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  • 1.
    Anna, Norrström
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Specialpedagogers samverkansuppdrag: En undersökning av en habiliterings samverkan med vårdnadshavare, skolor och förskolor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Öhrn, Elisabet
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rurality and education relations: metro-centricity and local values in rural communities and rural schools2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 19-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork in six different types of rural area and their schools in different parts of Sweden, this article identifies how rural schools relate to the local place and discusses some of the educational implications from this. Recurrent references to the local community were present in some schools and people there explicitly positioned themselves in the local rural context and valorised rurality positively in education exchanges, content and interactions, with positive effects on young people's experiences of participation and inclusion. These factors tended to occur in sparsely populated areas. An emphasis on nature and its value as materially vital in people's lives was present as was a critique of middle-class metrocentricity. Such values and critique seemed to be absent in other areas, where rurality was instead often represented along the metrocentric lines of a residual space in modernizing societies.

  • 3.
    Eiríksdóttir, Elsa
    et al.
    University of Iceland.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Teacher characterization of VET students: Paradoxes and consequences2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research illustrates that the student population in vocational education and training (VET) are diverse, in terms of achievement, learning disability and age for example. The diversity is prominent especially when compared to higher education preparatory programmes, which tend to be more homogenous. Policy research and classroom observations, indicate that recent educational policy reforms and pedagogical practices focus first and foremost on lower achieving students. This is not necessarily an accurate portrayal of the VET students and the aim of the presentation will be to look at how teachers discuss and describe their students and how student diversity is addressed in pedagogical practices.

     

    Interviews with 12 VET teachers in Iceland and Sweden (6 in each country) were conducted in the period of 2009 to 2014 in the course of larger studies on teaching practices in upper secondary schools and VET programmes. In the current analysis we extracted themes related to student characterization from the interviews. The resulting themes include discussion on dealing with diverse student groups, variations in age of students, and learning disabilities of students. Field notes from 41 classroom observations from the same two research projects were also analysed thematically, i.e. how VET teachers address diversity.

    The results highlight paradoxes related to the characterization of VET students and the reality facing VET teachers as well the consequences, i.e. consequences in pedagogical practices and the status of the vocational student and education. The teachers describe having students with learning disabilities and difficult educational history, but also students who are high-achieving and ambitious.  This description of the VET students is in contrast with how the VET students tend to be portrayed in policy documents – where the emphasis has been on VET being for lower achieving students, emphasizing the secondary status VET often holds in the educational system. The results also reveal that in dealing with the diversity in the classroom, teachers often revert to individualisation in their pedagogical practices: the students then move through the courses on their own speed separately and rarely work or reflect collectively on the issues at hand.

     

    Drawing on research data from VET programmes in Iceland and Sweden, even though having diverse educational structures, shows similar patterns when addressing diversity. Our findings seem relevant for all Nordic countries since policy reforms and pedagogical practices foremost address the low achieving student. When policy and pedagogic practices addressing the low achieving student the status of the VET education might “push” high achieving students away from VET as well as future employers with high demands of skilled labour. Still our conclusion is not to instead address the high achieving but rather emphasize that vocational teachers need knowledge in how to arrange challenging pedagogical practices for diverse groups of students, without too much individualisation. This could be done through improvements of in vocational teacher programmes, but also and probably more importantly, through the organization of VET. One suggestion might be closer and more extensive collaborations between VET subject teachers and special pedagogues. 

  • 4.
    Eiríksdóttir, Elsa
    et al.
    University of Iceland.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    VET teachers' interpretations of individualisation and teaching of skills and social order in two Nordic countries2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 355-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The age at which young people leave education for the labour market has increased in recent decades, and entering upper secondary education has become the norm. As a result, the diversity of the student population has increased, for instance in terms of students’ academic merits and achievements at school. Increased diversity seems to affect vocational education and training more than tracks preparing students for higher education, because entry into vocational education and training (VET) programmes is rarely selective. In this article we analyse a series of interviews with VET teachers regarding VET practices in upper secondary schools in Sweden and Iceland. We examine how policy plays out in practice in VET by looking at how VET teachers navigate the sometimes-conflicting educational goals of employability and civic engagement, while simultaneously teaching a highly diverse group of students. In both countries, pedagogic practices are dominated by individualisation with a focus on task-related skills. Those practices are important in VET, but can exclude broader understandings of civil and workplace life, because general knowledge about areas such as ethics, democracy, equality, and environmental issues is difficult to obtain if education gives students few opportunities to interact with others, such as through group work or classroom discussions.

  • 5.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Collective actions, alliances and resistance of young people invocational upper secondary education: Cross cultural perspective2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Time, space and agency in vocational upper secondary education2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Unit of Cultural and Feminist Studies, University of Helsinki.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    School of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås.
    Time, space and young people´s agency in vocational upper secondary education: a cross-cultural perspective2010In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 245-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on ethnographic studies in the context of vocational education: two in Sweden and one in Finland. The Swedish data originate from the Vehicle programme and the Child and Recreation programme; the Finnish data originate from the social and health-care sector. In this sense, the authors’ perspective is cross-cultural. The article focuses on temporal and spatial dimensions of these three educational contexts and analyzes how young people exhibit their agency when negotiating their time and constructing their own space. The authors’ analysis elucidates how time–space paths in the context of vocational education are classed and gendered. In the female-dominated fields of vocational upper secondary education, disciplinary practices related to time and space are more visible than in the male-dominated fields. Moreover, it is argued that the political atmosphere in Sweden has been more favourable for promoting equality than that in Finland. Despite this, divisions between students and pigeonholing exist in everyday school life.

  • 8.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Young people and spatial divisions in upper secondary education: a cross-cultural perspective2014In: Fair and competitive?: Critical perspectives on contemporary Nordic schooling / [ed] Anne-Lise Arnesen, Elina Lahelma, Lisbeth Lundahl & Elisabet Öhrn, London: Tufnell Press, 2014, p. 85-102Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Does social justice count?: 'Lived democracy' in mathematics classes in diverse Swedish upper secondary programmes2017In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 216-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses what students attending four Swedish upper secondary school programmes with different social class profiles tried and wanted to influence in relation to mathematics teachers' pedagogic practice and responses during the year 2008/9. The theoretical framework is based on Bernstein's theories regarding power and control. The analyses draw on ethnographic observations of classes taking the Natural Science and Social Science academic programmes, and the Vehicle and Child & Recreation vocational programmes, at two Swedish upper secondary schools. Students attending different programmes tried to influence the teaching. However, what the students taking the academic and vocational programmes were able to influence considerably differed. Generally the vocational students exerted influence more successfully when they wanted to reduce the pace and difficulty of teaching, than when they wished to get more out of their education, while the opposite applied to the academic, especially Natural Science, students. Thus, the power relations reflected the programmes' social class profiles and the students' expected positions in society, despite policies at the time to promote democracy and reduce social reproduction in education. The findings support the importance of analysing not only students' voices, but also their voices in relation to the pedagogic practice they encounter.

  • 10.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Joint work in ethnographic research: Possibilities and obstacles2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Education, rural youth and participation in local, regional and national contexts2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Where to go and what to do?: Young people's arguments about career choices in Swedish rural contexts2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Finland.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Imagining societies through discourses on educational equality: a cross-cultural analysis of Finnish and Swedish upper secondary curricula from 1970 to the 2010s2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 335-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational equality has been a central tenet framing educational policy in Nordic welfare states and stimulating school reforms in the 1960s and 1970s. However, the conceptualisation of equality has fluctuated, reflecting the changing economic and political climate within which policy statements have been made. In this article, we analyse policy and curriculum documents relating to upper secondary education from the 1970s to the 2010s in two Nordic countries. Drawing on Nancy Fraser’s theorisation of different forms of injustice, we focus on the aims and goals that are attached to the concept of educational equality, analysing how ideas about society and educational equality have changed over these decades. Our analysis suggests that over this period there have been quite dramatic shifts in how equality is conceptualised, inter alia shifting from a focus on economic inequalities to questions of sexuality and ethnicity. Furthermore, ambitions about tackling economic inequality have largely been replaced with ambitions about promoting employability, which is particularly visible in the curriculum of vocational upper secondary education. The Finnish general upper secondary education (GUS) curriculum has gone against the tide. In the 1970s the GUS curriculum had the most conservative tone in terms of equality, whereas the current curriculum requires an agentic stance against discrimination and a critical stance towards marketisation.

  • 14.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    et al.
    Helsinki University .
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Imagining society through educational equality? An analysis on Finnish and Swedish Curricula 1970- 20102017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational equality has been a central tenet that has framed educational policy in Nordic welfare states, motivating school reforms in the 1960s and 1970s. However, the conceptualization of equality has fluctuated, reflecting the political climate in which the policy statements have been created. In this presentation, we analyse policy and curriculum documents in two Nordic countries concerning upper secondary education with a specific focus on vocational curricula from the 1970s to the 2010s, focusing on the aims and goals of educational equality and on what kind of idea about society these argumentations are based on.

     

    The theoretical framework draws on Torsten Huséns (1975) concepts on possible ways to conceive equality: as a starting point; as a treatment; as a final goal or as assemblage of all these three. We also approach the question of educational equality by drawing on Nancy Fraser’s conceptualization on social justice. Fraser’s (1997; 2008) three-dimensional concept of social justice distinguishes economic, cultural and political injustice. The remedy for the first one is redistribution, for the second one recognition and for the third one representation. The political dimension of justice is a meta-level dimension, which defines who are those ones, entitled to just distribution and reciprocal recognition. Following Fraserian thinking we conceive curriculum documents as one of the sites where ‘struggles over distribution and recognition are played out’ (Fraser 2008, p.17).           

     

    We analyse policy and curricula documents, where value base, aims and goals of upper secondary education have been stated, paying attention to i) definition of the problem of equality ii) presuppositions that underlies the presented problem iii) conditions which produces particular representations of the problem iv) silences v) effects produced through the representations of the problem vi) production and ways to problematize the representation of the problem (Bacchi 2009).

     

    Compared to Finland, Sweden has traditionally been more enthusiastic to promote educational equality. However, it can be argued that change has been more dramatic in Sweden compared to Finland in 1970-2010s. In both countries neo liberal reasoning has re-shaped the value base, aims and goals of education. In Sweden it has had a fundamental influence in how the structure of upper secondary education has been organized. Through the longitudinal data from two Nordic countries it is possible to analyse how neo-liberal reasoning has influenced these countries, which have a reputation as ideal countries in terms of educational equality. It is also possible to ask, whether there are differences how these Nordic countries imagine themselves as societies.

  • 15.
    Ledman, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    How femininities are performed and valued in three domains of vocational education2018In: ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3–7 September, 2018, Free University Bolzano: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gendered identity and norms interplay with other social categories, as ethnicity, age and class. What is valued and recognised as ways of being a girl and women in one social group differs from another. In this study, we focus on how girls in three different tracks of vocational education act/perform gender as a part of their vocational, civic and private identity - in relation to peers and teachers. The research was carried out in Swedish upper secondary education, where the pupils, after comprehensive K-9, chose between twelve Vocational education and training programmes (VETP) alongside six Higher education preparatory programmes (HEPP). On a general level, the pupils applying for the VET programmes have working class background (parents with low educational level, level of income and living standard compared to students applying for HEPP) (Broady and Börjesson 2006). The VET programmes are strongly gendered, some programmes being either boy- or girl-dominated by tradition, peer-pressure and/or other fractors (Fehring and Herring 2013; Lundahl 2011), and gendered-marked vocational programmes have gendered practices (Connell 2006; Smyth and Steinmetz 2015). We argue that exploring gender in VET is of particular importance because of the strong gender divide. This is not only the case in Sweden, but rather a general phenomenon throughout Europe. The division, and ‘keeping apart’, of women and men is an important principle of upholding gendered categories, which is a prerequisite for the logic of men as norm (compare Hirdman 1988). The problem investigated is expected to generate results that can further the understanding of gender and vocational education more generally.

    In her anthropological study of groups in the Children and recreation programme and Social science programme, Ambjörnsson (2004) shows how norms and ideals of femininity is performed differently by VETP girls and HEPP girls. As Ambjörnsson, we are influenced by the works by Skeggs (2004; 2000) on how working class girls and women perform gendered subjectivities that differs from valued feminitities within middle class. We consider gender to be reified through social performances (compare Butler 2006 [1999]) and thus as socially constructed identities. Also, in line with Butler (2006 [1999] we acknowledge that the constant practices of performing gender opens for possibilities to change and challenge norms: subversive performativity. Our ambition is to explore how ‘girls’ - norms and ideals of femininity - are constructed in different contexts, i.e. different VET programmes. This means that we are comparing the performance of gender within the larger group of pupils enrolled in VET, i.e. a group of pupils that on an aggregated level have a working-class background, not, as Ambjörnsson (2004), pupils in VETP with HEPP, which have a larger share of pupils with middle class background. The three VET-programmes selected are gendered in terms of ratio of girls/boys enrolled and reflects a gendered divided labour market: Health and Care (HC) programme (81% girls), Restaurant management (RM) programme (58% girls) and Vehicle and transport (VT) programme (14% girls). The question of how girls act/perform gender as a part of their vocational, civic and private identity - in relation to peers and teachers in different VET contexts - are largely unexplored. The aim of this study is thus to contribute with knowledge of the processes of being and becoming a girl and a young women in the specific context of vocational education and training. RQ: How do the pupils perform feminitity? What ways of performing femininity is recognised, encouraged and valued by others?, and the other way around, what ways of performing femininity is not recognised, but opposed and disqualified?

  • 16.
    Ledman, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Democratic implications of school based activities before and after workplace learning2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ledman, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gendered distribution of ‘knowledge required for empowerment’ in Swedish vocational education curricula?2018In: Journal of Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 1363-6820, E-ISSN 1747-5090, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 85-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is internationally commended for a high degree of gender equality, but many divisions in Swedish society, including the labour market, disadvantage women. This paper addresses gendered divisions of preparation for civic participation in the vocational upper secondary national curricula, which may participate in reproduction of the pattern. In a comparative analysis of the curriculum guidelines for different vocational upper secondary programmes, we focus on the inclusion of important knowledge for empowerment and how knowledge is contextualised in terms of valued labour positions. We deploy Bernstein’s concepts of horizontal and vertical discourse and Connell’s concepts of production, consumption and gendered accumulation. A general finding is that vertical discourse is contextualised towards discourses of consumption in girl-dominated programmes and towards discourses of production in boy-dominated programmes. Boy-dominated programmes include more knowledge that can be clearly classified in recognised disciplines or fields, whereas girl-dominated programmes include courses of undefined knowledge, such as creativity and entrepreneurship. We conclude that the vocational curricula reinforce rather than challenge existing gender structures in the labour market and wider society. In a historical perspective, it can be concluded that Swedish vocational education policy has a continuum of ‘gender-blindness', and thus confirming with wider norms.

  • 18.
    Niemi, Anna-Maija
    et al.
    Helsinki university.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Framing and classifying the theoretical and practical divide: how young men’s positions in vocational education are produced and reproduced2013In: Journal of Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 1363-6820, E-ISSN 1747-5090, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 445-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research material from ethnographic studies of vocational upper secondary educational programmes in Finland and Sweden presented here indicates that the discourse of schoolwork as being either theoretical or practical is firmly fixed. However, the students on the researched programmes were aware of recent changes in the labour market that raise a need for generalisation, or at least knowledge of both practical and theoretical aspects of their programme-specific subjects. They referred to the changes with notions suggesting that a practical and theoretical divide was neither meaningful nor helpful for their education. We discuss how a stereotyped idea of what was thought of as ‘man’s work’ made it difficult for students who wanted to accomplish tasks considered as theoretical and how the teachers’ framing of pedagogic practice intensified or ameliorated this difficulty. We also address the dichotomy between theoretical and practical by contemplating students’ positions within different pedagogical practices. We suggest that some kinds of practices might diminish the dichotomy and could improve the students’ possibilities for fully engaging in their studies.

  • 19.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Jonsson, Annikki
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Adolescent-Centered Pain Management in School When Adolescents Have Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study2017In: Global Journal of Health Science, ISSN 1916-9736, E-ISSN 1916-9744, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 8-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain is common among Swedish adolescents, and stress is an independent factor in the onset and persistence of chronic pain. When Swedish school nurses conduct their health dialogs they have a unique opportunity to find adolescents with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to explore school nurses’ and adolescents’ experiences of factors that influence adolescent-centered pain management in school health care, when adolescents have chronic pain. The study context is schools in Sweden where primary health care is available through school nurses. A total of 15 school nurses and 15 adolescents participated in individual interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed by qualitative conventional content analysis. Bronfenbrenner’s bioecological model was used to explain how these factors are directed at the individual or society. The results demonstrated eight different categories of factors that influenced the pain management. The categories focused mainly on the adolescents’ micro- and mesosystems; few strategies were conducted on an exo- and macrosystem level. On the micro- and mesosystem levels, it was necessary to build trust to be able to influence the adolescents’ behavior in the pain management. Pharmacological strategies were paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; non-pharmacological strategies were physical activities and stress-reducing activities. Research and practice involving a more holistic perspective, studying the possibilities of both change at the organizational level and individual support for adolescents, are essential.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Wallbing, Ulrika
    Karolinska institutet.
    Alfvén, Gösta
    Karolinska institutet.
    Dalenius, Kristina
    Lerums kommun.
    Fors, Andreas
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Jönköpings kommun.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Wigert, Helena
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundberg, Mari
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Development of the Help Overcoming Pain Early (HOPE) Programme Built on a Person-Centred Approach to Support School Nurses in the Care of Adolescents with Chronic Pain: A Feasibility Study2019In: Children, ISSN 2227-9067, Vol. 6, no 9, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic pain and its consequences are major global health challenges, and the prevalence is increasing worldwide among adolescents. Adolescents spend most of their waking hours in school; however, there is limited research available on how school nurses can address chronic pain among adolescents in the Swedish school context. Therefore, we designed a person-centred intervention, known as Help Overcoming Pain Early (HOPE), to enable school nurses to offer adolescents strategies to manage their stress and pain. We used the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and designing this new complex intervention. For this study, we describe two of the four phases: (a) development and (b) feasibility and piloting. The final version of the HOPE programme consists of (i) an educational package for school nurses in the areas person-centred care, stress and pain education/management and gender perspective; and (ii) an intervention package for adolescents with chronic pain. The programme consists of four sessions during which adolescents with chronic pain have person-centred dialogues with a school nurse. The HOPE programme is based on the existing evidence of managing chronic pain and on the assumption that school nurses can support adolescents with chronic pain by using person-centred care.

  • 21.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Ledman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Socialisation and citizenship preparation in vocational education: Pedagogic codes and democratic rights in VET-subjects2019In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of citizenship preparation in upper secondary school, including studies on vocational programmes, have primarily focused on general subjects. Potential and actual roles of vocational subjects in this context have received little attention, so we have little knowledge of what is likely a significant part of the citizenship preparation that occurs in vocational programmes. Drawing on the work of Basil Bernstein and ethnographic data, this study presents an analysis of socialisation processes in vocational elements of three vocational programmes in Swedish upper secondary school. The analysis addresses the formation of pedagogic codes in various vocational programmes and subjects, and how these codes condition students’ practice of citizenship at individual, social and political levels. The results show how different pedagogic codes have different implications for the students’ practice of citizenship, and thus raise questions about factors and processes that may either constrain or strengthen, this aspect in vocational subject classes.

  • 22.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    A curriculum tailored for workers?: Knowledge organization and possible transitions in Swedish VET2016In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 692-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key feature of the Swedish upper secondary school reform of 2011 (GY11) is the new direction it sets out for the organization of vocational education (VET) and the role it plays in youths' transitions from school to work. This study analyses the GY11 reform in terms of its impact on the organization of knowledge in VET and its implications for students' prospects of transitioning from VET to work or higher education, and for their roles as citizens. To understand its likely consequences, GY11 is analysed in the context of practices in a school class for the Vehicle programme steered by the curriculum prior to GY11. The theoretical concepts used are drawn from Basil Bernstein and his distinctions between knowledge organized into horizontal and vertical discourses. The findings of the study suggest that GY11 reinforces an already strong emphasis on horizontally organized knowledge in VET by placing great importance on strongly context-bound, skill-oriented knowledge. This implies a stronger exclusion of VET students, primarily with working-class backgrounds, from vertical discourses and limits the possible transitions of youths taking the VET-route by reducing their access to higher education and their capacity to function as both workers and citizens.

  • 23.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Institutionen för pedagogik, Högskolan i Borås.
    Gymnasiereformens konsekvenser för den sociala fördelningen av kunskaper i de yrkesorienterade utbildningarna2011In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 81-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I föreliggande artikel analyseras den pågående gymnasiereformen (Prop 2008/09:199, SOU 2008:27) utifrån dess innebörd för kunskapers organisering i de yrkesorienterade utbildningarna. För att diskutera reformens möjliga konsekvenser analyseras den i relation till befintliga praktiker i en fordonsprogramsklass. Problemet som står i fokus är den ojämlika sociala fördelningen av kunskap och makt som föreligger mellan olika samhällsklasser. I denna problematik har de yrkesorienterade utbildningarna en central position, då dessa huvudsakligen både rekryterar elever från, tillika socialiserar för, arbetarklasspositioner. De teoretiska begreppen hämtas framförallt från utbildningssociologen Basil Bernstein, som skil-jer på kunskap organiserad i horisontella och vertikala diskurser, vilka ger olika förutsättningar för handling i olika sammanhang. Resultaten från analysen visar att befintliga praktiker i huvudsak är horisontellt organiserade och att de riskerar att ytterligare styras i den riktningen genom att reformen premierar starkt kontextbunden, färdighetsorienterad, kunskap. För den sociala fördelningen av kunskap innebär detta att reformen i högre grad än vad som redan är fallet utestänger hälften av gymnasieungdomarna, företrädelsevis med bakgrund i arbetarklassen, från vertikala diskurser, från kunskap som ger makt.

  • 24.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Vocational education, transitions, marginalisation and social justice in the Nordic countries2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 271-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The five articles in this special issue present studies focusing on two key aspects of vocational education and transitions in the Nordic countries in relation to social justice: (a) impacts of policies and reforms on transitions and (b) content, practices, curriculum and equality. Collectively, the articles outline important similarities and differences between the countries and contribute, inter alia, to our understanding of the ‘academic–vocational divide’, the impact of neo-liberal steering on vocational education and transitions. They also develop bridges between different empirical contexts and theoretical ‘languages’ that may help efforts to understand and contextualise the current development of vocational education and transitions in the Nordic countries.

  • 25.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Eiríksdóttir, Elsa
    University of Iceland.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka
    Niemi, Anna-Maija
    Gudrun, Ragnarsdottir
    The academic-vocational divide in three Nordic countries: implications for social class and gender2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 97-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we examine how the academic–vocational divide is manifested today in Finland, Iceland and Sweden in the division between vocationally (VET) and academicallyoriented programmes at the upper-secondary school level. The paper is based on a critical re-analysis of results from previous studies; in it we investigate the implications of this divide for class and gender inequalities. The theoretical lens used for the synthesis is based on Bernstein´s theory of pedagogic codes. In the re-analysis we draw on previous studies of policy, curriculum and educational praxis as well as official statistics. The main conclusions are that contemporary policy and curriculum trends in all three countries are dominated by a neo-liberal discourse stressing principles such as “market relevance” and employability. This trend strengthens the academic–vocational divide, mainly through an organisation of knowledge in VET that separates it from more general and theoretical elements. This trend also seems to affect VET students’ transitions in terms of reduced access to higher education, particularly in male-dominated programmes. We also identify low expectations for VET students, manifested through choice of textbooks and tasks, organisation of teacher teams and the advice of career counsellors.

  • 26.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ledman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Class, Gender and Knowledge. Knowledge Discourses in Vocational Programmes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Nylund, Mattias
    et al.
    Göterborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ledman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The vocational–academic divide in neoliberal upper secondary curricula: the Swedish case2017In: Journal of education policy, ISSN 0268-0939, E-ISSN 1464-5106, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 788-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A historical tension between a more general and a more specific focus in post-compulsory education is made visible in some educational systems by the division into more academic and more vocational programmes. Embedded in this tension are questions of social justice and the purposes of education. In addition, division into academic and vocational programmes has class dimensions since youth with working class backgrounds are often over-represented in vocational programmes. This study investigates how this tension is handled in the Swedish upper secondary curriculum, which reflects an international neoliberal policy trend in promoting competition, employability and employer influence over the curriculum. By analysing how the educational content of vocational educational and training (VET) programmes and higher educational preparatory (HEP) programmes is contextualised, we found that the two programme types were based on very different logics. In VET programmes, knowledge is strongly context-bound and often related to regulating behaviours. This contrasts sharply with the way knowledge is contextualised in HEP programmes in which less context-bound knowledge and skills such as using concepts, models and critical thinking are dominant. Students in VET programmes are trained to ‘do’ and to ‘adapt’, while the students in HEP programmes are trained to ‘think’ and to ‘imagine possibilities’. Thus, students from different social classes are prepared for very different roles in society.

  • 28.
    Ragnarsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review2019In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent pain and school failures are common problems in children visiting the school nurses office. The overall aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between recurrent pain and academic achievement in school-aged children. Literature was searched in seven electronic databases and in relevant bibliographies. Study selection, data extraction, and study and evidence quality assessments were performed systematically with standardized tools. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and 13 verified an association between recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, and musculoskeletal pain) and negative academic achievement. Two longitudinal studies indicated a likely causal effect of pain on academic achievement. All studies had substantial methodological drawbacks and the overall quality of the evidence for the identified associations was low. Thus, children’s lack of success in school may be partly attributed to recurrent pain problems. However, more highquality studies are needed, including on the direction of the association and its moderators and mediators.

  • 29.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    ”… det vore bättre om man kunde vara med och bestämma hur det skulle göras…”: En etnografisk studie om elevinflytande i gymnasieskolan2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore how young people act and the organisation of school practice, and what possibilities they have of influencing the content and the forms practiced. The study focuses on how the pedagogic practice is organised in two classes in their first year of upper secondary school, one Social Science programme class and one Vehicle programme class. This embraces questions as: How, where, when and for what cause do students act to influence, and then with what result? Are students offered influence, and in that case which students? How does the organisation of and the content in the pedagogic practice prepare students to act in order to be able to exert influence in the future? These questions have been studied with focus on differences between the programmes with regard to social background and gender.

    The thesis has its theoretical base in Bernstein’s theory of pedagogy and code (1990, 2000), feminist perspectives (Arnot, 2006; Arnot & Dillabough, 2000; Connell, 1987; Gordon, 2006; Gordon, Holland & Lahelma, 2000) as well as theories of structuration (Giddens, 1984).

    The empirical material of the thesis was ethnographically produced during one school year, through classroom observations, individual interviews with students, teachers and head teachers, and the gathering of school and teaching material. The main results in the analysis are that actions taken to gain influence were rare, that the organisation of and the content in the pedagogic practice was mainly focused on students as becoming, i. e. it focused students possibilities to be able to influence in the future and not the present. Furthermore, changing of pedagogic content or pedagogic forms was dependent on students’ own actions.   There was a lack of teacher organisation to promote student influence. Finally, what was evaluated in the pedagogic practice, i.e. factual learning, did not promote student influence.

    The thesis demonstrates how pedagogic practice was gendered and classed, which had consequences for how students could influence and how students were prepared to influence in the future. Since the Social Science programme mostly attracts students from a middle-class background and the Vehicle programme those with a working-class background, the content in the programmes contributed to reproducing hierarchical social relations. The content for the Vehicle students proved to be simplified, personal and context dependent, whereas the content of the Social Science programme was more advanced, general and context independent, knowledge which, in argumentation for influence, is usually highly valued.

    In previous research, working class masculinities have often been associated with opposition towards study-oriented   subjects.   However, the current  study indicates that there is an interest in studying Swedish, English and maths. The students argued that it was necessary for future employment, and that the Vehicle industry is now asking for this kind of knowledge.

  • 30.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Elevers erfarenheter, inflytande och bedömning2017In: Utvärdering och bedömning i skolan: för vem och varför? / [ed] Agneta Hult & Anders Olofsson, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2017, 2, p. 123-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Examinationer för elevinflytande?2015In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Högljudda och tysta elever: Marginaliseringseffekter i gymnasieskolans klassrumssamtal2013In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, E-ISSN 1891-5949, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 63-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Immigrants in Rural Areas Talk About Career Choices: Analysis of Place and Gender2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    'Lad' research, the reproduction of stereotypes?: ethnographic dilemmas when researching boys from working-class background2015In: Ethnography and Education, ISSN 1745-7823, E-ISSN 1745-7831, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 215-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research presented in this journal and elsewhere has suggested that vocational education is highly gender segregated and it is the heavy industrial sectors such as industry, vehicle and construction programmes that mainly attract boys with an anti-school attitude who are not interested in academic school work. However, there are good reasons to also question the reproduction of these stereotypes and how they may operate in relation to youth in education. This article therefore discusses issues connected to carrying out research in settings with a majority of boys from working-class backgrounds. It focuses specifically on methodological questions and possibly hidden forms of methodological bias in ethnographic research as well as the formulation of research questions (turn of gaze) and how these may work in relation to the reproduction or rupture of standard gender stereotypes in education research. The article highlights interviewing individually or in groups, initial encounters and the turn of gaze in ethnography.

  • 35.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    University of Borås. School of Education and Behavioural Sciences.
    Pedagogic practice and influence in a social science class2011In: Young people's influence and democratic education: ethnographic studies in upper secondary schools / [ed] Elisabet Öhrn, Lisbeth Lundahl, Dennis Beach, London: Tufnell Press, 2011, p. 71-91Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The teaching and practice of democracy in schools might be considered particularly important in the present era as young people are spending increasing amounts of time in education. Upper secondary schools and universities are becoming more common post-school options than conventional workplaces. Consequently, the experience of democratic participation among the young people is strongly related to education spaces. Contemporary research shows the teaching of democratic values to typically emphasise individual freedom of choice and individual rights, at the expense of collective justice, political criticism and reflection. This risks leaving young people without guidance for how to exert influence both inside school and more generally. However, we lack knowledge about the relations between the content and organisation of teaching, and young people's attitudes and actions, as they typically constitute different research fields. This book attempts to help bridge this gap. Young people's influence and democratic education explores the teaching of democracy in school. In particular it relates to young peoples' responses and initiatives to change in formal education. Based on recent ethnographic investigations of Swedish upper secondary schools the book has been developed with a special focus on gender in relation to social background. Five differently gendered and classed upper secondary programmes were studied in detail. Theoretically, the book draws in particular on Bernsteinian and feminist perspectives. The book includes close individual analyses of the researched upper secondary classes as well as common presentations of previous research, theory and main empirical results. Central joint themes that are explored concerns teaching students to influence, student initiatives to exert influence, conditions for developing valued masculinities and femininities, the reproduction of hierarchical relations, and representations and relations of theory and practice.

  • 36.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    University of Borås. School of Education and Behavioural Sciences.
    Pedagogic practice and influence in a vehicle programme class2011In: Young people's influence and democratic education: ethnographic studies in upper secondary schools / [ed] Elisabet Öhrn, Lisbeth Lundahl, Dennis Beach, London: Tufnell Press, 2011, p. 92-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The teaching and practice of democracy in schools might be considered particularly important in the present era as young people are spending increasing amounts of time in education. Upper secondary schools and universities are becoming more common post-school options than conventional workplaces. Consequently, the experience of democratic participation among the young people is strongly related to education spaces. Contemporary research shows the teaching of democratic values to typically emphasise individual freedom of choice and individual rights, at the expense of collective justice, political criticism and reflection. This risks leaving young people without guidance for how to exert influence both inside school and more generally. However, we lack knowledge about the relations between the content and organisation of teaching, and young people's attitudes and actions, as they typically constitute different research fields. This book attempts to help bridge this gap. Young people's influence and democratic education explores the teaching of democracy in school. In particular it relates to young peoples' responses and initiatives to change in formal education. Based on recent ethnographic investigations of Swedish upper secondary schools the book has been developed with a special focus on gender in relation to social background. Five differently gendered and classed upper secondary programmes were studied in detail. Theoretically, the book draws in particular on Bernsteinian and feminist perspectives. The book includes close individual analyses of the researched upper secondary classes as well as common presentations of previous research, theory and main empirical results. Central joint themes that are explored concerns teaching students to influence, student initiatives to exert influence, conditions for developing valued masculinities and femininities, the reproduction of hierarchical relations, and representations and relations of theory and practice.

  • 37.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Perspectives of students with mental health problems on improving the school environment and practice2019In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health problems are increasingly common risk factors for chronic pain, while stressors in school are associated with persistent and recurrent pain among students, and negatively associated with educational achievements. Clearly, it is important to identify elements that influence frequencies or intensities of mental health problems. To assist such efforts, this study analysed views of interviewed upper secondary students, in terms of physical, social and mental spaces. The results corroborate previous findings, such as the importance of school staff members collaboratively addressing students’ problems. However, the participants also explicitly or implicitly suggested other improvements in school environments and practices that could help them to cope, thereby enhancing their functioning. These included treating mental health problems as general problems rather than problems of a specific group, to reduce stigmatisation and frequencies of symptoms. They also indicate that small interventions, e.g. providing help with structuring schoolwork and other activities may be surprisingly beneficial.

  • 38.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    University of Borås.
    Programarbetslag som stöd för nyutexaminerade kärnämneslärares etablering som gymnasielärare?2014In: Educare - Vetenskapliga skrifter, ISSN 1653-1868, no 1, p. 56-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There have been many attempts to reform the Swedish education system inorder to reduce the size of the gaps between different upper secondaryschool programmes. These have included changes in teachers’ responsibilitiesand teacher education. Within an individual school, teachers of Swedish lan-­‐guage, English and mathematics may teach students of both vocational andfurther study preparation programmes. However, an analysis of new teach-­‐ers’ experiences and the organization of teacher teams at one school, ApelSchool, suggests that despite these reforms, some traditional preferenceshave persisted. Notably, teachers of the subjects listed above had clear hier-­‐archical preferences regarding the school’s various teacher teams. Very fewteachers were keen to join teams that were involved with a vocational pro-­‐gramme. This arguably put both newer teachers and vocational programmestudents into particularly vulnerable situations because the new teacherswere assigned to the less-­‐preferred vocational programme teams but notprovided with adequate support from more experienced teachers. Vocationalstudents were more likely to have their teachers replaced as their old teach-­‐ers advanced within the hierarchy. It is concluded that head teachers need todistribute new and experienced teachers in teacher teams more evenly eventhough experienced teachers express resistance.

  • 39.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The local place in pedagogic practices2019In: Young people's life and schooling in rural areas / [ed] Elisabet Öhrn & Dennis Beach, Tufnell Press, 2019, p. 45-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The town as a model in Lars Ahlin’s Cinnamoncandy2016In: The Explicator, ISSN 0014-4940, E-ISSN 1939-926X, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 110-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Yrkesutbildning i förändring?: konsekvenser för undervisningen2012In: Lärare och lärande i yrkesprogram och introduktionsprogram, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    'Lived democracy' in mathematics classes in diverse Swedish upper secondary school programmes2016In: JustEd: 2nd Biennial JustEd Conference: 'Actors for Social Justice in Education' : 8-9 March 2016, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland : Abstracts, Helsinki: University of Helsinki , 2016, p. 18-19Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Staying in the comfort zones: low expectations in vocational education and training mathematics teaching in Sweden and Finland2017In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 425-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vocational education has a historical legacy of being low-status and aimed at producing skilled workers. Students with low marks in comprehensive school are still often guided to the vocational educational track. In this article we examine how mathematics teaching in a vocational educational context is framed (henceforth VET). Therefore, our aim with this article is to explore how teacher responses come into play in school mathematics classes, and the teacher–student interactions within those practices. The empirical material is based on educational ethnographic research, i.e. classroom observations and interviews, conducted in three upper secondary institutions, two in Sweden and one in Finland. The results indicate that both teachers and students seem to remain in what might be called their ‘comfort zones’, i.e. that pedagogic practices tend to strengthen the idea of a vocational learner as being practically oriented; using their hands instead of their heads and in need of care and surveillance. The analysis focuses on mathematics teaching rather than on the content and was chosen because it is associated with general qualifications and the notion of lifelong learning. In this respect it exemplifies the growing tension in VET between workplace and academic knowledge.

  • 44.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ledman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Department of Education and Special Education, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Construction of ethnicity, immigration and associated concepts in Swedish vocational education and training2018In: Journal of Education and Work, ISSN 1363-9080, E-ISSN 1469-9435, Vol. 31, no 7-8, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surges of migration into Sweden and other European countries have raised needs to adjust civic education to provide Bernsteinian pedagogic rights of enhancement, participation and inclusion, both generally and in VET specifically. However, associated issues have received little research attention even in countries with colonial histories and longer traditions of immigration and non-native ethnic minorities. Moreover, most published empirical studies on race and ethnicity issues in VET have had Anglophone settings. Thus, research in other contexts is needed to broaden understanding and distinguish between general and context-specific aspects.

    This article addresses gaps in knowledge of the construction and significance of race and ethnicity in VET, particularly in Swedish contexts. First, it examines how critical understandings of being an immigrant, immigration and ethnicity are constructed in pedagogic practices in Swedish VET programmes, then analyses students’ and teachers’ discussion of these issues. Content related to immigration and ethnicity was sparse in monitored VET classes, but the presence of immigrants increased instances of both spontaneous and planned content. We conclude that pedagogic practices do not reflect the large increase in numbers of students in Swedish schools with immigrant backgrounds, and greater intercultural awareness is needed to safeguard their pedagogic and general democratic rights.

  • 45.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Challenges of engagement with health services in Sweden's schools: listening to the views of school nurses and students with recurrent pain2016In: Pastoral Care in Education, ISSN 0264-3944, E-ISSN 1468-0122, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 3-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the views of school nurses (n = 25) and students with recurrent pain (n = 24) in Sweden with regard to school-based pedagogic practices. A number of common categories with implications for pedagogic practice were identified by analysing qualitative interviews with these groups, using the coding techniques of grounded theory. The results indicate that a failure to develop trust made it difficult for some students to initiate contact with a school nurse and that some students perceive the issue of recurrent pain being of relevance to all young people, deserving coverage in the curriculum. We thus conclude that it is important to integrate personal, social and health education in the ordinary spaces of teaching and learning in order to complement and bolster the conventionally organised school health services in Sweden. However, this might be difficult to achieve because many of the school nurses emphasised that health and education were commonly treated on parallel tracks in their schools, under the management of different authorities.

  • 46.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Gender-based generalisations in school nurses' appraisals of and interventions addressing students' mental health2016In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 16, article id 451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There has been an increase of reports describing mental health problems in adolescents, especially girls. School nurses play an important role in supporting young people with health problems. Few studies have considered how the nurses' gender norms may influence their discussions.

    Methods: To investigate this issue, semi-structured interviews focusing on school nurses' work with students who have mental health problems were conducted. Transcripts of interviews with Swedish school nurses (n = 15) from the Help overcoming pain early project (HOPE) were analysed using theories on gender as a theoretical framework and then organised into themes related to the school nurses' provision of contact and intervention. The interviewees were all women, aged between 42–63 years, who had worked as nurses for 13–45 years, and as school nurses for 2–28 years. Five worked in upper secondary schools (for students aged 16–19) and 10 in secondary schools (for students aged 12–16).

    Results: The results show that school nurses more commonly associated mental health problems with girls. When the school nurses discussed students that were difficult to reach, boys in particular were mentioned. However, very few nurses mentioned specific intervention to address students' mental health problems, and all of the mentioned interventions were focused on girls. Some of the school nurses reported that it was more difficult to initiate a health dialogue with boys, yet none of the nurses had organized interventions for the boys.

    Conclusions: We conclude that generalisations can sometimes be analytically helpful, facilitating, for instance, the identification of problems in school nurses' work methods and interventions. However, the most important conclusion from our research, which applied a design that is not commonly used, is that more varied approaches, as well as a greater awareness of potential gender stereotype pitfalls, are necessary to meet the needs of diverse student groups.

  • 47.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Norrström, Anna
    Högskolan i Borås.
    En habiliterings samverkan med skolor och föräldrar: organisering – rådgivning – hierarkier2016In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel presenteras en studie av en habiliterings samverkan med skolor och föräldrar där aktörerna studerades genom deltagande observationer och intervjuer. Syftet i föreliggande artikel är att problematisera samverkans organisering och rådgivningssituation i förhållande till makt och hierarkiska strukturer. Enligt aktörerna i studien var det främsta syftet med samverkan informationsspridning och rådgivning. Resultatet visar dock att man under samverkansmöten ofta snarare hamnade i känslomässiga utbyten än i att diskutera pedagogiska dilemman. Analysen visade dessutom att frågor om makt var ett av de viktigaste inslagen i samverkanssituationen utan att det av aktörerna lyftes som primärt.

  • 48.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Young people talk about their 'rural' place: A rural idyll?2019In: Young people's life and schooling in rural areas / [ed] Öhrn, Elisabet & Beach, Dennis, Tufnell Press, 2019, p. 22-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Where to go and what to do? Young people's arguments about career choices in Swedish rural contexts in relation to social, economic and cultural resources2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is concerned with how rural youth discuss resources important in trajectories to post-secondary and higher education. The aim is to analyse how social, cultural and material resources influenced students in compulsory educations thoughts of educational/career choice in the stage of entering upper secondary education. In which different ways did the rural youth discuss those resources as important in decision making? Theoretically this is done by using Massey’s (1994) understanding of place and the concept of power geometry. According to the concept different social groups, and different individuals, are placed in very distinct ways in relation to flows and interconnection between local and global time-space interrelations.

    The data consists of ethnographic work in six classes in six rural towns, which differed in terms of size, access to post-compulsory education, unemployment and youth trajectories. That means classroom observations, interviews with the students, teachers, study- and work counsellors and heads.

    The results indicates that social resources such as siblings and cousins ‘pawing the way’ and having a relative in the receiving town could be important aspects in the choice of upper secondary school. Cultural resources such as institutional recognition, in the form of academic credentials or qualifications were also important. Also economic resources were important when it came to find accommodation, where economic privileged students did not seem to reflect as much in where they would study, but rather picked the programme of their choice. The conclusions are that different resources seems even more important to rural youth than what is known of their urban youth equivalent.

  • 50.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Young people's career choices in Swedish rural contexts: Schools' social codes, migration and resources2018In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 60, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful social and economic integration into Swedish society increasingly demands a post-compulsory education, but such education is increasingly centralised, posing problems for rural young people. To help efforts to address such problems, this article considers social codes and resources that may influence rural young peoples' trajectories to post-secondary and higher education. This is done by analysing how codes and resources (social, cultural and material) influenced thoughts of students preparing to leave compulsory education regarding their educational/career choices. The empirical data were gathered using ethnographic approaches (classroom observations, and interviews with students, teachers, heads and study/work counsellors) in six classes in six rural Swedish towns, differing in terms of size, access to post-compulsory education, unemployment and young peoples' trajectories. The theoretical framework is based on Massey's understandings of place and power geometry, i.e. the distinct ways different social groups and individuals are placed in relation to the flows and interconnections of socio-economic and cultural interactions. The results indicate that social resources such as siblings and cousins ‘paving the way’, or relatives in towns offering possible options, may influence choices of upper secondary school. Cultural resources such as institutional recognition, in the form of academic credentials or qualifications, were also important. So too were financial resources, partly because economically privileged students tended to pick the programme of their choice, without reflecting much about where they would live, while less privileged students had to consider potential accommodation problems. In conclusion, differences in resources seem even more important to rural young people than they reportedly are for their urban peers.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-01 01:00
12 1 - 50 of 57
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