Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 95
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ander, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Stjerna Doohan, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Elchockvapen som hjälpmedel vid polisiära ingripanden: En vetenskaplig utvärdering av Polismyndighetens försöksverksamhet med elchockvapen 2018-20192020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Less-­lethal weapons are often used when police officers deal with uncooperative and potentially dan­gerous persons. In recent years there has been growing international consensus regarding the useful­ness of less lethal weapons, such as conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). In 2018 the Swedish Police Authority launched a two­year trial of CEWs in Sweden.

    AIM: The current study aims to evaluate the Police Authority's CEW trial, and to explore the public's point of view about the legitimacy of the police’s use of CEW.

    METHODS: The study includes a quantitative survey and qualitative data. The survey data was collected at three time points; before, during, and at the end of the trial. Survey data was collected from two groups of police officers; one group that participated in the CEW trial and one control group that was not part of the trial. To increase the understanding of the survey results, in­depth interviews and focus group in­terviews were conducted with police officers who had experience of using CEW during the trial. To understand more about the citizens' perspective on different aspects of CEW legitimacy, focus group interviews were conducted with a convenient sample of the public. Data from the Police work injury system (LISA) was also collected to investigate the CEW’s impact on police officers' injuries.

    RESULTS: Results from the survey showed no differences between CEW and the control group in experiencing stress in certain given situations. Compared to the control group, the police officers in the CEW group experienced a greater sense of safety in situations that involve a high degree of resistance and/or phys­ical attacks. Similarly, the findings from the interviews showed that having access to CEW reduced stress in violent situations by boosting police officers' sense of safety. The interview results revealed that CEW contributes to police officers limiting the use of other potentially harmful means of violence, such as physical methods and firearms. In the survey, no difference was found between the CEW group and the control group in exposure to threat, violence, and resistance, as well as injuries to police officers or counterpart. The interviewees considered the CEW to be an important tool and saw only benefits with it. They believed it could save lives, reduce injuries to both police officers and counterparts, and improve their working environment. Findings from both quantitative and qualitative data confirm the positive effect of CEW through its contribution to lesser use of violence, for example in the reduction in the use of baton and pepper spray, which often cause more injuries. Participants from the public express that CEW is an effective and useful tool for the police, but emphasizes the importance of an awareness regarding the situations in which it is used in and towards whom.

    CONCLUSIONS: Based on the survey results, it is difficult to draw any definite conclusions about how and to what extent using CEW is associated with less injuries among police officers and counterparts. However, the inter­view results indicate that police officers experience a decreased risk of violence and thus, injuries. Ac­cess to CEW can increase the sense of safety in situations involving violence and strong resistance, which consequently reduces stress. CEW can also reduce the use of pepper spray, baton, and to some extent firearms. The CEW is perceived to have a de­escalating effect and can facilitate the process of decision making in relation to which tool to be used in police interventions with a high degree of threat and violence. Participants from the public perceived that the use of violence by the police, including the use of CEW, is in general justifiable. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Blom, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Snellman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet: en introduktion2023In: Socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet: insatser på individ-, grupp- och samhällsnivå / [ed] Björn Blom; Malin Eriksson; Marie-Louise Snellman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023, p. 21-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här antologin handlar om socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet. Det är ett tema som per definition kan sägas vara betydelsefullt, men samtidigt är det oklart vad det innebär, både i teori och praktik. Vi förmodar att olika läsare närmar sig boken med skilda förväntningar och förkunskaper. Några frågor som antagligen kan infinna sig är: Vad är social hållbarhet? Vad finns det för koppling mellan social hållbarhet och socialtjänstens arbete? Är socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet något nytt? Vilka behöver kunskap om socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet och varför? I det här kapitlet för vi en introducerade diskussion i anslutning till dessa frågor. Därigenom läggs en grund för bokens övriga kapitel där olika aspekter av socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet behandlas mer ingående.

  • 3.
    Blom, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, MalinUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.Snellman, Marie-LouiseUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet: insatser på individ-, grupp- och samhällsnivå2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att arbeta för social hållbarhet är nödvändigt då det i grund och botten handlar om vår gemensamma framtid. I Sverige är socialtjänsten en nyckelaktör i detta arbete. I den här boken diskuteras bland annat vad social hållbarhet är, kopplingen mellan social hållbarhet och socialtjänstens arbete, samt hur socialtjänsten arbetar med frågor som rör social hållbarhet. I boken ger forskare och yrkesverksamma praktiker initierade och konkreta exempel på socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet på olika samhällsnivåer. Författarna beskriver även hur arbetet med social hållbarhet har sett ut över tid och med utgångspunkt i lagförslag och aktuell forskning diskuteras hur socialtjänstens framtida arbete med social hållbarhet kan utvecklas. Socialtjänstens arbete med social hållbarhet vänder sig framför allt till studenter på socionomprogrammet och till studerande på andra professionsutbildningar inom det samhälls- och beteendevetenskapliga området. Boken kan med fördel läsas även av yrkesverksamma socionomer och annan personal i människobehandlande organisationer. Den är också relevant för beslutsfattare, lärare och forskare.

  • 4. Briones-Vozmediano, E.
    et al.
    Stjärnfeldt, J.
    Larson, F.
    Nielsen, A.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Salazar, M.
    Young men's discourses of health service utilization for Chlamydia infection testing in Stockholm2020In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 30, no Issue Supplement_5, article id ckaa166.854Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT) infection is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted bacterial disease in Sweden, other European countries, as well as globally. CT is often asymptomatic and if it goes untreated it can cause severe reproductive health issues. In Sweden, men test for CT in a much lesser extent than women. The aim of this study is to identify factors influencing Swedish young men to use Health care for CT detection.

    Methods:

    Qualitative study based on 18 semi-structured interviews with young men (18-30 years old) in Stockholm during 2018. A Situational Analysis was conducted (a development of Constructivist Grounded Theory) of the interviews' transcriptions, using Open Code as the software for qualitative analysis in order to code and organize the information obtained. We constructed a situational map to illustrate the positions taken by Swedish young men according to their discourses.

    Results:

    Three ideal types of Swedish young men with different discourses and behaviors towards CT testing were identified: unconcerned men are indifferent about CT and other sexual transmitted infections (STI) and therefore not testing; ambivalent men only test when suspect suffering from an STI and/or are influenced by their social network; Whereas, proactive men test regularly as a way to know they are healthy. The differences between the ideal types are explained by their risk perception, the role of health services, and the positive or negative influence of their social network.

