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  • 1.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Duarte, Nadia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Oeiras, Portugal .
    Campino, Susana
    Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Oeiras, Portugal .
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Motta, Vinicius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos
    Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Oeiras, Portugal.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia, Oeiras, Portugal.
    Diabetes protection and restoration of thymocyte apoptosis in NOD Idd6 congenic strains2003In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1677-1682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a multifactorial and polygenic disease. The NOD-derived genetic factors that contribute to type 1 diabetes are named Idd (insulin-dependent diabetes) loci. To date, the biological functions of the majority of the Idd loci remain unknown. We have previously reported that resistance of NOD immature thymocytes to depletion by dexamethazone (Dxm) maps to the Idd6 locus. Herein, we refine this phenotype using a time-course experiment of apoptosis induction upon Dxm treatment. We confirm that the Idd6 region controls apoptosis resistance in immature thymocytes. Moreover, we establish reciprocal Idd6 congenic NOD and B6 strains to formally demonstrate that the Idd6 congenic region mediates restoration of the apoptosis resistance phenotype. Analysis of the Idd6 congenic strains indicates that a 3-cM chromosomal region located within the distal part of the Idd6 region controls apoptosis resistance in NOD immature thymocytes. Together, these data support the hypothesis that resistance to Dxm-induced apoptosis in NOD immature thymocytes is controlled by a genetic factor within the region that also contributes to type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We propose that the diabetogenic effect of the Idd6 locus is exerted at the level of the thymic selection process.

  • 2.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Egevad, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Subgroups of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases defined through an inverse relationship between androgen receptor activity and immune response2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 776-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Novel therapies for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are needed, particularly for cancers not driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Objectives: To identify molecular subgroups of PC bone metastases of relevance for therapy.

    Design, setting, and participants: Fresh-frozen bone metastasis samples from men with CRPC (n = 40), treatment-naïve PC (n = 8), or other malignancies (n = 12) were characterized using whole-genome expression profiling, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA), and functional enrichment analysis. Expression profiles were verified by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in an extended set of bone metastases (n = 77) and compared to levels in malignant and adjacent benign prostate tissue from patients with localized disease (n = 12). Selected proteins were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. A cohort of PC patients (n = 284) diagnosed at transurethral resection with long follow-up was used for prognostic evaluation.

    Results and limitations: The majority of CRPC bone metastases (80%) was defined as AR-driven based on PCA analysis and high expression of the AR, AR co-regulators (FOXA1, HOXB13), and AR-regulated genes (KLK2, KLK3, NKX3.1, STEAP2, TMPRSS2); 20% were non–AR-driven. Functional enrichment analysis indicated high metabolic activity and low immune responses in AR-driven metastases. Accordingly, infiltration of CD3+ and CD68+ cells was lower in AR-driven than in non–AR-driven metastases, and tumor cell HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with nuclear AR immunoreactivity. RT-PCR analysis showed low MHC class I expression (HLA-A, TAP1, and PSMB9 mRNA) in PC bone metastases compared to benign and malignant prostate tissue and bone metastases of other origins. In primary PC, low HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was associated with high Gleason score, bone metastasis, and short cancer-specific survival. Limitations include the limited number of patients studied and the single metastasis sample studied per patient.

    Conclusions: Most CRPC bone metastases show high AR and metabolic activities and low immune responses. A subgroup instead shows low AR and metabolic activities, but high immune responses. Targeted therapy for these groups should be explored. Patient summary: We studied heterogeneities at a molecular level in bone metastasis samples obtained from men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. We found differences of possible importance for therapy selection in individual patients.

  • 3.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Excellent cabazitaxel response in prostate cancer xenografts expressing androgen receptor variant 7 and reversion of resistance development by anti-androgensManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Duarte, Nadia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Stenström, Martin
    Campino, Susana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Cardell, Susanna L
    Prevention of diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice mediated by CD1d-restricted nonclassical NKT cells.2004In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 173, no 5, p. 3112-3118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A role for regulatory lymphocytes has been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse but the nature of these cells is debated. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have been implicated in this process. Previous reports of reduced diabetes incidence in NOD mice in which the numbers of NKT cells are artificially increased have been attributed to the enhanced production of IL-4 by these cells and a role for classical NKT cells, using the Valpha14-Jalpha18 rearrangement. We now show that overexpression in NOD mice of CD1d-restricted TCR Valpha3.2(+)Vbeta9(+) NKT cells producing high levels of IFN-gamma but low amounts of IL-4 leads to prevention of type 1 diabetes, demonstrating a role for nonclassical CD1d-restricted NKT cells in the regulation of autoimmune diabetes.

