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  • 1. Ballesteros, S
    et al.
    Peter, C
    Waterworth, Eva L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The role of ICT and networking in healthy ageing2012In: PETRA 2012: 5th Workshop on Affect and Behaviour Related Assistance, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report the results from the psychologicalassessment conducted using a test battery composed of cognitiveand social wellbeing tests and questionnaires performed by usersand controls that participated in the AGNES project in Spain,Sweden and Greece at the beginning of the study and after thedeployment of the first prototype. The project carries out noveltechnological interventions in an emerging area in ageingresearch. The main innovation is the integration of differenttechnological components and social networking to provide anovel solution to the ageing population living at home. Themotivation was based on relevant findings on the psychology ofageing and the need for technologies to support the ageingpopulation. End-users have been heavily involved, providingdesign input, continuum evaluation and feedback. Theprojectfocuses on improving the mental and physical wellbeing ofelderly people living at home, who often suffer the effects ofsocial and physical isolation including cognitive decline, lowactivity levels and poor mood states. The main results were thatthe users but not the control participants improved cognitiveperformance andthe feeling of being treated with respect, beingindependent, self-realization and greater achievement.

  • 2. Ballesteros, S
    et al.
    Toril, P
    Mayas, J
    Reales, J.M
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Role of a New ICT Home Environment in Healthy Ageing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this longitudinal study was to prevent and/or delay cognitive decline, and help maintain the independence and wellbeing of elders by using a web-based social network platform, enhanced with devices to detect users´ states and collect activity data. The idea is that an active lifestyle rich in social interactions, active engagement and mental training with videogames may mitigate age-related decline and reduce healthcare costs. The innovative applications and the videogame training approach developed in the study could have wide application for a large number of European older adults living alone. The effectiveness of the ICT solution is being assessed throughout the project with user and control groups in Spain, Sweden and Greece. User interviews, extensive psychological testing and on-going cognitive and fMRI experiments are being conducted.. The results have shown so far that the users improved in cognitive performance compared to controls on the MMSE. Well-being assessed with the SPF-IL Scale also showed an improvement in the Status dimension of the users. This dimension assesses the feeling of being independent, self-realization and achievement. Exploring new ways to maintain the cognitive and functional state of older users is today a critical issue, for individuals, for families, and for whole societies. The study has shown the positive potential of new interactive technologies to maintain mental health and independent living in the elderly. Computer technology and cognitive training can increase social integration and provide mental stimulation for older adults living alone.

  • 3. Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Mayas, Julia
    Prieto, Antonio
    Toril, Pilar
    Pita, Carmen
    Ponce de Leon, Laura
    Reales, Jose
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up2015In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 7, UNSP 45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616)investigated the maintenance of training effects of 20 1-hr non-action video gametraining sessions with selected games from a commercial package on several agedecliningcognitive functions and subjective wellbeing after a 3-month no-contactperiod. Two groups of cognitively normal older adults participated in both the posttraining(posttest) and the present follow-up study, the experimental group who receivedtraining and the control group who attended several meetings with the research teamduring the study but did not receive training. Groups were similar at baseline ondemographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. Significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group had been previously found at posttest, in processing speed, attention and visual recognition memory, as well as in two dimensions of subjective wellbeing. In the current study, improvement from baseline to 3 months follow-up was found only in wellbeing (Affection and Assertivity dimensions) in the trained group whereas there was no change in the control group. Previous significant improvements in processing speed, attentionand spatial memory become nonsignificant after the 3-month interval. Training olderadults with non-action video games enhanced aspects of cognition just after training butthis effect disappeared after a 3-month no-contact follow-up period. Cognitive plasticitycan be induced in older adults by training, but to maintain the benefits periodic boosting sessions would be necessary.