    Conclusions:

    The ideal types of young men identified in this study show a range of discourses linked to their risk perception, the role of health services, and the influence of their social network, which in practice is translated into different behaviours adopted for CT testing. Testing should be encouraged as an important part of CT prevention by educating groups of unconcerned young men about both the consequences of untreated CT and the free testing options available in Sweden.

    Key messages: 

    Swedish young men have different discourses towards CT testing depending on their risk perception, the strategies adopted to test and the positive or negative role of their social network.

    The role of health services and the social support emerged as key factors to promoting testing among Swedish Young men.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Canabarro, Ana Paula Finatto
    et al.
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18a, Widerströmska Huset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nielsen, Anna
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18a, Widerströmska Huset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zeebari, Zangin
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18a, Widerströmska Huset, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Gjuterigatan 5, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Salazar, Mariano
    Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Tomtebodavägen 18a, Widerströmska Huset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cognitive social capital as a health-enabling factor for STI testing among young men in Stockholm, Sweden: A cross-sectional population-based study2023In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 10, article id e20812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess whether different forms of cognitive social capital increased the relative probability of testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among young men living in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2017 with men aged 20–29 years living in Stockholm County, Sweden (n = 523). The main outcome was STI testing patterns (never tested, tested only within a 12-month period, tested only beyond a 12-month period, repeatedly tested). The main exposure were two forms of cognitive social capital: social support (having received help, having someone to share inner feelings with) and institutionalized trust (in school, healthcare, media). Data were analyzed using weighted multivariable multinomial logistic regression to obtain adjusted weighted relative probability ratio (aRPR).

    Results: After adjusting for confounding factors, receiving help (aRPR: 5.2, 95% CI: 1.7–16.2) and having someone to share inner feelings with (aRPR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2–7.7) increased the relative probabilities of young men testing for STIs, but only for those testing beyond a 12-month period. Trust in media increased the relative probability of STI testing for those testing only within a 12-month period (aRPR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.1–6.1) and for those testing repeatedly (aRPR: 3.6, 95% CI: 1.5–8.8).

    Conclusion: Young men in Stockholm County exhibit distinct STI testing patterns. Social support and trust in media were factors that increased the probability of being tested for STIs, with this effect varying according to the young men's STI testing pattern. Further studies are required to explore how trust in media might promote STI testing in this population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Strandh, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sundqvist, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Den lokala nivåns betydelse i det förebyggande arbetet mot våldsbejakande islamistisk extremism2017In: Våldsbejakande extremism: en forskarantologi / [ed] Christofer Edling och Amir Rostamni, Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2017, p. 225--255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Strandh, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    What is local resilience against radicalization and how can it be promoted?: a multidisciplinary literature review2023In: Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, ISSN 1057-610X, E-ISSN 1521-0731, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 1108-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research note, we present results from a review of research on local resilience in relation to radicalization in public health, social work, crisis management, and community policing using terrorism studies as a point of departure. In order to identify agreements between literatures, we focus on how local resilience is understood, how it is said to be promoted, and how this knowledge could be synthesized. We show that resilience by and large is understood as both a process and a capacity underpinned by cooperation, social networks, and community resources and that an initial mapping of existing strengths and resources is pivotal for local resilience-building.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Strandh, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    "They think of us as part of the problem instead of part of the solution": Swedish civil society and faith based organizations in resilience building and prevention of radicalization and violent Islamist extremism2020In: Journal for Deradicalization, E-ISSN 2363-9849, no 22, p. 122-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radicalization and violent extremism are pressing issues on the Swedish political agenda. The local level has been identified as pivotal when it comes to preventive work and local public actors are encouraged to cooperate with civil society in efforts to promote local resilience. However, the Swedish debate on the role of civil society organizations (CSOs) and faith based organizations (FBOs) in resilience building and prevention is heated. Based on 14 interviews with representatives for secular, Christian and Muslim CSOs and FBOs, we have explored and analysed how they perceive their role in resilience building and preventive work. We have asked how they interpret local resilience against radicalization and violent extremism and what they think is needed in order to promote it. Findings are mirrored against a recent literature review on local resilience. In the interviews, there is a strong emphasis on work to strengthen social support networks, enhance community resources and build collective identity. In relation to the literature review, there are significant similarities with how resilience is defined and said to be promoted.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Strandh, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sundqvist, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Lokal resiliens mot radikalisering och våldsbejakande extremism - från ett krisberedskapsperspektiv2020Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Emmelin, Maria
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kan socialt kapital byggas in i våra bostadsområden och därmed förbättra invånarnas upplevda och mentala hälsa?: Ett diskussionsunderlag framtaget för Kommissionen för ett socialt hållbart Malmö2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11. Eriksson, Malin
    En essä om sociala bestämningsfaktorer för hälsan som ett användbart begreppsligt ramverk för hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorernas arbete2022In: Socionomens forskningssupplement, ISSN 0283-1929, no 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskapen om sambanden mellan sociala livsvillkor och hälsa var tidigt en central utgångspunkt för hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorernas arbete, men har över tid tenderat att underordnas ett fokus på mer individinriktade insatser. Samtidigt beskrivs ofta hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorerna ha en otydlig yrkesroll och en svag professionell ställning. Den nya legitimationsgrundande examen utgör en unik möjlighet att förtydliga hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorernas yrkesroll, och kan idealt leda till utvecklandet av ett samlat begreppsligt ramverk för arbetet. I denna essä lyfter jag ramverket om de sociala bestämningsfaktorerna för hälsan som ett lämpligt begreppsligt ramverk för hälso- och sjukvårdskuratorernas arbete. Ramverket passar väl in i kuratorernas generalistexpertis och biopsykosociala perspektiv, och skulle kunna bidra till att tydliggöra yrkesgruppens unika kompetens. Ramverket om de sociala bestämningsfaktorerna för hälsan kan också användas för att återaktualisera och tydliggöra behovet av kurativa insatser inte bara på individ- utan även på meso- och makronivå.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital and health: implications for health promotion2011In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 4, p. 5611-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a review of the PhD Thesis of Malin Eriksson, entitled 'Social capital, health and community action - implications for health promotion.' The article presents a theoretical overview of social capital and its relation to health, reviews empirical findings of the links between social capital and (self-rated) health, and discusses the usefulness of social capital in health promotion interventions at individual and community levels. Social capital, conceptualized as an individual characteristic, can contribute to the field of health promotion by adding new knowledge on how social network interventions may best be designed to meet the needs of the target group. The distinction of different forms of social capital, i.e. bonding, bridging, and linking, can be useful in mapping the kinds of networks that are available and health-enhancing (or damaging) and for whom. Further, social capital can advance social network interventions by acknowledging the risk for unequal distribution of investments and returns from social network involvement. Social capital, conceptualized as characterizing whole communities, provides a useful framework for what constitutes health-supporting environments and guidance on how to achieve them. Mapping and mobilization of social capital in local communities may be one way of achieving community action for health promotion. Social capital is context-bound by necessity. Thus, from a global perspective, it cannot be used as a 'cookbook' on how to achieve supportive environments and community action smoothly. However, social capital can provide new ideas on the processes that influence human interactions, cooperation, and community action for health promotion in various contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital, health and community action: implications for health promotion2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background; The overwhelming increase in studies about social capital and health occurring since 1995 indicates a renewed interest in the social determinants of health and a call for a more explicit use of theory in public health and epidemiology. The links between social capital and health are still not clear and the meanings of different forms of individual and collective social capital and their implications for health promotion needs further exploration. The overall aims of this thesis are to explore the relationship between social capital and health and to contribute to the theoretical framework of the role of social capital for health and health promotion.

