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  • 1.
    Assarsson, Rebecka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Center for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Gender inequality and adolescent suicide ideation across Africa, Asia, the South Pacific and Latin America: a cross-sectional study based on the Global School Health Survey (GSHS)2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 11, article id 1663619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Suicide ideation is a health issue affecting adolescents worldwide. There are significant variations in suicide ideation between countries and genders, which have not been fully explained. Research is especially lacking in countries outside Europe and North America. Gender equality has been shown to matter in other aspects of adolescent mental health, such as life satisfaction, but has not been researched in relation to suicide ideation at national level.

    Objective: To investigate how national gender inequality is related to self-reported suicide ideation among adolescents, and whether this association differs between boys and girls.

    Methods: This is a cross-national, cross-sectional study using individual survey data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey, a survey in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the South Pacific, developed and supported by among others the WHO and the CDC; connecting this to national data: the gender inequality index from the UNDP; controlling for GDP per capita and secondary school enrolment. The data was analysed using a multilevel logistic regression method and included 149,306 students from 37 countries.

    Results: Higher national gender inequality, as measured by the gender inequality index, was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of suicide ideation in both girls and boys (odds ratio: 1.38 p-value: 0.015), but for girls and both sexes this was only after adjusting for selection bias due to secondary school enrolment (as well as GDP/capita). Interaction models showed that this association was stronger in boys than in girls.

    Conclusions: National gender inequality seems to be associated with higher levels of suicide ideation among adolescents in mainly low- and middle-income countries, especially among boys.

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  • 2. Athanasiades, Christina
    et al.
    Figgou, Lia
    Flouli, Anastasia
    Gebel, Michael
    Gousia, Katerina
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kostouli, Marialena
    Nizalova, Olena
    Shapoval, Nataliia
    Sourvinou, Martina
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Täht, Kadri
    Unt, Marge
    Voßemer, Jonas
    Xanthopoulou, Despoina
    Report on the impact of the institutional setting and policies on the well-being and health of youth in insecure labour market positions in EU-28 and Ukraine2016Report (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Baranowska Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Spillover Effects of Job Separations: Does Becoming Unemployed Among Youth Affect Health of Their Family Members?2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Health effects of unemployment in couples: does becoming unemployed affect a young partner’s health?2021In: Social Exclusion of Youth in Europe: The Multifaceted Consequences of Labour Market Insecurity / [ed] Marge Unt; Michael Gebel; Sonia Bertolini; Vassiliki Deliyanni-Kouimtzi; Dirk Hofäcker, Bristol: Policy Press, 2021, p. 58-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 5.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    When things go wrong with you, it hurts me too: The effects of partner’s employment status on health in comparative perspective2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of changes in employment status on health within couples have attracted increasing attention. This paper contributes to this emerging research by investigating whether the impact of a partner’s employment status on individual self-rated health varies systematically across countries with varying decommodification levels.

    We use longitudinal data from the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) and hybrid models. We find that a change in an individual’s employment status may affect the health not just of the person who experiences this transition, but of his or her partner. The likelihood that such a spillover will occur varies across countries with different decommodification levels. The negative effects of a partner’s employment status on self-rated health are observed when the generosity of welfare state support is limited. The moderating effects of financial support from the state are not very strong, though, they are not robust across all our models and do not extend to all the dimensions of the generosity of welfare state support.

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  • 6.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    When things go wrong with you, it hurts me too: The effects of partner’s employment status on health in comparative perspective2021In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of changes in employment status on health within couples have attracted increasing attention. This paper contributes to this emerging research by investigating whether the impact of a partner’s employment status on individual self-rated health varies systematically across countries with varying decommodification levels. We use longitudinal data from the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) and hybrid models. We find that a change in an individual’s employment status may affect the health not just of the person who experiences this transition, but that of his or her partner. The likelihood that such a spillover will occur varies across countries with different decommodification levels. The negative effects of a partner’s employment status on self-rated health are observed when the generosity of welfare state support is limited. The moderating effects of financial support from the state are not very strong, though. They are not robust across all our models and do not extend to all the dimensions of the generosity of welfare state support.

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  • 7.
    Berglund, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Subjective well-being and job satisfaction among self-employed and regular employees: does personality matter differently?2016In: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, ISSN 0827-6331, E-ISSN 2169-2610, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the importance of personality traits for subjective well-being (SWB) and job satisfaction among self-employed. The aim of this article is to investigate if the Big-Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness to experience) have different relationships with SWB and job satisfaction among self-employed compared with regular employees. Data come from a Swedish survey comprising representative samples of self-employed (n = 2483) and regular employees (n = 2642). Personality traits are measured using a 10-item personality measure. Our findings show that there are only small differences, between self-employed and regular employees, in the associations between personality traits and SWB. For job satisfaction, on the other hand, we find much stronger relationships for self-employed than the regularly employed. For self-employed, every personality trait except ‘openness to experience’ have a significant positive relationship with job satisfaction. In comparison, only ‘extraversion’ and ‘emotional stability’ are significantly correlated to job satisfaction among regular employees. The relationship between ‘extraversion’ and job satisfaction was furthermore substantially weaker among regular employees. Therefore, being self-employed seems to be particularly beneficial for individuals scoring high on ‘extraversion,’ ‘agreeableness,’ and ‘conscientiousness.’

  • 8.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Psychotropic medication use and academic performance in adolescence: A cross-lagged path analysis2021In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 91, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The study investigated the directionality of associations between mental health problems and school grades across two timepoints (T1 and T2) during mid to late adolescence; inschool year 9 (ages 15–16) and school year 12 (ages 17–18). The study also investigated variation in the associations as a function of gender and across socioeconomic groups.

    Methods: Longitudinal data from several Swedish administrative registers were utilised. Information on prescribed psychotropic drugs was used as a proxy for mental health problems, and teacher-assigned school grades were used to measure academic performance. The study sample comprised 85 186 individuals (50.7% girls) born in 1991 who were alive and resident in Sweden in 2010. Directions of associations were analysed by estimating a series of cross-lagged path models.

    Results: The model with the best fit to data showed that higher school grades at T1 were associated with relatively lower rates of mental health problems by T2, for both boys and girls, mainlyi n socioeconomic groups with the highest educated parents. This association was equal in size across all of the socioeconomic groups that were explored.

    Conclusions: Performing well in school is equally important for boys’ and girls’ subsequent mental health, but only among adolescents in socioeconomic groups with the highest educated parents. The results underscore the importance of promoting opportunities for youth to do as well as theycan in school.

