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  • 1.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Bourdon, Jean-Christophe
    Coates, Philip J
    Sjöström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Expression of p53 isoforms in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.2007In: Eur J Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 617-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, P J
    Laurell, G
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Fahraeus, R
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Downregulation of miRNA-424: a sign of field cancerisation in clinically normal tongue adjacent to squamous cell carcinoma2015In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 112, no 11, p. 1760-1765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The overall survival for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue is low and the search for early diagnostic and prognostic markers is thus essential. MicroRNAs have been suggested as potential prognostic and diagnostic candidates in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in general. Methods: On the basis of the known differences between sub-sites within the oral cavity, we investigated the expression and role of microRNA-424 in squamous cell carcinoma arising in tongue. MicroRNA levels were measured by qRT-PCR in both tissue and plasma samples. Results: Levels of microRNA-424 were upregulated in tongue squamous cell carcinoma, but not in tumours originating from gingiva or floor of the mouth. Interestingly, microRNA-424 was downregulated in clinically normal tongue tissue next to tumour compared with completely healthy tongue, indicating that microRNA-424 could be a marker of field cancerisation in this tumour type. However, expression of microRNA-424 in a tongue-derived epithelial cell line revealed no significant changes in the expression profile of proteins and genes. Conclusions: Our patient data show that microRNA-424 alterations are a marker of field cancerisation specific for tongue tumourigenesis, which also could have a role in development of tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

  • 3.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    DeltaNp63 isoforms differentially regulate gene expression in squamous cell carcinoma: identification of Cox-2 as a novel p63 target.2009In: The Journal of pathology, ISSN 1096-9896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53 homologue p63 produces six different isoforms that are important in development of epithelial tissues and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In SCCHN, the expression of p63 isoforms is highly complex, with over-expression of DeltaNp63 and p63beta isoforms in many tumours. To date, little is known about the functions of different DeltaNp63 isoforms and elucidating the distinctive properties of DeltaNp63 isoforms will help to clarify how they influence tumour biology. By gene expression profiling of SCCHN cells over-expressing the DeltaNp63 isoforms we identified different effects of the three isoforms, with DeltaNp63beta being more effective at gene induction than DeltaNp63alpha and DeltaNp63gamma, whereas DeltaNp63gamma was most effective at repressing gene expression. Thus, tumours expressing even low levels of DeltaNp63beta or DeltaNp63gamma may have distinct clinicopathological characteristics important for metastasis and therapeutic response. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) was shown by each isoform and data were confirmed by independent quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting. No direct binding of DeltaNp63 to the Cox-2 promoter could be seen, neither could any evidence for Cox-2 induction as a consequence of activated NF-kappaB pathway responses be found. As Cox-2 is known to inhibit radiotherapy responses in SCCHN patients, data indicate an additional mechanism through which DeltaNp63 acts to promote cell survival and influence therapeutic response of SCCHN. MIAME-compliant data have been deposited in the MIAME Express database (Accession No. E-MEXP-1842). Copyright (c) 2009 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 4.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Coates, Philip J
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    DeltaNp63 isoforms regulate CD44 and keratins 4, 6, 14 and 19 in squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck.2007In: J Pathol, ISSN 0022-3417, Vol. 213, no 4, p. 384-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Hedberg, Ylva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Dahlqvist, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of p63, COX-2, EGFR and beta-catenin in smokers and patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck reveal variations in non-neoplastic tissue and no obvious changes in smokers.2005In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1661-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), the 6th most common malignancy in the world, is associated with smoking and has a low 5-year survival rate. Various changes have been described at different stages of SCCHN tumour development, including overexpression of p63, a protein important for development of normal epidermal structures. p63 has been suggested to activate beta-catenin, and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin is an important event in many cancers. Elevated COX-2 activity and overexpression of EGFR protein has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including SCCHN. An important question for the pathogenesis of SCCHN is when the genetic changes take place during the natural course of the disease, and whether they appear in clinically normal oral mucosa to predispose tumour development. We mapped the expression of p63, COX-2, EGFR, beta-catenin, and PP2A in oral mucosa from smokers/non-smokers and from patients with SCCHN. We also considered if changes occurring in tumours are present in the clinically normal tissue adjacent to the tumour. No direct influence of heavy smoking on the levels of the proteins studied could be seen. Tumours and clinically normal non-neoplastic tissue from SCCHN patients showed increased expression of COX-2 and PP2A. Interestingly, non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to SCCHN also showed increased beta-catenin, although this was not seen in tumours. The data support the notion that pre-existing alterations in clinically normal epithelium exist in patients with SCCHN and could be important for the pathogenesis of the disease and for local recurrences.

  • 6.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Differences in p63 expression in SCCHN tumours of different sub-sites within the oral cavity2011In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 861-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, SCCHN, the sixth most common cancer in the world, comprises tumours of differentanatomical sites. The overall survival is low, and there are no good prognostic or predictive markers available. The p53 homologue, p63, plays an important role in development of epithelial structures and has also been suggested to be involved in development of SCCHN. However, most studies on p63 in SCCHN have not taken into account the fact that this group of tumours is heterogeneous in terms of the particular site of origin of the cancer. Mapping and comparing p63 expression levels in tumours and corresponding clinically normal tissue in SCCHN from gingiva, tongue and tongue/floor of the mouth revealed clear differences between these regions. In normal samples from tongue and gingiva, tongue samples showed 2.5-fold higher median p63 expression and also more widespread expression compared to gingival samples. These results emphasise the importance of taking sub-site within the oral cavity into consideration in analyses of SCCHN.

  • 7.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    p63 transcriptionally regulates BNC1, a Pol I and Pol II transcription factor that regulates ribosomal biogenesis and epithelial differentiation2012In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1401-1406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53-family member, p63 is a transcription factor that influences cellular adhesion, motility, proliferation, survival and apoptosis, and has a major role in regulating epithelial stem cells. Expression of p63 is often dysregulated in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. In this study we show that p63 induces the expression of the basal epithelial transcription factor, Basonuclin 1. Basonuclin 1 is an unusual transcription factor that interacts with a subset of promoters of genes that are transcribed by both RNA polymerase-I and -II and has roles in maintaining ribosomal biogenesis and the proliferative potential of immature epithelial cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays demonstrate that Basonuclin 1 is a direct transcriptional target of p63 and we also show that up-regulation of Basonuclin 1 is a common event in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. These data identify a new transcriptional programme mediated by p63 regulation of the Basonuclin 1 transcription factor in squamous cell carcinomas and provide a novel link of p63 with the regulation of ribosomal biogenesis in epithelial cancer.

