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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Eric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    All-seeing eyes: metaphors of surveillance in the media monitoring industry2018In: Northern Lights, ISSN 1601-829X, E-ISSN 2040-0586, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 23-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to analyse and compare how technologies of media monitoring have been imagined as seeing devices at two turning points in media history – around 1900 and in the 2000s. The press-cutting agencies that were established during the late nineteenth century, depending on human eyes and scissors, were said to deliver customized news updates, business data and information on public opinion. As seeing devices, they took names such as Argus, Observer and Atlas. These agencies made it possible to see the world on paper. Today, media monitoring depends on automatic processes rather than human eyes. Yet, digital technologies are usually represented by images of old media devices such as magnifying glasses, binoculars, telescopes and watchtowers. These well-known and transparent technologies make the black boxes of digital media seem less strange, but they might also mask the assumptions and complexities that are built into them.

  • 2. Cronqvist, Marie
    et al.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Lundell, Patrik
    Inledning2014In: Mediehistoriska vändningar / [ed] Cronqvist, Marie; Jarlbrink, Johan; Lundell, Patrik, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2014, Vol. 25, p. 5-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Cronqvist, Marie
    et al.
    Jarlbrink, JohanUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.Lundell, Patrik
    Mediehistoriska vändningar2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4. Jarlbrink, Johan
    En tidningsläsares dagbok: Allan Holmströms klipp och läsvanor 1877-19622010In: Presshistorisk årsbok, ISSN 0282-020x, p. 7-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Jarlbrink, Johan
    Historien i tidningsklipp - tidningsklipp i historien: Klipp i arkiv, dagbok och bokfilm2010In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 130, no 3, p. 411-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first collection is the diary of Allan Holmström, a private collector, which documents everyday events from the 1870s to the 19 6 0s. Because Holmström added clippings and notes to his diary throughout his life, the diary became an ongoing project of reconstruction of memories rather than an account of how Holmström first experienced events. The second collection is an archive of newspaper clippings founded in 1917 by the Christian foundation Sigtunastiftelsen. The foundation aimed to collect articles about major issues but was not interested in everyday ephemeral news. Thus, this way of collecting reproduced a hierarchy of texts. The third collection is a series of printed volumes of newspaper clippings edited and published as ”filmbooks” by Erik Lindorm. He believed that his volumes allowed history to ”speak with its own voice”. The clippings and the pages look authentic, with the original columns and spelling retained, but some of the clippings were clearly edited to make the collections – and history – more accessible to modern newspaper readers.

    Collections of newspaper clippings provide a record of the past but are themselves historical products. Different collections are part of different traditions and are used in different contexts, which determine what kind of history they store and transmit. An examination of how these collections once constructed the memory of the past can provide a critical perspective on how the archives of today keep a record of the present.

  • 6.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Historievetenskapens mediehantering2015In: Massmedieproblem: mediestudiets formering / [ed] Mats Hyvönen, Pelle Snickars & Per Vesterlund, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2015, 1, p. 225-247Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Informations- och avfallshantering: mediearkeologiska perspektiv på det långa 1800-talets tidningar2019 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Ingen dag utan papper, Esko Häkli (red.)2010In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 2010 (130), no 2, p. 351-353Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Inledning: Digitala metoder2016In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Lunds universitet; Linköpings universitet.
    Lässcener: publik och medier på kafé och sockenbibliotek2010In: 1800-talets mediesystem / [ed] Jonas Harvard & Patrik Lundell, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2010, p. 43-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Magnefon-mysteriet: med trådbandspelaren på reportageresa 19512015In: Presshistorisk årsbok: 2015 / [ed] Ney, Birgitta, Stockholm: Svensk presshistorisk förening , 2015, p. 109-122Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Mobile/sedentary: News work behind and beyond the desk2015In: Media History, ISSN 1368-8804, E-ISSN 1469-9729, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 280-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the changing journalistic norms and roles in terms of mobile and sedentary news work at the end of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The analysis draws on the research into the small everyday tools of bureaucracy and science. The focus is on the quill, the scissors and paste pot, the body of the reporter and the computer. Journalistic neutrality and truth seem at any given time to be defined in line with the practices made possible by the available tools. A change in tools makes new practices possible, meaning that the norms have to be redefined. Journalism was once synonymous with mobile reporters reporting on events they themselves witnessed. Journalism today, however, is often sedentary copy-and-paste work, much resembling the scissors-and-paste journalism of the nineteenth century. Comparison reveals that such transmission of texts and images produced by someone else always runs the risk of reproducing the voices of the elites.

  • 13.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Mobile/sedentary: news work behind and beyond the desk2016In: Redefining journalism in the era of the mass press, 1880-1920 / [ed] John Steel and Marcel Broersma, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 59-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Objektiv journalistik i bandspelarens tidevarv2014In: Mediehistoriska vändningar / [ed] Cronqvist, Marie, Jarlbrink, Johan, Lundell, Patrik, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2014, p. 43-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Lunds universitet; Linköpings universitet.
    Potatiskravallernas kaos och klipparkivets ordning: opinion och propaganda under livsmedelskrisen våren 19172010In: Skåne, mat och medier / [ed] Helena Sandberg, Lund: Lunds universitet , 2010, p. 95-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Recension av Anna-Maria Hällgren, Skåda all världens uselhet: Visuell pedagogik och reformism i det sena 1800-talets populärkultur2015In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 162-164Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Recension av Martin Eide (red), Journalistikkens norske klassikere ...ved noen av dem: Et galleri over journalistikkens fornyere2015In: Norsk Medietidsskrift, ISSN 0804-8452, E-ISSN 0805-9535, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Redaktionella skrivbordsprodukter 1900 & 20002014In: Återkopplingar / [ed] Cronqvist, Marie; Lundell, Patrik; Snickars, Pelle, Lund: Mediehistoriskt arkiv , 2014, p. 149-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Telegrafen på distans: ett digitalt metodexperiment2018In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 84, no 1, p. 9-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitization of historical records not only creates new research opportunities but also challenges. Documents may be searched online and digital tools may be used for finding patterns in large datasets. Yet, the quality of digitized material is often low and it may be difficult for researchers to evaluate this material when hidden behind interfaces. My aim in this article is to explore a digitized newspaper and the associated problems and opportunities. My exploration is guided by the following question: What was written about the electrical telegraph in Aftonbladet in the 1830s, 1840s and 1850s? The files of the digitized Aftonbladet for the years 1830-1862 contain massive amounts of corrupted words generated by the OCR engine. Another problem is that the tool used for auto-segmentation has merged separate text items into single text blocks and split long texts into smaller parts. The digitization process is not a neutral text transfer from one medium to another, it is a process generating new texts never printed in the original newspaper. In order to find as many (corrupted) versions of the words "electrical" and "telegraph" as possible, the text files were searched with a Levhinstein distance of two (allowing for two letters to be added, replaced or missing). The words that were found were used as search words to identify texts blocks reporting on the electrical telegraph. To find themes in the texts, a co-occurrence search was carried out, identifying clusters of words frequently co-occurring. Previous research has focused on utopian ideas associated with this technology and the telegraph as an immaterial form of communication obliterating physical space. The clusters identified in the digital analysis suggest that more mundane topics dominated the newspaper: the electrical telegraph was described as a material form of communication controlled by bureaucracy, depending on and emphasizing geographical conditions. Digital databases make new research possible, but the low quality of digitized texts results in uncertainties concerning the results. Researchers using these databases need to be aware of the digital forms and interfaces regulating research practices.

  • 20.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Tidningen som läsning, papper och skräp2013In: Läsning / [ed] Jenny Björkman & Björn Fjæstad, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 60-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Tommy Gustafsson & Klara Arnberg, Moralpanik och lågkultur, anm. av Johan Jarlbrink2015In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 339-340Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Institutionen för kommunikation och medier, Lund.
    Vardagslivets medialisering: Mat och medier i privata receptsamlingar2012In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 2, p. 78-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and analyses foodways and media in everyday life, through collections of recipes and media material in private manuscript cookbooks. The research is based on about 200 private manuscript cookbooks from the south of Sweden, created from the late 19th century to the middle of the 20th century. This period saw great changes in foodways as well as media use. Many people moved from the countryside to the cities, new technologies were introduced in the food industry as well as in private kitchens and new ingredients and dishes were imported. Newspapers and weeklies became guides in this new world of food, and the recipes in manuscript cookbooks were often collected from the papers.

    The article shows that early cookbooks were compilations of recipes from the collector’s social networks of family, friends and neighbours. Gradually the sources of the recipes shifted from social networks to media. Recipes in the cookbooks from the 20th century were often cut or copied from papers or taken from radio or television. These recipes introduced new ingredients and foreign dishes, but also traditional everyday recipes and basic kitchen tasks. Recipes from the media helped the collectors to adopt new ways of cooking, but also cooking in its most basic form, e.g. how to fry. The collecting women did not learn as much from their mothers and social network, they got their recipes and skills from papers and published cookbooks.