  • 5.
    Duarte, Nádia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Medicinsk och klinisk genetik. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Medicinsk och klinisk genetik.
    The Idd6.2 diabetes susceptibility region controls defective expression of the Lrmp gene in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice2007In: Immunogenetics, ISSN 0093-7711, E-ISSN 1432-1211, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 407-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The identification of genes mediating susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains a challenging task. Using a positional cloning approach based on the analysis of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice congenic over the Idd6 diabetes susceptibility region, we found that the NOD allele at this locus mediates lower mRNA expression levels of the lymphoid restricted membrane protein gene (Lrmp/Jaw1). Analysis of thymic populations indicates that Lrmp is expressed mainly in immature thymocytes. The Lrmp gene encodes a type 1 transmembrane protein that localizes to the ER membrane and has homology to the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate gene, which negatively regulates intracellular calcium levels. We hypothesize that the observed decrease in expression of the Lrmp gene in NOD mice may constitute a T1D susceptibility factor in the Idd6 region.

  • 6. Erlandsson, Ann
    et al.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Fält, Anna
    Andersson, Sven-Olof
    Andrén, Ove
    Davidsson, Sabina
    M2 macrophages and regulatory T cells in lethal prostate cancer2019In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 363-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in the world. Emerging evidence suggests that inflammatory cells such as M2 macrophages and regulatory T cells (Tregs) can contribute to cancer progression by suppressing the anti‐tumor immune response. This study investigated the number of CD163‐positive M2 macrophages in PCa tissue. It also investigated the correlation and interaction of M2 macrophages and Tregs.

    Methods: This nested case‐control study included subjects from a cohort of men diagnosed with PCa as an incidental finding during transurethral resection of the prostate. The cases were 225 men who died from PCa, and the controls were 367 men who survived more than 10 years after PCa diagnosis without disease progression. Infiltrating CD163‐positive M2 macrophages and FOXP3/CD4‐positive Tregs in PCa tissue were identified using immunohistochemistry. The correlation and interaction of M2 macrophages and Tregs were assessed using Spearman's rank‐order correlation and a likelihood test, respectively. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for lethal PCa and macrophage counts.

    Results: The number of M2 macrophages and Tregs showed a significant correlation (P < 0.001) but no interactions. The OR for lethal PCa was 1.93 (95%CI: 1.23‐3.03) for men with high numbers of M2 macrophages. Also for cases with uncertain outcome (GS categories 3 + 4 and 4 + 3) high numbers of M2 macrophages does predict a poorer prognosis.

    Conclusions: Our data showed that men with high numbers of M2 macrophages in the prostate tumor environment had increased odds of dying of PCa. It is possible that M2 macrophages, together with other suppressor cells such as Tregs, promote an immunosuppressive environment.

  • 7. Fransen-Pettersson, Nina
    et al.
    Duarte, Nadia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. nstituto Gulbenkian de Sciencia, Oeiras, 2780–156 Oeiras, Portugal.
    Nilsson, Julia
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Larefalk, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Hannibal, Tine D.
    Hansen, Lisbeth
    Schmidt-Christensen, Anja
    Ivars, Fredrik
    Cardell, Susanna
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rozell, Bjoern
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. EMV Immunology, BMC, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; ISIM- Immunology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0159850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  • 8.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 31805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer.