  • 8.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Tayside Tissue Bank Division of Medical Sciences, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK.
    Wahlgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Subsite-based alterations in miR-21, miR-125b, and miR-203 in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and correlation to important target proteins.2012In: Journal of Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0974-6773, E-ISSN 1477-3163, Vol. 11, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules with an essential role in regulation of gene expression. miRNA expression profiles differ between tumor and normal control tissue in many types of cancers and miRNA profiling is seen as a promising field for finding new diagnostic and prognostic tools.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, we have analyzed expression of three miRNAs, miR-21, miR-125b, and miR-203, and their potential target proteins p53 and p63, known to be deregulated in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), in two distinct and one mixed subsite in squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity.

    RESULTS: We demonstrate that levels of miRNA differ between tumors of different subsites with tongue tumors showing significant deregulation of all three miRNAs, whereas gingival tumors only showed significant downregulation of miR-125b and the mixed group of tumors in tongue/floor of the mouth showed significant deregulation of miR-21 and miR-125b. In the whole group of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a significant negative correlation was seen between miR-125b and p53 as well as a significant correlation between TP53 mutation status and miR-125b.

    CONCLUSION: The present data once again emphasize the need to take subsite into consideration when analyzing oral SCC and clearly show that data from in vitro studies cannot be transferred directly to the in vivo situation.

  • 9.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 656 53 Brno, Czech Republic; Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, Hôpital St. Louis, 75010 Paris, France.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Surgical Sciences/ENT, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gene expression changes in tumor free tongue tissue adjacent to tongue squamous cell carcinoma2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 19389-19402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the high frequency of loco-regional recurrences, which could be explained by changes in the field surrounding the tumor, patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck show poor survival. Here we identified a total of 554 genes as dysregulated in clinically tumor free tongue tissue in patients with tongue tumors when compared to healthy control tongue tissue. Among the top dysregulated genes when comparing control and tumor free tissue were those involved in apoptosis (CIDEC, MUC1, ZBTB16, PRNP, ECT2), immune response (IFI27) and differentiation (KRT36). Data suggest that these are important findings which can aid in earlier diagnosis of tumor development, a relapse or a novel squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, in the absence of histological signs of a tumor.

  • 10.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Troiano, Giuseppe
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Wang, Lixiao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Evidence that circulating proteins are more promising than miRNAs for identification of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue2017In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 8, no 61, p. 103437-103448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research, squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue remains a devastating disease with a five-year survival of around 60%. Late detection and recurrence are the main causes for poor survival. The identification of circulating factors for early diagnosis and/or prognosis of cancer is a rapidly evolving field of interest, with the hope of finding stable and reliable markers of clinical significance. The aim of this study was to evaluate circulating miRNAs and proteins as potential factors for distinguishing patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma from healthy controls. Array-based profiling of 372 miRNAs in plasma samples showed broad variations between different patients and did not show any evidence for their use in diagnosis of tongue cancer. Although one miRNA, miR-150, was significantly down-regulated in plasma from patients compared to controls. Surprisingly, the corresponding tumor tissue showed an up-regulation of miR-150. Among circulating proteins, 23 were identified as potential markers of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. These findings imply that circulating proteins are a more promising source of biomarkers for tongue squamous cell carcinomas than circulating miRNAs. The data also highlight that circulating markers are not always directly associated with tumor cell properties.

  • 11.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rentoft, Matilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Coates, Philip
    Tayside Tissue Bank/Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Autoantibodies and decreased expression of the transcription factor ELF-3 together with increased chemokine pathways support an autoimmune phenotype and altered differentiation in lichen planus located in oral mucosa2013In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1410-1416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  The pathogenesis of oral lichen planus (OLP), a chronic inflammatory disease, is not fully understood. It is known that OLP has autoimmune features, and it is suggested to be an autoimmune disease. ELF-3 is involved in differentiation of keratinocytes and deregulated in different tumours and inflammatory diseases. CXCR-3 and its ligands CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 are increased in autoimmune diseases and linked to Th-1 immune response. Objectives  To analyse and compare expression of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 in OLP lesions and controls in whole and microdissected epithelium. Methods  Tissue biopsies from 20 patients clinically and histologically diagnosed with OLP and 20 healthy controls were studied using whole tissues or microdissected epithelium. By the use of qRT-PCR, mRNA levels of ELF-3, CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 were studied. Western blot was used for analysis of ELF-3 protein expression. Sera from 19 OLP patients and 20 controls were analysed with ELISA in search for autoantibodies. Results  The upregulation of CXCR-3, CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 found in OLP is similar to previous findings showing an autoimmune phenotype in lichen planus (LP) and lichen sclerosus. Decreased expression of the differentiation-related transcription factor ELF-3 was also seen in OLP lesions, and we further demonstrate presence of circulating autoantibodies against the ELF-3 protein in sera from 3 of 19 (16%) LP patients tested. Conclusions  On the basis of these findings, we confirm that OLP shows features of an autoimmune disease and suggest deregulated differentiation of keratinocytes to be one of the causes of the disease phenotype.

  • 12.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Coates, Philip J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Genes Involved in Epithelial Differentiation and Development are Differentially Expressed in Oral and Genital Lichen Planus Epithelium Compared to Normal Epithelium2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 526-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease with unknown cause. Patients with LP often have both oral and genital lesions, but these conditions are often considered as separate diseases and treated accordingly. To find out which genes are differently expressed in mucosal LP compared to normal mucosa and establish whether oral and genital LP are in fact the same disease, whole genome expression analysis was performed on epithelium from 13 patients diagnosed with oral and/or genital LP and normal controls. For confirmation of keratin 4 and corneodesmosin expression, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry were used. Many genes involved in epithelial development and differentiation are differently expressed in epithelium from LP compared to normal epithelium. Several of the differentially expressed genes are common for oral and genital LP and the same biological processes are altered which supports the fact that oral and genital LP are manifestations of the same disease. The change in gene expression indicates that differentiation is altered leading to changes in the epithelial barrier.

  • 13.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ebrahimi, Maijd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Increased levels of COX-2 in oral lichen planus supports an autoimmune cause of the disease2012In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1415-1419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease for which the pathogenesis is not fully understood. OLP has autoimmune features and auto immunity has been suggested as a potential cause, whereas WHO has classified OLP as a premalignant condition. Association between chronic inflammation and cancer is known and chronic inflammation is one of the characteristics of OLP. A protein connected to inflammation and suggested to be involved in cancer development is cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which can be inhibited by microRNA-26b (miR-26b).

    Objective: The aim was to map levels of COX-2 and miR-26b in OLP lesions to see if there was any correlation between expression of COX-2 and its regulator miR-26b in OLP.

    Methods: In biopsies from 20 OLP patients and 20 age and gender-matched controls laser- micro dissection of epithelium was performed. Quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used in the analysis.

    Results: Levels of COX-2 mRNA were significantly higher while levels of miR-26b were significantly lower in OLP lesions compared to controls. Using immunohistochemistry normal oral mucosa samples did not show any expression of COX-2 while OLP samples expressed the protein. No COX-2 protein was detectable with Western blot.

    Conclusion: Increased expression of COX-2 and decreased expression of miR-26b in OLP suggests both to play a role in OLP. COX-2 has been connected to both malignant development and autoimmunity but as malignant development of OLP is quite rare we suggest that the increased levels of COX-2 seen here support an autoimmune cause of the disease.

  • 14.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Alterations in factors involved in differentiation and barrier function in the epithelium in oral and genital lichen planus2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 214-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichen planus is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease affecting both skin and mucosa, mainly in oral and/or genital regions. Keratinocytes go through a well-regulated process of proliferation and differentiation, alterations in which may result in defects in the protective epithelial barrier. Long-term barrier impairment might lead to chronic inflammation. In order to broaden our understanding of the differentiation process in mucosal lichen planus, we mapped the expression of 4 factors known to be involved in differentiation. Biopsies were collected from oral and genital lichen planus lesions and normal controls. Altered expression of all 4 factors in epithelium from lichen planus lesions was found, clearly indicating disturbed epithelial differentiation in lichen planus lesions.

  • 15.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Prosthetic Dentistry.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Reply to increased levels of COX-2 and oral lichen planus by P.D. Pigatto, F. Spaderi, G.P. Bombeccari, G. Guzzi by Danielsson et al2013In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 395-396Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wahlin, Ylva Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Coates, PJ
    Division of Medical Sciences, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, UK.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Increased expression of Smad proteins, and in particular Smad3, in oral lichen planus compared to normal oral mucosa2010In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 639-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Backgound: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa which the World Health Organisation (WHO) considers a premalignant condition. One step in malignant development is so called epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process whereby epithelial cells acquire mesenchymal characteristics. EMT occurs during embryogenesis and wound healing but also in some human diseases such as cancer and fibrosis. A factor known to induce EMT is transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), which uses the Smad proteins as mediators for its signalling. TGF-beta is also often over-expressed in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).

    Methods: In the present study we mapped expression of Smad proteins in OLP lesions by immunohistochemistry, and compared to expression in normal and sensitive oral mucosa. The latter group of patients had developed SCCHN after shorter or longer periods of diffuse oral symptoms. The aim was to see if there were any signs of EMT related changes in the OLP lesions, as judged by changes in the TGF-beta pathway.

    Conclusion: Changes in the TGF-beta pathway related to EMT are seen in the very earliest stages of oral malignancy and become more severe as lesions progress.

  • 17.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Diagnostics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Prosthetic Dentistry.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Decreased expression of ELF-3 indicating disturbed differentiation in oral lichen planus2012In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825, Vol. 18, no Special Issue, Suppl. 1, p. 20-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Danielsson, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Altered expression of miR-21, miR-125b, and miR-203 indicates a role for these microRNAs in oral lichen planus2012In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP), which is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa with unknown etiology, affects about 2% of the population. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in normal processes such as development and differentiation as well as progression of human diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of miR-21, miR-125b, and miR-203 and to compare RNA levels of their potential targets, the tumor suppressor p53 and its relative p63, both known to be deregulated in OLP.

    Methods: In biopsies from 20 patients with OLP and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, epithelium was laser dissected and analyzed for the expression of miR-21, miR-125b, miR-203, p53, and p63 using qRT/PCR.

    Results: Increased expression of miR-21 and miR-203, decreased expression of miR-125, and down-regulation of p53 and ΔNp63 RNA were seen in OLP compared to normal oral mucosa. When comparing microRNA expression to levels of p53 and p63 RNA, a significant negative correlation was seen between ΔNp63 and miR-203 and between miR-21 and p53, respectively.

    Conclusion: Results indicate a role for the studied microRNAs in changes seen in OLP.

  • 19. Daskalogianni, Chrysoula
    et al.
    Pyndiah, Slovenie
    Apcher, Sebastien
    Mazars, Anne
    Manoury, Benedicte
    Ammari, Nisrine
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Voisset, Cecile
    Blondel, Marc
    Fahraeus, Robin
    Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBNA1 and ZEBRA: targets for therapeutic strategies against EBV-carrying cancers2015In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 235, no 2, p. 334-341Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EBV-encoded EBNA1 was first discovered 40 years ago, approximately 10 years after the presence of EBV had been demonstrated in Burkitt's lymphoma cells. It took another 10 years before the functions of EBNA1 in maintaining the viral genome were revealed, and it has since been shown to be an essential viral factor expressed in all EBV-carrying cells. Apart from serving to maintain the viral episome and to control viral replication and gene expression, EBNA1 also harbours a cis-acting mechanism that allows virus-carrying host cells to evade the immune system. This relates to a particular glycine-alanine repeat (GAr) within EBNA1 that has the capacity to suppress antigen presentation to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway. We discuss the role of the GAr sequence at the level of mRNA translation initiation, rather than at the protein level, as at least part of the mechanism to avoid MHC presentation. Interfering with this mechanism has become the focus of the development of immune-based therapies against EBV-carrying cancers, and some lead compounds that affect translation of GAr-carrying mRNAs have been identified. In addition, we describe the EBV-encoded ZEBRA factor and the switch from the latent to the lytic cycle as an alternative virus-specific target for treating EBV-carrying cancers. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of how EBNA1 and ZEBRA interfere with cellular pathways not only opens new therapeutic approaches but continues to reveal new cell-biological insights on the interplay between host and virus. This review is a tale of discoveries relating to how EBNA1 and ZEBRA have emerged as targets for specific cancer therapies against EBV-carrying diseases, and serves as an illustration of how mRNA translation can play roles in future immune-based strategies to target viral disease. 

  • 20. de Almeida, Fernando J. Mota
    et al.
    Kivijarvi, Kristina
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    A case of disseminated histoplasmosis diagnosed after oral presentation in an old HIV-negative patient in Sweden2015In: Gerodontology, ISSN 0734-0664, E-ISSN 1741-2358, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 234-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic disease in various regions such as North America and South-East Asia but remains rare in Europe. Disseminated histoplasmosis is unusual in HIV-negative patients. Here, we describe a case of disseminated histoplasmosis in an HIV-negative patient diagnosed after oral presentation.

  • 21.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Bourdon, Jean-Christophe
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of novel p53 isoforms in oral lichen planus.2007In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 156-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin, showing little spontaneous regression. WHO classifies OLP as a premalignant condition, however, the underlying mechanisms initiating development of cancer in OLP lesions are not understood. The p53 tumour suppressor plays an important role in many tumours, and an increased expression of p53 protein has been seen in OLP lesions. Recently it was shown that the human TP53 gene encodes at least nine different isoforms. Another member of the p53 family, p63, comprises six different isoforms and plays a crucial role in the formation of oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth and skin. It has also been suggested that p63 is involved in development of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In contrast to p53, a decreased expression of p63 protein has been seen in OLP lesions. In this study, we mapped the expression of five novel p53 isoforms at RNA and protein levels in OLP and matched normal controls. In the same samples we also measured levels of p63 isoforms using quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed p53 to be expressed in all OLP lesions and normal tissues. The p53beta and Delta133p53 isoforms were expressed in the majority of samples whereas the remaining three novel isoforms analysed were expressed in only a few samples. Levels of p63 isoforms were lower in OLP lesions compared with normal tissue, however, changes were not statistically significant.

  • 22.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Coates, Philip J
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Decreased expression of the p63 related proteins beta-catenin, E-cadherin and EGFR in oral lichen planus2007In: Oral Oncology, ISSN 1368-8375, E-ISSN 1879-0593, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 634-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease and although classified by WHO as a premalignant condition, the risk for transformation into squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is a matter of great controversy. The p63 gene encodes six different proteins which are required for development of ectodermally derived tissues such as oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth and skin. p63 is highly expressed in SCCHN whereas decreased expression is seen in OLP. beta-catenin, E-cadherin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are p63 related proteins, and abnormalities in their expression suggested they are involved in development of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). In this study we mapped the expression of these p63 related proteins in OLP and matched normal healthy controls. Results showed decreased expression of beta-catenin, E-cadherin and EGFR in the vast majority of OLP samples compared with the normal controls. This is the first comprehensive study mapping expression of several p63- and SCCHN-related proteins in tissue from patients with OLP. Results showed a mixed expression pattern with OLP variably resembling normal as well as tumour tissue. Based on our present and previous data it cannot be judged whether OLP lesions are at an increased risk of malignant development.

  • 23.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Bäcklund, Bodil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The use of a novel ELISA method for detection of antibodies against p63 in sera from patients diagnosed with oral and/or genital and skin lichen planus.2010In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease of mucosa and skin affecting approximately 1-2% of the adult population. Autoimmunity has been implicated in the etiology of this disease, and recently we detected antibodies directed against all six p63 isoforms in sera from 2 out of 20 patients diagnosed with oral lichen planus (OLP) using Western blot analysis. Here we have developed an ELISA method for screening sera for presence of autoantibodies directed against p63. Using the same sera as previously analysed, we show that the optical density ratios for sera from the two patients with known autoantibodies was considerably higher compared to mean optical density ratios for all samples as well as controls analysed. Applying this novel ELISA technique for screening of sera from an additional group of 46 patients with oral and/or genital or skin lichen and 43 matched controls, we detected another three patients with autoantibodies against the p63 proteins. These data are discussed together with the observation that all five patients with detectable p63 autoantibodies from our two studies had clinically severe disease symptoms.

  • 24.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    van der Waal, Isaäc
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam .
    Letter to the editor: Reply to H. M. Ögmundsdóttir & W. P. Holbrook by M. Ebrahimi et al.2011In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 40, no 9, p. 732-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Van Der Waal, Isaäc
    Oral lichen planus and the p53 family: what do we know?2011In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 281-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    J Oral Pathol Med (2010) Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common chronic disease of the oral mucosa for which the aetiopathogenesis is not fully understood. It mainly affects middle aged and elderly. The finding of autoantibodies against p63, a member of the p53 family, is a strong indication of autoimmunity as a causative or contributing factor. The WHO classified OLP as a potentially malignant disorder, but still there is an ongoing debate in the literature on this subject. The TP53 gene encodes a tumour suppressor protein that is involved in induction of cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis of DNA-damaged cells. The p63 gene encodes six different proteins that are crucial for formation of the oral mucosa and skin. The coordinated stabilization of p53 and decreased expression of p63 seen in OLP cause induction of apoptosis enabling removal of DNA-damaged cells. In view of the complexity of cancerogenesis, no firm statement can at present be made about the relevance of the observed relationship between p53 and p63 and the possible malignant transformation of OLP.

  • 26.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Sjöström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Decreased expression of p63 in oral lichen planus and graft-vs.-host disease associated with oral inflammation.2006In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 46-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oral lichen planus (OLP) and graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) are conditions with increased risk of malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The p63 gene encodes six different proteins and is expressed at high levels in SCCHN. METHODS: Biopsies from patients diagnosed with OLP and GVHD were analysed for p63 protein expression using antibodies distinguishing between the major isoforms expressed in normal epithelia, in parallel with biopsies from normal buccal mucosa and SCCHN. RESULTS: In OLP and GVHD a decreased expression of all p63 isoforms was seen, while expression of p53 protein was upregulated, compared with normal mucosa. In SCCHN, p63 was abundantly expressed and some tumours showed strong p53 staining, suggestive of p53 mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased p63 and increased p53 expression in OLP and GVHD indicates a coordinated action of these two related proteins to protect the oral mucosae from the damaging effects of underlying inflammation. In SCCHN disruption of the TP53 gene and overrepresentation of certain p63 isoforms

  • 27.
    Ebrahimi, Majid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wahlin, Ylva-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Wiik, Allan
    Roos, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Detection of antibodies against p63 and p73 isoforms in sera from patients diagnosed with oral lichen planus.2007In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 93-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of oral mucosa. Despite numerous publications and intense research, the etiology of OLP is still unknown, however, autoimmunity as a possible causative factor has been discussed. Methods: In the present study sera from 20 patients clinically and histologically diagnosed with OLP were analyzed for antibodies directed toward p53, p63, and p73 using Western blot. Results: Sera from two patients reacted with all six p63 isoforms, and one also with p73. The strongest reaction was noted against the TAp63beta protein, which is the most potent transactivator of all p63 proteins and is implicated in the differentiation of stratified epithelia. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration of antibodies directed against all p63 and some p73 isoforms in sera from patients diagnosed with OLP.

  • 28. Gnanasundram, Sivakumar Vadivel
    et al.
    Pyndiah, Slovenie
    Daskalogianni, Chrysoula
    Armfield, Kate
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Wilson, Joanna B.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. Inserm UMRS1162, Equipe Labellisée la Ligue Contre le Cancer, Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, Hôpital St. Louis, 75010, Paris, France; RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Zluty kopec 7, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic.
    PI3Kδ delta activates E2F1 synthesis in response to mRNA translation stress2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 2103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The c-myc oncogene stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis to promote cellular growth. However, the pathway by which cells sense and restore dysfunctional mRNA translation and how this is linked to cell proliferation and growth is not known. We here show that mRNA translation stress in cis triggered by the gly-ala repeat sequence of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-encoded EBNA1, results in PI3Kδ-dependent induction of E2F1 mRNA translation with the consequent activation of c-Myc and cell proliferation. Treatment with a specific PI3Kδ inhibitor Idelalisib (CAL-101) suppresses E2F1 and c-Myc levels and causes cell death in EBNA1-induced B cell lymphomas. Suppression of PI3Kδ prevents E2F1 activation also in non-EBV-infected cells. These data illustrate an mRNA translation stress–response pathway for E2F1 activation that is exploited by EBV to promote cell growth and proliferation, offering new strategies to treat EBV-carrying cancers.