  • 23.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Lundell, Patrik
    Från pressarkivet 1800-1899: en källsamling2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 24. Jarlbrink, Johan
    et al.
    Nyblom, Andreas
    Aviatik och journalistik: Flygbaronen och medierna kring 19102012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 13-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first years of the twentieth century, numerous attempts were made at powered flight. What is commonly labelled 'the pioneer era' (1900-1914) covers the unsteady beginnings of the motorized airplane as well as its large-scale introduction in warfare and for the transportation of goods and passengers. Initially regarded as a foolish toy for hazardous adventure, the airplane rapidly became a favoured symbol of modernity, and the engineers, pilots, and entrepreneurs involved were celebrated as the heroes of progress. However, the quick change in opinion regarding the use and benefit of airplanes was not only prompted by the technical skill of the inventors or the bravery of the flyers. The aim of this paper is to shed light on the media history of early aviation, including the celebrity pilot as an important means by which aviation was publicly experienced and popularized. Through a case study of the mediatization of the first Swedish aviator, Carl Cederstrom (1867-1918), the article explores the interplay of the press, other kinds of media, and advertising in the introduction of the motorized airplane in Sweden in around 1910. At this time, air shows and competitions were being arranged all over the world. The media coverage was massive, and the aviators were frequently interviewed and celebrated. The press, however, did not only report on the events. By offering prizes and arranging competitions, individual newspapers played an active role in the introduction of powered flight. When the Stockholm Air Show was held in 1910 and 1911, one of the Stockholm dailies, Dagens Nyheter, was among the main organizers. The relation between the air show and the press coverage can be interpreted in terms of a feedback loop: the reporting drew attention to the show; the show became a mass attraction; and the papers reported it even more. At the centre of attention was always the aviator Cederstrom himself, popularly known as 'The Flying Baron'. The status of this persona and the participation of the press, the cinema, and postcard publishers also made the air shows attractive for sponsors such as champagne houses, patent medicine companies, and manufacturers of fire equipment. It was this joint attention that quickly transformed a limited concern into national awareness. When the Swedish armed forces in 1912 sought funding for its first aircraft, the politicians were easily convinced of the benefits of aviation.

  • 25.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Cultural heritage as digital noise: nineteenth century newspapers in the digital archive2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1228-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze the digitized newspaper collection at the National Library of Sweden, focusing on cultural heritage as digital noise. In what specific ways are newspapers transformed in the digitization process? If the digitized document is not the same as the source document – is it still a historical record, or is it transformed into something else?

    Design/methodology/approach

    The authors have analyzed the XML files from Aftonbladet 1830 to 1862. The most frequent newspaper words not matching a high-quality references corpus were selected to zoom in on the noisiest part of the paper. The variety of the interpretations generated by optical character recognition (OCR) was examined, as well as texts generated by auto-segmentation. The authors have made a limited ethnographic study of the digitization process.

    Findings

    The research shows that the digital collection of Aftonbladet contains extreme amounts of noise: millions of misinterpreted words generated by OCR, and millions of texts re-edited by the auto-segmentation tool. How the tools work is mostly unknown to the staff involved in the digitization process? Sticking to any idea of a provenance chain is hence impossible, since many steps have been outsourced to unknown factors affecting the source document.

    Originality/value

    The detail examination of digitally transformed newspapers is valuable to scholars depending on newspaper databases in their research. The paper also highlights the fact that libraries outsourcing digitization processes run the risk of losing control over the quality of their collections.

  • 26.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Colliander, Cristian
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Maskinläsning: om massdigitalisering, digitala metoder och svensk dagspress2016In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights the media historical possibilities to analyse linguistic patterns in massive amounts of texts using digital methods. Our starting point is the fact that The National Library of Sweden has made over 12 million newspaper pages available in digital format. An important question is how to research them. The article presents a media history of the Swedish newspaper digitisation, as well as new ways of conducting historical newspaper research using digital methods. A case study is presented where the conceptualisation of a new media technology (the internet) in newspapers from the 1990s is tracked with a digital tool searching for word co-occurrences. The possibilities of digital methods are often incredible, but we should not underestimate the problematic aspects of using digital tools to explore digitised newspapers. The poor quality of the OCR (Optical Character Recognition) is described as one of the major challenges facing historical newspaper research in a digital environment

1 - 26 of 26
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