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  • 9.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Associations between children’s diagnosed mental disorders and educational achievements in Sweden2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 1140-1147Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To examine associations between multiple clinically diagnosed mental disorders among children in Sweden and educational achievements at the end of ninth grade.

    Methods: Data from Swedish administrative registers were utilised. Diagnoses of specific mental disorders (unipolar depression, mood, anxiety, obsessive compulsive, eating, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) were used as exposure variables. Educational achievements were assessed in terms of teacher-assigned school grades and eligibility for upper secondary education. The sample comprised 266,664 individuals (49% females) born in 2000 to 2002 who were alive and resident in Sweden in 2017. Exposed and unexposed individuals were compared in terms of outcome variables by fitting linear and logistic regression models.

    Results: The results revealed negative associations between all the examined mental disorders and educational achievements, except for positive associations between eating disorders and grades among female students. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was the most strongly associated disorder in terms of non-successful completion of compulsory education, among both male and female students (odds ratio (OR): 3.58 (95% confidence interval (CI), 3.42 to 3.74) and 4.31 (95% CI, 4.07 to 4.57), respectively). This was followed by unipolar depression among males (OR: 2.92 (95% CI, 2.60 to 3.28)) and anxiety disorder among females (OR: 2.68 (95% CI, 2.49 to 2.88)). Obsessive compulsive disorder had the weakest negative association with educational achievements among both males (OR: 1.48 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.17)) and females (OR: 1.38 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.72)).

    Conclusions: Specific diagnosed mental disorders have varying, largely disadvantageous, associations with educational achievements of students in Sweden that differ between males and females.

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  • 10.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ragnarsson, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    The Bidirectional Relationship Between Subjective Well-Being and Academic Achievement in Adolescence2021In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 992-1002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The well-being of young people in relation to their school performance has received increased attention in recent years. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the longitudinal and reciprocal relationship between adolescents’ subjective well-being and their academic achievements. The current study examined the bidirectional relationship between subjective well-being and academic achievement across two timepoints (T1 and T2) during the course of mid to late adolescence, i.e.,in school year 9 (age 15), and school years 11–12 (ages 17–18). The study also investigated variation in the association as afunction of adolescent gender. Data on subjective well-being and teacher-assigned school grades of 723 adolescents (48.7% girls) residing in Sweden were analyzed by estimating a series of cross-lagged path models. The findings suggest gender differences in the relationship as no associations were found among boys. Support for a bidirectional relationship between the constructs was only found for girls. For girls, higher subjective well-being at T1 was associated with higher academic achievements at T2, while higher academic achievements at T1 was associated with lower subjective well-being at T2. These findings highlight that the subjective well-being of adolescent girls may be important for their ability to perform at school, but their academic achievements may also inflict negatively on their subjective well-being.

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  • 11.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Health problems during childhood and school achievement: Exploring associations between hospitalization exposures, gender, timing, and compulsory school grades2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1-14, article id e0208116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To investigate while accounting for health at birth 1) associations between health problems during childhood, measured as hospitalizations, and school achievement in the final year of compulsory school, measured as overall grade points and eligibility for upper secondary education, 2) if and how gender moderates the association between health problems and school achievement, 3) if and how the timing of a health problem during childhood is associated with later school achievement.

    METHODS:

    Analyzes were performed on a population-based cohort (n = 115 196) born in 1990 in Sweden (51.3% boys, 48.7% girls) using data from several national registries. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to analyze associations between study variables.

    RESULTS:

    Overall grade points and eligibility for continuation to upper secondary school were lower for individuals exposed to hospitalizations. Only the association between hospitalizations and overall grade points was moderated by gender and only for ages 13-16 years. Exposure close to actual grading had worst outcomes.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Health problems, measured through hospitalizations, was significantly associated with lower school achievements among Swedish children. Girls exposed to health problems requiring hospitalizations had relatively poorer school achievements as compared to boys. Health problems requiring hospitalization during junior high school had the greatest negative association with final achievement at compulsory school.

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  • 12.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Is the effect of ill health on school achievement among Swedish adolescents gendered?2019In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 8, article id 100408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates why the relationship between health problems requiring hospitalization between the ages of 13 and 16 and school achievement (school grades in 9th grade) in Sweden was stronger for girls than for boys. We reviewed previous research on gender differences in subjective health, health care utilization and medical drug treatment to identify mechanisms responsible for this gendered effect. The relationship was analysed using retrospective observational data from several national full-population registers of individuals born in 1990 in Sweden (n = 115 196), and ordinary least squares techniques were used to test hypotheses. We found that girls had longer stays when hospitalized, which mediated 15% of the interaction effect. Variability in drug treatment between boys and girls did not explain the gendered effect of hospitalization. The main mediator of the gendered effect was instead differences in diagnoses between boys and girls. Girls’ hospitalizations were more commonly related to mental and behavioural diagnoses, which have particularly detrimental effects on school achievement.

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  • 13.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Parental Illness and Young People's Education2020In: Child Indicators Research, ISSN 1874-897X, E-ISSN 1874-8988, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 2069-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of parental health problems on the probability of youths leaving upper secondary education before completion in Sweden, and to investigate potential gender differences in these effects. Medical and social microdata from Swedish administrative registers were used. The study population consisted of individuals born between 1987 and 1990 (N = 398,748) who were still alive and residing in Sweden in 2010. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-test post-test study design. Logistic regression was used to analyse the relationships between indicators of parental illness and young people's early school leaving in relation to health and sociodemographic confounders. Having had a mother or father with psychiatric, but not somatic, illness that necessitated hospitalisation after completing compulsory schooling was significantly associated with an increased probability of leaving upper secondary education. We found no significant gender-specific interaction effects. The existence of these effects in Sweden, a country with an extensive institutional welfare system, suggests that similar but more pronounced effects may exist in regions lacking such systems.

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  • 14.
    Bortes, Cristian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sibling Ill-Health and Children's Educational Outcomes2020In: Journal of School Health, ISSN 0022-4391, E-ISSN 1746-1561, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 407-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The presence of health problems in a child is known to be negatively associated with later academic achievement, but less is known about the educational outcomes for siblings of children in poor health. The study investigated how having a sibling with health problems affects a healthy sibling’s academic achievement.

    METHODS: We utilized medical and social microdata from Swedish administrative population registers. Our sample consisted of N = 115 106 individuals (51.3% boys) born in 1990 in Sweden. We compared children with ill siblings to children whose siblings did not have poor health. Siblings’ hospital admissions and the academic achievements of the healthy sibling during their final year of compulsory education (at the age of 15-16) were analyzed using linear and logistic regression in relation to individual health- and family-related confounders.