  • 29.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic; Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, Hôpital St. Louis, Paris, France.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Loizou, Christos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Gärskog, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Epigenetic regulation of OAS2 shows disease-specific DNA methylation profiles at individual CpG sites2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 32579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic modifications are essential regulators of biological processes. Decreased DNA methylation of OAS2 (2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase 2), encoding an antiviral protein, has been seen in psoriasis. To provide further insight into the epigenetic regulation of OAS2, we performed pyrosequencing to detect OAS2 DNA methylation status at 11 promoter and first exon located CpG sites in psoriasis (n = 12) and two common subtypes of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck: tongue (n = 12) and tonsillar (n = 11). Compared to corresponding controls, a general hypomethylation was seen in psoriasis. In tongue and tonsillar SCC, hypomethylation was found at only two CpG sites, the same two sites that were least demethylated in psoriasis. Despite differences in the specific residues targeted for methylation/demethylation, OAS2 expression was upregulated in all conditions and correlations between methylation and expression were seen in psoriasis and tongue SCC. Distinctive methylation status at four successively located CpG sites within a genomic area of 63 bp reveals a delicately integrated epigenetic program and indicates that detailed analysis of individual CpGs provides additional information into the mechanisms of epigenetic regulation in specific disease states. Methylation analyses as clinical biomarkers need to be tailored according to disease-specific sites.

  • 30.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bäckman, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Coates, Philip J
    Cullman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lind, Lisbet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Exclusion of p63 as a candidate gene for autosomal-dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.2006In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 111-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    p63 contributes to cell invasion and migration in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck2008In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 263, no 1, p. 26-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wang, Lixiao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Krejci, Adam
    Hupp, Ted
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic; Institute of Molecular Genetics, University Paris 7, St. Louis Hospital, Paris, France.
    Norberg-Spaak, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Sgaramella, Nicola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Copy number variation: A prognostic marker for young patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue2019In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT) is increasing in people under age 40. There is an urgent need to identify prognostic markers that help identify young SCCOT patients with poor prognosis in order to select these for individualized treatment. Materials and methods To identify genetic markers that can serve as prognostic markers for young SCCOT patients, we first investigated four young (<= 40 years) and five elderly patients (>= 50 years) using global RNA sequencing and whole-exome sequencing. Next, we combined our data with data on SCCOT from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), giving a total of 16 young and 104 elderly, to explore the correlations between genomic variations and clinical outcomes. Results In agreement with previous studies, we found that SCCOT from young and elderly patients was transcriptomically and also genomically similar with no significant differences regarding cancer driver genes, germline predisposition genes, or the burden of somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs). However, a disparate copy number variation (CNV) was found in young patients with distinct clinical outcome. Combined with data from TCGA, we found that the overall survival was significantly better in young patients with low-CNV (n = 5) compared to high-CNV (n = 11) burden (P = 0.044). Conclusions Copy number variation burden is a useful single prognostic marker for SCCOT from young, but not elderly, patients. CNV burden thus holds promise to form an important contribution when selecting suitable treatment protocols for young patients with SCCOT.

  • 33.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip
    MacCallum, Stephanie
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    TRAF4 is potently induced by TAp63 isoforms and localised according to differentiation in SCCHN2007In: Cancer Biology & Therapy, ISSN 1538-4047, E-ISSN 1555-8576, Vol. 6, no 12, p. 1979-1983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    p63, a member of the p53 family, is overexpressed in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and some other tumors of epithelial origin. As a transcription factor, p63 can bind to p53-type response elements and there is some overlap between p53 family transcriptional targets. Tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 4 (TRAF4) is a p53 regulated gene which is overexpressed in many human carcinomas. We investigated the involvement of p63 in regulation of TRAF4 and the expression of the TRAF4 protein in SCCHN. Disrupting endogenous p63 expression resulted in downregulation of TRAF4 mRNA and protein in an SCCHN cell line. Endogenous p63 bound to the TRAF4 promoter in vivo and reporter assays showed that p63, p73 and p53 can all transactivate TRAF4, with TAp63 isoforms being the most potent activators. The level of TRAF4 activation by TAp63 was two-fold higher than by p53, and TRAF4 was ten-fold more responsive to TAp63 than another p63-target, IGFBP3. Nuclear expression of TRAF4 was seen in normal oral epithelium and highly/moderately differentiated SCCHN, whereas cytoplasmic expression of TRAF4 was seen in poorly differentiated SCCHN. These results indicate that TRAF4 is a common target of p53 family members and that localization of TRAF4 is associated with differentiation of SCCHN cells.

  • 34.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, E
    Coates, PJ
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Little effect on p63 but significant effect on miR-21 and miR-125b by NB-UVB phototherapy on psoriatic lesions2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease in which dysregulation of p63, a member of the p53 family and crucial for skin development and maintenance, has been shown. Though currently incurable, many therapies are available including narrowband ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy. To further elucidate the role of p63 in psoriasis and increase our understanding of the mechanisms of phototherapy, we studied the effects of NB-UVB treatment on p63 expression. Expression of p53 was also studied due to its functional role in the response of skin to UV. In addition, we investigated expression of miR-203, miR-125b and miR-21, as these microRNAs are p63 and/or p53 regulators and their involvement in psoriasis pathogenesis has previously been suggested. Skin biopsies from 12 psoriasis patients were collected before, during and at the final session of phototherapy. Real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry showed that epidermal p63 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly affected following phototherapy, whereas a significant increase in p53 mRNA expression and protein accumulation was found. NB-UVB treatment also significantly affected expression of miR-21 and miR-125b, whereas individual clinical improvement seemed related to p53 status only. Our results indicate that even though NB-UVB phototherapy causes diverse molecular changes, induction of p53 is pivotal for successful treatment of psoriasis, and unresolved p63 abnormality in the treated epidermis of psoriasis patients further indicate a role for p63 in psoriasis.

  • 35.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Fahraeus, Robin
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Correlation between Reversal of DNA Methylation and Clinical Symptoms in Psoriatic Epidermis Following Narrow-Band UVB Phototherapy2015In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 135, no 8, p. 2077-2083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic modifications by DNA methylation are associated with a wide range of diseases. Previous studies. in psoriasis have concentrated on epigenetic changes in immune cells or in total skin biopsies that include stromal-associated changes. In order to improve our understanding of the role of DNA methylation in psoriasis, we sought to obtain a comprehensive DNA methylation signature specific for the epidermal component of psoriasis and to analyze methylation changes during therapy. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of epidermal cells from 12 patients undergoing narrow-band UVB phototherapy and 12 corresponding healthy controls revealed a distinct DNA methylation pattern in psoriasis compared with controls. A total of 3,665 methylation variable positions (MVPs) were identified with an overall hypomethylation in psoriasis patient samples. DNA methylation pattern was reversed at the end of phototherapy in patients showing excellent clinical improvement. Only 7% of phototherapy-affected MVPs (150 out of 2,108) correlate with nearby gene expression. Enrichment of MVPs in enhancers indicates tissue-specific modulation of the transcriptional regulatory machinery in psoriasis. Our study identified key epigenetic events associated with psoriasis pathogenesis and helps understand the dynamic DNA methylation landscape in the human genome.

  • 36.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Effect of narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy on p63 and microRNA (miR-21 and miR-125b) expression in psoriatic epidermis2011In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, ISSN 0001-5555, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 392-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease in which dysregulation of p63, a member of the p53 family that is crucial for skin development and maintenance, has been demonstrated. Involvement of miR-203, miR-21 and miR-125b, small non-coding RNAs implicated in the regulation of p63 or p53, has been suggested in the patho-genesis of psoriasis. To elucidate the roles of p63 and p63-related microRNAs in psoriasis and to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy, we studied the effects of NB-UVB treatment on the expression of these molecules. Skin biopsies from 12 psoriasis patients were collected before, during and after NB-UVB therapy. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry showed that p63 expression was not significantly affected, whereas NB-UVB phototherapy significantly decreased expression of miR-21 (p = 0.003) and increased miR-125b levels (p = 0.003). The results indicate that the unresolved p63 abnormality in treated epidermis may play a role in maintenance of this disease.

  • 37.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Oxidation Reduction is a Key Process for Successful Treatment of Psoriasis by Narrow-band UVB Phototherapy2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrow-band UVB (NB-UVB) phototherapy is commonly used for treatment of psoriasis, though the mechanisms underlying its efficacy have not been completely elucidated. We used gene expression profiling to characterise gene expression in lesional epidermis from psoriasis patients in the middle and late stages of NB-UVB phototherapy. Increased melanogenesis gene expression was the earliest response to phototherapy. At the end of treatment, genes responding to phototherapy and correlated to treatment outcome were involved in oxidation reduction, growth and mitochondria organisation. Particularly, SPATA18, a key regulator of mitochondrial quality, was significantly down-regulated in psoriasis (p < 0.05). Poly(dA:dT) and poly(I:C) stimulation increased SPATA18 level in primary keratinocytes, indicating the importance of mitochondria quality control under innate immune induced oxidative stress. Normalised SPATA18 expression after phototherapy indicates improved mitochondrial quality control and restored cellular redox status. Our data suggest that oxidation reduction is critical for the resolution of psoriatic plaques following NB-UVB phototherapy.

  • 38.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wang, Lixiao
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. RECAMO, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 656 53 Brno, Czech Republic; Équipe Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, INSERM UMRS1162, Institut de Génétique Moléculaire, Université Paris 7, IUH Hôpital St. Louis, 75010 Paris, France.
    Sgaramella, Nicola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wilms, Torben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    AP001056.1, A Prognosis-Related Enhancer RNA in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck2019In: Cancers, ISSN 2072-6694, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). A subclass of lncRNAs, termed enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), are derived from enhancer regions and could contribute to enhancer function. In this study, we developed an integrated data analysis approach to identify key eRNAs in SCCHN. Tissue-specific enhancer-derived RNAs and their regulated genes previously predicted using the computational pipeline PreSTIGE, were considered as putative eRNA-target pairs. The interactive web servers, TANRIC (the Atlas of Noncoding RNAs in Cancer) and cBioPortal, were used to explore the RNA levels and clinical data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. Requiring that key eRNAs should show significant associations with overall survival (Kaplan-Meier log-rank test, p < 0.05) and the predicted target (correlation coefficient r > 0.4, p < 0.001), we identified five key eRNA candidates. The most significant survival-associated eRNA was AP001056.1 with ICOSLG encoding an immune checkpoint protein as its regulated target. Another 1640 genes also showed significant correlation with AP001056.1 (r > 0.4, p < 0.001), with the "immune system process" being the most significantly enriched biological process (adjusted p < 0.001). Our results suggest that AP001056.1 is a key immune-related eRNA in SCCHN with a positive impact on clinical outcome.

  • 39.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Eriksson, Irene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Uppsala University.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Absence of high-risk human papilloma virus in p16 positive inverted sinonasal papillomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sinonasal inverted papilloma (SIP) is a relatively rare disease, and its etiology is not understood. It is characterized by locally aggressive growth and a strong tendency to recur despite its benign histology.

    Aims: The aim of this study was to identify the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and its surrogate marker p16 in SIP tissue samples from a regional cohort.

    Material and Methods: Subjects were identified from our regional center cohort of 88 SIP patients treated between 1984-2014. From these subjects, 54 were included in this study.  Of these, 53 biopsies were analyzed with PCR, and 54 samples were immunohistochemically stained for p16. DNA was extracted from histopathologically verified SIP.  Genotype screening for 13 high risk-, 5 oncogenic and 6 low risk HPV types was performed using the PapilloCheck® HPV-screening test.

    Results: HPV analysis was successful for 38 of 53 samples. Of the 38 successfully analyzed samples, only 2 samples were positive for HPV 11.  Notably, p16 was present in the epithelia in all samples, and in the papilloma lesions in 37 samples.

    Conclusion: Since only 2 out of 38 SIPs were positive for HPV (type 11), and at the same time p16 was positive in epithelia in all samples and in 37 of 38 papilloma lesions of the samples, it is concluded that p16 cannot be used as a surrogate marker for high-risk HPV-infection in SIP. We are currently planning a prospective, multicenter study in order to increase the study power and in order to be able to better evaluate the clinical implications of HPV-and p16 in SIP.

  • 40.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech and Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Laurell, Göran
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Hyaluronan in vocal folds and false vocal folds in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis2018In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 138, no 11, p. 1020-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hyaluronan (HA) is a glycosaminoglycan with viscoelastic properties necessary for vocal fold (VF) vibration and voice production. Changes in HAs molecular mass, possibly related to human papilloma virus, could affect formation/persistence of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).

    Aims/Objective: Describing mass and localization of HA and localization of HA receptor CD44 in VF and false vocal folds (FVF) in RRP.

    Materials and Methods: Biopsies from VF and FVF from 24 RRP patients. Twelve were studied with histo-/immunohistochemistry for HA and CD44 in epithelium, stroma and RRP lesions. Twelve samples were analyzed for HA molecular mass distribution with gas-phase-electrophoretic-molecular-mobility-analyzer (GEMMA).

    Results: Three of 23 stains (VF and FVF combined) showed faint HA staining in the epithelium; there was more extensive staining in the stroma. CD44 was present throughout all areas in FVF and VF, it did not concur with HA. GEMMA analysis revealed very high mass HA (vHMHA) with more varying amounts in VF.

    Conclusions/Significance: HA was mainly distributed in the stroma. CD44 not binding to HA might explain the non-inflammatory response described in RRP. Possibly crosslinked vHMHA was seen in VF and FVF, with more variable amounts in VF samples. Counteracting HA crosslinking could become a treatment option in RRP.

  • 41.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loizou, Christos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Lymphocyte profile and cytokine mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis suggest dysregulated cytokine mRNA response and impaired cytotoxic capacity2017In: Immunity, Inflammation and Disease, E-ISSN 2050-4527, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 541-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a relatively rare, chronic disease caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 6 and 11, and characterized by wart-like lesions in the airway affecting voice and respiratory function. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic and resolve spontaneously, however, some individuals are afflicted with persistent HPV infections. Failure to eliminate HPV 6 and 11 due to a defect immune responsiveness to these specific genotypes is proposed to play a major role in the development of RRP.

    METHODS: We performed a phenotypic characterization of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected from 16 RRP patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls, using immunoflow cytometry, and monoclonal antibodies against differentiation and activation markers. The cytokine mRNA profile of monocytes, T helper-, T cytotoxic-, and NK cells was assessed using RT-qPCR cytokine analysis, differentiating between Th1-, Th2-, Th3/regulatory-, and inflammatory immune responses.

    RESULTS: We found a dominance of cytotoxic T cells, activated NK cells, and high numbers of stressed MIC A/B expressing lymphocytes. There was an overall suppression of cytokine mRNA production and an aberrant cytokine mRNA profile in the activated NK cells.

    CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate an immune dysregulation with inverted CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio and aberrant cytokine mRNA production in RRP patients, compared to healthy controls.

  • 42.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Schindele, Alexandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Östersunds hospital, Sweden.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Eriksson, Irene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Sandström, Karl
    Laurell, Göran
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Mapping of Human Papilloma Virus, p16, and Epstein-Barr Virusin Non-Malignant Tonsillar Disease2019In: Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology, E-ISSN 2378-8038, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Due to their location in the entrance of the aero‐digestive tract, tonsils are steadily exposed to viruses. Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein‐Barr virus (EBV) are two potentially oncogenic viruses that tonsils encounter. The incidence of HPV positive tonsillar cancer is on the rise and it is unknown when infection with HPV occurs.

    Aim: To investigate if tonsils are infected with HPV and EBV, to study the co‐expression of HPV and its surrogate marker p16, and to evaluate the number of EBV positive cells in benign tonsillar disease.

    Materials and Methods: Tonsils from 40 patients in a university hospital were removed due to hypertrophy, chronic or recurrent infection. These were analyzed for presence of HPV, its surrogate marker p16, and EBV. HPV was studied using PapilloCheck (a PCR method), while p16 was identified in epithelial and lymphoid tissue with immunohistochemistry and EBV using EBER‐ISH (Epstein‐Barr encoding region–in situ hybridization).

    Results: HPV was not detected, and p16 was present at low numbers in all epithelial samples as well as in 92.5% of the lymphoid tonsillar samples. At least one EBER‐positive cell was seen in 65% of cases. Larger numbers of EBER‐expressing cells were only seen in two cases.

    Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that EBV and HPV infect tonsils independently, but further studies are warranted to confirm their infectious relationship.

    Level of Evidence: Cross‐sectional study

  • 43.
    Jonsson, Eva Lindell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallen, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Effect of radiotherapy on expression of hyaluronan and EGFR and presence of mast cells in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck2012In: ONCOL LETT, ISSN 1792-1074, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1177-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is a common form of cancer, and despite improvements in treatment during the last decades, survival rates have not significantly increased. There is therefore a need to better understand how these tumours and the adjacent tissues react to radiotherapy, the most common type of treatment for this group of tumours. In order to improve this understanding, the expression of hyaluronan (HA) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the presence of mast cells were mapped before and after radiotherapy using immunohistochemistry. The results showed HA and EGFR to have similar expression patterns in tumour tissue and histologically normal squamous epithelium prior to radiotherapy. Following radiotherapy, EGFR increased in histologically normal epithelium. An increased number of mast cells were also observed as a result of radiotherapy. No expression of EGFR was observed in the connective tissue either prior to or following radiotherapy.

  • 44. Karakostis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Ponnuswamy, Anand
    Fusee, Leila T. S.
    Bailly, Xavier
    Laguerre, Laurent
    Worall, Erin
    Vojtesek, Borek
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Fåhraeus, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. E´quipe Labellise´e Ligue Contre le Cancer, Universite´ Paris 7, INSERM UMR 1162, Paris, France; Regional Centre for Applied Molecular Oncology, RECAMO and Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic.
    p53 mRNA and p53 Protein Structures Have Evolved Independently to Interact with MDM22016In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 1280-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53 tumor suppressor and its key regulator MDM2 play essential roles in development, ageing, cancer, and cellular stress responses in mammals. Following DNA damage, MDM2 interacts with p53 mRNA in an ATM kinase-dependent fashion and stimulates p53 synthesis, whereas under normal conditions, MDM2 targets the p53 protein for degradation. The peptide-and RNA motifs that interact with MDM2 are encoded by the same conserved BOX-I sequence, but how these interactions have evolved is unknown. Here, we show that a temperature-sensitive structure in the invertebrate Ciona intestinalis (Ci) p53 mRNA controls its interaction with MDM2. We also show that a nonconserved flanking region of Ci-BOX-I domain prevents the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. These results indicate that the temperature-regulated p53 mRNA-MDM2 interaction evolved to become kinase regulated in the mammalian DNA damage response. The data also suggest that the negative regulation of p53 by MDM2 via protein-protein interaction evolved in vertebrates following changes in the BOX-I flanking sequence.

  • 45. Kragelund, C
    et al.
    Reibel, J
    Hadler-Olsen, E S
    Hietanen, J
    Johannessen, A C
    Kenrad, B
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Puranen, M
    Rozell, B
    Salo, T
    Syrjänen, S
    Søland, T M
    van der Waal, I
    van der Wal, J E
    Warfvinge, G
    Scandinavian fellowship for oral pathology and oral medicine: statement on oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum2010In: Journal of Oral Pathology & Medicine, ISSN 0904-2512, E-ISSN 1600-0714, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 800-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For many years, dentists have migrated between the Scandinavian countries without an intentionally harmonized dental education. The free movement of the workforce in the European Union has clarified that a certain degree of standardization or harmonization of the European higher education acts, including the dental education, is required. As a result of the Bologna process, the Association for Dental Education in Europe and the thematic network DentEd have generated guidelines in the document 'Profile and Competences for the European Dentist' (PCD). This document is meant to act as the leading source in revisions of dental curricula throughout Europe converging towards a European Dental Curriculum. In order to render the best conditions for future curriculum revisions providing the best quality dentist we feel obliged to analyse and comment the outlines of oral pathology and oral medicine in the PCD.

    METHODS: The representatives agreed upon definitions of oral pathology and oral medicine, and competences in oral pathology and oral medicine that a contemporary European dentist should master. The competences directly related to oral pathology and oral medicine were identified, within the PCD.