  • 4. Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Prieto, Antonio
    Mayas, Julia
    Pilar, Toril
    Ponce De León Romero, Laura
    Reales, José Manuel
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Corrigendum: brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial2015In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 7, 82Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Prieto, Antonio
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Mayes, Julia
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Toril, Pilar
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Pita, Carmen
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Ponce de León, Laura
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Reales, José
    Studies on Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group, Department of Basic Psychology II, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Brain training with non-action video games enhances aspects of cognition in older adults: a randomized controlled trial2014In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 6, 277- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related cognitive and brain declines can result in functional deterioration in many cognitive domains, dependency, and dementia. A major goal of aging research is to investigate methods that help to maintain brain health, cognition, independent living and wellbeing in older adults. This randomized controlled study investigated the effects of 20 1-hr non-action video game training sessions with games selected from a commercially available package (Lumosity) on a series of age-declined cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing. Two groups of healthy older adults participated in the study, the experimental group who received the training and the control group who attended two meetings with the research team along the study. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. All participants were assessed individually before and after the intervention, or a similar period of time, using neuropsychological tests and laboratory tasks to investigate possible transfer effects. The results showed significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group, in processing speed (choice reaction time), attention (reduction of distraction and increase of alertness), immediate and delayed visual recognition memory, as well as a trend to improve in Affection and Assertivity, two dimensions of the Wellbeing Scale. Visuospatial working memory (WM) and executive control (shifting strategy) did not improve. Overall, the current results support the idea that training healthy older adults with non-action video games will enhance some cognitive abilities but not others.

  • 6. Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Sebastian, M
    Toril, P
    Mayas, J
    Reales, J
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Cognitive enrichment effects in aging: Can new information technology and networking preserve and enhance cognitive functions and wellbeing of older adults?2011In: 7th Congress of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Toril, Pilar
    Mayas, Julia
    Reales, José M.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    An ICT-mediated social network in support of successful ageing2014In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 13, no 1, 37-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The idea is that an active lifestyle rich in social interactions and active engagement may mitigate age-related decline and reduce healthcare costs. The main aim of the AGNES project was to investigate the potential of new Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environments to help maintain the independence and wellbeing of elders. The innovative applications developed in this research project could have wide application for a large number of older adults living alone.  Method We used a web-based social network platform, enhanced with devices to detect users´ states and collect activity data. The effectiveness of the ICT-based solution was assessed throughout the project with user and control groups in Spain, Sweden and Greece. User interviews and psychological testing were conducted at the beginning of the project and after a year of deployment of the equipment. Both groups completed the same assessment protocol. Results & discussion We found that only the user group showed an improvement from pretest to posttest in the affective dimension of the wellbeing SPF-IL scale. This dimension relates to the degree of confidence, social acceptance, and level of satisfaction with the people around them. Exploring new ways to maintain the cognitive and functional state of older users is today a critical issue, for individuals, their families, and for whole societies. The study suggests the potential of AGNES to improve older adults’ perceived wellbeing. However, more research may be needed to determine if AGNES is a tool to maintain mental health and independent living in older adults, especially those with MCI.

  • 8. Ballesteros, Soledad
    et al.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mayas, Julia
    Reales, Jose
    Sebastian, Manuel
    The role of information computer technology and networking in healthy aging2011In: Supplement to Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, Vol. 23, no 1, 113-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Carús, Juan Luis
    et al.
    García, Sonia
    García, Rodrigo
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Erdt, Stefanie
    The ELF@Home project: elderly sELF-care based on sELF-check of health conditions and sELF-fitness at home2014In: Proceedings of pHealth 2014: 11th International Conference on Wearable Micro and Nano Technologies for Personalized Health, Vienna, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ELF@Home project is a research and innovation project running from June 1st 2013 to May 31st 2016 and co-funded by the Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme (AAL JP) and National Authorities in Spain, Sweden and Germany. The ELF@Home project relies in the use of the proven advantages of elderly fitness to develop a self-care solution based on self-check of health conditions and self-fitness at home. The project uses information and communication technologies (ICT) to build an autonomous fitness system targeting healthy or pre-frail elder people aged over 65 and living independently at home.

  • 10. Chignell, Mark
    et al.
    Hosono, Naotsune
    Fels, Deborah
    Lottridge, Danielle
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Responsive interfaces: Mobility, emotion and universality2009In: Interact 2009: Research & Practice, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Fallman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dealing with User Experience and Affective Evaluation in HCI Design: A Repertory Grid Approach2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jalkanen, Kalle
    Lörstad, Henrik
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Westling, Jonas
    The Reality Helmet: A Wearable Interactive Experience2003In: Proceedings of Siggraph 2003: Sketches & Applications, San Diego, CA, July 27-31, New York: ACM Press , 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Waterworth, J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Dealing with User Experience and Affective Evaluation in HCI Design: A Repertory Grid Approach2005In: CHI 2005: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Capturing user experiences of mobile information technology with the repertory grid technique2010In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 6, no 2, 250-268 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the application of the repertory grid technique (RGT) as a tool for capturing the user experience of technological artifacts. In noting the artificiality of assessing the emotional impact of interactive artifacts in isolation from cognitive judgments, we argue that HCI techniques must provide practical solutions regarding how to assess the holistic meaning of users’ interactive experiences. RGT is a candidate for this role. This paper takes the reader step by step through setting up, conducting, and analyzing a RGT study. RGT is a technique on the border between qualitative and quantitative research, unique in that it respects the wholeness of cognition and does not separate the intellectual from the emotional aspects of the user experience. Compared to existing methods in HCI, RGT has the advantage of treating experiences holistically, while also providing a degree of quantitative precision and generalizability in their capture.