    RESULTS: Sibling hospitalization was significantly associated with lower overall grade points (b = –10.73, p < .001) and an increased odds ratio (OR) of ineligibility for upper secondary education (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.31-1.52, p < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: School and health personnel should also consider the needs of healthy siblings during their work with children in poor health, because they too can be disadvantaged.

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  • 15.
    Brydsten, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Youth unemployment and functional somatic symptoms in adulthood: results from the Northern Swedish cohort2015In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 796-800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about the possible long-term health consequences of youth unemployment. Research indicates that unemployment may lead to socioeconomic downward mobility and mental health problems, but we still lack knowledge of the long-term health consequences of youth unemployment. This article examines the potential long-term association between youth unemployment and functional somatic symptoms in adulthood. 

    Methods: The ‘Northern Swedish cohort’ was used with data from five data collections, from 1981 (age 16) until 2007 (age 42). Youth unemployment was measured as months in unemployment between age 16 and 21, and health outcome as functional somatic symptoms (an index of 10 items of self-reported symptoms). Linear regression was used to analyse the relationship between months in youth unemployment and functional somatic symptoms at age 21 and age 42, stratified for women and men and adjusted for potential confounders, such as time spent in education at age 21 and later unemployment between age 21 and 42. 

    Results: Youth unemployment was significantly related to functional somatic symptoms at age 21 for men after controlling for confounders, but not for women. Among men, the association remained for functional somatic symptoms at age 42, after controlling for confounders. 

    Conclusions: Adolescence seems to be a sensitive period during which unemployment could have remaining health effects in adulthood, at least for men, though assumptions of causality are tentative and more research is needed.

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    Youth unemployment and functional somatic symptoms in adulthood
  • 16.
    Brännlund, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Centre for Applied Psychological Research, School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Australia .
    Education and health-lifestyle among men and women in Sweden: a 27-year prospective cohort study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 284-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research has found a positive association between health-behaviour and health. Only a few longitudinalstudies have been performed, and as far as we found, none have followed a cohort for 27 years. Methods: This study used acohort study, the “Northern Swedish Cohort”, which consisted of all graduates, n = 1080, from a compulsory school in aSwedish town. Data were collected with a comprehensive questionnaire; response rate 96.4%. Health-behaviour was analysedwith binary logistic regression, with health-behaviour at age 21, 30 and 43 years as dependent variable. Besides baselinehealth-behaviour, gender, somatic and psychological health and socioeconomic background, the analyses were adjustedfor work situation and social network. Results: The main findings were that education reduces the probability of unhealthybehaviour over the life course, which held after controlling for early life health-behaviour and possible confounders. Thegeneral education effect on health-behaviour was stronger among men than among women. Conclusions: Higher educationreduces the probability of unhealthy behavior. Thus, investments in higher education should be an important public goal.

  • 17.
    Brännlund, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Nordlander, Erica
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Centre for Applied Psychological Research, School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy at University of South Australia, Australia.
    Higher education and self-governance: the effects of higher education and field of study on voice and agency in Sweden2012In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 817-834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is extensive research pointing to the positive effects of education in the form of labour market outcomes. These outcomes are vital when evaluating education; there are however additional outcomes of education that might also be important for quality of life. From this point of view, education could affect non-market areas such as democracy, gender equality and civic engagement. This article investigates the effects of level of education and field of study on two vital non-market capabilities: agency and voice. The study uses an eight-year longitudinal national survey of 1058 Swedish youth, controlling for baseline values of voice and agency. The empirical analysis shows that university education increases young people’s capabilities of voice and agency. Field of study was also found to have a relationship with agency, where social science and business education was found to be connected with the highest probability of agency, whereas there were only small effects of field of education on voice.

  • 18.
    Brännlund, Annica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Mental-health and educational achievement: the link between poor mental-health and upper secondary school completion and grades2017In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Education profoundly affects adult socioeconomic status, so it is important to ensure that all children have the capability and opportunity to achieve educational goals.Aims: The study aimed to examine the relationship between mental-health during adolescence and upper secondary school completion and grades, which has received comparatively little research attention to date.Method: Longitudinal administrative and registered data were used to analyse the relationship between school achievement and prescriptions of psycholeptic and psycho-analeptic drugs. The sample consisted of all children born in Sweden in 1990 (n=109223), who were followed from birth to age 20. Logistic and OLS regressions were performed separately for boys and girls, controlling for birth health and family characteristics.Results: A negative relationship between mental-health problems and educational outcomes was found; this result was almost independent of the controls. Only minor differences between the sexes were detected.Conclusions: Poor mental-health during childhood correlated negatively with educational attainment. Given the strong link between educational success and adult life, more resources are needed to support children with mental-health problems.

  • 19.
    Cashman, Matthew R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Does fear-of-failure mediate the relationship between educational expectations and stress-related complaints among Swedish adolescents?: A structural equation modelling approach2023In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study investigated the possible mediating role of fear-of-failure between educational expectations and adolescent stress-related complaints with a specific focus on gender differences among Swedishadolescents, and related these findings more broadly to school-related demands and stress-related complaints.

    Methods: A total of N¼ 5504 Swedish adolescents (Mage¼ 15 years, SD ¼ 0.0 years, 50.2% girls) were drawn from the2018 Swedish Programme for International Student Assessment study for our investigation. We used structural equation models to explore if fear-of-failure mediates the relationship between educational expectations and negativeaffect, with a specific focus on gender differences. Educational expectations were utilized in the measurement model.Fear-of-failure was constructed as a latent mediating variable. Negative affect was constructed as a latent variableand utilized as an outcome variable. We subsequently undertook bootstrapping tests of indirect effects and nonlinear comparisons of indirect effects to assess the reliability of the results.

    Results: Fear-of-failure partially mediatedthe association between educational expectations and negative affect (39%). Our gender-specific structural equation model demonstrated that this relationship was more pronounced for girls, suggesting girls are more vulnerable to negative affect as a result of experiencing higher levels of fear of failing.

    Conclusions: The findingssuggest that fear-of-failure partially explains the association between educational expectations and negativeaffect and that this association is more pronounced for girls. This study provides insights into better understanding adolescent stress-related complaints, and the differential role fear of failing has in regards to gender.