    Methods; Data from a social capital survey were used to investigate the associations between individual social capital and self-rated health for men and women and different educational groups. Survey data were also analyzed to determine the association between collective social capital and self-rated health for men and women. A qualitative case study in a small community with observed high levels of civic engagement formed the basis for exploring the role of social capital for community action. Data from the same study were utilized for a grounded theory situational analysis of the social mechanisms leading to social capital mobilization.

    Main findings; Access to individual social capital increases the odds for good self-rated health equally for men and women and different educational groups. However, the likelihood of having access to social capital differs between groups. The results indicate a positive association between collective social capital and self-rated health for women but not for men. Results from the qualitative case study illustrate how social capital in local communities can facilitate collective actions for public good but may also increase social inequality. Mobilizing social capital in local communities requires identification of community issues that call for action, a fighting spirit from trusted local leaders, “know-how” from creative entrepreneurs, and broad legitimacy and support in the community.

    Conclusions; This thesis supports the idea that individual social capital is health-enhancing and that strengthening individual social capital can be considered one important health promotion strategy. Collective social capital may have a positive effect on self-rated health for women but not for men and therefore mobilizing collective social capital might be more health-enhancing for women. Collective social capital may have indirect positive effects on health for all by facilitating the ability of communities to solve collective health problems. However, mobilizing social capital in local communities requires an awareness of the risk for increased social inequality.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Socialt kapital och hälsa: förklaringsmodeller och implikationer för hälsofrämjande interventioner2012In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 89, no 4-5, p. 332-346Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital concerns social networks, the reciprocities that arise from them and the value of these for individuals as well as for whole communities. Despite extensive research many questions remain, such as the implication of this knowledge for health promotion. The aim of this article is to give a brief overview of the links between social capital and health, and to illuminate possible explanations for these associations. Furthermore, I intend to highlight areas where this knowledge may have implications for health promotion. The review shows that social capital adds knowledge concerning how social network interventions could best be designed, and generates new knowledge on what characterizes a health enabling environment. Social capital can be used as a "theoretical tool" for health promotion, but requires an awareness of people's unequal opportunities to access social networks.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Socialt kapital och lokalt polisarbete2022In: Polisiärt arbete i utsatta områden: utmaningar och möjligheter / [ed] Mehdi Ghazinour; Malin Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 225-245Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Socialt kapital: teori, begrepp och mätning - en kunskapsöversikt med fokus på folkhälsa2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital has become an attractive theoretical perspective for a range of phenomena. However there is no consensus about definitions and measures of the concept. The aim of this paper is to make a Swedish review with relevance for public health of how the concept is used among some well cited researchers in political science, sociology, economy and public health. The review describes the background and use of the concept within these four disciplines. Different forms and perspectives on social capital are reviewed, and the important question about sources and consequences of social capital is discussed. Some of the critics against the concept are also presented. Social capital is often measured by connecting variables from already existing databases to the concept. However there are also examples of instruments that are prepared especially for measuring social capital and some of these are showed in this review. Examples of both quantitative and qualitative studies are presented. The review calls attention to the wide application of social capital within public health. The concept is useful in understanding the connections between social factors and health outcome on three different levels, - state, community and individual level. Some researchers state that the concept is too broad to be able to add some new knowledge; while this review argues that a wide application also could be a benefit. The question about health determinants is complex and could not be understood only on one level. Social capital can add important new knowledge about health determinants on all three levels. However, there is a need for further theoretical development to make the research about social capital and health valid. The basis for community social capital has to be clarified. In addition, there is a need for more knowledge about the collective and the individual aspects of social capital. Analysis of social capital on different levels also demands awareness of the fact that social capital could have positive consequences on one level and concurrently, negative consequences on another level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Twenty years of research on social capital and health: what is the utility for health promotion?2020In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 467-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the huge amount of research about social capital and health during the last 20 years, the utility of this knowledge for health promotion remains unclear. This article aims to conceptualise social capital in relation to health promotion and to identify what is required for social capital to be used as a resource in health promotion. It suggests that social capital has become an important concept in health promotion but that many challenges remain on how it could be utilised in policy and practice. Social capital does not add any ground-breaking new knowledge in health promotion but complements already existing knowledge within social networks/social support and community development approaches in health promotion. Utilizing social capital in health promotion requires an awareness of power relations and social inequality, as well as the political structures that exist were the intervention take place. There is a need for more systematic explorations of case studies attempting to utilise social capital in health promotion.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dahlblom, Kjerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Children's perspectives on health promoting living environmens: the significance of social capital2020In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 258, article id 113059Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the usefulness of social capital as a conceptual tool to design neighbourhoods promoting children’s health. The aim was to explore children’s perspectives of health promoting environments, and we used a combination of photovoice and grounded theory. Children from two neighbourhoods in a Swedish municipality were invited to photograph and discuss places of importance for their well-being. They presented places facilitating togetherness, enjoyable activities and positive emotions, mostly found in their immediate environments: at home, at school and in their neighbourhoods, but the access to these places was unequally distributed between the areas. The results highlight a need for ensuring all children’s access to health promoting places and to include children’s views in policy and planning. Investments in the physical environment need to be combined with efforts to influence norms and collective efficacy to secure local ownership and use of these investments. We found that the concept of social capital is a relevant conceptual tool for understanding what constitutes health-promoting places from children’s perspectives and contributes to a deeper understanding on how physical and social environments are interlinked.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dahlblom, Kjerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    What constitute health promoting living environments from children's perspectives?2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 508-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Swedish research on the effects of living environment on children's health is limited, and very few studies bring up children’s own views and experiences from their everyday lives. The overall aim of this study is to explore what constitutes health promoting living environments from children’s own perspectives.

    Methods: This is an ongoing qualitative exploratory study, building on children’s active involvement using Photovoice method. Schoolchildren in grade five, living in a medium sized Swedish municipality were equipped with digital cameras to document places of importance for their well-being. These photographs were discussed in sex-stratified focus groups. By discussing their photos, the children could identify and portray their choices of places, which gave valuable insights of how they view their worlds and what they perceive as health promoting in their living environments. Data were initially analyzed thematically.

    Results: Children presented photos from their homes showing mostly their own rooms and their computers, sports- and other facilities for leisure activities as well as photos from playgrounds, forests and neighborhood venues. These places were all perceived as important for their wellbeing. Preliminary analyzes reveal how these places in different ways are characterized as; Places allowing Socializing; Places for Activities; Places for Relaxation, and Places providing a sense of Freedom. Having a Space of one’s own was also perceived as important for well-being.

    Conclusions: A safe environment, allowing positive activities, relaxation, togetherness as well as freedom and a space of one’s own, characterizes health-promoting places for Children in a Swedish context.

    Key messages:

    • Children are active actors in their living environments and are well aware of aspects in their living environments of importance for their well-being.
    • Children’s voices and experiences needs to be taken into account in the planning and design of health promoting living environments.
  • 20.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?2010In: Social capital and rural development / [ed] H Westlund & K Kobayashi, ? , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Lund university.
    Collective actors as driving forces for mobilizing social capital in a local community: what can be learned for health promotion?2013In: Social capital and rural development in the knowledge society / [ed] Hans Westlund and Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 273-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Understanding the role of social capital for health promotion beyond Putnam: a qualitative case study from northern Sweden2009In: Social theory and health, ISSN 1477-8211, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 318-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital is believed to improve the capacity of communities to work together for solving collective health problems. The present study was conducted in a community in northern Sweden where citizens through collective actions managed to build an association-driven health center. The aims were to describe the community's existing social capital in order to explore how Putnam's theories could contribute to an understanding of the observed high civic engagement and to discuss how other theoretical perspectives might add to an understanding of the role of social capital for health promotion. A qualitative case study was performed and the analysis followed a grounded theory approach. In accordance with Putnam, inherited social capital and high participation in existing associations were found to be important for uniting people. Beyond these, other aspects such as effective information channels, strong leaders and high social control were also significant and better understood by adding Coleman's and Bourdieu's views of social capital. If social capital is to be used for the purposes of health promotion the risk of increased social inequality as an unintended consequence needs to be considered. An awareness of how specific contextual conditions affect the building and mobilizing of social capital is also crucial.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital, gender and educational level: impact on self-rated health2010In: The Open Public Health Journal, ISSN 1874-9445, Vol. 3, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Social capital has been recognized as one important social determinant for health, but we still have limited knowledge about how it can be used to explain inequality in health. This study investigated the links between individual social capital and self-rated health by gender and educational level, and analyzed if access to social capital might explain the observed disparities in self-rated health between men and women and different educational groups. Study design: A cross-sectional survey in Northern Sweden. Methods: A social capital questionnaire was constructed and mailed to 15 000 randomly selected individuals. Different forms of structural and cognitive social capital were measured. Self-rated health was used as the outcome measure. Crude and adjusted OR and 95% CI were calculated for good selfrated health and access to each form of social capital. Multivariate regression was used to analyze how sociodemographic factors and access to social capital might influence differences in self-rated health by gender and educational level. Results: Access to almost each form of social capital significantly increased the odds for good self-rated health for all groups. A higher education significantly increased the odds for access to each form of social capital, and being a man significantly increased the odds for having access to some forms of social capital. The health advantage for higher educated and men partly decreased when controlling for access to social capital. Conclusions: Access to social capital can partly explain the observed health inequality between men and women and different educational groups. Strengthening social capital might be one way of tackling health inequality. It is important to consider the structural conditions that create unequal opportunities for different groups to access social capital.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ensamkommande ungdomars placering vid SiS särskilda ungdomshem. Placeringsmotiv, problembild och insatser2021Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Challenges and opportunities for local development initiatives to influence social capital for health promoting purposes: theoretical and empirical support2016In: Handbook of social capital and regional development / [ed] Hans Westlund, Johan P. Larsson, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 359-390Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Lunds universitet.
    What constitutes a health-enabling neighborhood? A grounded theory situational analysis addressing the significance of social capital and gender.2013In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 97, p. 112-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variations in health between neighborhoods are well known and the conceptualization of social capitalhas contributed to an understanding of how contextual factors influence these differences. Studies showpositive health-effects from living in high social capital areas, at least for some population sub-groups.The aim of this qualitative study was to understand what constitutes a ‘health-enabling’ neighborhood.It follows up results from a social capital survey in northern Sweden indicating that the healtheffects of living in a high social capital neighborhood is gendered in favor of women. A grounded theorysituational analysis of eight focus group discussions e four with men and four with women e illustratedsimilar and different positions on how neighborhood characteristics influence health. A neighborhood,where people say hi to each other (“hi-factor”) and where support between neighbors exist, were factorsperceived as positive for health by all, as was a good location, neighborhood greenness and proximity toessential arenas. Women perceived freedom from demands, feeling safe and city life as additional healthenabling factors. For men freedom to do what you want, a sense of belonging, and countryside life wereimportant. To have burdensome neighbors, physical disturbances and a densely living environment wereperceived as negative for health in both groups while demands for a well styled home and feeling unsafewere perceived as negative for health among women. Neighborhood social capital, together with otherelements in the living environment, has fundamental influence on people’s perceived health. Ourfindings do not confirm that social capital is more important for women than for men but that distinctiveform of social capital differ in impact. Investing in physical interventions, such as planning for meetingplaces, constructing attractive green areas, and making neighborhoods walking-friendly, may increasehuman interactions that is instrumental for social capital and is likely to have health promoting effectsfor all.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Hammarström, Anne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Different uses of Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory in public mental health research: what is their value for guiding public mental health policy and practice?2018In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 414-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bronfenbrenner’s ecological theory is appealing as a conceptual tool for guiding public mental health interventions. However, his theory underwent significant changes since its first inception during the late 1970s until his death in 2005, due to which the implications that can be drawn might differ depending on what concepts (i.e. early or later) of the theory is utilized. The aim of this paper was to examine how different concepts of Bronfenbrenner’s theory have been utilized in (public) mental health research, and to analyse the value of these different uses for guiding public mental health policy and practice. A systematic search for articles that have utilized concepts of Bronfenbrenner’s theory within the field of mental health resulted in a review of 16 published papers. We found that one set of papers (N = 10) used the early concepts of ecological systems without investigating interactions between these systems, while another set of papers used the concepts of ecological systems by also investigating interactions within and between these systems (N = 4). Another limited set of papers (N = 2) utilized the later concepts of proximal processes and the PPCT model. Our results show that studies using Bronfenbrenner’s ecological system concepts by clearly considering interactions between and within these systems can result in recommendations that are most useful for guiding public mental health policy and practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wimelius, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Utvärdering av insatser för ensamkommande barn och ungdomar i Umeå 2012-2013: slutrapport2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna slutrapport redovisas en utvärdering av hur mottagningssystemet och samhällets insatser för ensamkommande barn och ungdomar har utformats och fungerat i Umeå kommun under perioden 2012-2013. Rapporten har utvecklats inom ramen för forskningsprojektet ”Hur fungerar samhällets insatser för ensamkommande flyktingungdomar?” och handlar om flyktingungdomars introduktion och etablering i det svenska samhället.