  • 15. Helgason, I.
    et al.
    Smyth, M.
    McCall, R.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The body and the urban space2009In: European Future Technologies Conference: Science beyond fiction. Prague, 21-23 April, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Pesola, Ulla-Maija
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Tools, Perspectives and Avatars in Blended Reality Space2009In: Annual Review of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine 2009: Advanced Technologies in the Behavioral, Social and Neurosciences / [ed] Brenda K Wiederhold and Giuseppe Riva, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2009, 91-95 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blended Reality Space is our term for an interactive mixed-reality environment where the physical and the virtual are intimately combined ill the service of interaction goals and communication environments aimed at health support and rehabilitation. The present study examines the effect on rated presence and self-presence of three key factors in the way blended realities may be implemented for these purposes. Our findings emphasize the importance of tangibility for presence, but suggest that presence and self-presence are unrelated phenomena. These findings will be incorporated into design principles for our planned work to develop free movement-based interactions for motor rehabilitation as well as blended-reality spaces for collaboration between hospitals, care organizations, and the home.

  • 17.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Effective collaboration for healthcare by bridging the reality gap across media-physical spaces2008In: PETRA: 1st International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments,: Athens, July 2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hoshi, Kei
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Tangible presence in blended reality space2009In: Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Workshop on Presence, 2009, 1-10 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss issues relating to presence arising from the recent evolution of tangible interaction techniques as an alternative interaction paradigm to the familiar WIMP-based Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The intersection of sensory, cognitive and also emotional aspects in such interfaces takes us a significant step further than GUI techniques. We introduce our concept of Tangible Presence in Blended Reality Space, and its study as an emerging weaving of HCI and presence research. An experimental study is then described, which examined the influence of three key factors in the way blended realities may be implemented: tangibility, viewpoint and avatar identity. The study examined the effect of manipulations of these factors on rated presence and self-presence. Our findings emphasize the importance of tangibility for presence, but suggest that presence and self-presence are unrelated phenomena. Finally, as critical concerns in future work to design and implement blended reality spaces for a variety of purposes, context sensitivity and usability issues are discussed.

  • 19.
    Lindh Waterworth, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Augustsson, Nils-Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Game of memories2004In: Proceedings of WWCS: 7th International Conference on Work with Computing Systems, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20. Peter, Christian
    et al.
    Kreiner, Andreas
    Schröter, Martin
    Bieber, Gerald
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The AGNES System for Ambient Social Interaction2012In: PETRA 2012: 5th Workshop on Affect and Behaviour Related Assistance, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the AGNES system, a technology for connecting people at home with their social network be means of off-the-shelf sensing devices and an Internet-based social network. The system provides the user with relevant information of the network by use of traditional information and communication technology as well as dedicated ambient and tangible devices. We describe briefly the requirements on such technology that were elaborated in the frame of the AGNES project, and give an overview of the system developed.

  • 21.
    Peter, Christian
    et al.
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Kreiner, Andreas
    Modernfamilies.net GmbH, Linz, Austria.
    Schröter, Martin
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Kim, Hyosun
    Graz University ofTechnology, Inffeldgasse 16c, 8010 Graz, Austria.
    Beiber, Gerald
    Fraunhofer IGD, Rostock, Germany.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Hoshi, Kei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Ballesteros, Soladad
    Facultad de Psicologia, UNED, Madrid, Spain.
    AGNES: connecting people in a multimodal way2013In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 7, no 3, 229-245 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western societies are confronted with a number of challenges caused by the increasing number of older citizens. One important aspect is the need and wish of older people to live as long as possible in their own home and maintain an independent life. As people grew older, their social networks disperse, with friends and families moving to other parts of town, other cities or even countries. Additionally, people become less mobile with age, leading to less active participation in societal life. Combined, this normal, age-related development leads to increased loneliness and social isolation of older people, with negative effects on mental and physical health of those people. In the AGNES project, a home-based system has been developed that allows connecting elderly with their families, friends and other significant people over the Internet. As most older people have limited experience with computers and often special requirements on technology, one focus of AGNES was to develop with the users novel technological means for interacting with their social network. The resulting system uses ambient displays, tangible interfaces and wearable devices providing ubiquitous options for interaction with the network, and secondary sensors for additionally generating carefully chosen information on the person to be relayed to significant persons. Evaluations show that the chosen modalities for interaction are well adopted by the users. Further it was found that use of the AGNES system had positive effects on the mental state of the users, compared to the control group without the technology.

  • 22. Peter, Christian
    et al.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lindh Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Voskamp, Jörg
    Sensing Mood to Counteract Dementia2007In: International Workshop on Pervasive Technologies for the support of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Preziosa, A
    et al.
    Grassi, A
    Villani, D
    Mantovani, F
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Freeman, J
    Riva, G
    Mobile Narratives to Improve the Quality of Life: An Experimental Research2005In: CyberTherapy 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Riva, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Mantovani, Fabiizia
    Lindh Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Intention, action, self and other: an evolutionary model of presence2015In: Immersed in media: telepresence theory, measurement & technology / [ed] Matthew Lombard, Frank Biocca, Jonathan Freeman, Wijnand IJsselsteijn, Rachel J. Schaevitz, New York: Springer, 2015, 73-99 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term "presence" entered in the wide scientific debate in 1992 when Sheridan and Furness used it in the title of a new journal dedicated to the study of virtual reality systems and teleoperations: Presence, Teleoperators and Virtual Environments. Following this approach, the term "presence" has been used to describe a widely re-ported sensation experienced during the use of virtual reality. The main limitation of this vision is what is not said. What is presence for? Is it a specific cognitive process? To answer to these questions, a second group of researchers considers presence as a broad psychological phenomenon, not necessarily linked to the experience of a medium, whose goal is the control of the individual and social activity. In this chapter we support this second vision, starting from the following broad statements: (a) the psychology of presence is related to human action and its organization in the environment; (b) the psychology of presence is related to the body and to the embodiment process; (c) presence is an evolved process related to the understanding and management of the causal texture of both the physical and social worlds. In the following paragraphs we will justify these claims and underline their relevance for the design and usage of interactive technologies.

  • 25. Riva, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Being Present in a Virtual World2013In: The Oxford handbook of virtuality / [ed] Mark Grimshaw, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, 205-221 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the concept of presence in a virtual world. It discusses recent findings of cognitive sciences research to offer a broader definition of presence. It suggests that presence is not the same as consciousness and discusses the three critical features of presence that cannot be explained by other cognitive processes. These include the ability of presence to allow the evolution of the self through the incorporation of tools and the role of presence in providing feedback to the self about the status of its activity. This chapter also explains that presence is an intuitive process.

  • 26. Riva, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Murray, Dianne
    Interacting with Presence: HCI and the sense of presence in computer-mediated environments2014 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our experience of using and interacting with the newest computer information technologies is profoundly affected by the extent to which we feel ourselves to be really ‘present’ in the computer-mediated world that the technology makes available to us. This feeling, which is described as 'Presence’, is the “feeling of being inside the mediated world”. It is a crucial and increasingly necessary element in both design and usage of many recent and developing interactive technologies. In the same way that ‘feeling present’, or consciously ‘being there’, in the physical world around us is based upon perception, physical action and activity in that world, so the feeling of presence in a technologically-mediated environment is a function of the possibilities for interaction. Unlike the physical world, the extent to which presence is experienced in an interactive context can be manipulated by design. For example, by linking the display of appropriate information directly to movements of the body of the interacting person, the illusion of flying, or swimming underwater, or walking in a wide variety or seemingly-real places – all actually generated by the technology. Interacting with Presence provides an introduction and overview of the increasingly important topic of mediated presence or tele-presence – which is the compelling illusion of being physically located in a computer-generated or augmented world. This timely edited volume presents a range of theoretic perspectives and empirical evidence casting new light on understanding and designing for presence in interaction. Because of its experiential impact on the user, presence is emerging as a key concept for understanding and predicting developments in diverse areas such as interactive entertainment, gaming, psychotherapy, education, scientific visualization, sports training and rehabilitation, and many more.

  • 27. Riva, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Murray, Dianne
    Introduction: editor's introduction to interacting with presence2014In: Interacting with presence: HCI and the sense of presence in computer-mediated environments / [ed] Riva, G., Waterworth, J. A. & Murray, D., Warsaw: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, 1-8 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume arose from a longstanding conviction that our subjective experienceof information technology is profoundly affected by the extent to which we feelourselves to be really present in the mediated worlds that the technology makesavailable to us. ‘Presence’ is just this “feeling of being inside the mediated world”.It is a crucial and increasingly necessary element in both design and usage ofmany recent and developing interactive technologies. In the same way that ‘feelingpresent’, or consciously ‘being there’, in the physical world around us is based uponperception, physical action and activity in that world, so the feeling of presencein a technologically-mediated environment is a function of the possibilities forinteraction.

  • 28.
    Riva, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Applied Technology for Neuro-Psychology Lab. – ATN-P Lab., Istituto Auxologico Italiano, I-20149, Milan, Italy.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mantovani, Fabrizia
    From intention to action: the role of presence2011In: New ideas in psychology, ISSN 0732-118X, E-ISSN 1873-3522, Vol. 29, no 1, 24-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research in neuroscience has tried to understand human action from two different but converging perspectives: the cognitive and the volitional. On one side, cognitive studies analyze how action is planned and controlled in response to environmental conditions. On the other side, volitional studies analyze how action is planned and controlled by a subject's needs, motives and goals. In this paper we suggest that the notion of presence may be the missing link between these two approaches, explaining how can we differentiate between perception, action and concepts.

    In particular, a consideration of presence can explain how can we distinguish between a perceived action, a planned or an executed one. We argue that the evolutionary role of presence is the control of agency through the unconscious separation of “internal” and “external” and the enaction/reenaction of intentions.

    The model makes sense in terms of evolutionary psychology and is beginning to be supported by evidence of the neural and other physical correlates of action, imitation and self-monitoring. Another strength of this model is that it provides testable predictions about how to improve the experience of presence in media: maximal presence in a mediated experience arises from an optimal combination of form and content, able to support the intentions of the user.

  • 29. Villani, D
    et al.
    Riva, F
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Freeman, J
    Riva, G
    Virtual Reality to Reduce Anxiety in Healthy Populations: The Relaxation Island2005In: CyberTherapy 2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Häggqvist, M
    Jalkanen, K
    Olsson, S
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Antonsson, E
    Chapman, K
    Keogh, E
    Freeman, J
    Eyes Open or Closed: is a virtual beach more relaxing than an imagined beach?2004In: Proceedings of Design and Emotion: Ankara, Turkey, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing EmoHCI: Emotions and presence in HCI2005In: BCS HCI2005: The Bigger Picture, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today emotions are more accepted as an important ingredient of human life. Several studies show that emotions play a vital role in almost everything we do, for example in cognitive functions, such as rational decision making and learning, as well as in perception.

  • 32.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing IT for Older People2006In: eChallenges, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    ELITE design: IT for the elderly2005In: BCS HCI2005: The Bigger Picture, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The ELITE approach to designing IT for the elderly2006In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, Vol. 5, no 2, 99-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce the MAMA (Mobile Augmented Memory Aid) project, during which we gradually evolved a design approach that we call ELITE. MAMA was focused on older people with some kind of memory and associated communication problems, living in residential homes. The overall goal of the project was to examine how information and communication technology can best be used to support and improve memory and communication capacity in senior users, and in the process provide an aid to sensory and social stimulation. We briefly describe the hardware and software prototypes that have resulted so far, during which process the ELITE approach was evolved. We then present the ELITE design principles developed during the project, as a general approach to designing technology for older users. Note that in this paper, the term ELITE refers only to these design principles and should not be confused with any other organisation or company with a similar name.

  • 35.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Presence of Emotion: Designing the Feeling of Being There in Interactive Media Experiences2006In: Design and Emotion, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss key psychological factors relevant to the design of interactive experiences with intended specific emotional impacts: the sense of presence, reality judgement, and awareness of the need for embodied responses. The extent to which a participant experiences a sense of presence (the feeling of being there) within an external environment is particularly important, but is complicated by the fact that mediated experiences are influenced by many other factors, including mental media schemata, which vary across cultures, across historical timescales, and within and between individuals. We expand on these factors in relation to three example interactive environments, each designed to invoke specific emotional responses and types of experience.

  • 36.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing IT for Older People2006In: Exploiting the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications and Case Studies, PTS 1 AND 2, IOS Press, 2006, 1523-1530 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people are largely excluded from the use of new information and communication technology (IT), a fact which contributes to the tendency for them to become socially isolated and under-stimulated TO understand any group of users, the design team needs to get to know them. Spending time with older people, especially observing and participating in their normal social activities, provides many clues on which to base design decisions. Older people with memory problems often cannot learn new skills, or at least cannot retain them. However, longstanding knowledge remains. For this reason, a design based around an interaction metaphor from earlier technology can prove effective. We briefly introduce the MAMA (Mobile Augmented Memory Aid) project, and describe the hardware and software prototypes that have resulted so tar. We go on to present Five design principles developed during the project, as a general approach to designing technology for older users. We indicate future work and how our approach can be applied more generally in the area of eInclusion.

  • 37.
    Waterworth, Eva Lindh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Markus, Häggqvist
    Jalkanen, Kalle
    Olsson, Sandra
    Wimelius, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Yttergren, Björn
    Mood Devices: Interactive media and mental health2004In: E-Society 2004 : proceedings of the IADIS International Conference, Ávila, Spain, July 16-19, 2004, IADIS Press, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce Mood Devices, interactive digital media and environments designed to alter the inter-actor’s psychological state. In particular, we describe three very different virtual reality (VR) environments: Relaxation Island, the Exploratorium, and the Achievement Room, developed with our partners as part of the EMMA (Engaging Media for Mental Health) project. Relaxation Island is designed to support established relaxation techniques, as part of interventions to assist individuals cope with specific anxieties such as examination stress. The Achievement Room gives users with chronic restricted mobility the opportunity to sing and play in a virtual concert, in front of an audience of avatars programmed to respond to their performance. The aim is to provide a sense of achievement and encourage a more positive attitude. The Exploratorium, as the name suggests, takes a more user-directed approach: It provides an environment that can be explored in an embodied way, with three specific zones designed to elicited widely different moods. All three environments can be run on a range of platforms, from high-end immersive VR, to pocket-sized PDAs and web-based applications. We see such interactive media as providing an important contribution to the future of ehealth programmes.

  • 38.
    Waterworth, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing ICT for the over 80s2010In: Dementia, design and technology: Time to get involved, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2010, 2, 125-137 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many older people (over 80 years) are excluded from the use of new information and communication technology (ICT) because of the prevalence of mild to moderate memory problems in this group. This is a factor which contributes to the tendency for them to become socially isolated and mentally under-stimulated and inactive, a situation which may exacerbate dementia and associated cognitive impairment. To understand any group of users, the design team needs to get to know them. Spending time with members of this particular group, and especially observing and participating in their normal social activities, provides many unexpected insights on which to base design decisions. Older people with mild to moderate cognitive impairment often cannot learn new skills, or at least cannot retain them. However, longstanding knowledge generally remains. For this reason, a design based around an interaction metaphor from earlier technology can prove effective. We introduce the MAMA (Mobile Augmented Memory Aid) project, aimed at older users with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. We describe the hardware and software prototypes that have resulted so far. We go on to present five design principles developed during the project, and suggest that these may serve as a general approach to designing technology for older people. We indicate future work and how our approach can be applied more generally.

  • 39.
    Waterworth, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mediated presence in the future2010In: Immersed in Media: Telepresence in Everyday Life / [ed] Cheryl Campanella Bracken, Paul Skalski, London: Routledge , 2010, 1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Waterworth, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Peter, Christian
    Ballesteros, Soledad
    Seniors in charge of ICT innovation2012In: Petra 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the user-driven AGNES project (aal-2008-1-014). The project has three user groups, one in each of Sweden, Spain andGreece, who have participated as full members of the project team. The method used for developing this novel ICT was an extension of the ELITE design approach for user driven innovation. The results presented in the paper are on how theusers’ attitudes changed during the project due to their having theexpert role in the development process and how they accepted andacted in that role. To start with, the elderly users were very polite, often negative about and frightened of technology. Some did not have a computer of their own and did not have any or much experiences of new communication technologies. During theproject the users were introduced to an interactive social network, generated design ideas for new ICT and also tested ICT solutions related to using the social network and connected devices. Thepaper gives examples of how the user attitudes towards technology changes during the project and discusses how theybecame true experts able to express their knowledge and in thatway exert control over the technical design in the project. The result is that the users have become bold, good at expressing theirknowledge, and good at marketing the project and the use oftechnology to other people, and in the process increasing theirsocial life both on the net and in the physical world.

  • 41.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Improving quality of life for elderly people living alone: state detection : ambient interaction : social networking :2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Information technology, the sense of presence, and the evolution of the conscious self2008In: Toward a Science of Consciousness, Tucson 2008., 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Is HCI spiralling out of control (and does it matter?)2006In: Interfaces: BCS HCI Group Newsletter, Vol. 66, no Spring, 6-7 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Altered, expanded and distributed embodiment: three transit points to Human-Computer Confluence2012Other (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Some experiences with interregional EU funding in Västerbotten2010In: Are EU innovation and research policies making a difference in regions of the Baltic Sea area, 2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Supporting the elderly with new interactive technology in their homes2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the AGNES project, illustrating the design and development of new information technologies to stimulate and support the elderly in their everyday lives. The aim was to provide a feeling of connectedness and safety, sensory stimulation and an increased social network. AGNES provided user-sensitive home-based ICT-environments capable of detecting, communicating and responding to the elderly person’s needs and daily activities.

    The approach included the unobtrusive detection of user states and activities, based on inexpensive mass-market components such as web-cams and mobile phones; a social networking technology platform specifically designed to meet the needs of, and be usable by, the elderly person, and providing the communications channel through which people and applications communicate; and ambient interaction devices for the display of information and events and for easy interaction with the home-based system and connected others.

    For the success and relevance of such a project, it is vital to include the elderly users as active members of the project, and we outline our approach to this with user groups in Sweden, Spain and Greece.

    AGNES is a first step in demonstrating that integrated innovative ICT solutions can produce beneficial effects on the cognitive wellbeing of elderly people by preventing social isolation and mental deterioration.

  • 47.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The AGNES project: Elderly users as co-designers of supportive ICT2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The AGNES project, started in September 2009, has developed user-sensitive home-based ICT-environments capable of detecting, communicating and responding to the elderly person’s needs and their daily activities. Throughout the project, we have included target elderly users as active members in the design and evaluation of the technology, with user groups in Sweden, Spain and Greece. The purpose of the technology that was developed and installed in users’ homes was to provide a feeling of connectedness and safety, sensory stimulation and an increased social network. The AGNES approach includes the unobtrusive detection of user states and activities, based on inexpensive mass-market components such as web-cams and mobile phones; a social networking technology platform specifically designed to meet the needs of, and be usable by, the elderly person, and which provides the communications channel through which people and applications communicate; and ambient interaction devices for the display of information and events and for easy interaction with the home-based system and connected others. AGNES is a first step in demonstrating that integrated innovative ICT solutions can produce beneficial effects on the cognitive wellbeing of elderly people by preventing social isolation and mental deterioration. The AGNES approach and our results to date will be described in the presentation

  • 48.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    The Self, the Cyborg, and the Other: (invited keynote address)2007In: PEACH (Presence Research in Action) Summer School, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Waterworth, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    User involvement in the innovation process: The AGNES project2010In: ICT 2010: Digitally Driven, Brussels: European Commission , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Waterworth, John A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Waterworth, Eva L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Presence in the Future2008In: Presence 2008: Proceedings of the 11th International Workshopon Presence / [ed] Anna Spagnolli and Luciano Gamberini, Padova: HT Lab, University of Padova , 2008, 1, 61-65 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We view the sense of presence as being the result of an evolved neuropsychological process, created through the evolution of the central nervous system, and which solves a key problem for an organism’s survival: how to differentiate between the internal (the self) and the external (the other). When we experience strong mediated presence, our experience is that the technology has become part of the self, and the mediated reality part of the other. There is no attentional effort of access to information. We can perceive and often act directly, as if unmediated. The rapidly developing phenomena of mediated presence point beyond the replacement of the world with virtual other worlds, and towards dynamically changing relationships between self (and selves) and others. We discuss the implications these developments for the future of the sense of presence and of presence research.

12 1 - 50 of 65
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