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  • 20.
    Cashman, Matthew
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Have performance-based educational reforms increased adolescent school-pressure in Sweden?: A synthetic control approach2023In: International Journal of Educational Development, ISSN 0738-0593, E-ISSN 1873-4871, Vol. 103, article id 102922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased levels of stress and other mental health problems have been reported among adolescents in high-income countries. In particular, rates of school pressure have increased significantly. Despite such increases, little is known about the underlying determinants of increased adolescent stress, making this an emerging public health concern. The educational stressors hypothesis contends that increased rates of stress result from pronounced performance pressures placed on adolescents resulting from educational policy initiatives which emphasize academic goal attainment. The present study tests this hypothesis using a synthetic control method and panel data techniques to analyze data from the Health Behavior in School-aged children (HBSC) survey, including more than 150,000 adolescents per survey wave in 25 European countries over 16 years, to assess if the Swedish Educational reforms implemented in the 2011–13 period were associated with increased self-reported school pressure. These reforms implemented increased summative assessments, new grading systems and increased eligibility criteria in accessing further education. Results demonstrate that following the reforms, Swedish adolescents experienced greater levels of school-pressure and led to a greater gender difference in experienced school-pressure where girls were relatively more affected. We conclude that, consistent with the educational stressors hypothesis, the educational reforms have likely contributed to increasing levels of school-pressure for Swedish adolescents.

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  • 21.
    Elwér, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Socialmedicin.
    Life course models of economic stress and poor mental health in mid-adulthood: results from the prospective Northern Swedish Cohort2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to analyse the association between economic stress during youth and adulthood, and poor mental health through life course models of (1) accumulation of risk and (2) sensitive period. Methods: The study was based on the Northern Sweden Cohort, a 26-year prospective cohort (N = 1010 in 2007; 94% of those participating in 1981 still alive) ranging from adolescence to middle age. Economic stress was measured at age 16, 21, 30 and 42 years. Two life course models of accumulation of risk and sensitive period were analysed using ordinal regression with internalized symptoms of mental health as outcome. Results: Exposure of economic stress at several life course periods was associated with higher odds of internalized mental health symptoms for both women and men, which supports the accumulated risk model. No support for a sensitive period was found for the whole sample. For men, however, adolescence appears to be a sensitive period during which the exposure to economic stress has negative mental health consequences later in life independently of economic stress at other ages. Conclusion: This study confirms that the duration of economic stress between adolescence and middle age is important for mental health. In addition, the results give some indication of a sensitive period of exposure to economic stress during adolescence for men, although more research is needed to confirm possible gender differences.

  • 22.
    Halleröd, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Measuring capabilities – possibilities and obstacles2010In: A blue-print of capabilities for work and education / [ed] Hans Uwe Otta and Holger Ziegler, Bielefeld: Workable Research Consortioum , 2010, p. 191-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hammarström, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Virtanen, Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    It´s no surprise! Men are not hit more than women by the health consequences of unemployment in the Northern Swedish Cohort2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 187-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Research often fails to ascertain whether men and women are equally hit by the health consequences of unemployment. The aim of this study was to analyze whether men’s self-reported health and health behaviour were hit more by unemployment than women’s in a follow-up of the Northern Swedish Cohort.

    Methods: A follow-up study of a cohort of all school leavers in a middle-sized industrial town in northern Sweden was performed from age 16 to age 42. Of those still alive of the original cohort, 94% (n = 1,006) participated during the whole period. A sample was made of participants in the labour force and living in Sweden (n = 916). Register data were used to assess the length of unemployment from age 40 to 42, while questionnaire data were used for the other variables.

    Results: In multivariate logistic regression analyses significant relations between unemployment and mental health/smoking were found among both women and men, even after control for unemployment at the time of the investigation and indicators of health-related selection. Significant relations between unemployment and alcohol consumption were found among women, while few visits to a dentist was significant among men.

    Conclusions: Men are not hit more by the health consequences of unemployment in a Swedish context, with a high participation rate of women in the labour market. The public health relevance is that the study indicates the need to take gendered contexts into account in public health research.

  • 24.
    Harryson, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Domestic work and psychological distress: what is the importance of relative socioeconomic position and gender inequality in the couple relationship?2012In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38484-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the relation between responsibility for domestic work and psychological distress was influenced by perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship and relative socioeconomic position.

    Methods: In the Northern Swedish Cohort, all pupils who studied in the last year of compulsory school in a northern Swedish town in 1981 have been followed regularly until 2007. In this study, participants living with children were selected (n = 371 women, 352 men). The importance of relative socioeconomic position and perception of gender inequality in the couple relationship in combination with domestic work for psychological distress was examined through logistic regression analysis.

    Results: Two combinations of variables including socioeconomic position ('having less than half of the responsibility for domestic work and partner higher socioeconomic position' and 'having more than half the responsibility for domestic work and equal socioeconomic position') were related to psychological distress. There were also higher ORs for psychological distress for the combinations of having 'less than half of the responsibility for domestic work and gender-unequal couple relationship' and 'more than half the responsibility for domestic work and gender-unequal couple relationship'. Having a lower socioeconomic position than the partner was associated with higher ORs for psychological distress among men.

    Conclusions: This study showed that domestic work is a highly gendered activity as women tend to have a greater and men a smaller responsibility. Both these directions of inequality in domestic work, in combination with experiencing the couple relationship as gender-unequal, were associated with psychological distress There is a need for more research with a relational approach on inequalities in health in order to capture the power relations within couples in various settings.

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  • 25.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Consequences of school grading systems on adolescent health: evidence from a Swedish school reform2021In: Journal of education policy, ISSN 0268-0939, E-ISSN 1464-5106, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 84-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education reforms that entail increased emphasis on high-stakes testing, assessment and grading have spread across education systems in recent decades. Critics have argued that these policies could have consequences for stress, identity, self-esteem and the overall health of pupils. However, these potentially negative consequences have rarely been investigated in a systematic and rigorous way. In this study we use a major education reform in Sweden, which introduced grades and increased the use of testing for pupils in the 6th and 7th school year (aged 12 to 13 years), to study the consequences of grading and assessment for health outcomes. Using data from the Health Behaviours of School-Aged Children Survey, we find that the reform increased school-related stress and reduced the academic self-esteem of pupils in the 7th school year. This, in turn, had an indirect effect on psychosomatic symptoms and life satisfaction for these pupils. Moreover, the negative effects of the reform were generally stronger for girls, thereby widening the already troubling gender differences in health. We conclude that accountability reforms aimed at increased use of testing, assessment and grading can potentially have negative side effects on pupils’ health.

