

  • 4.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Akademiska resor: om klass och genus2007In: Sigbrit Franke: tydlig, synlig, djärv / [ed] Åsa Klevard och Ragnhild Nitzle, Stockholm: Högskoleverket , 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Att återvända till orden2011In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 20, no 3-4, 53-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Brave New World: leading large research structures2013In: The Social Politics of Research Collaboration / [ed] Gabriele Griffin, Katarina Hamberg and Britta Lundgren, New York, London: Routledge, 2013, 23-38 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Challenging Gender: A dynamic and growing research field2010In: PS. Public Service Review. European Union, ISSN 1472-3395, Vol. 19, 408-409 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Challenging Gender: A strong case for internationalization and interdisciplinarity2009In: Umeå Centre for Gender Studies, Annual Report, 10-12 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    En pandemis vetenskapliga verkligheter2013In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 1, 21-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Genusforskarskolan - organisation, konsolidering och expansion2006In: Genusforskarskolans årsskrift 2005, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Humanistisk offensiv: en akademisk balansakt2008In: Forska lagom eller vara världsbäst?: Sverige möter forskningens globala strukturomvandling, Stockholm: SNS förlag , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Introduction2013In: The Social Politics of Research Collaboration / [ed] Gabriele Griffin, Katarina Hamberg and Britta Lundgren, New York, London: Routledge, 2013, 1-20 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Introduction2006In: Reaching for Scientific excellence in gender research: conference report / [ed] Hillevi Ganetz, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet (The Swedish Research Council) , 2006, 6-6 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Narrating narcolepsy: centering a side effect2015In: Medical Anthropology, ISSN 0145-9740, E-ISSN 1545-5882, Vol. 34, no 2, 150-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mass-vaccination with Pandemrix was the most important preventive measure in Sweden during the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic of 2009–2010, and covered 60% of the population. From 2010, an increased incidence of the neurological disease narcolepsy was reported, and an association with Pandemrix was affirmed for more than 200 children and young adults. The parental experience of this side effect provided a starting point for a collectively shaped critical narrative to be acted out in public, but also personalized narratives of continual learning about the disease and its consequences. This didactic functionality resulted in active meaning-making practices about how to handle the aftermath—using dark humor, cognitive tricks, and making themselves and their children’s bodies both objects and subjects of knowledge. Using material from interviews with parents, this mixing of knowledge work and political work, and the potential for reflective consciousness, is discussed.

  • 15.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Oväntad död - förväntad sorg: En etnologisk studie av sörjandets processer2006Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    'Rhyme or reason?' Saying no to mass vaccination: subjective re-interpretation in the context of the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in Sweden 2009-20102015In: Medical Humanities, ISSN 1468-215X, E-ISSN 1473-4265, Vol. 41, no 2, 107-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the swine flu pandemic of 2009–2010, all Swedish citizens were recommended to be vaccinated with the influenza vaccine Pandemrix. However, a very serious and unexpected side effect emerged during the summer of 2010 and more than 200 children and young adults were diagnosed with narcolepsy after vaccination. Besides the tragic outcome for these children and their families, this adverse side effect also suggests future difficulties in obtaining trust in vaccination in case of emerging pandemics, and thus there is a growing need to find methods to understand the complexities of vaccination decision processes. This article explores written responses to a questionnaire from a Swedish folklife archive as an unconventional source for analysing vaccine decisions. The aim is to investigate how laypersons responded to and re-interpreted the message about the recommended vaccination in their answers. The answers show the confusion and the complex circumstances and influences in everyday life that people reflect on when making such important decisions. The issue of confusion is traced back to the initial communications about the vaccination intervention in which both autonomy and solidarity were expected from the population. Common narratives and stories about the media or ‘big pharma capitalism’ are entangled with private memories, accidental coincidences, and serendipitous associations. It is obvious that vaccination interventions that require compliance from large groups of people need to take into account the kind of personal experience narratives that are produced by the complex interplay of the factors described by the informants.

     

  • 17.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    The Challenging Gender Programme and its Arena for Reflexivity and Research Development2010In: Umeå Centre for Gender Studies, Annual Report, 14-16 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    The common cold, influenza, and immunity in post-pandemic times: lay representations of self and other among older people in Sweden2015In: Health, Culture and Society, ISSN 1551-7136, E-ISSN 1175-0928, Vol. 8, no 2, 46-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for new knowledge about lay representations of contagions, immunity, vaccination, common colds, and influenza has become clear after the A(H1N1) pandemic and the resulting challenges regarding pandemic preparedness. This article analyzes written responses from 67 persons, mostly women, to a semi-structured questionnaire about colds and the flu. Three themes are discussed: “Common cold and flus as ritualized experiences”, “Me, my body, and my immune defense”, and “Regulations of space, place, and behaviors.” Overall, the narratives were about trust, value, and respect in the body, in lived experiences, and in the capacity to ‘help’ and ‘nurture’ the immune system, but also about the feeling of powerlessness when perceiving inadequacies in other people’s parallel interpretations and actions. Pandemic preparedness policies need to acknowledge the multiple ‘immunity talk’ in the responses to create productive, ongoing relations with the ‘Other’, that rely on people’s trust and resilience, rather than on people´s fear.

  • 19.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Umeås genusforskning - från seminarier till excellenscentrum2009In: Thule - Kungl. Skytteanska Samfundets årsbok, ISSN 0280-8692, 245-252 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lundgren, Britta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Holmberg, Martin
    Uppsala universitet.
    Svininfluensapandemin i backspegeln2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 92, no 6, 683-695 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandemic preparedness has been discussed since the 1990-ies. During the swine flu pandemic of 2009-2010, interventions were performed according to plan; the most important was mass vaccination using the Pandemrix© vaccine. In retrospect the pandemic was considered mild. However, the massvaccination had unexpected adverse effects – an increased number of narcolepsycases among children and young people. This paper discusses the emphasis that the preparedness plan placed on mass vaccination and how authorities and politicians acted in consensus around the message: "Protect yourself, protect others, stop the spread". The underlying argument for solidarity demands responsibility when unexpected adverse effects emerge. Awareness of the relational and reciprocal nature of solidarity is needed in future work, with a broadening of competencies in pandemic preparedness to include the humanities and social sciences.

1 - 20 of 20
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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  • text
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