  • 9.
    Holmberg, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Cilio, Corrado M
    Lundholm, Marie
    Motta, Vinicius
    CTLA-4 (CD152) and its involvement in autoimmune disease.2005In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 225-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Karlsson, Terese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes from the Prostate Cancer Cell Line TRAMP-C1 Impair Osteoclast Formation and Differentiation2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0166284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal metastatic disease is a deleterious consequence of dissemination of tumor cells from numerous primary sites, such as prostate, lung and breast. Skeletal metastases are still incurable, resulting in development of clinical complications and decreased survival for cancer patients with metastatic disease. During the last decade, tumor cell-derived microvesicles have been identified and suggested to be involved in cancer disease progression. Whether cancer exosomes are involved in tumor and bone cell interactions in the metastatic site is still, however, a rather unexplored field. Here we show that exosomes isolated from the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C1 dramatically decrease fusion and differentiation of monocytic osteoclast precursors to mature, multinucleated osteoclasts. The presence of tumor cell-derived exosomes also clearly decreased the expression of established markers for osteoclast fusion and differentiation, including DC-STAMP, TRAP, cathepsin K, and MMP-9. In contrast, exosomes derived from murine fibroblastic cells did not affect osteoclast formation. Our findings suggest that exosomes released from tumor cells in the tumor-bone interface are involved in pathological regulation of bone cell formation in the metastatic site. This further strengthens the role of tumor cell-derived microvesicles in cancer progression and disease aggressiveness.

  • 11.
    Lundholm, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Egevad, Lars
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. anders.bergh@umu.se.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Edin, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Secreted Factors from Colorectal and Prostate Cancer Cells Skew the Immune Response in Opposite Directions2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 15651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Macrophage infiltration has been associated with an improved prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but a poor prognosis in prostate cancer (PC) patients. In this study, the distribution and prognostic value of proinflammatory M1 macrophages (NOS2(+)) and immunosuppressive M2 macrophages (CD163(+)) was evaluated in a cohort of 234 PC patients. We found that macrophages infiltrating PC were mainly of an M2 type and correlated with a more aggressive tumor and poor patient prognosis. Furthermore, the M1/M2 ratio was significantly decreased in PC compared to CRC. Using in vitro cell culture experiments, we could show that factors secreted from CRC and PC cells induced macrophages of a proinflammatory or immunosuppressive phenotype, respectively. These macrophages differentially affected autologous T lymphocyte proliferation and activation. Consistent with this, CRC specimens were found to have higher degrees of infiltrating T-helper 1 cells and active cytotoxic T lymphocytes, while PC specimens displayed functionally inactive T cells. In conclusion, our results imply that tumour-secreted factors from cancers of different origin can drive macrophage differentiation in opposite directions and thereby regulate the organization of the anti-tumour immune response. Our findings suggest that reprogramming of macrophages could be an important tool in the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies.

  • 12.
    Lundholm, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Univ Copenhagen, Dept Dis Biol, Fac Life Sci, DK-1870 Copenhagen C, Denmark.
    Motta, Vinicius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Univ Toronto, Dept Immunol, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Danska, Jayne
    Univ Toronto, Dept Immunol, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics. Univ Copenhagen, Dept Dis Biol, Fac Life Sci, DK-1870 Copenhagen C, Denmark.
    Variation in the Cd3 zeta (Cd247) gene correlates with altered T cell activation and is associated with autoimmune diabetes.2010In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 184, no 10, p. 5537-5544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tuning of TCR-mediated activation was demonstrated to be critical for lineage fate in T cell development, as well as in the control of autoimmunity. In this study, we identify a novel diabetes susceptibility gene, Idd28, in the NOD mouse and provide evidence that Cd3zeta (Cd247) constitutes a prime candidate gene for this locus. Moreover, we show that the allele of the Cd3zeta gene expressed in NOD and DBA/2 mouse strains confers lower levels of T cell activation compared with the allele expressed by C57BL/6 (B6), BALB/c, and C3H/HeJ mice. These results support a model in which the development of autoimmune diabetes is dependent on a TCR signal mediated by a less-efficient NOD allele of the Cd3zeta gene.

  • 13.
    Lundholm, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Motta, Vinicius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse allele of Cd3ζ (Cd247) is associated with impaired TCR/CD3 mediated activation of T cellsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lundholm, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Motta, Vinicius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Duarte, Nadia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mayans, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Defective induction of CTLA-4 in the NOD mouse is controlled by the NOD allele of Idd3/IL-2 and a novel locus (Ctex) telomeric on chromosome 12006In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 538-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), or CD152, is a negative regulator of T-cell activation and has been shown to be associated with autoimmune diseases. Previous work has demonstrated a defect in the expression of this molecule in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice upon anti-CD3 stimulation in vitro. Using a genetic approach we here demonstrate that a novel locus (Ctex) telomeric on chromosome 1 together with the Idd3 (Il-2) gene confers optimal CTLA-4 expression upon CD3 activation of T-cells. Based on these data, we provide a model for how gene interaction between Idd3 (IL-2), Ctex, and Idd5.1 (Ctla-4) could confer susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse. Additionally, we showed that the Ctex and the Idd3 regions do not influence inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS) protein expression in NOD mice. Instead, as previously shown, higher ICOS levels in NOD mice appear to be controlled by gene(s) in the Idd5.1 region, possibly a polymorphism in the Icos gene itself.

  • 15.
    Lundholm, Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Schröder, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Baranov, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Prostate Tumor-Derived Exosomes Down-Regulate NKG2D Expression on Natural Killer Cells and CD8(+) T Cells: Mechanism of Immune Evasion2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108925-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor-derived exosomes, which are nanometer-sized extracellular vesicles of endosomal origin, have emerged as promoters of tumor immune evasion but their role in prostate cancer (PC) progression is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of prostate tumor-derived exosomes to downregulate NKG2D expression on natural killer (NK) and CD8(+) T cells. NKG2D is an activating cytotoxicity receptor whose aberrant loss in cancer plays an important role in immune suppression. Using flow cytometry, we found that exosomes produced by human PC cells express ligands for NKG2D on their surface. The NKG2D ligand-expressing prostate tumor-derived exosomes selectively induced downregulation of NKG2D on NK and CD8(+) T cells in a dose-dependent manner, leading to impaired cytotoxic function in vitro. Consistent with these findings, patients with castration-resistant PC (CRPC) showed a significant decrease in surface NKG2D expression on circulating NK and CD8(+) T cells compared to healthy individuals. Tumor-derived exosomes are likely involved in this NKG2D downregulation, since incubation of healthy lymphocytes with exosomes isolated from serum or plasma of CRPC patients triggered downregulation of NKG2D expression in effector lymphocytes. These data suggest prostate tumor-derived exosomes as down-regulators of the NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic response in PC patients, thus promoting immune suppression and tumor escape.

  • 16.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lerner, Ulf H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor enhances effects of Simvastatin on prostate cancer cells in co-culture with bone2013In: Cancer Microenvironment, ISSN 1875-2292, E-ISSN 1875-2284, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prostate cancer (PC) bone metastases show weak responses to conventional therapies. Bone matrix is rich in growth factors, with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) being one of the most abundant. IGF-1 acts as a survival factor for tumor cells and we speculate that bone-derived IGF-1 counteracts effects of therapies aimed to target bone metastases and, consequently, that therapeutic effects could be enhanced if given in combination with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitors. Simvastatin inhibits the mevalonate pathway and has been found to induce apoptosis of PC cells. The aims of this study were to confirm stimulating effects of bone-derived IGF-1 on PC cells and to test if IGF-1R inhibition enhances growth inhibitory effects of simvastatin on PC cells in a bone microenvironment. The PC-3 and 22Rv1 tumor cell lines showed significantly induced cell growth when co-cultured with neonatal mouse calvarial bones. The tumor cell IGF-1R was activated by calvariae-conditioned media and neutralization of bone-derived IGF-1 abolished the calvarium-induced PC-3 cell growth. Treatment of PC-3 and 22Rv1 cells with simvastatin, or the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541, reduced tumor cell numbers and viability, and induced apoptosis. Combined simvastatin and NVP-AEW541 treatment resulted in enhanced growth inhibitory effects compared to either drug given alone. Effects of simvastatin involved down-regulation of IGF-1R in PC-3 and of constitutively active androgen receptor variants in 22Rv1 cells. In conclusion, we suggest that IGF-1 inhibition may be a way to strengthen effects of apoptosis-inducing therapies on PC bone metastases; a possibility that needs to be further tested in pre-clinical models.

  • 17. Rolf, J
    et al.
    Motta, V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Duarte, N
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundholm, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Berntman, E
    Bergman, ML
    Cardell, SL
    Holmberg, D
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Congenic nonobese diabetic mouse strains fail to confirm linkage of a marginal zone B lymphocyte phentoype to the Idd11 locus on chromosome 4-Response.2006In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 2, no 176, p. 702-702Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Rolf, Julia
    et al.
    Motta, Vinicius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Duarte, Nadia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Berntman, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Sorokin, Lydia
    Cardell, Susanna L
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    The enlarged population of marginal zone/CD1d(high) B lymphocytes in nonobese diabetic mice maps to diabetes susceptibility region Idd11.2005In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 174, no 8, p. 4821-4827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The NOD mouse is an important experimental model for human type 1 diabetes. T cells are central to NOD pathogenesis, and their function in the autoimmune process of diabetes has been well studied. In contrast, although recognized as important players in disease induction, the role of B cells is not clearly understood. In this study we characterize different subpopulations of B cells and demonstrate that marginal zone (MZ) B cells are expanded 2- to 3-fold in NOD mice compared with nondiabetic C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The NOD MZ B cells displayed a normal surface marker profile and localized to the MZ region in the NOD spleen. Moreover, the MZ B cell population developed early during the ontogeny of NOD mice. By 3 wk of age, around the time when autoreactive T cells are first activated, a significant MZ B cell population of adult phenotype was found in NOD, but not B6, mice. Using an F2(B6 x NOD) cross in a genome-wide scan, we map the control of this trait to a region on chromosome 4 (logarithm of odds score, 4.4) which includes the Idd11 and Idd9 diabetes susceptibility loci, supporting the hypothesis that this B cell trait is related to the development of diabetes in the NOD mouse.

  • 19.
    Strömvall, Kerstin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Highly aggressive rat prostate tumors rapidly precondition regional lymph nodes for subsequent metastatic growth2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 10, article id e0187086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine in what ways MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate tumors with high metastatic capacity influence regional lymph nodes prior to metastatic establishment compared to AT1 rat prostate tumors with low metastatic potential. MLL or AT1 tumor cells were injected into the ventral prostate of immunocompetent rats. Tumor and lymph node morphology, and lymph node mRNA expression of macrophage associated markers, T-cell associated markers, and cytokines were examined over time until the first microscopic signs of metastases (at day 14 for MLL- and at day 28 for AT1-tumors). Already at day 3 after tumor cell injection, when the tumors were extremely small and occupied less than 1% of the prostate volume, MLL- and AT1-tumors provoked different immune responses in both the prostate and the regional lymph nodes. MLL-tumors induced expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, suppressed T-cell accumulation, and directed T-cells towards an immunosuppressive phenotype. AT1-tumors caused a response more similar to that in vehicle-injected animals, with accumulation of T-cells in tumors and regional lymph nodes. Prostate tumors with high metastatic potential were able to precondition regional lymph nodes to subsequent metastatic growth in ways different from tumors with less metastatic potential. This may indicate the existence of a time-window when pre-metastatic changes in regional lymph nodes can aid in the prognostication of locally aggressive and potentially metastatic prostate cancer.

  • 20. Svennerholm, Kristina
    et al.
    Rodsand, Pouria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Biber, Björn
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Myocardial ischemic preconditioning in a porcine model leads to rapid changes in cardiac extracellular vesicle messenger RNA content2015In: International Journal of Cardiology Heart and Vasculature, ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 8, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are thought to exert protective effects after ischemic and remote ischemic preconditioning. It is not well understood which EV content factors are most relevant for protective effects. We hypothesize that ischemic preconditioning leads to qualitative changes in EV mRNA content and quantitative changes in EV size and number.

    Methods: Using an in vivo porcine ischemic preconditioning model, EVs were collected from coronary venous blood, and isolated by differential ultracentrifugations. The presence and purity of EV were verified by electron microscopy and Western blot, and EV number was assessed by nanoparticle tracking analysis. The mRNA EV was identified by microarray.

    Results: Gene ontology analysis showed enrichment of EV mRNA coding for proteins associated with regulation of transcription, translation, extracellular matrix, morphogenic development and feeding behavior. There were 11,678 different mRNA transcripts detected in EV, where a total of 1103 was significantly increased or decreased after preconditioning, of which 638 mRNA sequences were up-regulated and/or emerged due to preconditioning. Several of them have known association with ischemic preconditioning. There was no significant difference in EV quantity or size before and after preconditioning.

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrate in an in vivo model that myocardial ischemic preconditioning influences the composition of mRNA in EV, including gene transcripts for proteins associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The finding that preconditioned parental cells release EV containing mRNA that is qualitatively different from those released by non-preconditioned cells shows the importance of the external milieu on parental cell EV production.

  • 21. Svennerholm, Kristina
    et al.
    Rodsand, Pouria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ahrén, Dag
    Biber, Björn
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    DNA content in extracellular vesicles isolated from porcine coronary venous blood directly after myocardial ischemic preconditioning2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0159105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular vesicles (EV) are nano-sized membranous structures released from most cells. They have the capacity to carry bioactive molecules and gene expression signals between cells, thus mediating intercellular communication. It is believed that EV confer protection after ischemic preconditioning (IPC). We hypothesize that myocardial ischemic preconditioning will lead to rapid alteration of EV DNA content in EV collected from coronary venous effluent.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a porcine myocardial ischemic preconditioning model, EV were isolated from coronary venous blood before and after IPC by differential centrifugation steps culminating in preparative ultracentrifugation combined with density gradient ultracentrifugation. The EV preparation was validated, the DNA was extracted and further characterized by DNA sequencing followed by bioinformatics analysis.

    RESULTS: Porcine genomic DNA fragments representing each chromosome, including mitochondrial DNA sequences, were detected in EV isolated before and after IPC. There was no difference detected in the number of sequenced gene fragments (reads) or in the genomic coverage of the sequenced DNA fragments in EV isolated before and after IPC. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of genes coding for ion channels, enzymes and proteins for basal metabolism and vesicle biogenesis and specific cardiac proteins.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that porcine EV isolated from coronary venous blood plasma contain fragments of DNA from the entire genome, including the mitochondria. In this model we did not find specific qualitative or quantitative changes of the DNA content in EV collected immediately after an in vivo myocardial IPC provocation. This does not rule out the possibility that EV DNA content changes in response to myocardial IPC which could occur in a later time frame.

  • 22.
    Tjon-Kon-Fat, Lee-Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Schröder, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wurdinger, Thomas
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Rolf Jonas Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Platelets harbor prostate cancer biomarkers and the ability to predict therapeutic response to abiraterone in castration resistant patients2018In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Novel therapies for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have been introduced in the clinic with possibilities for individualized treatment plans. Best practice of those expensive drugs requires predictive biomarker monitoring. This study used circulating biomarker analysis to follow cancer-derived transcripts implicated in therapy resistance.

    METHOD: The isolated platelet population of blood samples and digital-PCR were used to identify selected biomarker transcripts in patients with CRPC prior chemo- or androgen synthesis inhibiting therapy.

    RESULTS: Fifty patients received either docetaxel (n = 24) or abiraterone (n = 26) therapy, with therapy response rates of 54% and 48%, respectively. Transcripts for the PC-associated biomarkers kallikrein-related peptidase-2 and -3 (KLK2, KLK3), folate hydrolase 1 (FOLH1), and neuropeptide-Y (NPY) were uniquely present within the platelet fraction of cancer patients and not detected in healthy controls (n = 15). In the abiraterone treated cohort, the biomarkers provided information on therapy outcome, demonstrating an association between detectable biomarkers and short progression free survival (PFS) (FOLH1, P < 0.01; KLK3, P < 0.05; and NPY, P < 0.05). Patients with biomarker-negative platelets had the best outcome, while FOLH1 (P < 0.05) and NPY (P = 0.05) biomarkers provided independent predictive information in a multivariate analysis regarding PFS. KLK2 (P < 0.01), KLK3 (P < 0.001), and FOLH1 (P < 0.05) biomarkers were associated with short overall survival (OS). Combining three biomarkers in a panel (KLK3, FOLH1, and NPY) made it possible to separate long-term responders from short-term responders with 87% sensitivity and 82% specificity.

    CONCLUSION: Analyzing tumor-derived biomarkers in platelets of CRPC patients enabled prediction of the outcome after abiraterone therapy with higher accuracy than baseline serum PSA or PSA response.

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