umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lindhagen-Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ca2+ enhances Aβ polymerization rate and fibrillar stability in a dynamic manner2013In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 450, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying factors that affect the self-assembly of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is of utmost importance in the quest to understand the molecular mechanisms causing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ca2+ has previously been shown to accelerate both Aβ fibril nucleation and maturation, and a dysregulated Ca2+ homeostasis frequently correlates with development of AD. The mechanisms regarding Ca2+ binding as well as its effect on fibril kinetics are not fully understood. Using a polymerization assay we show that Ca2+ in a dynamic and reversible manner enhances both the elongation rate and fibrillar stability, where specifically the "dock and lock" phase mechanism is enhanced. Through NMR analysis we found that Ca2+ affects the fibrillar architecture. In addition, and unexpectedly, we found that Ca2+ does not bind the free Aβ monomer. This implies that Ca2+ binding requires an architecture adopted by assembled peptides, and consequently is mediated through intermolecular interactions between adjacent peptides. This gives a mechanistic explanation to the enhancing effect on fibril maturation and indicates structural similarities between prefibrillar structures and mature amyloid. Taken together we expose how Ca2+ levels affect the delicate equilibrium between the monomeric and assembled Aβ and how fluctuations in vivo may contribute to development and progression of the disease.

  • 2.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pihl, Mathias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sandblad, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The N-terminal Region of Amyloid β Controls the Aggregation Rate and Fibril Stability at Low pH Through a Gain of Function Mechanism2014In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 136, no 31, p. 10956-10964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease is linked to a pathological polymerization of the endogenous amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) that ultimately forms amyloid plaques within the human brain. We used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to measure the kinetic properties of Aβ fibril formation under different conditions during the polymerization process. For all polymerization processes, a critical concentration of free monomers, as defined by the dissociation equilibrium constant (KD), is required for the buildup of the polymer, for example, amyloid fibrils. At concentrations below the KD, polymerization cannot occur. However, the KD for Aβ has previously been shown to be several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations found in the cerebrospinal and interstitial fluids of the human brain, and the mechanism by which Aβ amyloid forms in vivo has been a matter of debate. Using SPR, we found that the KD of Aβ dramatically decreases as a result of lowering the pH. Importantly, this effect enables Aβ to polymerize within a picomolar concentration range that is close to the physiological Aβ concentration within the human brain. The stabilizing effect is dynamic, fully reversible, and notably pronounced within the pH range found within the endosomal and lysosomal pathways. Through sequential truncation, we show that the N-terminal region of Aβ contributes to the enhanced fibrillar stability due to a gain of function mechanism at low pH. Our results present a possible route for amyloid formation at very low Aβ concentrations and raise the question of whether amyloid formation in vivo is restricted to a low pH environment. These results have general implications for the development of therapeutic interventions.

  • 3.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Aβ peptide fibrillar architectures controlled by conformational constraints of the monomer2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, p. e25157-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anomalous self-assembly of the Aβ peptide into fibrillar amyloid deposits is strongly correlated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ fibril extension follows a template guided "dock and lock" mechanism where polymerisation is catalysed by the fibrillar ends. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR (H/D-exchange NMR), we have analysed the fibrillar structure and polymerisation properties of both the highly aggregation prone Aβ1-40 Glu22Gly (Aβ(40Arc)) and wild type Aβ1-40 (Aβ(40WT)). The solvent protection patterns from H/D exchange experiments suggest very similar structures of the fibrillar forms. However, through cross-seeding experiments monitored by SPR, we found that the monomeric form of Aβ(40WT) is significantly impaired to acquire the fibrillar architecture of Aβ(40Arc). A detailed characterisation demonstrated that Aβ(40WT) has a restricted ability to dock and isomerise with high binding affinity onto Aβ(40Arc) fibrils. These results have general implications for the process of fibril assembly, where the rate of polymerisation, and consequently the architecture of the formed fibrils, is restricted by conformational constraints of the monomers. Interestingly, we also found that the kinetic rate of fibril formation rather than the thermodynamically lowest energy state determines the overall fibrillar structure.

  • 4.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Characterization of SPINK9, a KLK5-specific inhibitor expressed in palmo-plantar epidermis2012In: Biological chemistry (Print), ISSN 1431-6730, E-ISSN 1437-4315, Vol. 393, no 5, p. 369-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SPINK9, a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor, is almost exclusively expressed in the palmo-plantar epidermis. SPINK9 selectively inhibits kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5), no other target enzyme is known at present. In this study, we defined the reactive loop to residues 48 and 49 of SPINK9 and characterized the inhibition and binding of different SPINK9 variants towards KLK5, KLK7, KLK8 and KLK14. Substitutions of single amino acids in the reactive loop had a large impact on both inhibitory efficiency and specificity. Binding studies showed that it is mainly the dissociation rate that is affected by the amino acid substitutions. The inhibitory effect of wild-type SPINK9 was clearly pH-dependent with an improved effect at a pH similar to that of the outer layers of the skin. Modeling of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes showed that the reactive loop of SPINK9 fits very well into the deep negatively charged binding pocket of KLK5. A decrease in pH protonates His48 of the wild-type protein resulting in a positively charged residue, thereby explaining the observed decreased dissociation rate. Interestingly, substitution with a positively charged amino acid at position 48 resulted in a more efficient inhibitor at higher pH.

  • 5.
    Edwin, Aaron
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stier, Gunter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Domain isolation, expression, purification and proteolytic activity of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae2014In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 96, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the bacteria's ability to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that so far has only been expressed in V. cholerae. Structural studies require high amounts of soluble protein with high purity. Previous attempts for recombinant expression have been hampered by low expression and solubility of protein fragments. Here, we describe results from parallel cloning experiments in Escherichia coli where fusion tagged constructs of PrtV fragments were designed, and protein products tested for expression and solubility. Of more than 100 designed constructs, three produced protein products that expressed well. These include the N-terminal domain (residues 23-103), the PKD1 domain (residues 755-839), and a 25kDa fragment (residues 581-839). The soluble fusion proteins were captured with Ni(2+) affinity chromatography, and subsequently cleaved with tobacco etch virus protease. Purification protocols yielded ∼10-15mg of pure protein from 1L of culture. Proper folding of the shorter domains was confirmed by heteronuclear NMR spectra recorded on (15)N-labeled samples. A modified protocol for the native purification of the secreted 81kDa pro-protein of PrtV is provided. Proteolytic activity measurements suggest that the 37kDa catalytic metalloprotease domain alone is sufficient for activity.

  • 6. Haglund, Ellinor
    et al.
    Lind, Jesper
    Öman, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mäler, Lena
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    The HD-exchange motions of ribosomal protein S6 are insensitive to reversal of the protein-folding pathway2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 51, p. 21619-21624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of protein structures are found to encompass multiple folding nuclei, allowing their structures to be formed by several competing pathways. A typical example is the ribosomal protein S6, which comprises two folding nuclei (sigma1 and sigma2) defining two competing pathways in the folding energy landscape: sigma1 --> sigma2 and sigma2 --> sigma1. The balance between the two pathways, and thus the order of folding events, is easily controlled by circular permutation. In this study, we make use of this ability to manipulate the folding pathway to demonstrate that the dynamic motions of the S6 structure are independent of how the protein folds. The HD-exchange protection factors remain the same upon complete reversal of the folding order. The phenomenon arises because the HD-exchange motions and the high-energy excitations controlling the folding pathway occur at separated free-energy levels: the Boltzmann distribution of unproductive unfolding attempts samples all unfolding channels in parallel, even those that end up in excessively high barriers. Accordingly, the findings provide a simple rationale for how to interpret native-state dynamics without the need to invoke fluctuations off the normal unfolding reaction coordinate.

  • 7.
    Jia, Xueen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gharibyan, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Liu, Yonggang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity2011In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 414, no 5, p. 699-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical.

  • 8.
    Olofsson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindhagen Persson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vestling, Monika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Quenched hydrogen/deuterium exchange NMR characterization of amyloid-β peptide aggregates formed in the presence of Cu2+ or Zn2+2009In: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658, Vol. 276, no 15, p. 4051-4060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder causing synaptic impairment and neuronal cell death, is strongly correlated with aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Divalent metal ions such as Cu2+ and Zn2+ are known to significantly affect the rate of aggregation and morphology of Aβ assemblies in vitro and are also found at elevated levels within cerebral plaques in vivo. The present investigation characterized the architecture of the aggregated forms of Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) in the presence or absence of either Cu2+ or Zn2+ using quenched hydrogen/deuterium exchange combined with solution NMR spectroscopy. The NMR analyses provide a quantitative and residue-specific structural characterization of metal-induced Aβ aggregates, showing that both the peptide sequence and the type of metal ion exert an impact on the final architecture. Common features among the metal-complexed peptide aggregates are two solvent-protected regions with an intervening minimum centered at Asn27, and a solvent-accessible N-terminal region, Asp1–Lys16. Our results suggest that Aβ in complex with either Cu2+ or Zn2+ can attain an aggregation-prone β-strand–turn–β-strand motif, similar to the motif found in fibrils, but where the metal binding to the N-terminal region guides the peptide into an assembly distinctly different from the fibril form.

  • 9.
    Olofsson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP).
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP).
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP).
    Amyloid fibril dynamics revealed by combined hydrogen/deuterium exchange and nuclear magnetic resonance2009In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 385, no 2, p. 374-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general method to explore the dynamic nature of amyloid fibrils is described, combining hydrogen/deuterium exchange and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the exchange rates of individual amide protons within an amyloid fibril. Our method was applied to fibrils formed by the amyloid-beta(1-40) peptide, the major protein component of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease. The fastest exchange rates were detected among the first 14 residues of the peptide, a stretch known to be poorly structured within the fibril. Considerably slower exchange rates were observed in the remainder of the peptide within the beta-strand-turn-beta-strand motif that constitutes the fibrillar core.

  • 10.
    Paracuellos, Patricia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Expression and purification of SfaX(II), a protein involved in regulating adhesion and motility genes in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli2012In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli strains commonly harbor genes involved in formation of fimbriae, such as the sfa(II) fimbrial gene cluster found in uropathogenic and newborn meningitis isolates. The sfaX(II) gene, located at the distal end of the sfa(II) operon, was recently shown to play a role in controlling virulence-related gene expression in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Until now, detailed characterization of the SfaX(II) protein has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining large quantities of soluble protein. By a rational modeling approach, we engineered a Cys70Ser mutation, which successfully improved solubility of the protein. Here, we present the expression, purification, and initial characterization of the recombinant SfaX(IIC70S) mutant. The protein was produced in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells grown in autoinduction culture media. The plasmid vector harbored DNA encoding the SfaX(IIC70S) protein N-terminally fused with a six histidine (H6) sequence followed by a ZZ tag (a derivative of the Staphylococcus protein A) (H6-ZZ tag). The H6-ZZ tag was cleaved off with Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease and the 166 amino acid full-length homo-dimeric protein was purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the protein possesses DNA-binding properties, suggesting that the transcriptional regulatory activity of SfaX(II) can be mediated via direct binding to DNA.

  • 11.
    Petzold, Katja
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biochemistry and Biophsyics.
    Öhman, Anders
    Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Centre for Molecular Pathogenesis (UCMP) (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Backman, Lars
    Chemistry.
    Folding of the αΙΙ-spectrin SH3 domain under physiological salt conditions2008In: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 474, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SH3 domain has often been used as a model for protein folding due to its typical two-state behaviour. However, recent experimental data at low pH as well as molecular dynamic simulations have indicated that the folding process of SH3 probably is more complicated, and may involve intermediate states. Using both kinetic and equilibrium measurements we have obtained evidence that under native-like conditions the folding of the spectrin SH3 domain does not follow a classic two-state behaviour. The curvature we observed in the Chevron plots is a strong indication of a non-linear activation energy relationship due to the presence of high-energy intermediates. In addition, circular dichroism measurements indicated that refolding after thermal denaturation did not follow the same pattern as thermal unfolding but rather implied less cooperativity and that the refolding transition increased with increasing protein concentration. Further, NMR experiments indicated that upon refolding the SH3 domain gave rise to more than one conformation. Therefore, our results suggest that the folding of the SH3 domain of II-spectrin does not follow a classical two-state process under high-salt conditions and neutral pH. Heterogeneous folding pathways, which can include folding intermediates as well as misfolded intermediates, might give a more reasonable insight into the folding behaviour of the II-spectrin SH3 domain.

  • 12.
    Wikström Hultdin, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindberg, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Allgardsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Huang, Shenghua
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Stier, Günter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Purification, crystallization and preliminary data analysis of FocB, a transcription factor regulating fimbrial adhesin expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli2010In: Acta Crystallographica. Section F: Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications, ISSN 1744-3091, E-ISSN 1744-3091, Vol. 66, no Pt 3, p. 337-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcription factor FocB belongs to a family of regulators encoded by several different fimbriae gene clusters in uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Recent findings suggest that FocB-family proteins may form different protein-protein complexes and that they may exert both positive and negative effects on the transcription of fimbriae genes. However, little is known about the actual role and mode of action when these proteins interact with the fimbriae operons. The 109-amino-acid FocB transcription factor from the foc gene cluster in E. coli strain J96 has been cloned, expressed and purified. The His6-tagged fusion protein was captured by Ni2+-affinity chromatography, cleaved with tobacco etch virus protease and purified by gel filtration. The purified protein is oligomeric, most likely in the form of dimers. NMR analysis guided the crystallization attempts by showing that probable conformational exchange or oligomerization is reduced at temperatures above 293 K and that removal of the highly flexible His6 tag is advantageous. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 295 K. A native data set to 2.0 Å resolution was collected at 100 K using synchrotron radiation.

  • 13.
    Öhman, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    NMR metabonomics of cerebrospinal fluid distinguishes between Parkinson's disease and controls2015In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 594, p. 36-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses if nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics can discriminate between Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and control subjects, and consequently identify metabolic markers for the disease. One-dimensional H-1 NMR spectroscopy was used for quantitative analysis of metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 10 PD patients and 10 control individuals, together with uni- and multivariate statistical analysis to discriminate between the groups and to identify significantly altered metabolite concentrations. In total 60 metabolites were identified and of those 38 were quantified in all CSF samples. An overall lowering of metabolite content was observed in PD patients compared to control subjects (fold change of 0.85 +/- 0.30). Multivariate statistics reveal significant changes (vertical bar w*vertical bar>0.2) among nine metabolites (alanine, creatinine, dimethylamine, glucose, lactate, mannose, phenylalanine, 3-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid). Three of these (alanine, creatinine and mannose) are identified as significantly changed also by univariate statistics (p < 0.00132, Bonferroni corrected). Panels with all or a selected set of these metabolites were successfully used for discriminating between the two groups. In conclusion, NMR metabonomics can readily determine metabolite concentrations in CSF, identify putative biomarkers that distinguish between the PD patients and control subjects, and thus potentially become a tool for diagnostic purposes.

  • 14.
    Öhman, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Öman, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Solution structures and backbone dynamics of the ribosomal protein S6 and its permutant P(54-55)2010In: Protein science : a publication of the Protein Society, ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 183-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ribosomal protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus has served as a model system for the study of protein folding, especially for understanding the effects of circular permutations of secondary structure elements. This study presents the structure of a permutant protein, the 96-residue P(54-55), and the structure of its 101-residue parent protein S6(wt) in solution. The data also characterizes the effects of circular permutation on the backbone dynamics of S6. Consistent with crystallographic data on S6(wt), the overall solution structures of both P(54-55) and S6(wt) show a beta-sheet of four anti-parallel beta-strands with two alpha-helices packed on one side of the sheet. In clear contrast to the crystal data, however, the solution structure of S6(wt) reveals a disordered loop in the region between beta-strands 2 and 3 (Leu43-Phe60) instead of a well-ordered stretch and associated hydrophobic mini-core observed in the crystal structure. Moreover, the data for P(54-55) show that the joined wild-type N- and C-terminals form a dynamically robust stretch with a hairpin structure that complies with the in silico design. Taken together, the results explain why the loop region of the S6(wt) structure is relatively insensitive to mutational perturbations, and why P(54-55) is more stable than S6(wt): the permutant incision at Lys54-Asp55 is energetically neutral by being located in an already disordered loop whereas the new hairpin between the wild-type N- and C-termini is stabilizing.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf