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  • 1. Appelros, Peter
    et al.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Asberg, Kerstin Hulter
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Epidemiologic Center, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Terént, Andreas
    Trends in baseline patient characteristics during the years 1995-2008: observations from Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register2010In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 114-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many baseline parameters in Riks-Stroke have changed over the years. This has consequences for the interpretation of outcome data. Some changes may be due to inclusion bias, others due to alterations in general health, evolution of vascular risk factors or demographics.

  • 2. Asberg, Signild
    et al.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Henriksson, Karin M
    Terént, Andreas
    Reduced risk of death with warfarin: results of an observational nationwide study of 20 442 patients with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke2013In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 689-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is demonstrated to be superior in efficacy over antiplatelet agents for the prevention of stroke, but the relationship between warfarin and mortality is less clear. Our aim was to investigate this relationship in a large cohort of unselected patients with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke.

    METHODS: This observational study was based on patients who were discharged alive and registered in the Swedish Stroke Register in 2001 through 2005. Vital status was retrieved by linkage to the Swedish Cause of Death Register. We calculated a propensity score for the likelihood of warfarin prescription at discharge from hospital. The risk of death and 95% confidence intervals were estimated in Cox regression models.

    RESULTS: Out of the 20 442 patients with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke (mean age = 79·5 years), 31% (n = 6399) were prescribed warfarin. After adjustment for the propensity score, warfarin was associated with a reduced risk of death (0·67; 95% confidence interval, 0·63-0·71). The crude rate (per 100 person-years) of fatal non-haemorrhagic stroke was lower in patients who received warfarin (1·60; 95% confidence interval, 1·34-1·89) compared to those who received antiplatelet (6·83; 95% confidence interval, 6·42-7·25). The rates (per 100 person-years) of fatal haemorrhagic stroke were 0·21 (95% confidence interval, 0·12-0·32) and 0·43 (95% confidence interval, 0·34-0·55) in patients prescribed warfarin and antiplatelet therapy, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: In addition to its established benefit for stroke prevention, warfarin therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke was associated with a reduced risk of death, without an increased risk of fatal haemorrhagic stroke.

  • 3.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Inflammation, poststroke depression and statins2011In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 567-568Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Persson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Country comparisons of human stroke research since 2001: a bibliometric study2012In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 830-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This is the first bibliometric comparison between countries of the development of stroke research over time.

    METHODS: Clinical and epidemiological articles on stroke published 2001 to mid-2011 were identified in Science Citation Index Expanded. Article fractions, citation fractions, h-index, and international collaboration were calculated using the BibExcel software and adjusted for population size and gross domestic product.

    RESULTS: The United States dominated with 28.7% of the sum of article fractions and 36.2% of the sum of citation fractions. The United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Germany together accounted for 52.1% of articles and 61.0% of citations. When adjusted for population size or gross domestic product, several small European countries, together with Israel and Taiwan, ranked the highest. Per population, there was a negative association (r=0.60) between burden of stroke (disability-adjusted life-years lost) and number of articles per population. In China, South Korea, and Singapore, the annual growth of stroke articles was more than twice the worldwide average. Whereas multinational collaboration was common within Europe and North America, it was relatively uncommon between Asian countries.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Big 4 in scientific literature on stroke, as to both number of articles and citations, are the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, and Germany. Many small European countries have, in relation to their size, a high scientific production. Several countries with rapidly expanding economies have very fast growth of scientific production on stroke. Our results emphasize the need for stroke research in countries with a high population burden of stroke and they highlight the role of multinational collaboration.

  • 5.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Effects of Extending the Time Window of Thrombolysis to 4.5 Hours: Observations in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riks-Stroke)2011In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 2492-2497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: The European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS) III trial and Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke–International Stroke Thrombolysis Register (SITS-ISTR) data were published in 2008. Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, was used to explore how thrombolysis in the 3- to 4.5-hour window has been spread in different hospitals and patient groups and what effects this has had on treatment within 3 hours.

    Methods: All 76 hospitals in Sweden admitting patients with acute stroke participate in Riks-Stroke. During the study period, January 2003 to June 2010, 92 150 18- to 80-year-old patients were hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke.

    Results: After the publication of the ECASS III results in the third quarter of 2008, thrombolysis in the 3- to 4.5-hour window increased from 0.5% before publication to 2.1% in 2010. Thrombolysis in the 3- to 4.5-hour window spread somewhat faster in men than women (P=0.04) but at a similar rate in different age groups. The use of thrombolysis within 3 hours after onset of symptoms increased successively from 0.9% in 2003 to 6.6% in late 2008 and then it stabilized at 6%. The median time from arrival to the hospital to start of treatment remained unchanged at 66 to 69 minutes before and after 2008 (P=0.06).

    Conclusions: Since the end of 2008, there has been a rapid nationwide dissemination of thrombolysis in the 3- to 4.5-hour window, whereas rates in the <3-hour window have leveled off. The extended time window has not affected door-to-needle time.

  • 6.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hulter Åsberg, Kerstin
    Appelros, Peter
    Bjarne, Daniela
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Terént, Andreas
    Wallin, Sari
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wester, Per-Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The Riks-Stroke story: building a sustainable national register for quality assessment of stroke care2011In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, is the world's longest-running national stroke quality register (established in 1994) and includes all 76 hospitals in Sweden admitting acute stroke patients. The development and maintenance of this sustainable national register is described.

    Methods Riks-Stroke includes information on the quality of care during the acute phase, rehabilitation and secondary prevention of stroke, as well as data on community support. Riks-Stroke is unique among stroke quality registers in that patients are followed during the first year after stroke. The data collected describe processes, and medical and patient-reported outcome measurements. The register embraces most of the dimensions of health-care quality (evidence-based, safe, provided in time, distributed fairly and patient oriented).

    Result Annually, approximately 25 000 patients are included. In 2009, approximately 320 000 patients had been accumulated (mean age 76-years). The register is estimated to cover 82% of all stroke patients treated in Swedish hospitals. Among critical issues when building a national stroke quality register, the delicate balance between simplicity and comprehensiveness is emphasised. Future developments include direct transfer of data from digital medical records to Riks-Stroke and comprehensive strategies to use the information collected to rapidly implement new evidence-based techniques and to eliminate outdated methods in stroke care.

    Conclusions It is possible to establish a sustainable quality register for stroke at the national level covering all hospitals admitting acute stroke patients. Riks-Stroke is fulfilling its main goals to support continuous quality improvement of Swedish stroke services and serve as an instrument for following up national stroke guidelines.

  • 7.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurology .
    Appelros, Peter
    University Hospital. Örebro, Sweden; Department of Neurology .
    Norrving, Bo
    University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Medicine.
    Terént, Andreas
    Akademiska University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medicine.
    Åsberg, Kerstin Hulter
    Enköping Hospital, Enköping, Sweden.
    Patient dissatisfaction with acute stroke care2009In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 3851-3856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, was used to explore patient characteristics and stroke services as determinants of patient dissatisfaction with acute in-hospital care. METHODS: All 79 hospitals in Sweden admitting acute stroke patients participate in Riks-Stroke. During 2001 to 2007, 104 876 patients (87% of survivors) responded to a follow-up questionnaire 3 months after acute stroke; this included questions on satisfaction with various aspects of stroke care. RESULTS: The majority (>90%) were satisfied with acute in-hospital stroke care. Dissatisfaction was closely associated with outcome at 3 months. Patient who were dependent regarding activities of daily living, felt depressed, or had poor self-perceived general health were more likely to be dissatisfied. Dissatisfaction with global acute stroke care was linked to dissatisfaction with other aspects of care, including rehabilitation and support by community services. Patients treated in stroke units were less often dissatisfied than patients in general wards, as were patients who had been treated in a small hospital (vs medium or large hospitals) and patient who had participated in discharge planning. In multivariate analyses, the strongest predictor of dissatisfaction with acute care was poor outcome (dependency regarding activities of daily living, depressed mood, poor self-perceived health). CONCLUSIONS: Dissatisfaction with in-hospital acute stroke care is part of a more extensive complex comprising poor functional outcome, depressive mood, poor self-perceived general health, and dissatisfaction not only with acute care but also with health care and social services at large. Several aspects of stroke care organization are associated with a lower risk of dissatisfaction.

  • 8.
    Asplund, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Norrving, B.
    Department of Neurology, Skane University Hospital, Lund.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Implementation in routine clinical practice of thrombolysis in extended time window 3-4.5 h: A nationwide swedish study2011In: Special Issue: Abstracts of the 15th Congress of the EFNS, Budapest, Hungary, 2011, Oxford: Rapid Communications , 2011, Vol. 18, p. 52-52Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bergstedt Oscarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Brorstad, Alette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Forssén, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Human Puumala hantavirus infection in northern Sweden: increased seroprevalence and association to risk and health factors2016In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 16, article id 566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The rodent borne Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) causes haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in central and northern Europe. The number of cases has increased and northern Sweden has experienced large outbreaks in 1998 and 2006-2007 which raised questions regarding the level of immunity in the human population.

    METHODS: A randomly selected population aged between 25 and 74 years from northern Sweden were invited during 2009 to participate in a WHO project for monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease. Health and risk factors were evaluated and sera from 1,600 participants were available for analysis for specific PUUV IgG antibodies using a recombinant PUUV nucleocapsid protein ELISA.

    RESULTS: The overall seroprevalence in the investigated population was 13.4 %, which is a 50 % increase compared to a similar study only two decades previously. The prevalence of PUUV IgG increased with age, and among 65-75 years it was 22 %. More men (15.3 %) than women (11.4 %) were seropositive (p < 0.05). The identified risk factors were smoking (OR = 1.67), living in rural areas (OR = 1.92), and owning farmland or forest (OR = 2.44). No associations were found between previous PUUV exposure and chronic lung disease, diabetes, hypertension, renal dysfunction, stroke or myocardial infarction.

    CONCLUSIONS: PUUV is a common infection in northern Sweden and there is a high life time risk to acquire PUUV infection in endemic areas. Certain risk factors as living in rural areas and smoking were identified. Groups with increased risk should be targeted for future vaccination when available, and should also be informed about appropriate protection from rodent secreta.

  • 10.
    Bråndal, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Effect of early supported discharge after stroke on patient reported outcome based on the Swedish Riksstroke registry2019In: BMC Neurology, ISSN 1471-2377, E-ISSN 1471-2377, Vol. 19, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The efficacy of early supported discharge (ESD) has not been tested in current stroke care setting, which provide relatively short hospital stays, access to hyper-acute therapies and early carotid stenosis interventions. This study aimed to compare patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) among patients with stroke that received modern stroke unit care with or without ESD.

    Methods: Observational study of 30,232 patients with first-ever stroke registered in the Riksstroke registry in Sweden, between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2013. Patient characteristics were collected from the Riksstroke and Statistics Sweden databases. The primary outcome was satisfaction with the rehabilitation at 3 months after discharge. Secondary outcome were information about stroke provided, tiredness/fatigue, pain, dysthymia/ depression, general health status and dependence in activities of daily living (mobility, toileting and dressing) at 3 months after the stroke. We used separate multivariable logistic regression models for each PROM variable to analyze associations between PROMs and ESD/no ESD.

    Results: The ESD group comprised 1495 participants: the control group comprised 28,737 participants. Multivariable logistic regression models of PROMs showed that, compared to controls, the ESD group was more satisfied with rehabilitation after discharge (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.17–2.49), experienced less dysthymia/depression (OR: 0.68, 95% 0.55–0.84) and showed more independence in mobility (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.17–1.92), toileting (OR: 1.30, 95%CI: 1.05–1.61), and dressing (OR: 1.23, 95%CI: 1.02–1.48).

    Conclusion: In the setting of modern stroke unit care, ESD appeared to have positive effects on stroke rehabilitation, in the subacute phase.

  • 11.
    Bråndal, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Wester, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Reliability and validity of the Swedish Fatigue Assessment Scale when self-administrered by persons with mild to moderate stroke2016In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, ISSN 1074-9357, E-ISSN 1945-5119, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 90-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine internal consistency, test-retest reliability, floor/ceiling effects and construct validity of the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS), when self-administrated by persons with mild to moderate stroke.

    Method: The FAS was translated into Swedish and tested for psychometric properties when self-administrated by persons with mild to moderate stroke. Participants, consequently selected from the stroke unit admission register received a letter with three questionnaires: the FAS, Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) subscale for vitality and Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS-15. Within two weeks, a second letter with FAS was sent for re-test.

    Result: Seventy-tree persons with mild to moderate stroke participated in the study. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s alpha 0.82). The test and retest reliability of individual items showed that five items out of 10 items were good (weighted kappa > 0.60), four were moderate (0.40-0.60), and one was fair (0.22). The relative reliability between total scores was good (ICC 3.1 = 0.73) and the absolute reliability was nine points, meaning that a change of at least nine points in total score implies a real change of fatigue level. Correlation analysis showed that the Swedish FAS correlated with the SF-36 subscale for vitality (rs = - 0.73) and GDS-15 (rs = 0.62), suggesting convergent construct validity. There were no floor or ceiling effects.

    Conclusion: The Swedish translation of the FAS used as a self-administrated questionnaire is reliable and valid for measuring fatigue in persons with mild to moderate stroke.

  • 12.
    Darehed, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Blom, Mathias
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Niklasson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Bray, Benjamin D.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Diurnal variations in the quality of stroke care in Sweden2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: A recent study of acute stroke patients in England and Wales revealed several patterns of temporal variation in quality of care. We hypothesized that similar patterns would be present in Sweden and aimed to describe these patterns. Additionally, we aimed to investigate whether hospital type conferred resilience against temporal variation.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: We conducted this nationwide registry-based study using data from the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) including all adult patients registered with acute stroke between 2011 and 2015. Outcomes included process measures and survival. We modeled time of presentation as on/off hours, shifts, day of week, 4h and 12 h time blocks. We studied hospital resilience by comparing outcomes across hospital types.

    RESULTS: 113862 stroke events in 72 hospitals were included. The process indicators and survival all showed significant temporal variation. Door-to-needle (DTN) time within 30 minutes was less likely during nighttime than daytime (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.41-0.60). Patients admitted during off-hours had lower odds of direct stroke unit (SU) admission (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.70-0.75). 30-day survival was lower in nighttime versus daytime presentations (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.96). The effects of temporal variation differed significantly between hospital types for DTN time within 30 minutes and direct SU admission where university hospitals were more resilient than specialized non-university hospitals.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that variation in quality of care and survival is present throughout the whole week. We also found that university hospitals were more resilient to temporal variation than specialized non-university hospitals.

  • 13.
    Eliasson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lundqvist, R.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Comparison of trends in cardiovascular risk factors between two regions with and without a community and primary care prevention programme2018In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 39, p. 76-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Eliasson, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lundqvist, Robert
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Comparison of trends in cardiovascular risk factors between two regions with and without a community and primary care prevention programme2018In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1765-1772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The effect of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is debated. The Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) is an individual and community-based public health programme that comprises the whole county of Västerbotten (VB). In the neighbouring county of Norrbotten (NB), no programmes have been implemented.

    Method Between 1994 and 2014, five surveys were performed in the two counties on persons aged 40 to 75 years within the Northern Sweden MONICA Study. The number of subjects participating was 6600 (75.4%). We compared time trends in risk factors between the two counties using regression models including age, county and year of survey. To test whether time trends differed between counties, the interaction between county and year was included in the models.

    Results Systolic blood pressure declined in both counties, and the decline was faster in Västerbotten than in Norrbotten ( p = 0.043 for interaction county*year). Diastolic blood pressure declined in VB but increased in NB ( p < 0.001). Cholesterol levels declined at a similar rate in both counties whereas body mass index increased in both counties. Fasting glucose decreased in VB ( p = 0.003) and increased in NB. The prevalence of regular smokers decreased faster in VB than in NB ( p = 0.01). Trend in waist and hip circumference, known diabetes, having an academic degree, being physically inactive or 10 year cardiovascular mortality according to SCORE did not differ.

    Conclusion Blood pressure, glucose and smoking improved at a faster rate in the county with a community and primary care-based intervention than in the county without such an intervention.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Leptin levels are not associated with enalapril treatment after an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, but associate strongly with changes in fibrinolytic variables in menManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Appelros, Peter
    Norrving, Bo
    Terént, Andreas
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Assessment of functional outcome in a national quality register for acute stroke: can simple self-reported items be transformed into the modified Rankin Scale?2007In: Stroke, ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 1384-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. mats.eliasson@nll.se.
    Differences in cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status do not explain the increased risk of death after stroke in diabetic patients: results from the Swedish Stroke Register2013In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 35, no Suppl. 3, p. 305-305Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Medicin.
    Terent, Andreas
    Hulter Åsberg, Kerstin
    Wester, Per-Olov
    Self-reported depression and use of antidepressants after stroke: a national survey.2004In: Stroke, ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 936-941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Van Rompaye, Bart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Department of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Differences in cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status do not explain the increased risk of death after a first stroke in diabetic patients: results from the Swedish Stroke Register2013In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 2181-2186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study compared survival rates and causes of death after stroke in diabetic and non-diabetic patients in Sweden. We hypothesised that differences in cardiovascular risk factors, acute stroke management or socioeconomic status (SES) could explain the higher risk of death after stroke in diabetic patients. METHODS: The study included 155,806 first-ever stroke patients from the Swedish Stroke Register between 2001 and 2009. Individual patient information on SES was retrieved from Statistics Sweden. Survival was followed until 2010 (532,140 person-years) with a median follow-up time of 35 months. Multiple Cox regression was used to analyse survival adjusting for differences in background characteristics, in-hospital treatment, SES and year of stroke. Causes of death were analysed using cause-specific proportional hazard models. RESULTS: The risk of death after stroke increased in diabetic patients (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.25, 1.31), and this risk was greater in younger patients and in women. Differences in background characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, in-hospital treatment and SES did not explain the increased risk of death after stroke (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.32, 1.37) after adjustments. Diabetic patients had an increased probability of dying from cerebrovascular disease and even higher probabilities of dying from other circulatory causes and all other causes except cancer. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Differences in cardiovascular risk factors, acute stroke management and SES do not explain the lower survival after stroke in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients are at higher risk of dying from cardiovascular causes and all other causes of death, other than cancer.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The disparity in long-term survival after a first stroke in patients with and without diabetes persists: the Northern Sweden MONICA Study2012In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetes is an established risk factor for stroke. Compared to nondiabetic patients, diabetic patients also have an increased risk of new vascular events and death after stroke. We analyzed how differences in long-term survival between diabetic and nondiabetic stroke patients have changed over time, and if differences varied with respect to sex and age.

    Methods: This population-based study included 12,375 first-ever stroke patients, 25-74 years old, who were registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA Stroke Registry 1985-2005. Uniform diagnostic criteria for stroke case ascertainment were used throughout the study period. The diagnosis of diabetes was based on medical records or diabetes diagnosed during the acute stroke event. Patients were separated into four cohorts according to year of stroke and followed for survival until August 30, 2008.

    Results: The diabetes prevalence at stroke onset was 21%, similar in men and women, and remained stable throughout the study period. The diabetic patients were an average of 2 years older, more often nonsmokers and more likely to have antihypertensive treatment, antithrombotics, atrial fibrillation, and a history of myocardial infarction or transient ischemic attack than the nondiabetic patients. The total follow-up time was 86,086 patient-years during which a total of 1,930 (75.7%) of the diabetic patients and 5,744 (58.5%) of the nondiabetic patients died (p < 0.001). Median survival was 60 months (95% CI: 57-64) in diabetic patients and 117 months (113-120) in the nondiabetic patients. Survival improved significantly in both groups (p < 0.001). A Cox regression, adjusting for possible confounders (age, sex, antihypertensive medication, antithrombotics or other thrombolytic agents, history of myocardial infarction, type of stroke, diabetes, cohort and the diabetes-by-sex, diabetes-by-age and diabetes-by-cohort interactions), showed a hazard ratio of 1.67 (1.58-1.76) comparing survival in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients. The reduced survival in diabetic stroke patients was more pronounced in women (p = 0.02) and younger patients (p < 0.001). There was a tendency that the difference in survival decreased between the earlier cohorts and the 2000-2005 cohort, but the test for interaction did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.08).

    Conclusion: Long-term survival after a first stroke has improved in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Survival is markedly lower in diabetics, especially in women and younger patients, and the disparity persisted over 24 years. Decreasing the disparity in stroke survival is a challenge for stroke and diabetes care. New treatment methods in combination with intense secondary prevention in diabetic patients, especially in younger women, are needed.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Comparison of blood pressure measurements between an automated oscillometric device and a Hawksley random-zero sphygmomanometer in the northern Sweden MONICA study.2012In: Blood Pressure Monitoring, ISSN 1359-5237, E-ISSN 1473-5725, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Hawksley random-zero sphygmomanometer (random-zero) has been used widely in epidemiological observation studies. This study compares blood pressure measurements using the random-zero with measurements using an automated oscillometric device and suggests a correction of the automated oscillometric measurements to enable comparisons of blood pressure levels over time.

    METHODS: The northern Sweden MONICA population survey 2009 included 1729 participants, 853 men and 876 women, 25-74 years old. Blood pressure was measured using both random-zero and an automated oscillometric device in all participants. The Omron M7 digital blood pressure monitor was used for automated oscillometric measurements. A linear mixed model was used to derive a formula to adjust the automated oscillometric readings.

    RESULTS: Automated oscillometric measurements of systolic blood pressure were generally lower than random-zero measurements in women [oscillometric mean 122.1 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 121.0-123.2) versus random-zero mean 124.4 mmHg (123.5-125.5)], whereas automated oscillometric measurements of systolic blood pressure were generally higher than random-zero measurements in men [oscillometric 131.1 mmHg (130.0-132.2) versus random-zero 129.0 mmHg (127.9-130.1)]. For diastolic blood pressure, automated oscillometric measurements were higher in both women [oscillometric 79.9 mmHg (79.2-80.5) versus random-zero 76.7 mmHg (76.0-77.4)] and men [oscillometric 83.1 mmHg (82.4-83.8) vs. random-zero 81.2 mmHg (80.6-81.9)]. The difference also varied with age and order of measurement. Adjustment of the automated oscillometric measurements using mixed model regression coefficients produced estimates of blood pressure that were close to the random-zero measurements.

    CONCLUSION: Blood pressure measurements using an automated oscillometric device differ from those with random-zero, but the oscillometric measurements can be adjusted, on the basis of sex, age and measurement order, to be similar to the random-zero measurements.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pennlert, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Time trends and socioeconomic differences in blood pressure levels: the Northern Sweden MONICA study 1994-20142017In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 24, no 14, p. 1473-1481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People with low socioeconomic status have higher blood pressure (BP), increasing their risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. We hypothesized that the gap in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP, according to educational level, has decreased over time but, that economical vulnerability would confer higher BP.

    Methods: A total of 4564 women and 4363 men aged 25-74 years participated in five population-based surveys in the Northern Sweden MONICA study between 1994 and 2014 (participation rate 76.8-62.5%).

    Results: SBP decreased by 10 mmHg in women and 4 mmHg in men, while DBP was unchanged. Treatment with antihypertensives increased in all but the youngest men. The prevalence of BP control in the population (<140/90 mmHg) increased and in 2014 reached 75% among women and 70% among men. The decrease in SBP was more pronounced in people without university education than in people with university education and DBP showed the same pattern, regardless of education. After adjustment for confounding factors, age, male sex, higher body mass index, and being born in a Nordic country were related to higher SBP and DBP. University education was related to lower SBP, while variables mirroring economic vulnerability were not associated with BP levels.

    Conclusions: BP levels as well as the socioeconomic gap in BP has decreased in Sweden but people with a lower level of education still have higher SBP. Lacking economic resources is not associated with high BP.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Forslund, Ann-Sofi
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Greater decreases in cholesterol levels among individuals with high cardiovascular risk than among the general population: the northern Sweden MONICA study 1994 to 20142016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, no 25, p. 1985-1992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Decreasing cholesterol levels in Western populations is the main reason for decreasing mortality due to coronary heart disease. Our aim was to analyze trends in cholesterol levels in the population during a period of 20 years in relation to previous cardiovascular disease (CVD), other cardiovascular risk factors, and socioeconomic status.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 4546 women and 4349 men aged 25-74 years participated in five population-based surveys in the Northern Sweden MONICA Study between 1994 and 2014 (participation rate 76.8-62.5%). Total cholesterol levels decreased from 6.2 mmol/L (95% confidence interval, CI, 6.1-6.2) in 1994 to 5.5 mmol/L (CI 5.4-5.5) in 2014. The decrease was more pronounced in elderly vs. younger participants (1.0 vs. 0.5 mmol/L). In 2014, participants with previous CVD, diabetes, or hypertension had lower cholesterol levels than the general population, whereas their levels were higher or similar to the general population in 1994. The use of lipid-lowering drugs increased markedly and was used by 14.3% in 2014. Previously described differences in cholesterol levels between participants with obesity and normal weight, and between those with and without university education, diminished, or vanished over time.

    CONCLUSION: Cholesterol levels decreased by 0.7 mmol/L over 20 years with no sign of abating. The improvement occurred in all age and gender groups but more prominently among those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease.

  • 24.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Norrving, B.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Post-stroke suicide attempts and completed suicides: A socioeconomic and nationwide perspective2015In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 10, p. 33-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Kvalitetsregistret Riksstroke visar på ojämlik strokevård: omedveten diskriminering kanske förklarar en del av skillnaderna2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, article id DR7HArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, results from a series of studies on the relationships between socioeconomic factors and stroke processes (stroke unit care, acute reperfusion treatment, secondary prevention with oral anticoagulants and statins) and outcomes (long-term survival, return to work and risk of suicide and suicide attempts) are summarized. The overall pattern is that acute and secondary prevention interventions and prognosis are better in patients with a high compared with a low level of education, better in people with high than low income, better in people who are cohabitant than single. As to country of birth, a more complex pattern has emerged. Unmeasured confounding may possibly explain part of the difference, but the socioeconomic gradients remain after adjustment for multiple potential confounders, leaving the possibility that there is an element of unconscious discrimination in stroke care.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Poststroke suicide attempts and completed suicides: a socioeconomic and nationwide perspective2015In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 84, no 17, p. 1732-1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We examined attempted and completed suicides after stroke to determine whether they were associated with socioeconomic status, other patient characteristics, or time after stroke.

    METHODS: This nationwide cohort study included stroke patients from Riksstroke (the Swedish Stroke Register) from 2001 to 2012. We used personal identification numbers to link the Riksstroke data with other national registers. Suicide attempts were identified by a record of hospital admission for intentional self-harm (ICD-10: X60-X84), and completed suicides were identified in the national Cause of Death Register. We used multiple Cox regression to analyze time from stroke onset to first suicide attempt.

    RESULTS: We observed 220,336 stroke patients with a total follow-up time of 860,713 person-years. During follow-up, there were 1,217 suicide attempts, of which 260 were fatal. This was approximately double the rate of the general Swedish population. Patients with lower education or income (hazard ratio [HR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-1.68) for primary vs university and patients living alone (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.52-1.97) had an increased risk of attempted suicide, and patients born outside of Europe had a lower risk compared to patients of European origin. Male sex, young age, severe stroke, and poststroke depression were other factors associated with an increased risk of attempted suicide after stroke. The risk was highest during the first 2 years after stroke.

    CONCLUSIONS: Both clinical and socioeconomic factors increase the risk of poststroke suicide attempts. This suggests a need for psychosocial support and suicide preventive interventions in high-risk groups of stroke patients.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden2017In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 7, no 4, article id e00654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Ambulance services and stroke alerts reduce the time from stroke onset to acute stroke diagnosis. We describe the use of stroke alerts and ambulance services in different hospitals and patient groups and their relationship with reperfusion therapy. Methods: This nationwide study included 49,907 patients admitted with acute stroke who were registered in The Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) in 2011-2012. Results: The proportions of patients admitted as stroke alerts out of all acute stroke admissions varied from 12.2% to 45.7% in university hospitals (n=9), 0.5% to 38.7% in specialized nonuniversity hospitals (n=22), and 4.2% to 40.3% in community hospitals (n=41). Younger age, atrial fibrillation (AF), living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were factors associated with a higher probability of stroke alerts. Living alone, primary school education, non-European origin, previous stroke, diabetes, smoking, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were associated with a lower probability of stroke alert. The proportion of patients arriving at the hospital by ambulance varied from 60.3% to 94.5%. Older age, living alone, primary school education, being born in a European country, previous stroke, AF, dependency in ADL, living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were associated with ambulance services. Hospital stroke alert frequencies correlated strongly with reperfusion rates (r=.75). Conclusion: Acute stroke alerts have a significant potential to improve stroke reperfusion rates. Prehospital stroke management varies conspicuously between hospitals and patient groups, and the elderly and patients living alone have a markedly reduced likelihood of stroke alerts.

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Norrving, Bo
    the Department of Neurology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Terént, Andreas
    the Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sex differences in stroke care and outcome in the Swedish national quality register for stroke care2009In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 909-914Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Previous reports concerning sex-related differences in stroke management and outcome are inconsistent and are sometimes difficult to interpret. We used data from a national stroke register to further explore possible differences between men and women in baseline characteristics, stroke treatment, and outcome.

    Methods: This study included 24633 stroke events registered in Riks-Stroke, the Swedish national quality register for stroke care, during 2006. Information on background variables and treatment was collected during the hospital stay. After 3 months, the patients' living situation and outcome were assessed.

    Results: Women were older than men when they had their stroke (mean age, 78.4 versus 73.6 years; P<0.001). On admission to the hospital, women were more often unconscious. Among conscious patients, there was no sex-related difference in the use of stroke unit care. Men and women had equal probability to receive thrombolysis and oral anticoagulants. Women were more likely to develop deep venous thromboses and fractures, whereas men were more likely to develop pneumonia during their hospital stay. Women had a lower 3-month survival, a difference that was associated with higher age and impaired level of consciousness on admission. Women were less often living at home at the 3-month follow-up. However, the difference in residency was not present in patients <85 years who were living at home without community support before the stroke.

    Conclusions: Reported sex differences in stroke care and outcome were mainly explained by the women's higher age and lower level of consciousness on admission.

  • 29.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Holmgren, L.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Medicine, Skellefteå Hospital, Skellefteå.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå.
    Large improvements in major cardiovascular risk factors in the population of northern Sweden: the MONICA study 1986–20092011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 219-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The incidence of cardiovascular disease has declined rapidly in Sweden since the 1980s. We explored changes in major cardiovascular risk factors in northern Sweden between 1986 and 2009.

    Design. Since 1986, six population surveys have been carried out in northern Sweden using procedures of the World Health Organization MONICA project. The population age range was 25–64 years in 1986 and 1990, and 25–74 years from 1994. Trends were analysed using generalized linear models.

    Results. A total of 10 586 subjects were included in the surveys. Blood pressure decreased by 4.9/3.9 mmHg in women and 1.8/1.5 mmHg in men aged 25–64 years between 1986 and 2009. In men and women aged 65–74 years, the decrease was 12.6/6.1 mmHg between 1994 and 2009. From 1994, the use of blood pressure‐lowering drugs increased, particularly among the older subgroup. The prevalence of smoking halved between 1986 and 2009; 11% of women and 9% of men were smokers in 2009. Cholesterol levels decreased by 0.9 mmol L−1 in the younger age group (25–64 years), and the use of lipid‐lowering agents increased from 1994. Among subjects aged 25–64 years, one in five was obese in 2009, which was twice as many as in 1986, and body mass index (BMI) increased by 1.5 kg m−2, corresponding to an increase in weight of 4 kg. There was no further increase in BMI from 2004. The prevalence of diabetes did not change between 1986 and 2009. The proportion that received a university education increased markedly in all age groups, especially in women, during the study period.

    Conclusions. Significant improvements were observed in major cardiovascular risk factors in northern Sweden between 1986 and 2009.

  • 30.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Appelros, Peter
    Asberg, Kerstin Hulter
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Terént, Andreas
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Dissemination of thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke across a nation: experiences from the Swedish stroke register, 2003 to 20082010In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1115-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We used Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, to explore how thrombolysis has been disseminated in Swedish hospitals since it was approved in 2003. METHODS: All 78 hospitals in Sweden admitting patients with acute stroke participate in Riks-Stroke. Between 2003 and 2008, 72 033 adult patients were hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke. We analyzed thrombolysis use by region, patient characteristics, and stroke service settings. RESULTS: Nationwide, the use of thrombolysis increased from 0.9% in 2003 to 6.6% in 2008. There were marked regional differences in the dissemination of thrombolysis, but these gaps narrowed over time. Nonuniversity hospitals reached treatment levels similar to university settings, although with a 2- to 3-year delay. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage remained at the 3% to 9% level without an apparent time trend during dissemination. Independent predictors of higher thrombolysis use included younger age, male sex, not living alone, and no history of stroke or diabetes. In 2008, patients admitted to a stroke unit were 5 times more likely to receive thrombolysis than those admitted to general wards. CONCLUSIONS: Nationwide implementation of thrombolysis has been slow but has accelerated mainly due to increased access outside university hospitals. The increased use has been achieved safely, but access has been unequal.

  • 31.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jonsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Appelros, Peter
    Åsberg, Kerstin Hulter
    Norrving, Bo
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Terént, Andreas
    Asplund, Kjell
    Trombolys som akutbehandling vid ischemisk stroke sprids över landet: Men regionala variationer är ännu stora, visar Riks-Stroke-analys2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 1-2, p. 21-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Spridningen av trombolys som akutbehandling vid ischemisk stroke har analyserats hos patienter registrerade i Riks-Stroke under 2003–2009.

    Implementeringen har varit långsam, även om den varit snabbare än i många andra länder.

    De regionala variationerna i införandet av trombolys är stora.

    Trombolys har införts med 2–3 års fördröjning vid icke-universitetssjukhus jämfört med universitetssjukhus.

    Andra oberoende prediktorer för trombolysbehandling har varit bl a låg ålder, sammanboende, intagning på strokeenhet och intagning på neurologklinik i stället för medicinklinik.

    Andelen trombolyslarm i målgruppen har nära samband med behandlingsfre­kvensen.

    Spridningen till mindre sjukhus har kunnat genomföras med bevarad patientsäkerhet.

  • 32.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Terént, Andreas
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Functional outcome 3 months after stroke predicts long-term survival.2008In: Cerebrovascular diseases (Basel, Switzerland), ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 423-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: When reporting stroke survival and prognostic factors with a possible effect on outcome, the starting point for the observation of a clinical cohort usually is the onset of stroke or the acute admission of a patient. Thus, acute and early mortality inflict prognosis on long-term outcome. In order to give a more robust analysis of long-term survival after the acute period we chose to start our observation with 3-month survivors. METHODS: We used data from Riks-Stroke, the Swedish quality register for stroke care, together with survival information from the Swedish population register to explore the influence of disability level 3 months after stroke on long-term survival. The main analysis included 15,959 stroke patients, registered during 2001-2002, who had been independent in primary activities of daily living before stroke, had suffered an ischaemic or a haemorrhagic stroke and reported no previous stroke. RESULTS: Impaired functional outcome after stroke was an independent predictor of poor survival. Patients with modified Rankin scale (mRS) grades 3, 4 and 5 had hazard ratios of 1.7, 2.5 and 3.8, respectively, as compared with patients with lower mRS grades. In addition to high mRS, male sex, high age, diabetes, smoking, hypertension therapy at stroke onset, atrial fibrillation and depressed mood were also recognized as significant predictors of poor survival using a multiple Cox regression model. CONCLUSION: The influence of disability on survival is stronger than that of several other well-known prognostic factors. This finding indicates that any intervention in the acute phase that may improve functional status at 3 months will also have favourable secondary effects on survival in the long term.

  • 33.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stecksén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Appelros, Peter
    Hulter Åsberg, Kerstin
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    The National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Terént, Andreas
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Discarding heparins as treatment for progressive stroke in Sweden 2001 to 20082010In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 2552-2558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no immediate, stepwise effect of new scientific information and national guidelines on clinical practice. Rather, the phasing out of heparin has followed a linear course over several years, with less variation between hospitals. We speculate that open comparisons between hospitals in a national stroke register may have helped to reduce the variations in clinical practice.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundberg, Vivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    MONICA quality assessments.2003In: Scandinavian journal of public health. Supplement, ISSN 1403-4956, Vol. 61, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors give an overview of the quality assessments in the WHO MONICA project and compare the quality of the data from Northern Sweden with other reporting units. METHODS AND RESULTS: Standardized measurement procedures and routine checks were used to ensure good quality of the data. The quality has been evaluated by a scoring system. The results show that the data from Northern Sweden have good quality for all variables except total cholesterol in the initial survey. In the subsequent surveys, the quality of cholesterol data was good. CONCLUSIONS: Great effort was put in to ensure good data quality and Northern Sweden is one of the MONICA units with very good quality of data.

  • 35.
    Friskopp, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Periodontology, Public Dental Services, SE-164 42 Kista, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Marie
    AstraZeneca, Clinical R&D, SE-151 85 Södertälje, Sweden.
    Isacsson, Göran
    AstraZeneca, Clinical R&D, SE-151 85 Södertälje, Sweden.
    The anesthetic onset and duration of a new lidocaine/prilocaine gel intra-pocket anesthetic (Oraqix) for periodontal scaling/root planing2001In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 453-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A new non-injection anesthetic, lidocaine/prilocaine gel (Oraqix, AstraZeneca) in a reversible thermosetting system, has been developed to provide local anesthesia for scaling/root planing (SRP). The aim of this study was to determine the anesthetic onset and duration of the gel for SRP in patients with periodontitis.

    METHODS: 30 patients were randomized to either 30 s, 2 min, or 5 min of treatment with the gel prior to SRP of a tooth. The gel was applied to periodontal pockets with a blunt applicator. On completion of the SRP of each tooth (2-3 teeth treated/patient), the patients rated their pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS).

    RESULTS: The median VAS pain score was 7.5 mm in the 30-s group, 28.5 mm in the 2-min group, and 15.5 mm in the 5-min group, with a significant difference between the 30-s and 2-min groups (p=0.03). In 2 patients in the 5-min group, but none in the other groups, the SRP was interrupted due to pain. The mean duration of anesthesia measured as pain on probing were 18.1, 17.3, and 19.9 min in the 30-s, 2-min, and 5-min groups, respectively. There were no reports of numbness of the tongue, lip, or cheek, neither were there any adverse local reactions in the oral mucosa. The gel was easy to apply and did not interfere with the SRP procedure.

    CONCLUSION: Oraqix provides anesthesia after an application time of 30 s, with a mean duration of action of about 17 to 20 min.

  • 36.
    Ghatnekar, Ola
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mapping health outcome measures from a stroke registry to EQ-5D weights2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, no 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To map health outcome related variables from a national register, not part of any validated instrument, with EQ-5D weights among stroke patients.

    Methods: We used two cross-sectional data sets including patient characteristics, outcome variables and EQ-5D weights from the national Swedish stroke register. Three regression techniques were used on the estimation set (n = 272): ordinary least squares (OLS), Tobit, and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD). The regression coefficients for “dressing“, “toileting“, “mobility”, “mood”, “general health” and “proxy-responders” were applied to the validation set (n = 272), and the performance was analysed with mean absolute error (MAE) and mean square error (MSE).

    Results: The number of statistically significant coefficients varied by model, but all models generated consistent coefficients in terms of sign. Mean utility was underestimated in all models (least in OLS) and with lower variation (least in OLS) compared to the observed. The maximum attainable EQ-5D weight ranged from 0.90 (OLS) to 1.00 (Tobit and CLAD). Health states with utility weights <0.5 had greater errors than those with weights ≥0.5 (P < 0.01).

    Conclusion: This study indicates that it is possible to map non-validated health outcome measures from a stroke register into preference-based utilities to study the development of stroke care over time, and to compare with other conditions in terms of utility.

  • 37.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Edlund, Hilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Sukhova, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, B
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    More equal stroke unit care over time. A 15-year follow up of socioeconomic disparities in stroke unit care in Sweden2013In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 35, no Suppl. 3, p. 702-702Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Edlund, Hilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Sukhova, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Asplund, Kjell
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Norrving, Bo
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Neurology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Reduced inequality in access to stroke unit care over time: a 15-year follow-up of socioeconomic disparities in Sweden2013In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 36, no 5-6, p. 407-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the compelling scientific evidence on the superiority of stroke unit care, far from all acute stroke patients have access to stroke unit care. In congruence with what has been observed when other new methods are introduced in health care, we hypothesized that there has been an inequality in the buildup phase of stroke units but that the gradients between patient groups have decreased as the total capacity of stroke unit care has increased. The purpose of this study was to explore if patients in a national sample who were socioeconomically disadvantaged (low education or low income) had reduced access to stroke unit care and if differences varied over time.

    Methods: All patients 18-74 years of age registered between 1995 and 2009 in Riks-Stroke, the Swedish stroke register, were included. The Stroke Unit Trialists' definition of a stroke unit has been adopted by Riks-Stroke and hospitals participating in the registry. Basic patient characteristics, stroke risk factors, process and outcome variables are recorded in Riks-Stroke. Socioeconomic data were accessed from Statistics Sweden. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for stroke unit care between prespecified patient subgroups.

    Results: A total of 319,240 stroke patients were included in Riks-Stroke during the years 1995-2009, and 124,173 were aged between 18 and 74 years; they were included in the final analyses. After adjustment for confounders in a multiple regression model, women were treated in stroke units slightly less often [OR 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-0.99]. There were no statistically significant associations between stroke unit care and age or between stroke unit care and cohabiting or living alone. The highest level of education predicted access to stroke unit care (secondary vs. primary school: OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07; university vs. primary school: OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10). Differences according to level of education diminished over time (p = 0.001). Income was not independently associated with stroke unit care, and over time the proportion of patients treated in stroke units increased at a similar rate in all income groups (p = 0.12).

    Conclusions: Even in a country with modest socioeconomic differences in the general population and public financing of all acute hospital care, socioeconomic inequalities in access to stroke unit care were evident during the early years, but they diminished as the total capacity for stroke unit care increased.

    © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 39.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Jonsson, B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Socioeconomic status predicts return to work after first stroke in younger adults2015In: International Journal of Stroke, ISSN 1747-4930, E-ISSN 1747-4949, Vol. 10, p. 174-174Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jonsson, B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Norrving, B.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Socioeconomic factors' effect on return to work after first stroke2017In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 135, no 6, p. 608-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this nationwide study was to analyze how functional status and socioeconomic status affect return to work (RTW) among younger patients with first-time stroke in a Sweden.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: This register-based cohort study included employed patients aged 25-55 with first-time stroke between 2008 and 2011 and primary outcome was RTW within 1 year after stroke. Data regarding functional status and employment status were retrieved from the Swedish Stroke Register, Riksstroke, and socioeconomic data (income, education, and country of birth) from Statistics Sweden.

    RESULTS: We included 2539 patients who had answered the question on RTW, and 1880 (74.0%) had RTW within 12 months. Patients with low income (69.9% in lowest income group vs 79.9% in highest group, P<.001), patients born in countries outside the Nordic countries (Sweden 75.5%, Nordic countries 74.3%, European countries 61.7%, other countries 57.3%, P<.001), and the youngest patients (25-34, 63.1%; 35-44, 75.9%; 45-55, 74.3%; P=.008) were less likely to RTW. Pain, low mood, and answering the questionnaire with help were more common in low socioeconomic groups, and when adjusting for these variables, together with age and sex, income and country of birth were no longer independent predictors for RTW.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with low socioeconomic status less often RTW 1 year after stroke.Impaired functional status after stroke is more common in patients with lower socioeconomic status and mediates socioeconomic differences in RTW. Improvement of functional status should be targeted to facilitate RTW among stroke patients with low socioeconomic status.

  • 41.
    Glader, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundberg, Michael
    Persistent use of secondary preventive drugs declines rapidly during the first 2 years after stroke.2010In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 397-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To prevent new cardiovascular events after stroke, prescribed preventive drugs should be used continuously. This study measures persistent use of preventive drugs after stroke and identifies factors associated with persistence.

    METHODS: A 1-year cohort (21,077 survivors) from Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register, was linked to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    RESULTS: The proportion of patients who were persistent users of drugs prescribed at discharge from hospital declined progressively over the first 2 years to reach 74.2% for antihypertensive drugs, 56.1% for statins, 63.7% for antiplatelet drugs, and 45.0% for warfarin. For most drugs, advanced age, comorbidity, good self-perceived health, absence of low mood, acute treatment in a stroke unit, and institutional living at follow-up were independently associated with persistent medication use.

    CONCLUSIONS: Persistent secondary prevention treatment declines rapidly during the first 2 years after stroke, particularly for statins and warfarin. Effective interventions to improve persistent secondary prevention after stroke need to be developed.

  • 42.
    Gonzalez, Manuel Cruz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Robinson, Simon
    Mills, Nicholas L
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Hyperleptinemia is associated with altered endothelial functionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Leptin effects on vascular endothelium may be a key mediator although contradictory results have been presented. We aimed to explore the effects of leptin on endothelial vasomotor and fibrinolytic function in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease.

    Methods and Results The vascular effects of leptin were assessed using venous occlusion plethysmography in healthy volunteers (n=17) and in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD) (n=83). In healthy male volunteers, intra-arterial infusion of recombinant human leptin (80, 800 and 8,000 ng/min; n=10) did not affect forearm blood flow or plasma tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) or plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) concentrations (all P>0.05).  However, during concomitant co-infusion with leptin (800 ng/min; n=10), induced vasodilatation was reduced (P=0.001), and tPA activity increased (P=0.002). In line with this, patients with coronary heart disease included in the highest tertile of plasma leptin concentrations had reduced substance P-induced vasodilatation (P<0.001), and increased tPA antigen and activity release (p<0.001 and p=0.03 respectively) compared to those in the lowest tertile.

    Conclusions Although leptin does not directly affect basal vascular function, acute local and chronic systemic hyperleptinemia are associated with altered endothelial function in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease respectively. These results support hyperleptinemia as a link between obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  • 43.
    Guez, Michel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Nilsson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Toolanen, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    The prevalence of neck pain: A population-based study from northern Sweden2002In: Acta Orthopaedica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6470, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 455-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two northernmost counties in Sweden form together 1 of the 39 collaborating centers in the World Health Organization (WHO) MONICA (MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) project. At the last survey in 1999, we added some questions about cervical spine complaints. Persons randomly selected from the population in a geographically well-defined area completed a self-administered questionnaire. The sample included 8,356 subjects and 6,000 (72%) of them answered. 43% of the population reported neck pain, more women (48%) than men (38%). Women of working age had more neck pain than older ones, a phenomenon not seen among men. Chronic neck pain, defined as continuous pain of more than 6 months' duration, was commoner in women (22%) than men (16%).More than one fourth of the cases with chronic symptoms had a history of neck or head trauma and one third of these had sustained a whiplash type of injury. Thus, all types of neck trauma seem to be associated with chronic neck pain.

  • 44. Hadimeri, Henrik
    et al.
    Frisenette-Fich, Carsten
    Deurell, Sven-Ingemar
    Svensson, Lars
    Carlsson-Bjering, Lena
    Fernstrom, Anders
    Almroth, Gabriel
    Melander, Stefan
    Haarhaus, Mattias
    Andersson, Per-Olof
    Cassel, Agneta
    Mauritz, Nils-Johan
    Stahl-Nilsson, Agneta
    Wilske, Jan
    Nordstrom, Kataryna
    Oruda, Pavel
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Larsson, Annelie Inghilesi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    A fixed protocol for outpatient clinic routines in the care of patients with severe renal failure2013In: Renal failure, ISSN 0886-022X, E-ISSN 1525-6049, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 845-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The primary aim of this study was to assess whether a fixed protocol, using a specially trained team, for intermediate follow-up to fulfillment of guideline targets is non-inferior to conventional follow-up in the care of uraemic patients. A secondary aim was to investigate possible impact on patient outcome.

    Methods: The cohort comprised 424 patients from seven centers. Inclusion criteria were either serum creatinine exceeding 200 mu mol/l or calculated clearance below 30 ml/min, representing CKD 4 or 5a. Six centers followed a standardized protocol (group 1). One center provided controls (group 2). The study design was prospective and interventional. The variables measured were blood hemoglobin, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, intact parathyroid hormone, albumin, renal function variables, blood pressure and RAAS blockade. The number of patients achieving the set goals was analyzed as a time trend to determine if the intervention resulted in an improvement.

    Results: At baseline, group 1 had significantly lower GFR and higher serum creatinine, calcium, phosphate, calcium x phosphate product and bicarbonate, lower mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressures and less use of RAAS. During the intervention, group 1 improved in the direction of guidelines for blood hemoglobin, albumin, bicarbonate and MAP. Outcome of secondary endpoints gave a risk of death of 30% in both groups, while the risk of renal replacement therapy was higher in group 1.

    Conclusions: However, the time to renal replacement therapy was significantly shorter in the intervention group, indicating that other variables than guideline achievements are important for the patient.

  • 45. Hansson, Jenny
    et al.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Hergens, Maria-Pia
    Fredlund, Peeter
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bellocco, Rino
    Engström, Gunnar
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Hedblad, Bo
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Snus (Swedish smokeless tobacco) use and risk of stroke: Pooled Analyses of Incidence and Survival2014In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 276, no 1, p. 87-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Snus is a moist smokeless tobacco product with a high nicotine content. Its use has a short-term effect on the cardiovascular system, but the relationship between snus use and stroke is unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the associations between use of snus and incidence of and survival after stroke, both overall and according to subtypes.

    METHODS: Pooled analyses of eight Swedish prospective cohort studies were conducted, including 130 485 men who never smoked. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incidence and death after diagnosis using Cox proportional hazard regression models, and case fatality and survival using logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier methods, respectively.

    RESULTS: No associations were observed between the use of snus and the risk of overall stroke (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.92-1.17) or of any of the stroke subtypes. The odds ratio (OR) of 28-day case fatality was 1.42 (95% CI 0.99-2.04) among users of snus who had experienced a stroke, and the HR of death during the follow-up period was 1.32 (95% CI 1.08-1.61).

    CONCLUSION: Use of snus was not associated with the risk of stroke. Hence, nicotine is unlikely to contribute importantly to the pathophysiology of stroke. However, case fatality was increased in snus users, compared to non-users, but further studies are needed to determine any possible causal mechanisms.

  • 46. Hansson, Jenny
    et al.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Hergens, Maria-Pia
    Fredlund, Peeter
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bellocco, Rino
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Hedblad, Bo
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Trolle Lagerros, Ylva
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Use of snus and acute myocardial infarction: pooled analysis of eight prospective observational studies2012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 771-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of snus (also referred to as Scandinavian or Swedish moist smokeless tobacco), which is common in Sweden and increasing elsewhere, is receiving increasing attention since considered a tobacco smoke "potential reduction exposure product". Snus delivers a high dose of nicotine with possible hemodynamic effects, but its impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether snus use is associated with risk of and survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Data from eight prospective cohort studies set in Sweden was pooled and reanalysed. The relative risk of first time AMI and 28-day case-fatality was calculated for 130,361 men who never smoked. During 2,262,333 person-years of follow-up, 3,390 incident events of AMI were identified. Current snus use was not associated with risk of AMI (pooled multivariable hazard ratio 1.04, 95 % confidence interval 0.93 to 1.17). The short-term case fatality rate appeared increased in snus users (odds ratio 1.28, 95 % confidence interval 0.99 to 1.68). This study does not support any association between use of snus and development of AMI. Hence, toxic components other than nicotine appear implicated in the pathophysiology of smoking related ischemic heart disease. Case fatality after AMI is seemingly increased among snus users, but this relationship may be due to confounding by socioeconomic or life style factors.

  • 47. Henriksson, Karin M.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Asberg, Signild
    Statin Therapy is Associated with Decreased Risk of First Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Reduced 30-Day Fatality: Results of a Nationwide Observational Study Including 7,696 Cases and 14,670 Controls2013In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 22, p. 399-400Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48. Hergens, Maria-Pia
    et al.
    Galanti, Rosaria
    Hansson, Jenny
    Fredlund, Peeter
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bellocco, Rino
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Knutsson, Anders
    Pedersen, Nancy
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Use of Scandinavian Moist Smokeless Tobacco (Snus) and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation.2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 872-876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Snus is a smokeless tobacco product, widely used among Swedish men and increasingly so elsewhere. There is debate as to whether snus is an acceptable "harm-reduction" tobacco product. Since snus use delivers a dose of nicotine equivalent to cigarettes, and has been implicated in cardiac arrhythmia because of associations with sudden cardiovascular death, a relation with atrial fibrillation is plausible and important to investigate.

    METHODS:: To assess the relation between use of snus and risk of atrial fibrillation, we carried out a pooled analysis of 7 prospective Swedish cohort studies. In total, 274,882 men, recruited between 1978 and 2004, were followed via the National Patient Register for atrial fibrillation. Primary analyses were restricted to 127,907 never-smokers. Relative risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression.

    RESULTS:: The prevalence of snus use was 25% among never-smokers. During follow-up, 3,069 cases of atrial fibrillation were identified. The pooled relative risk of atrial fibrillation was 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 0.97-1.19) in current snus users, compared with nonusers.

    CONCLUSION:: Findings from this large national pooling project indicate that snus use is unlikely to confer any important increase in risk of atrial fibrillation.

  • 49.
    Hägg, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Sundström, Anders
    Psoriasis Patients New to Specialist Care in Sweden 2007-2009: A Two-Year Follow-Up of Treatment Allocation2016In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 25, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Hägg, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Sundström, Anders
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    The higher proportion of men with psoriasis treated with biologics may be explained by more severe disease in men2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 5, p. e63619-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Moderate to severe psoriasis, once regarded as merely a skin disease, is today seen as an inflammatory systemic disease. The sex ratio of the prevalence of psoriasis is balanced. In recent years several reports have documented that men receive more systemic or UV treatment than women, and different hypotheses were made. In PsoReg, the national registry for systemic treatment of psoriasis in Sweden, we have, like other European registries, observed a predominance of men (59%), especially of men treated with biologics (63%). Biologics are a relatively new group of very effective but high-priced drugs. The objective of this study was to analyse if women are discriminated by not having the same access to the high-priced biologics.

    DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from a nationwide quality register of psoriasis patients.

    POPULATION: 2294 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis receiving systemic treatment from a specialist in dermatology.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time to initiation of biologic treatment. A multiple Cox proportional hazard's regression was performed, with time to initiating a biologic treatment as the outcome in order to assess the independent role of the patient's sex in initiating such therapy. The psoriasis severity was defined as a time-varying variable.

    RESULTS: Men had more severe psoriasis than women according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), regardless of age at enrolment, and throughout the study period. The analysis in the multiple Cox regression show that age, psoriasis severity and psoriasis arthropathy were relevant factors for initiating biologic therapy, whereas sex is not.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although as many women as men are believed to suffer from psoriasis, men seem to be more severely affected by psoriasis. The asymmetry in allocation of biologic therapy thereby probably reflects the differing disease activity between the sexes, and is not a discrimination against women per se.

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