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  • 26.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Determinants of Declining School Belonging 2000–2018: The Case of Sweden2021In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 157, no 2, p. 783-802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students' sense of belonging at school has declined across the world in recent decades, and more so in Sweden than in almost any other high-income country. However, we do not know the characteristics or causes of these worldwide trends. Using data on Swedish students aged 15–16 years from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) between 2000 and 2018, we show that the decline in school belonging in Sweden was driven by a disproportionately large decline at the bottom part of the distribution, and was greatest for foreign-born students, students from disadvantaged social backgrounds, and for low-achieving students. The decline cannot be accounted for by changes in student demographics or observable characteristics related to the school environment. The decline did, however, coincide with a major education reform, characterized by an increased use of summative evaluation, and an overall stronger performance-orientation.

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  • 27.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Temporal trends and inequalities in school-related stress in three cohorts in compulsory school in Sweden2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School stress is widespread among students’ worldwide, impacting academic success and mental health. Most research focuses on average stress levels but lacks insights into temporal trends and inequalities. Using repeated longitudinal survey data on 33,000 students in Swedish compulsory school from the Evaluation Through Follow-up (ETF) study, we investigate temporal trends in stress across three cohorts of students (born 1992, 1998, and 2004), with a focus on inequalities by school year, sex, socio-economic status, migration background, school grades, and school difficulties. The results show that (1) stress increased more in year 6 than in year 9 in recent cohorts; (2) stress increased more for girls than for boys; and (3) low school grades and school difficulties have become stronger risk factors for stress. We discuss the findings in the context of recent educational reforms and broader societal trends concerning the role of education for young people’s prospects in life.

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  • 28.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Transitions from temporary employment to permanent employment among young adults: The role of labour law and education systems2019In: Journal of Sociology, ISSN 1440-7833, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 689-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary work is common across Europe, especially among young people. Whether temporary employment is a transitory stage on the road to standard employment, and whether this varies depending on institutional contexts, is controversial. This article investigates variability in transition rates from temporary to permanent employment across Europe, and how this is related to employment protection legislation (EPL) and the vocational specificity of education systems. We utilize harmonized panel data from the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions, covering 18 European countries and including 34,088 temporary workers aged 18–30. The results show that stricter EPL is associated with lower rates of transitions to permanent employment, while partial deregulation, with strict EPL for permanent contracts but weaker EPL for temporary contracts, is associated with higher transition rates. Vocationally specific education systems have higher transition rates, on average. Moreover, the role of EPL is conditional on the degree of vocational specificity.

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  • 29.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Baranowska-Rataj, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ageing, health inequalities and the welfare state: a multilevel analysis2018In: Journal of European Social Policy, ISSN 0958-9287, E-ISSN 1461-7269, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 311-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparative studies of health inequalities have largely neglected age and ageing aspects, while ageing research has often paid little attention to questions of social inequalities. This article investigates cross-country differences in gradients in self-rated health and limiting long-standing illness (LLSI) in middle-aged and in older people (aged 50–64 and 65–80 years) linked to social class, and degrees to which the social health gradients are associated with minimum pension levels and expenditure on elderly care. For these purposes, data from the European Social Survey (2002–2010) are analysed using multilevel regression techniques. We find significant cross-level interaction effects between class and welfare policies: higher expenditure on elderly care and particularly more generous minimum pensions are associated with smaller health inequalities in the older age group (65–80 years). It is concluded that welfare policies moderate the association between social class and health, highlighting the importance of welfare state efforts for older persons, who are strongly reliant on the welfare state and welfare state arrangements such as pensions and care policies.

  • 30.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Hagquist, Curt
    Gender and secular trends in adolescent mental health over 24 years – The role of school-related stress2020In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 250, article id 112890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing levels of psychosomatic symptoms, and other mental health problems, among adolescents, and especially among girls, have been reported across various countries. The “educational stressors hypothesis” states that this trend can be explained by an increasing amount of stressors in the school environment. This study tests this hypothesis, using repeated cross-sectional data, between the years 1993–2017, from the Health Behaviours of School-aged Children (HBSC) survey. Regression and decomposition techniques are used to investigate the role of school stress for trends in psychosomatic symptoms, and for gender differences in symptoms.

    Results show that the effects of school stress on psychosomatic symptoms have become stronger over time, but that they can only account for a small share of the overall increase in symptoms since 1993. However, school stress has increased more among girls than among boys, and it explains about half of the growth of the gender gap in symptoms. Thus, school stress accounts for a substantial portion of the increase in symptoms for girls, but only a minor share of the increase for boys. In sum, we found weak evidence for the educational stressors hypothesis in regard to the overall trend in symptoms, but strong evidence for it in explaining the growing gender gap.

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  • 31.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Trends in adolescent psychosomatic complaints: a quantile regression analysis of Swedish HBSC data 1985–20172023In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 51, p. 619-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: According to recent criticism, survey-based measures of adolescent psychosomatic complaints have poor content validity insofar as they conflate trivial with severe complaints. It is argued that this means that estimates of prevalence and trends in complaints may reflect trivial complaints that are not indicators of health problems. In this study, two observable implications of this criticism were investigated: (a) that self-reported psychosomatic complaints should have a bimodal distribution; and (b) that the increase in complaints over time should be of approximately equal size throughout the distribution of complaints.

    Methods: Three decades (1985/1986–2017/2018) of repeated cross-sectional data from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey were used. Psychosomatic complaints were measured using the screening instrument Health Behaviour in School-aged Children symptom checklist. Histograms, bar charts and quantile regression models were used for the analysis.

    Results and conclusions: With regard to the first implication, the results showed that the distribution of complaints was not bimodal and that there were no clusters of respondents. This suggests that binary categorisations of students can be reductive and conceal important variations across students. With regard to the second implication, the results showed that the increase in complaints was greatest among students who report frequent and co-occurring complaints. This suggests that reports of increasing complaints in adolescents cannot be explained as being primarily due to a greater inclination to report trivial complaints. It is concluded that any conflation of trivial and more severe complaints in surveys of psychosomatic complaints is not reflected in population-based estimates.

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  • 32.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Johansson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Education system stratification and health complaints among school-aged children2019In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 220, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that the school environment is an important social determinant of health among children and adolescents. However, we know virtually nothing of the health consequences of national education systems and policies, for example the stratification of pupils by academic ability. This study aimed to investigate if education system stratification is related to self-reported psychological and somatic health complaints of pupils aged 11 to 15, and social inequalities in such health complaints.

    Survey data from the Health Behaviors of School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, covering 33 countries and more than 180 000 pupils in primary and lower secondary school, were used. Multilevel models showed that education system stratification was not associated with the average levels of health complaints of pupils, but cross-level interaction effects showed that stratification moderated the relationship between social background and health complaints, such that inequalities in health complaints were smaller in countries with more stratified systems. Moreover, this moderating effect was mediated by the school learning environmentand social relations in school. Specifically, social inequalities in school pressure, academic self-concept, school climate, and school satisfaction were smaller in more stratified education systems, which in turn accounted for smaller inequalities in health complaints in these countries.

  • 33.
    Högberg, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Vossemer, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of Bamberg, Germany.
    Gebel, Michael
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Unemployment, well-being, and the moderating role of education policies: A multilevel study2019In: International Journal of Comparative Sociology, ISSN 0020-7152, E-ISSN 1745-2554, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 269-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to investigate if education policies moderate the association between unemployment and well-being among young adults. Based on the capability approach, we argue that education policies mitigate the negative effects of unemployment by providing opportunities for education and thus ways to exit unemployment. Education policies can strengthen capabilities, enhance the control that individuals have over their situation, and thereby reduce the stress associated with unemployment. We estimated cross-level interactions between education policies and unemployment status using multilevel methods and data from the European Social Survey. Results showed that policies that increase educational opportunities—such as generous second chance opportunities—were associated with smaller negative effects of unemployment on well-being and that this moderating impact was stronger for young adults with low education. Further analyses show that education policies are also associated with perceived capabilities among unemployed, supporting the proposed mechanism.

  • 34.
    Johansson, Klara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Högberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Stevens, Gonneke W J M
    De Clercq, Bart
    Frasquilho, Diana
    Elgar, Frank
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The interplay between national and parental unemployment in relation to adolescent life satisfaction in 27 countries: analyses of repeated cross-sectional school surveys2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 1555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research shows that parental unemployment is associated with low life satisfaction in adolescents. It is unclear whether this translates to an association between national unemployment and adolescent life satisfaction, and whether such a contextual association is entirely explained by parental unemployment, or if it changes as a function thereof. For adults, associations have been shown between unemployment and mental health, including that national unemployment can affect mental health and life satisfaction of both the employed and the unemployed, but to different degrees. The aim of this paper is to analyse how national unemployment levels are related to adolescent life satisfaction, across countries as well as over time within a country, and to what extent and in what ways such an association depends on whether the individual’s own parents are unemployed or not.

    Methods: Repeated cross-sectional data on adolescents’ (aged 11, 13 and 15 years, n = 386,402) life satisfaction and parental unemployment were collected in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, in 27 countries and 74 country-years, across 2001/02, 2005/06 and 2009/10 survey cycles. We linked this data to national harmonised unemployment rates provided by OECD and tested their associations using multilevel linear regression, including interaction terms between national and parental unemployment.

    Results: Higher national unemployment rates were related to lower adolescent life satisfaction, cross-sectionally between countries but not over time within countries. The verified association was significant for adolescents with and without unemployed parents, but stronger so in adolescents with unemployed fathers or both parents unemployed. Having an unemployed father, mother och both parents was in itself related to lower life satisfaction.

    Conclusion: Living in a country with higher national unemployment seems to be related to lower adolescent life satisfaction, whether parents are unemployed or not, although stronger among adolescents where the father or both parents are unemployed. However, variation in unemployment over the years did not show an association with adolescent life satisfaction.

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  • 35.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Larsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The prevalence, characteristics and well-being of 'necessity' self-employed and 'latent' entrepreneurs: findings from Sweden2016In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 58-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-employment is often discussed in terms of 'push' and 'pull' factors. The aim of this article is to assess not only the prevalence of 'necessity' self-employed and 'latent' entrepreneurs in Sweden, but also the characteristics in terms of socio-demography, personality traits, intrinsic work motivation and preference for independence associated with each group. In addition, the article investigates whether 'necessity' self-employment and 'latent' entrepreneurship are related to four measures of well-being. This is done using a nationally representative survey of the self-employed (small-business owners, n = 2,483) and regularly employed (n = 2,642) in Sweden. The main findings indicate that 'necessity' self-employed have characteristics and preferences that differ from other (non-'necessity') self-employed. They display relatively low intrinsic work motivation and preference for independence as well as scores on personality traits typically associated with entrepreneurship. They also report lower levels of work autonomy, job-satisfaction, life satisfaction and family-life satisfaction than other self-employed. 'Latent' entrepreneurs resemble entrepreneurs in many ways but they nevertheless report lower levels of well-being than non-'necessity' self-employed.

  • 36.
    Johansson Sevä, Ingemar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    Mid Sweden University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Subjective well-being among the self-employed in Europe: macroeconomy, gender and immigrant status2016In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that the self-employed generally experience a higher degree of job satisfaction compared to regular employees. However, our knowledge of subjective well-being among the self-employed, the differences between various groups of self-employed and the potential influence of contextual factors is somewhat limited. The purpose of the present paper is to address this gap by taking macroeconomic conditions, gender and immigrant status into consideration. The results show that self-employment is positively related to subjective well-being, but there are also differences between groups of the self-employed; self-employed with employees report a higher level of life satisfaction than the self-employed without employees. Economic growth is more important for the level of life satisfaction among the self-employed than among employees. The analyses also point to different patterns for female and male self-employed without employees: only women experience a higher level of life satisfaction compared to employees. The results also show that the relationship is stronger among immigrants than natives. The results of this study confirm the importance of considering potential heterogeneity when examining subjective well-being among the self-employed.

  • 37.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Bortes, Cristian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University.
    Is there a social gradient in how youth with mental disorder perform academically? Findings from a Swedish longitudinal register-based study2021In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is well established that academic achievement and other school-related outcomes are associated with mental health status in children and youths. However, few studies have examined the influence of socioeconomic background on the relationship between poor childhood/adolescent mental health and schoolperformance. From an equity perspective, it is important to explore how school-related outcomes are affected for young people with mental disorder and if these outcomes differ depending on gender and socioeconomic background. This study aimed to investigate social gradients in the prospective association between childhood/adolescent mental disorder and academic achievement.

    Methods: This register based study used data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab of linked Swedish registers on all children born between 1990 and 1994 and their parents (N = 642 558). The outcome was school grades achieved upon compulsory school graduation (age 15/16). Mental disorder was indicated by number of hospitalisations due to ICD classified mental disorders and prescription of psychoanaleptic drugs. Indicators of socioeconomic position were parental level of education and family income in four categories respectively. Parental history of mental disorder was controlled for. Linear regressions, including interaction analyses, were performed.

    Results: Mental disorder in childhood/adolescence was related to lower grades, particularly in boys. The drop in academic achievement among youth with mental disorder was more pronounced among girls in mid SEP categories than among their less and more advantaged peers. A less clear interaction pattern was identified in boys.

    Conclusions: Based on theory and existing research we expected a typical social gradient in the strength of the association between mental disorder and academic achievement. However, we identified a U-shaped social gradient among girls. Analyses of the links between mental health and academic outcomes need to take both gender andsocial position into account. More research is needed to investigate these patterns further.

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  • 38.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Effect of childhood coeliac disease on ninth grade school performance: evidence from a population-based study2018In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN 0003-9888, E-ISSN 1468-2044, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 143-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coeliac disease might affect school performance due to its effect on cognitive performance and related health consequences that might increase school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with coeliac disease performed differently on completion of ninth grade in school compared with children without coeliac disease.

    Methods: Analysis was performed on a population of 445 669 children born in Sweden between 1991 and 1994 of whom 1767 were diagnosed with coeliac disease. School performance at ninth grade was the outcome and coeliac disease was the exposure. Other covariates included sex, Apgar score at 5 min, small for gestational age, year of birth, family type, parental education and income.

    Results: There was no association between coeliac disease and school performance at ninth grade (adjusted coefficient -2.4, 95% CI 5.1 to 0.4). A weak association was established between late coeliac diagnosis and higher grades, but this disappeared after adjusting for parent socioeconomic conditions. Being small for gestational age affected performance negatively (adjusted coefficient -6.9, 95% CI 8.0 to 5.7). Grade scores were significantly lower in children living with a single parent (adjusted coefficient -20.6, 95% CI 20.9 to 20.2), compared with those with married/cohabiting parents. A positive association was found between scores at ninth grade and parental education and income.

    Conclusion: Coeliac disease diagnosis during childhood is not associated with poor school performance at ninth grade.

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  • 39.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Social medicine.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    The relationship between work and family preferences and behaviors: a longitudinal study of gender differences in Sweden2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proposed theories to explain gender inequality in the labor market and family, such as gender specialization within families and gender segregation in the labor markets, lack consideration for individual preferences. Preference theory accounts for individual choice and gendered preferences but has been substantially criticized, indicating a need for further research. This study uses Swedish longitudinal data to explore how preferences for work and family relate to behavior. We explore three critical issues raised in previous research: gender differences in preferences; the relationship between work and family changes and subsequent preferences; how preferences relate to work and family behaviors. Our results showed small general gender differences in preferences, although women had a stronger preference for both children and work than men. Changes in work status were further related to changes in work preferences, while changes in family status were related to changes in family preferences. Moreover, preferences had poor predictive power in relation to work and family behaviors. Our results indicate that preferences do not explain gender inequality in Sweden. The relationship between preferences and behaviors seems bidirectional and preferences and behavior within the family sphere has little to do with preferences and behavior within the work sphere.

  • 40.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nest leaving in Sweden: the importance of early educational and labour market careers1999In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 61, no 4, p. 1068-1079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the importance of the early educational and labor market career for nest leaving and for returning to the parental home. Using unique individual life course data for the entire Swedish cohort born in 1973, the article shows that employment means a high probability of nest leaving and stability of independent living. University studies mean a high probability of nest leaving but less stability of independent living. Those neither employed nor pursuing and education had both low probabilities of nest leaving and less stability of independent living. The early career was more important for structuring women's nest leaving than men's nest leaving.

  • 41.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    New gender roles – new explanations for separation?: From specialisation and trading to role balance?2008In: Journal of Societal and Social Policy, ISSN 1681 2816, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Davidson College, NC, USA.
    Skilsmässor och separationer: betydelsen av rollspecialisering och jämställdhet2009In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the same time as women made their large scale entrance on the labour market divorce rates increased in most western societies. This combination of societal trends was widely understood from the perspective of the specialization and trading model, which implies undermined marital stability through decreasing interdependency between husband and wife. We argue the need to acknowledge the new roles, and perceptions of these roles, men and women have in order to explain differences in separation and stability among couples. When both partners are expecting to be in paid labour and share housework responsibilities, specialisation could actually be a risk factor for cohabitational dissolution. This article uses a ten year longitudinal data base of all Swedish cohabiting first time parents in 1993. The analyses generally support what could be labelled a role balance model on separation rather than the specialization model. Looking at the father's participation in childcare this was quite clear, where the man's outtake of parental leave for the first child was shown to be related to reduced hazards of separation. In the same way equal distribution of the household labour market incomes between the partners was related to lower hazards of separation.

  • 43.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Skilsmässor och separationer: Betydelsen av rollspecialisering och jämställdhet2009In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Nilsson, Karina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Work in Swedish households: the role of education2004In: Australian Journal of Adult Learning, Vol. 44, no 2, p. ?-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Noland, Ebba
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Box 880, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Klötz Logan, Fia
    Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Box 880, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Stefan
    Department of Sociology, Center for social work, Uppsala University, Box 624, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    What happens after forensic psychiatric care?: A latent class analysis of dimensions of welfare for former forensic psychiatric patients2023In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mentally disordered offenders are a heterogenous group regarding psychopathology as well as background factors, which makes it likely that more than one stereotypical life situation will apply to all forensic psychiatric patients following discharge. Knowledge about typical life situations would be valuable for optimising support for improving the overall life situation of these individuals. This paper investigates life situations from the perspective of level of living research and resources in terms of different welfare dimensions.

    Methods: Included were all all individuals (n = 1146) who had been discharged from forensic psychiatric care in Sweden during 2009–2018 and were included in the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register. Follow-up time varied from 4 to 3644 days, (m = 1697, Md = 1685). Register data from several different registers was combined. Data was analysed using latent class analysis, and multinominal logistic regression analysis investigated what background factors were associated with class membership.

    Results: The results show that there are four subgroups of post-discharge life situations: the high support group, the general psychiatric needs group, the working group, and the family group. The high support group was the largest, representing 54% of the entire sample. There are background factors associated with group membership, including both age at discharge, length of stay in forensic psychiatric care and pre-index crime historical factors.

    Conclusions: This study contributes to the understanding of the post-discharge lives of former forensic psychiatric patients and shows that for several subgroups, negative outcomes are rare. Knowledge about these subgroups could be drawn upon to make informed decisions about in- and outpatient forensic psychiatric care, discharge from forensic psychiatric services, and what support is offered to former forensic psychiatric patients.

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  • 46.
    Noland, Ebba
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Historical, clinical and situational risk factors for post-discharge recidivism in forensic psychiatric patients – A Swedish registry study2021In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, ISSN 0160-2527, E-ISSN 1873-6386, Vol. 79, article id 101749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate which factors, known at the time of discharge, correlate with post-discharge recidivism in forensic psychiatric patients in Sweden.

    Subjects and methods: A database was constructed based on registry data taken from the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register, as well as data on post-discharge convictions sourced from the National Council of Crime Prevention and demographic data from Statistics Sweden. The sample consisted of all individuals discharged from forensic psychiatric services in Sweden during 2009–2018 (n = 1150), and the follow-up period was 2009–2018. Survival analyses were used to investigate predictors of an increased likelihood for recidivism using both bivariate comparisons and multivariate Cox regression analyses.

    Results: The Cox regression analyses showed that out of the demographic background factors, higher age at discharge was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of recidivism within the follow-up period. The two discrete historical factors of having a history of substance abuse and having been sentenced before the index crime, and the clinical factor of presence of personality disorder without the presence of psychosis were associated with an increase in the likelihood of recidivism. The situational factors of having a trustee or limited guardian and main living accommodation being supported living were associated with a decrease in the likelihood of recidivism. The results support previous research regarding historical and pre-treatment factors, but also show that situational factors related to increased support and supervision in everyday life are associated with a decreased likelihood of recidivism. This knowledge may help the administrative courts and forensic psychiatric services to prevent future recidivism.

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  • 47.
    Noland, Ebba
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Box 880, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Klötz Logan, Fia
    Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Box 880, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    The reconvictions of mentally disordered offenders: how, when, and where?2022In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about the recidivism of mentally disordered offenders after discharge from forensic psychiatric services. This is problematic because such knowledge could (i) help professionals who encounter this group to better plan interventions to prevent recidivism, (ii) clarify the rates of recidivism post-discharge from forensic psychiatric care and (iii) further develop instruments for specific risk assessment. The aim of this study was to investigate the new crimes of mentally disordered offenders who had been reconvicted after discharge from forensic psychiatric care.

    Methods: Included in this study were all individuals (n = 1142) who had been discharged from forensic psychiatric care in Sweden during 2009–2018, were included in the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register, and had been reconvicted in a criminal court within the follow-up period of 2009–2018 (n = 157, 14% of the population). The follow-up times of the discharged patients within the period varied from 4 to 3644 days, (m = 1697, Md = 1685). Retrospective registry data along with coded data from criminal court judgments (n = 210) were used to create a database. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and descriptive statistical analysis was performed.

    Results: 75% of included individuals were reconvicted for at least one violent crime, but only 9 individuals were reconvicted for a serious violent crime, which can be compared to the 44 individuals with serious violent index crimes. The most common crime was “Other violent”. The most common sentence was probation. The offender’s most common relationship to the victim was having no known relationship, followed by the victim being a person of authority. The most common circumstance of the crime leading to the reconviction was that it occurred without apparent provocation; other common circumstances were related to the exercise of public authority. The most common crime scene was a public place.

    Conclusions: Even though the reconvictions of this group included many violent crimes, there were very few serious violent crimes. The findings that the victims of the crimes of mentally disordered offenders are most commonly either unknown to the perpetrator or persons of authority, and that the crimes are often perpetrated without apparent provocation or reason, are important information for all professionals who encounter this group and should be taken into consideration to assess risk more accurately.

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  • 48.
    Noland, Ebba
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Suvi
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klötz Logan, Fia
    Sundsvall Forensic Psychiatric Centre, Region Västernorrland, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Chang, Zheng
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Post-discharge pharmacological treatment discontinuation of forensic psychiatric patients in Sweden2024In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 15, article id 1342722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Most forensic psychiatric patients have chronic psychiatric disorders that require long-term pharmacological treatment even after discharge from care. However, the prevalence and correlates of post-discharge medication discontinuation in this patient group remain unclear.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-discharge discontinuation of pharmacological treatment in forensic psychiatric patients in Sweden.

    Methods: Data on individuals discharged from forensic psychiatric care between 2009 and 2018 (n = 1,142) with ongoing pharmacological treatment at the time of discharge (n = 856) were identified from the Swedish National Forensic Psychiatric Register. Cox regression models were used to estimate the association between patient characteristics and medication discontinuation.

    Results: Of the 856 individuals with pharmacological treatment at discharge, 488 (57%) discontinued treatment within 2 years of discharge. Factors associated with an increased risk of treatment discontinuation varied between different types of psychotropic medications: the most important correlate was comorbidity between psychosis and personality disorder. Higher age at discharge, longer length of stay, having a history of several psychiatric care episodes, having a trustee, having a limited guardian, and a residing in a supported living accommodation at the time of discharge were associated with a decreased rate of medication discontinuation. This applied for antipsychotics, antidepressants, antiepileptics, and any psychotropic medication, but not for psychostimulants or drugs used in addictive disorders.

    Conclusion: For many former forensic psychiatric patients, there are situational factors associated with medication discontinuation. This insight holds significance for professionals who are involved in pre-discharge planning within forensic psychiatric care and those who interact with this cohort of former patients post-discharge.

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  • 49.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Towards a Sociological Understanding of Mental Well-being among the Unemployed: The role of Economic and Psychosocial Factors1999In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 577-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classic research on unemployment and mental health has focused on the functions of employment. These functions are considered to be of equal importance for all unemployed. A critique of this perspective has been that it views the unemployed as passive and homogeneous. Instead, an agency approach has been suggested, which focuses on the individual goals of the unemployed. This paper develops and tests a model for understanding the differentiated mental consequences of unemployment, which on a theoretical level integrates both the structural restrictions of the unemployment situation and the agency of the individual. The model is based on previous findings which indicate that mental well-being is dependent on the economic need for employment, on the one hand, and on the psychosocial need for employment, on the other hand. The model integrates both these aspects and the results show that the combined effect is of central importance for the differentiated mental well-being of the unemployed. The analysis is based on a longitudinal survey of 3,500 randomly selected, unemployed Swedes.

  • 50.
    Nordenmark, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Strandh, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Layte, Richard
    The impact of unemployment benefit system on the mental well-being of the unemployed in Sweden, Ireland and Great Britain2006In: European Societies, ISSN 1461-6696, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 83-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the availability of social support and psychological attachment to work have been shown to influence mental well-being in unemployment, the main determinant suggested in research is economic strain. Yet, though the level of state support in unemployment is the most crucial determinant of economic strain, there has been little research on the impact of welfare benefit regime on mental well-being among the unemployed. In this paper we compare the impact of benefit regime by comparing the unemployed in Britain, Ireland and Sweden. We find that the type of benefit received is an important determinant of mental distress with income replacement benefits being more beneficial than flat rate benefits. Results also show that different systems differentially impact on different groups with income replacement benefits tending to maintain pre-unemployment differences in distress and flat rate benefits equalising these differences.

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