    RESULTS: The subject representatives suggested eighteen additions and two rewordings of the PCD, which all were substantiated by thorough argumentation.

    PERSPECTIVES: Hopefully, this contribution will find support in future revisions of the PCD in order to secure the best quality dental education.

  • 46. Kragelund, C.
    et al.
    Reibel, J.
    Hietanen, J.
    Hadler-Olsen, E.
    Johannessen, A. C.
    Kenrad, B.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Puranen, M.
    Salo, T.
    Syrjanen, S.
    Soland, T. M.
    van der Waal, I.
    van der Wal, J. E.
    Warfvinge, G.
    Scandinavian fellowship for oral pathology and oral medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum2012In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must have knowledge of clinical symptoms, local and systemic signs and clinical differential diagnoses to make an accurate diagnosis. The dentist must be competent in selecting appropriate diagnostic tests, for example, tissue biopsy and microbiological samples, and conducting them correctly, as well as in interpreting test results and taking appropriate action accordingly. Furthermore, the dentist must be aware of diseases demanding multidisciplinary cooperation and be able to recognise his/her professional limitation, and to refer to other specialists when required. The dental curriculum changes over time as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine.

  • 47.
    Li, Xingru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Ottosson, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Wang, Sihan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Boldrup, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gu, Xiaolian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Wilms' tumor gene 1 regulates p63 and promotes cell proliferation in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck2015In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 15, article id 342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) can act as a suppressor or activator of tumourigenesis in different types of human malignancies. The role of WT1 in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is not clear. Overexpression of WT1 has been reported in SCCHN, suggesting a possible oncogenic role for WT1. In the present study we aimed at investigating the function of WT1 and its previously identified protein partners p63 and p53 in the SCCHN cell line FaDu. Methods: Silencing RNA (siRNA) technology was applied to knockdown of WT1, p63 and p53 in FaDu cells. Cell proliferation was detected using MTT assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)/PCR analysis was performed to confirm the effect of WT1 on the p63 promoter. Protein co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) was used to find protein interaction between WT1 and p53/p63. Microarray analysis was used to identify changes of gene expression in response to knockdown of either WT1 or p63. WT1 RNA level was detected using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in patients with SCCHN. Results: We found that WT1 and p63 promoted cell proliferation, while mutant p53 (R248L) possessed the ability to suppress cell proliferation. We reported a novel positive correlation between WT1 and p63 expression. Subsequently, p63 was identified as a WT1 target gene. Furthermore, expression of 18 genes involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation and DNA replication was significantly altered by downregulation of WT1 and p63 expression. Several known WT1 and p63 target genes were affected by WT1 knockdown. Protein interaction was demonstrated between WT1 and p53 but not between WT1 and p63. Additionally, high WT1 mRNA levels were detected in SCCHN patient samples. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that WT1 and p63 act as oncogenes in SCCHN, affecting multiple genes involved in cancer cell growth.

  • 48. Lindell Jonsson, Eva
    et al.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallen, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Goran
    Immunohistochemical analysis of EGFR and hyaluronan in tongue cancer and the development of regional recurrence in patients initially diagnosed N02017In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 137, no 8, p. 877-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether the extent of expression of hyaluronan (HA) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue can predict the risk of cervical metastasis and survival.

    Study design: Retrospective histopathologic study.

    Methods: Surgical specimens from 64 patients who had undergone surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the mobile tongue were assessed using immunohistochemistry to investigate the expression of HA and EGFR in the primary tumours, and the data were then correlated to cervical metastasis and survival.

    Results: There was a significant correlation between the intensity of HA staining and patient survival (p .024), and a weak correlation between the staining proportion of EGFR and the risk for regional recurrence (AUC 66).

    Conclusions: This study indicates that immunoscoring using HA could be used to provide prognostic tools for tongue cancer, and that it might be of interest to study the prognostic properties of EGFR further concerning the risk for regional recurrence after the primary treatment.

  • 49.
    Loizou, Christos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Arvidsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in northern Sweden: Clinical characteristics and practical guidance2015In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 135, no 10, p. 1058-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) patients with high surgical treatment frequency (>= 1/year, HF) were significantly younger and had a more widespread laryngeal disease compared to a low frequency treated group (< 1 treatment/year, LF). This study confirms the existence of a clinical RRP group, not primarily related to HPV sub-type, but more care-intensive and in need of more vigilant follow-up. Objectives: RRP is associated with high morbidity due to its influence on breathing and voice. The purpose of this study was to characterize RRP patients in northern Sweden and investigate possible predictor factors affecting therapeutic needs. Method: Patients from the regional referral area (northern Sweden) were categorized for age, disease duration, juvenile or adult onset, profile of disease development, number of surgical sessions in relation to disease duration, laryngeal deposition of papilloma, gender, and HPV sub-types, in order to identify patients with increased need for frequent surgical treatment. Results: The median age of the RRP patients (n = 48) was 44.5 years; 34 (71%) were males and 14 (29%) females, most were infected with HPV 6. Patients with high surgical treatment frequency/year were significantly younger and showed more widespread papillomatous vegetation in the larynx, compared to the low frequency treated group.

  • 50.
    Loizou, Christos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Laurell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Uppsala University.
    Lindquist, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Öfverman, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stefansson, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Incidence of tonsillar cancer in northern Sweden: Impact of human papilloma virus2015In: Oncology Letters, ISSN 1792-1074, E-ISSN 1792-1082, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 3565-3572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence rate of tonsillar cancer is increasing worldwide. The current study identifies a parallel increase in the incidence of tonsillar cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV) and p16 expression among a population from northern Sweden, a sparsely populated area, confirming the strong association between p16 and HPV infection in tonsillar tissue. Data from the Swedish Cancer Registry was assessed to identify cases of tonsillar cancer in the northern territorial area of Sweden. HPV DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded diagnostic biopsies and detected by polymerase chain reaction using general primers Gp5+/6+ and CpI/IIG. Expression of p16 was identified by immunochemistry. Patients were grouped into urban or rural residence categories. A total of 214 cases were identified, comprising 155 (72.4%) men and 59 (27.6%) women, and 65 of these patients, who presented between 2000 and 2012, were analyzed. The overall median age for the analyzed patients was 58 years; 48 (74%) were males (median age, 57.5 years) and 17 (26%) were females (median age, 65 years). Of the 65 specimens, 59 (91%) were positive for HPV, and 62 (95%) expressed p16. The incidence of tonsillar cancer in the cohort demonstrated a 2-fold increase between 1990 and 2013; specifically, a 2.7-fold increase was observed in men whilst the female group exhibited only a small increase. These findings demonstrate a strong association between p16 expression and HPV infection in tonsillar malignancies. The incidence of HPV-positive tonsillar cancer has increased in recent years, even in sparsely populated regions, as demonstrated in northern Sweden.

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