    En av slutsatserna är att det saknas en tydlig politisk styrning och vägledning av mottagandet av ensamkommande i Umeå och att aktörerna i hög grad själva har fått tolka sina uppdrag och samordna insatserna. En annan slutsats är att samhällets insatser har bidragit till att stödja, stärka och förbereda ungdomarna på att leva i Sverige och till att socialisera dem till vad som förväntas och krävs för att anpassa sig i det svenska samhället, men det finns stora utmaningar när det gäller ungdomarnas fortsatta integration i samhället.

    I rapporten presenteras också rekommendationer för hur mottagandet kan utvecklas. Bland annat rekommenderas att de olika aktörernas uppdrag förtydligas och att en mer utvecklad målsättning och vägledning för Umeå kommuns mottagande av ensamkommande arbetas fram. Aktörerna bör också utveckla och pröva nya sätt att främja ungdomarnas integration i samhället som bättre tillvaratar resurser i civilsamhället.

    Forskningsprojektet har utvecklats och genomförts av en tvärvetenskaplig forskargrupp vid Umeå universitet i samverkan med Umeå kommun och KFUM i Umeå. Projektet har medfinansierats av Europeiska Flyktingfonden.

    Download full text (pdf)
    slutrapport
  • 29.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wimelius, Malin E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Utvärdering av insatser för ensamkommande flyktingungdomar i Umeå: delrapport2013Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 41-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Child health inequalities can be explained by social determinants of health, including neighborhood social capital. Swedish research about place effects on children's health is limited. This project aims to contribute to knowledge on how neighborhood social capital may influence child health in the Swedish context. The overall research questions were: What is the incidence rate of child injuries in the living environments among boys and girls? What are the associations between neighborhood social capital and child injuries?

    Methods: Child injury data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab were utilized, with data from all children 0-12 years of age, living in Umeå municipality during 2006-2009. Individual child injury and residential area data were linked to a neighborhood social capital index, where 49 defined neighborhoods were assigned a score from low- high in social capital, based on people’s perceptions about their neighborhoods. Individual, household and neighborhood demographic and socioeconomic variables (country of birth, educational level, income and family type) were also extracted from the Umeå SIMSAM lab. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze factors associated with child injury.

    Results: We observed 3930 injury events that occurred in the living environments, experienced by 24 000 children who lived in 14 767 households within 49 neighborhoods. The incidence rate of child injuries was about 72.5/1000 for boys and 60/1000 for girls. The odds for child injures was lower in neighborhoods with high social capital compared to neighborhoods with low social capital (OR 0.87 95%CI 0.80-0.95) after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighborhood level. The protective effects of neighborhood social capital were stronger for girls than boys.

    Conclusions: Neighborhood social capital may have a protective effect on child injuries and especially so for girls.

    Key messages:

    • Neighborhood conditions have a significant influence on child health inequalities in the Swedish context, including inequalities in child injuries.
    • Mobilization of neighborhood social capital might be good investment for reducing child injuries.
  • 31.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effect of neighbourhood social capital on child injuries: a gender-stratified analysis2019In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 60, article id 102205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We designed a longitudinal retrospective cohort study to analyse the associations between neighbourhood social capital and child injures. Register data from the Umeå Simsam Lab in Sweden was used to measure child injuries and demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighbourhood level. A social capital score from a previous survey was used to measure neighbourhood social capital. We conducted a three-level multilevel negative binomial regression analysis, with children (level 1, N = 77,193) nested within households (level 2, N = 10,465), and households nested within neighbourhoods (level 3, N = 49). The incidence rate of child injuries was lower in high social capital neighbourhoods. When controlling for factors at individual, household and neighbourhood levels, living in a high social capital neighbourhood was protective of injuries among girls, but not among boys. Promoting social capital in local neighbourhoods could be seen as a prevention strategy for injuries among girls.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Lönnberg, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    En pilotstudie om Hälsa och livskvalitet i Storuman: i en jämförelse med Västerbotten i stort2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna pilotundersökning har författarna, med hjälp av data från "Västerbottens hälsoundersökningar (VHU), tittat närmare på hur utfallet av hälsa och livskvalitet i Storumans kommun ser ut i en jämförelse med Västerbotten i stort. Bland de frågor som deltagarna fått svara på i VHU-materialet finns också upplysningar om socialt stöd, sociala nätverk och föreningsaktivitet - faktorer som ofta kopplas samman med begreppet socialt kapital. Dessa avser vi lyfta fram och diskutera som möjliga förklaringsfaktorer till utfallet av hälsa och livskvalitet. I studien finns också material från en intervju med en nyckelperson i Storuman, vilket bidrar till en subjektiv beskrivning av lokalsamhället Storuman. Utförd inom EU-projektet Urban Design.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Changes in access to structural social capital and its influence on self-rated health over time for middle-aged men and women: a longitudinal study from northern Sweden.2015In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 130, p. 250-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently, most studies on social capital and health have been cross-sectional making it difficult to draw causal conclusions. This longitudinal study used data from 33,621 individuals (15,822 men and 17,799 women) from the Vasterbotten Intervention Program, to analyse how changes in access to individual social capital influence self-rated health (SRH) over time. Two forms of structural social capital, i.e. informal socializing and social participation, were measured. Age, sex, education, marital status, smoking, snuff, physical activity, alcohol consumption, high blood pressure, and body mass index were analysed as potential confounders. The association between changes in access to structural social capital and SRH in the follow-up was adjusted for SRH at baseline, as well as for changes in the socio-demographic and health-risk variables over time. The results support that changes in access to structural social capital over time impact on SRH. Remaining with no/low level of informal socializing over time increased the odds ratio for poor SRH for both men and women (OR of 1.45; 95%CI = 1.22-1.73 among men and OR of 1.56; 95%CI = 1.33-1.84 among women). Remaining with no/low levels of social participation was also detrimental to SRH in men and women (OR 1.14; 95%CI = 1.03-1.26 among men and OR 1.18; 95% Cl = 1.08-1.29 among women). A decrease in informal socializing over time was associated with poor SRH for women and men (OR of 135; 95%CI = 1.16-1.58 among men and OR of 1.57; 95%Cl = 1.36-1.82 among women). A loss of social participation had a negative effect on SRH among men and women (OR of 1.16; 95%Cl = 1.03-130 among men and OR of 1.15; 95%CI = 1.04-1.27 among women). Gaining access to social participation was harmful for SRH for women (OR 1.17; 95%CI = 1.05-131). Structural social capital has complex and gendered effects on SRH and interventions aiming to use social capital for health promotion purposes require an awareness of its gendered nature.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Neighborhood social capital and women's self-rated health - is there an age pattern?: A multi-level study from Northern Sweden2015In: Social capital as a health resource in later life: the relevance of context / [ed] Fredrika Nyqvist, Anna K. Forsman, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2015, p. 127-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    The importance of gender and conceptualization for understanding the association between collective social capital and health: a multilevel analysis from northern Sweden2011In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 264-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing research on social capital and health has fuelled the debate on whether there is a place effect on health. A central question is whether health inequality between places is due to differences in the composition of people living in these places (compositional effect) or differences in the local social and physical environments (contextual effects). Despite extensive use of multilevel approaches that allows controlling for whether the effects of collective social capital are confounded by access to social capital at the individual level, the picture remains unclear. Recent studies indicate that contextual effects on health may vary for different population subgroups and measuring "average" contextual effects on health for a whole population might therefore be inappropriate. In this study from northern Sweden, we investigated the associations between collective social capital and self-rated health for men and women separately, to understand if health effects of collective social capital are gendered. Two measures of collective social capital were used: one conventional measure (aggregated measures of trust, participation and voting) and one specific place-related (neighbourhood) measure. The results show a positive association between collective social capital and self-rated health for women but not for men. Regardless of the measure used, women who live in very high social capital neighbourhoods are more likely to rate their health as good-fair, compared to women who live in very low social capital neighbourhoods. The health effects of collective social capital might thus be gendered in favour for women. However, a more equal involvement of men and women in the domestic sphere would potentially benefit men in this matter. When controlling for socioeconomic, sociodemographic and social capital attributes at the individual level, the relationship between women's health and collective social capital remained statistically significant when using the neighbourhood-related measure but not when using the conventional measure. Our results support the view that a neighbourhood-related measure provides a clearer picture of the health effects of collective social capital, at least for women.

  • 36.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Santosa, Ailiana
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Medicinaregatan 18A, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Liv
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, MA, Boston, United States.
    Ng, Nawi
    School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Medicinaregatan 18A, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Social capital and sustainable social development - how are changes in neighbourhood social capital associated with neighbourhood sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics?2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 23, article id 13161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of social capital is acknowledged as key for sustainable social development. Little is known about how social capital changes over time and how it correlates with socio-demographic and socioeconomic factors. This study was conducted in 46 neighbourhoods in Umeå Municipality, northern Sweden. The aim was to examine neighbourhood-level characteristics associated with changes in neighbourhood social capital and to discuss implications for local policies for sustainable social development. We designed an ecological study linking survey data to registry data in 2006 and 2020. Over 14 years, social capital increased in 9 and decreased in 15 neighbour-hoods. Higher levels of social capital were associated with specific sociodemographic factors, but these differed in urban and rural areas. Urban neighbourhoods with a higher proportion of older pensioners (OR = 1.49, CI: 1.16–1.92), children under 12 (OR= 2.13, CI: 1.31–3.47), or a lower proportion of foreign-born members (OR= 0.32, CI: 0.19–0.55) had higher odds for higher social capital levels. In rural neighbourhoods, a higher proportion of single-parent households was associated with higher levels of social capital (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.04–1.98). Neighbourhood socioeconomic factors such as income or educational level did not influence neighbourhood social capital. Using repeated measures of social capital, this study gives insights into how social capital changes over time in local areas and the factors influencing its development. Local policies to promote social capital for sustainable social development should strive to integrate diverse demographic groups within neighbourhoods and should increase opportunities for inter-ethnic interactions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sundqvist, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Problembilden: medborgarnas kontra polisens perspektiv2022In: Polisiärt arbete i utsatta områden: utmaningar och möjligheter / [ed] Mehdi Ghazinour; Malin Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 75-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Wimelius, Malin E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    'I stand on my own two feet but need someone who really cares': Social networks and social capital among unaccompanied minors for becoming established in Swedish society2019In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 372-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Settling in a new host country as an unaccompanied minor holds a lot of challenges such as adaptation of new social norms, learning a new language and understanding a new culture. Social networks may foster good conditions for settlement in the host community but little is known about the availability, quality and significance of social networks for unaccompanied minors (UM) in Sweden. The aim of this qualitative grounded-theory situational study was to explore experiences of social networks among UM and the significance of those networks for becoming established in Sweden, based on data from in-depth interviews with 11 young persons. Unaccompanied young persons were broadly found to be involved in three different kinds of networks: professional carers, like-ethnic friends and ‘Swedes’ in general. Networks with professionals (i.e. linking social capital) were perceived as both a secure base and a source of rejection, and could either facilitate or obstruct the establishment. Supporting networks with like-ethnic friends (bonding social capital) proved to be the most available and important resource for becoming established, while access to networks with Swedes (bridging social capital) was in general low but still perceived as important for becoming established, not least for reducing language and cultural barriers.

  • 39.
    Frumence, Gasto
    et al.
    Department of Development Studies, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Social Medicine and Global Health, Lund University, Malmö.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kwesigabo, Gideon
    Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Killewo, Japhet
    Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Moyo, Sabrina
    Department of Microbiology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania..
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Access to social capital and risk of HIV infectionin Bukoba urban district, Kagera region, Tanzania2014In: Archives of Public Health, ISSN 0778-7367, E-ISSN 2049-3258, Vol. 72, no 38, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Kagera is one of the 22 regions of Tanzania mainland, which has witnessed a decline in HIV prevalence during the past two decades; decreasing from 24% in 1987 to 4.7 in 2009 in the urban district of Bukoba. Access to social capital, both structural and cognitive, might have played a role in this development. The aim was to examine the association between individual structural and cognitive social capital and socio-economic characteristics and the likelihood of being HIV infected.

    METHODS:

    We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study of 3586 participants, of which 3423 (95%) agreed to test for HIV following pre-test counseling. The HIV testing was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibody detection tests. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the impact of socio-economic factors, individual structural and cognitive social capital and HIV sero-status.

    RESULTS:

    Individuals who had access to low levels of both structural and cognitive individual social capital were four and three times more likely to be HIV positive compared to individuals who had access to high levels. The associations remained statistically significant for both individual structural and cognitive social capital after adjusting for potential confounding factors such as age, sex, marital status, occupation, level of education and wealth index (OR =8.6, CI: 5.7-13.0 and OR =2.4, CI: 1.6-3.5 for individual structural and cognitive social capital respectively). For both women and men access to high levels of individual structural and cognitive social capital decreased the risk of being HIV infected. This study confirms previous qualitative studies indicating that access to structural and cognitive social capital is protective to HIV infection.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We suggest that policy makers and programme managers of HIV interventions may consider strengthening and facilitating access to social capital as a way of promoting HIV preventive information and interventions in order to reduce new HIV infections in Tanzania.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Frumence, Gasto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Kwesigabo, Gideon
    Killewo, Japhet
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital and HIV infection in Bukoba urban district, Kagera region, TanzaniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Frumence, Gasto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Kwesigabo, Gideon
    Killewo, Japhet
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital and HIV risk related behaviors in Kagera region, TanzaniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Frumence, Gasto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Killewo, Japhet
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Exploring the role of cognitive and structural social capital in the declining trends of HIV/AIDS in the Kagera region of Tanzania: A grounded theory study2011In: African Journal of AIDS Research, ISSN 1608-5906, E-ISSN 1727-9445, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents a synthesis of data from three village case studies focusing on how structural and cognitivesocial capital may have influenced the progression of the HIV epidemic in the Kagera region of Tanzania. Groundedtheory was used to develop a theoretical model describing the possible links between structural and cognitivesocial capital and the impact on sexual health behaviours. Focus group discussions and key informant interviewswere carried out to represent the range of experiences of existing social capital. Both structural and cognitive socialcapital were active avenues for community members to come together, empower each other, and develop norms,values, trust and reciprocal relations. This empowerment created an enabling environment in which members couldadopt protective behaviours against HIV infection. On the one hand, we observed that involvement in formal andinformal organisations resulted in a reduction of numbers of sexual partners, led people to demand abstinencefrom sexual relations until marriage, caused fewer opportunities for casual sex, and gave individuals the agency todemand the use of condoms. On the other hand, strict membership rules and regulations excluded some members,particularly excessive alcohol drinkers and debtors, from becoming members of the social groups, which increasedtheir vulnerability in terms of exposure to HIV. Social gatherings (especially those organised during the night) werealso found to increase youths’ risk of HIV infection through instances of unsafe sex. We conclude that even thoughsocial capital may at times have negative effects on individuals’ HIV-prevention efforts, this study provides initialevidence that social capital is largely protective through empowering vulnerable groups such as women and thepoor to protect against HIV infection and by promoting protective sexual behaviours.

  • 43. Frumence, Gasto
    et al.
    Killewo, Japhet
    Kwesigabo, Gideon
    Nyström, Lennarth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Social capital and the decline in HIV transmission: a case study in three villages in the Kagera region of Tanzania2010In: SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, ISSN 1729-0376, E-ISSN 1813-4424, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present data from an exploratory case study characterising the social capital in three case villages situated in areas of varying HIV prevalence in the Kagera region of Tanzania. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews revealed a range of experiences by community members, leaders of organisations and social groups. We found that the formation of social groups during the early 1990s was partly a result of poverty and the many deaths caused by AIDS. They built on a tradition to support those in need and provided social and economic support to members by providing loans. Their strict rules of conduct helped to create new norms, values and trust, important for HIV prevention. Members of different networks ultimately became role models for healthy protective behaviour. Formal organisations also worked together with social groups to facilitate networking and to provide avenues for exchange of information. We conclude that social capital contributed in changing HIV related risk behaviour that supported a decline of HIV infection in the high prevalence zone and maintained a low prevalence in the other zones.

  • 44.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Inledning2022In: Polisiärt arbete i utsatta områden: utmaningar och möjligheter / [ed] Mehdi Ghazinour; Malin Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 1, p. 17-21Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, MalinUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Polisiärt arbete i utsatta områden: utmaningar och möjligheter2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ensamkommande barns placering vid SiS särskilda ungdomshem: Vilka place­ras, hur mår de och vilka insatser får de?2019In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Antalet asylsökande barn har globalt ökat dramatiskt de senaste åren och Sverige har under flera år mottagit ensamkommande ungdomar. Deras behov har tillgodosetts genom samarbete mellan ett stort antal aktörer. De senaste åren har antalet ensamkommande ungdomar som placerats för tvångsvård vid SiS särskilda ungdomshem ökat. Syftet med denna artikel är att beskriva vad som kännetecknar ensamkommande ungdomar som placeras på SiS särskilda ungdomshem, beträffande bakgrund, asylstatus, hälsa och tillgång till sociala nätverk samt att beskriva de insatser som genomförs vid placering av ensamkommande ungdomar på SiS. Resultaten baseras på en genom-gång av avidentifierade journaler från 25 ensamkommande ungdomar som varit placerade på SiS under 2015, och visar att gruppen som sådan består av en majoritet pojkar, flertalet har traumatiska upplevelser i sitt förflutna, en majoritet har en dokumenterad psykisk ohälsa, tillgången till sociala nätverk i Sverige är begränsad och flertalet saknar uppehållstillstånd i Sverige.

  • 47.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Sundqvist, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Den psykiska hälsan hos poliser som arbetar i yttre tjänst i särskilt utsatta områden2021In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 290-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the article is to shed light on the Swedish patrolling police officers’ mental health. The mental health of the police is an important area of research since they act in society as a grant for safety and security. Performing simple and difficult tasks places high demands on the mental processes of the police. In this article we pay attention to patrolling police officers who works in particularly vulnerable areas in Stockholm region. Self-assessed DSM-5 questionnaire on mental health was collected and analyzed with descriptive statistics. The results show that rising age and living in relationships are protective factors against mental illness in these police officers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umea University.
    Rostami, Arian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umea University.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Padyab, Mojgan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Are the problems and motives clear enough?: A study on the placement of unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors at compulsory care institutions in Sweden2021In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 1675-1694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish National Board of Institutional Care (SNBIC) is an independent governmental agency that provides compulsory care for minors with psychosocial problems, criminal behavior, and substance abuse. During recent years, a noticeable number of the youth placed at compulsory care institutions have been asylum-seeking minors who have arrived in Sweden without parents or guardians. This steady increase in placements has raised questions and concerns among the involved actors regarding the motives and needs underlying these placements. This qualitative study investigates the main motives that lead unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors to be placed at SNBIC residential homes and the problems that are to be solved during their placement, according to social workers and SNBIC staff. The study is based on 28 in-depth interviews with social workers and SNBIC staff. Findings indicate clear disagreement between social workers and SNBIC staff with regard to the motives for placing unaccompanied minors at SNBIC homes. Although the social workers and SNBIC staff explain that most of the unaccompanied youth placed at SNBIC homes have some form of criminal behavior or substance abuse, SNBIC staff believe, in some cases, the problem is not sufficiently serious to warrant compulsory care. As these disagreements and misunderstandings between the actors have an impact on their collaboration and, consequently, the situation of the unaccompanied minors, all attempts to reach a consensus on the leading causes for placement and the problems that need to be solved with SNBIC placement would increase security for both the young people and the relevant staff.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49. Haafkens, Joke
    et al.
    Blomstedt, Yulia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Becher, Heiko
    Ramroth, Heribert
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Training needs for research in health inequities among health and demographic researchers from eight African and Asian countries2014In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, article id 1254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To support equity focussed public health policy in low and middle income countries, more evidence and analysis of the social determinants of health inequalities is needed. This requires specific know how among researchers. The INDEPTH Training and Research Centres of Excellence (INTREC) collaboration will develop and provide training on the social determinants of health approach for health researchers from the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (INDEPTH) in Africa and Asia. To identify learning needs among the potential target group, this qualitative study explored what INDEPTH researchers from Ghana, Tanzania, South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, India, Vietnam, and Bangladesh feel that they want to learn to be able to conduct research on the causes of health inequalities in their country.

    METHODS: Using an inductive method, online concept-mapping, participants were asked to generate statements in response to the question what background knowledge they would need to conduct research on the causes of health inequalities in their country, to sort those statements into thematic groups, and to rate them in terms of how important it would be for the INTREC program to offer instruction on each of the statements. Statistical techniques were used to structure statements into a thematic cluster map and average importance ratings of statements/clusters were calculated.

    RESULTS: Of the 150 invited researchers, 82 participated in the study; 54 from Africa; 28 from Asia. Participants generated 59 statements and sorted them into 6 broader thematic clusters: "assessing health inequalities"; "research design and methods"; "research and policy"; "demography and health inequalities"; "social determinants of health" and "interventions". African participants assigned the highest importance to further training on methods for assessing health inequalities. Asian participants assigned the highest importance to training on research and policy.

    CONCLUSION: The identified thematic clusters and statements provide a detailed understanding of what INDEPTH researchers want to learn in order to be able to conduct research on the social determinants of health inequalities. This offers a framework for developing capacity building programs in this emerging field of public health research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Eklund Wimelius, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Isaksson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Police Education Unit at Umeå University.
    Eriksson, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Local Service-Delivery Networks for Unaccompanied Children in Sweden: evaluating Their Effectiveness2016In: Journal of social service research, ISSN 0148-8376, E-ISSN 1540-7314, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 675-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article defines the effectiveness of local service-delivery networks for unaccompanied and separated children (UASC) and develops criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of such networks in Sweden. It also explores factors and conditions that enhance network performance and suggests that cultural and multicultural competences are required for such networks to be effective. Twentyone evaluation criteria are developed for enhancing network performance generated from research into UASC, network governance theory, and the authors’ own evaluation of the reception of UASC in a Swedish municipality. The evaluation and this article are based on 32 interviews with social workers, legal guardians, care-home staff, teachers and school personnel, a questionnaire, and 11 interviews with UASC. The article reanalyzes data from the authors’ evaluation study finalized in 2014 and applies the criteria tentatively on this reception system. Experiences and findings include the importance of taking into account client needs and involvement in services when evaluating the effectiveness of service-delivery networks. The criteria can productively inform policy and practice when actors deliberate on how to assess and improve local reception-system and servicedelivery-network performance in different contexts.

12 1 - 50 of 95
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf