umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Assi, Nada
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Thomas, Duncan C.
    Leitzmann, Michael
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Chajès, Véronique
    Philip, Thierry
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bamia, Christina
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Molinuevo, Amaia
    Boshuizen, Hendriek
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kühn, Tilman
    Travis, Ruth
    Overvad, Kim
    Riboli, Elio
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Jenab, Mazda
    Viallon, Vivian
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Metabolic signature of healthy lifestyle and its relation with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in a large European cohort2018In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 117-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies using metabolomic data have identified metabolites from several compound classes that are associated with disease-related lifestyle factors.

    Objective: In this study, we identified metabolic signatures reflecting lifestyle patterns and related them to the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

    Design: Within a nested case-control study of 147 incident HCC cases and 147 matched controls, partial least squares (PLS) analysis related 7 modified healthy lifestyle index (HLI) variables (diet, BMI, physical activity, lifetime alcohol, smoking, diabetes, and hepatitis) to 132 targeted serum-measured metabolites and a liver function score. The association between the resulting PLS scores and HCC risk was examined in multivariable conditional logistic regression models, where ORs and 95% CIs were computed.

    Results: The lifestyle component's PLS score was negatively associated with lifetime alcohol, BMI, smoking, and diabetes, and positively associated with physical activity. Its metabolic counterpart was positively related to the metabolites sphingomyelin (SM) (OH) C14:1, C16:1, and C22:2, and negatively related to glutamate, hexoses, and the diacyl-phosphatidylcholine PC aaC32:1. The lifestyle and metabolomics components were inversely associated with HCC risk, with the ORs for a 1-SD increase in scores equal to 0.53 (95% CI: 0.38, 0.74) and 0.28 (0.18, 0.43), and the associated AUCs equal to 0.64 (0.57, 0.70) and 0.74 (0.69, 0.80), respectively.

    Conclusions: This study identified a metabolic signature reflecting a healthy lifestyle pattern which was inversely associated with HCC risk. The metabolic profile displayed a stronger association with HCC than did the modified HLI derived from questionnaire data. Measuring a specific panel of metabolites may identify strata of the population at higher risk for HCC and can add substantial discrimination compared with questionnaire data. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03356535.

  • 2. Assi, Nada
    et al.
    Thomas, Duncan C.
    Leitzmann, Michael
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Chajès, Véronique
    Philip, Thierry
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bamia, Christina
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Sandanger, Torkjel M.
    Molinuevo, Amaia
    Boshuizen, Hendriek C.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Kühn, Tilman
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Riboli, Elio
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Jenab, Mazda
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Viallon, Vivian
    Are Metabolic Signatures Mediating the Relationship between Lifestyle Factors and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Risk? Results from a Nested Case–Control Study in EPIC2018In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 531-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The "meeting-in-the-middle" (MITM) is a principle to identify exposure biomarkers that are also predictors of disease. The MITM statistical framework was applied in a nested case-control study of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), where healthy lifestyle index (HLI) variables were related to targeted serum metabolites.

    Methods: Lifestyle and targeted metabolomic data were available from 147 incident HCC cases and 147 matched controls. Partial least squares analysis related 7 lifestyle variables from a modified HLI to a set of 132 serum-measured metabolites and a liver function score. Mediation analysis evaluated whether metabolic profiles mediated the relationship between each lifestyle exposure and HCC risk.

    Results: Exposure-related metabolic signatures were identified. Particularly, the body mass index (BMI)-associated metabolic component was positively related to glutamic acid, tyrosine, PC aaC38:3, and liver function score and negatively to lysoPC aC17:0 and aC18:2. The lifetime alcohol-specific signature had negative loadings on sphingomyelins (SM C16:1, C18:1, SM(OH) C14:1, C16:1 and C22:2). Both exposures were associated with increased HCC with total effects (TE) = 1.23 (95% confidence interval = 0.93-1.62) and 1.40 (1.14-1.72), respectively, for BMI and alcohol consumption. Both metabolic signatures mediated the association between BMI and lifetime alcohol consumption and HCC with natural indirect effects, respectively, equal to 1.56 (1.24-1.96) and 1.09 (1.03-1.15), accounting for a proportion mediated of 100% and 24%.

    Conclusions: In a refined MITM framework, relevant metabolic signatures were identified as mediators in the relationship between lifestyle exposures and HCC risk.

    Impact: The understanding of the biological basis for the relationship between modifiable exposures and cancer would pave avenues for clinical and public health interventions on metabolic mediators.

  • 3. Klemmensen, Børge
    et al.
    Pedersen, Sofie
    Rydén, Lars
    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Kasper R.
    Marklund, Anneli
    Umeå University.
    Environmental Policy: Legal and Economic Instruments2007 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Marklund, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Levels and sources of organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in indoor and outdoor environments2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global consumption of organophosphate esters (OPs), which are used as flame retardants and plasticizers, is rapidly increasing. Their use as additives in diverse applications poses a risk as they may be emitted from the products they are added to and be further transported in the environment. Therefore, the levels, distribution, and possible sources of 15 OPs, some of which are reported to be toxic, were investigated in indoor and outdoor environments. An exposure assessment was performed, and the exposure to OPs via inhalation was examined for five occupational groups. In addition, based on the findings of the studies, the total flow of OPs in Sweden was estimated.

    In indoor environments, the OPs detected in air and dust varied between the sites, but generally reflected the building materials, furniture etc. used in the premises. A majority of the analysed OPs were detected in all samples, and public buildings tended to have higher levels than domestic buildings. The chlorinated OPs dominated in indoor air and wipe samples from vehicles. They were also abundant in the dust samples. Some occupational groups were significantly more exposed to OPs than others. Aircraft technicians, for example, were exposed to about 500 times more tributyl phosphate than day care centre personnel.

    Upon domestic and industrial cleaning, OPs are discharged with the wastewater via the sewage system to sewage treatment plants (STPs). Irrespective of the size of the STPs investigated, they had similar levels of OPs in their influents, indicating that products containing OPs are widely used by the communities they serve. In some cases, it was possible to trace elevated levels of individual OPs to specific sources. The OPs were poorly removed from the wastewater, and the chlorinated OPs especially tended to pass through the STPs without being removed or degraded. Thus, levels of OPs in their effluents were also similar, as were the levels in their sludge. Of the total amounts of OPs entering the STPs, 50% was emitted to the recipients via the effluent. Hence, there is room for significant improvement in the treatment processes. Carps living in a pond, receiving STP effluent were found to contain relatively high levels of OPs compared to perch collected in lakes from background locations.

    Air and road traffic were also identified as sources of OPs: the concentration of total OPs in snow samples decreased with increasing distance from a major road intersection, and OPs were detected in aircraft lubricants and hydraulic fluids and in waste oil from cars and lorries. OPs are emitted from both diffuse and direct sources to the environment and may then be spread by long-range air transport, rivers and streams. This probably explains why OPs were also detected in air and fish from background locations.

    Finally, OPs are ubiquitous substances in both indoor and outdoor environments. The possibility that prolonged exposure to OPs at the levels found may cause adverse effects, for instance in aqueous organisms, cannot be excluded. For example, the OP levels in snow were of the same magnitude as reported effect concentrations. Similarly, in some premises, indoor exposure to OPs was close to the suggested guideline value. However, since these studies include only a limited number of samples, and data regarding the health and environmental effects of OPs are sparse, no definitive conclusions regarding their possible environmental effects can be drawn.

  • 5.
    Marklund, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Barbro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments2005In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 814-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 mu g kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 mu g kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively.

  • 6.
    Marklund, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Barbro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in Swedish sewage treatment plants2005In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 39, no 19, p. 7423-7429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The levels, distribution, and possible sources of 12 organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers, some of which are reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms, were investigated in samples of influents, effluents, and sludge from 11 Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs). The organophosphorus compounds (OPs) studied were poorly removed from the wastewater; especially the chlorinated OPs tended to pass through the STPs without being removed or degraded, while alkyl-OPs, such as tributyl phosphate (TBP), were more successfully removed. In both influents and effluents, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate and TBP were the most prominent substances followed by tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP). The highest concentration of any individual OP detected in the influents was 52 mu g L-1 (TBP). Ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate and TCPP dominated in all sludge samples. A budget calculation comparing the annual amount of OPs in the influent received by Swedish STPs with the known amount of OPs imported indicated that approximately 15% is emitted to STPs. Of the total amount of OPs reaching the STPs annually, 49% is degraded, 50% (27 tons) is emitted to the recipients, and only 1% ends up in the sludge. The concentrations of most OPs were quite similar among the sampled STPs, indicating that the data may be applicable in other STPs.

  • 7.
    Marklund, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Barbro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Screening of organophosphorus compounds and their distribution in various indoor environments2003In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 53, no 9, p. 1137-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twelve organophosphorus compounds (OPs), which are used for diverse purposes (e.g. as plasticizers and flame retardants), were analysed in settled house dust from 15 indoor environments and in wipe test samples from computer screens and covers. Seven of the substances analysed dominated Swedish imports of OPs in 1999, six of these are also listed as EU High Production Volume Chemicals. Eight of the substances were found in all samples. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate was the most abundant in most of the samples, with levels ranging from 0.014 to 5.3 g/kg followed by tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate, tris(chloropropyl)phosphate and tris(1,3-dichloropropyl)phosphate. In wipe test samples from computers, triphenyl phosphate proved to be the main component of the OPs analysed (4.0 μg/m2). Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, floor polish, polyvinylchloride floor coverings, upholstery and plastic products. The distribution patterns of the OPs differed between the sites and generally reflected the building materials and consumer products used in their vicinity.

  • 8.
    Marklund, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Barbro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    The Distribution of Organophosphorus Compounds in Various Indoor Environments2003In: Organohalogen Compounds, Vol. 62, p. 367-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Marklund, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Barbro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Traffic as a Source of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants and Plasticizers in Snow2005In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 3555-3562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Snow samples collected in northern Sweden at a road intersection and an airport indicated that traffic is a source of organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (OPs) in the outdoor environment. Analysis of snow samples taken at distances of 2, 100, and 250 m from the road intersection showed that the total amount of OPs declined as distance increased. Of the I I analyzed substances, tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) dominated in the snow samples from the intersection, with levels of 170, 130, and 110 ng/kg snow at distances of 2, 100, and 250 m. Similar amounts of TCPP were found at the airport (100220 ng/kg). These levels are approximately twice as high as the level found in the reference snow sample from a remote area (70 ng/kg). A possible explanation for the higher levels of TCPP found close to the road intersection is that it may be emitted from the interior of cars via their ventilation systems. Triphenyl phosphate (TPP) was identified in lubricants and in waste oil from vehicles, and thus, leakage of transmission and motor oils is a probable source of TPP found at the sampled sites. Ten OPs were detected in the three samples from the airport, of which tributyl phosphate (TBP) was the most abundant, at levels 3 orders of magnitude higher than in the reference sample, that is, 25 000 compared to 19 ng/kg. The main source of TBP at the airport was traced to aircraft hydraulic fluid. Analysis of background air and deposition samples indicated that some OPs are subject to long-range air transportation.

  • 10.
    Marklund Sundkvist, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in marine and fresh water biota and in human milk2010In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 943-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The levels and relative proportions of 11 organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (OPs), some of which are reportedly toxic to aquatic organisms, were investigated in human breast milk and samples of fish and mussels from Swedish lakes and coastal areas in order to assess spatial differences in environmental exposure and spatial and temporal differences in human exposure. Some of the biota samples were collected at locations with known potential sources of OPs, but most were collected in background locations. Tris-2-chloroisopropyl phosphate (TCPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) dominated in the biota with levels ranging from 170 to 770 ng g-1 for TCPP in perch and between 21 and 180 ng g-1 for TPP. In milk samples, TCPP (median 45 ng g-1) and tributyl phosphate (median 12 ng g(-1)) were the most frequently occurring OPs. Among samples of fish from background locations, the concentrations and profiles of most OPs were quite similar, indicating that their sources were diffuse. However, in fish from sample locations near known sources, there were marked differences in OP concentrations and profiles. Fish from a stream receiving surface water from Arlanda airport displayed high levels of OPs (10 200 ng g-1) that are commonly used in aircraft hydraulic fluids. Fish collected at points 1 or 2 km downstream of sewage treatment plants showed significantly higher levels of tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP), one of the most typically abundant OP in effluents from such plants. In the milk samples obtained from women in different towns no distinct differences were detected in OP concentrations or profiles. However, the levels of TBEP tended to be higher in milk collected 10 years ago than in milk collected more recently. However, human exposure to OPs through eating fish or to breastfeeding babies seems to be of minor importance in relation to other potential sources, such as indoor dust inhalation and ingestion.

  • 11.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Zingmark, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Löfgren Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Metabolic biomarkers and the risk of molecular subtypes of colorectal cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body fatness measured as high body mass index (BMI) increase the risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). The mechanisms behind the relationship are not fully understood, but might include insulin resistance and changes in adipokine concentrations produced by adipose tissue. Yet, associations between circulating biomarkers related to these mechanisms and CRC risk have been somewhat inconsistent, possibly due to CRC heterogeneity. To better understand the role of insulin resistance and adipokines in CRC development, we therefore investigated circulating biomarkers related to these mechanisms in relation to molecular subtypes of CRC.

    Methods: This was a prospective case-control study of 1010 cases and 1:1 matched controls nested within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS). Concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, adiponectin, and leptin were quantified in prediagnostic plasma using immunoassays and related to CRC and CRC subtypes defined by mutations in BRAF and KRAS, and microsatellite instability (MSI) status analyzed in tumor tissue. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CRC by metabolic biomarker levels were calculated with conditional logistic regression.

    Results: Higher C-peptide and lower adiponectin were associated with an increased CRC risk (ORs per 1 standard deviation increase (95% CI): 1.11 (1.01, 1.23) and 0.91 (0.83, 1.00), respectively). The associations were attenuated when adjusting for BMI (ORs (95% CI): 1.07 (0.96, 1.19) and 0.93 (0.84, 1.03), respectively), with the potential exception of the association of C-peptide in women. Circulating insulin and leptin were not associated with CRC risk. We found no clear differences in the association between any biomarkers and CRC risk by molecular subtypes defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation status (Pheterogeneity>0.6), or MSI status (Pheterogeneity>0.3).

    Conclusion: Circulating biomarkers of insulin resistance and adipokines were not associated with CRC or specific molecular subtypes of CRC defined by KRAS and BRAF mutation or MSI status.

  • 12.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Circulating levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation, an analysis of repeated samples from a population based cohort2019In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 649-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA methylation in blood may adapt to conditions affecting our health, such as inflammation, and multiple studies have identified differential DNA methylation related to smoking, obesity and various diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate previously reported, and explore possible new, associations between levels of inflammatory markers and DNA methylation in blood. We used a well-characterized study population consisting of 127 individuals, all of whom were participants in the population-based Vasterbotten Intervention Programme cohort and had provided two blood samples, ten years apart. Levels of CRP and 160 other proteins were measured in plasma, and DNA methylation levels (assessed using the 850K Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip) were measured in white blood cell DNA. Associations between CpG methylation and protein levels were estimated using linear mixed models. In the study we were able to confirm the direction for 85 of 102 previously reported protein-methylation associations. Depicting associations in a network allowed us to identify CpG sites with associations to multiple proteins, and ten CpG sites were each associated with three or more inflammatory markers. Furthermore, two genetic regions included nine additional unreported CpG sites that may represent trans-acting methylation sites. Our study supports a complex interaction between DNA methylation and circulating proteins involved in the inflammatory response. The notion of trans-acting methylation sites affecting, or being affected by, the expression of genes on completely different chromosomes should be taken into account when interpreting results from epigenome-wide association studies.

  • 13. Pawlas, Natalia
    et al.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Cerna, Milena
    Harari, Florencia
    Harari, Raul
    Horvat, Milena
    Hruba, Frantiska
    Koppova, Kvetoslava
    Krskova, Andrea
    Krsnik, Mladen
    Li, Yu-Feng
    Löfmark, Lina
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lundström, Nils-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lyoussi, Badiaa
    Markiewicz-Gorka, Iwona
    Mazej, Darja
    Osredkar, Josko
    Pawlas, Krystyna
    Rentschler, Gerda
    Spevackova, Vera
    Spiric, Zdravko
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Tratnik, Janja Snoj
    Vadla, Drazenka
    Zizi, Soumia
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Cadmium, mercury and lead in blood of urban women in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, China, Ecuador and Morocco2013In: International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, ISSN 1232-1087, E-ISSN 1896-494X, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 58-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to make an international comparison of blood levels of cadmium (B-Cd), lead (B-Pb) and mercury (B-Hg) of women in seven European, and three non-European cities, and to identify determinants. About 50 women (age: 46-62) from each city were recruited (totally 480) in 2006-2009. Interview and questionnaire data were obtained. Blood samples were analysed in one laboratory to avoid interlaboratory variation. Between the European cities, the B-Pb and B-Cd results vary little (range of geometric means: 13.5-27.0 mu g/l and 0.25-0.65 mu g/l, respectively); the variation of B-Hg was larger (0.40-1.38 mu g/l). Between the non-European cities the results for B-Pb, B-Cd and B-Hg were 19.2-68.0, 0.39-0.99 and 1.01-2.73 mu g/l, respectively. Smoking was a statistically significant determinant for B-Cd, while fish and shellfish intakes contributed to B-Hg and B-Pb, amalgam fillings also contributed to B-Hg. The present results confirm the previous results from children; the exposure to lead and cadmium varies only little between different European cities suggesting that other factors than the living area are more important. The study also confirms the previous findings of higher cadmium and lead levels in some non-European cities. The geographical variation for mercury is significant.

  • 14. Rentschler, Gerda
    et al.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Cerna, Milena
    Chen, Chunying
    Harari, Florencia
    Harari, Raúl
    Horvat, Milena
    Hruba, Frantiska
    Kasparova, Lucie
    Koppova, Kvetoslava
    Krskova, Andrea
    Krsnik, Mladen
    Laamech, Jawhar
    Li, Yu-Feng
    Löfmark, Lina
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lundström, Nils-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lyoussi, Badiaa
    Mazej, Darja
    Osredkar, Josko
    Pawlas, Krystyna
    Pawlas, Natalia
    Prokopowicz, Adam
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Snoj Tratnik, Janja
    Spevackova, Vera
    Spiric, Zdravko
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Vadla, Drazenka
    Wranova, Katerina
    Zizi, Soumia
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Platinum, palladium, rhodium, molybdenum and strontium in blood of urban women in nine countries2018In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 221, no 2, p. 223-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is little reliable information on human exposure to the metals platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), despite their use in enormous quantities in catalytic converters for automobile exhaust systems.

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate blood concentrations of Pt (B-Pt), Pd (B-Pd) and Rh (B-Rh) in women from six European and three non-European countries, and to identify potentially influential factors. In addition, molybdenum (Mo) and strontium (Sr) were analysed.

    METHODS: Blood from 248 women aged 47-61 was analysed by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry under strict quality control.

    RESULTS: The medians were: B-Pt 0.8 (range <0.6-5.2), B-Pd <5 (<5-9.3), B-Rh <0.4 (<0.4-3.6)ng/L and B-Mo 2.0 (0.2-16) and B-Sr 16.6 (3.5-49) μg/L. Two women with highly elevated B-Pt (242 and 60ng/L), previously cancer treated with cis-platinum, were not included in the data analysis. All elements varied geographically (2-3 times) (B-Pd P=0.05; all other elements P<0.001); variations within each area were generally 5-10 times. Traffic was not associated with increased concentrations.

    CONCLUSIONS: General population blood concentrations of Pt, Pd and Rh are within or below the single digit ng/L range, much lower than in most previous reports. This is probably due to improved analytical performance, allowing for more reliable information at ultra-trace levels. In general, Mo and Sr agreed with previously reported concentrations. All elements showed geographical and inter-individual variations, but no convincing relationships with self-reported traffic intensity were found. Pt from the antineoplastic drug cis-platinum is retained in the body for years.

  • 15.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bodén, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Gyllensten, Ulf
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Targeted plasma proteomics identifies a novel, robust association between cornulin and Swedish moist snuff2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle behaviors are believed to influence the body's inflammatory state. Chronic low-grade inflammation contributes to the development of major non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inflammation may thus be an important link between lifestyle and disease. We evaluated self-reported physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption in relation to plasma levels of 160 validated inflammatory and cancer biomarkers. The study included 138 participants from a population-based cohort, all with repeated sampling of plasma and data ten years apart, allowing consideration of both intra- and inter-individual variation. Of 17 relationships identified, the strongest was an independent, positive association between cornulin (CRNN) and Swedish moist snuff (snus) use. We replicated the finding in a second cohort of 501 individuals, in which a dose-response relationship was also observed. Snus explained approximately one fifth of the variance in CRNN levels in both sample sets (18% and 23%). In conclusion, we identified a novel, independent, dose-dependent association between CRNN and snus use. Further study is warranted, to evaluate the performance of CRNN as a potential snus biomarker. The putative importance of lifestyle behaviors on a wide range of protein biomarkers illustrates the need for more personalized biomarker cut-offs.

  • 16.
    Sundkvist, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Plasma ghrelin is probably not a useful biomarker for risk prediction or early detection of colorectal cancer2019In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 373-374Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf