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  • 1.
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Härtlova, Anetta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sloniecka, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Raffi, Faizal A. M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hosseinzadeh, Ava
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Rofougaran, Reza
    Resch, Ulrike
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ek, Torben
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity2016In: Immunity, ISSN 1074-7613, E-ISSN 1097-4180, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 106-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome- dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection.

  • 2.
    Härtlova, Anetta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Link, Marek
    Balounova, Jana
    Benesova, Martina
    Resch, Ulrike
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Straskova, Adela
    Sobol, Margarita
    Philimonenko, Anatoly
    Hozak, Pavel
    Krocova, Zuzana
    Gekara, Nelson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Filipp, Dominik
    Stulik, Jiri
    Quantitative proteomics analysis of macrophage-derived lipid rafts reveals induction of autophagy pathway at the early time of Francisella tularensis LVS infection2014In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 796-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen that has evolved an efficient strategy to subvert host defense response to survive inside the host. The molecular mechanisms regulating these host-pathogen interactions and especially those that are initiated at the time of the bacterial entry via its attachment to the host plasma membrane likely predetermine the intracellular fate of pathogen. Here, we provide the evidence that infection of macrophages with F. tularensis leads to changes in protein composition of macrophage-derived lipid rafts, isolated as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Using SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach, we observed the accumulation of autophagic adaptor protein p62 at the early, stages of microbe-host cell interaction. We confirmed the colocalization of the p62 with ubiquitinated and LC3-decorated intracellular F. tularensis microbes with its maximum at 1 h postinfection. Furthermore, the infection of p62-knockdown host cells led to the transient increase in the intracellular number of microbes up to 4 h after in vitro infection. Together, these data suggest that the activation of the autophagy pathway in F. tularensis infected macrophages, which impacts the early phase of microbial proliferation, is subsequently circumvented by ongoing infection.

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