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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Anell, Barbro
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Zackariasson, Peter
    Challenges in project management: Grabbing the elephant2007In: Projects & Profits, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 33-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projects and project management tend to have special meanings to the individuals involved in a specific line of research. This article reports on some topics covered in an informal Swedish network devoted to study project management. Ten topics are selected for discussion that fall into three broad categories—projects as practice, productivity in projects and education in a PM curriculum.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Contracted ERP projects: sequential progress, mutual learning, relationships, control and conflicts2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 458-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the sequential nature that enterprise resource planning (ERP) projects tend to take and to describe how the buyer typically behaves concerning the need for control and learning in and in-between ERP projects.

    Design/methodology/approach – Results come from an in-depth case study of sequential ERP projects. The respondents were a major Swedish retailer and a supplier who undertook upgrading of an ERP system with six separate and sequential projects. The research was framed by independent pre- and post-interviews in three buyer companies' from different areas of business.

    Findings – Results suggest that success is associated with mutual learning between supplier and buyer organizations that lead to reasonably amicable working relationships. Control considerations run through these projects and conflicts appear minimal in the sequential treatment. Insightful interpretation comes not only from empirical reflection on interactions in an in-depth case study, but also from concepts available in decision making and project marketing as well.

    Research limitations/implications – Case studies present in-depth understanding but have generalization limitations. Also the case study was accomplished in Sweden and thus knowledge about behaviour in other countries and cultures is needed.

    Practical implications – Managers investing in relationships and learning in an initial project probably suffer in terms of satisfaction and profitability at that stage but could accomplish more effective, satisfying and profitable situations over time. In particular, appreciation of the nature of the sequential project development, mutual control, delivery and learning in these projects could be useful in understanding the buyer behaviour in ERP projects.

    Originality/value – Learning is important in projects but how do the buyers behave? A description of the sequential nature of ERP projects and the learning process both within the buyer's company and within the supplier's company is established. Tables are created that describe how the gap in the mutual learning process decreases in-between projects in business-to-business projects.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Customized Erp Projects: Toward understanding their sequential nature2006In: Projects & ProfitsArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing and implementing customized IT systems can be frustrating to both the developers and the users. From comprehensive observations made from three case studies of Swedish firms involved in developing and implementing ERP systems, certain reflections might be made that suggest that system development tends to occur by a series of sequential projects. This article develops some background necessary to understand the complexity that tends to arise in these projects. An illustration is given from an example obtained from the field, which reflects the observations made from classical literature on adoption processes and decision-making.

  • 4. Anell, Barbro
    et al.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Channel Structures of International After-Sales Services Networks2001In: Journal of marketing channels, ISSN 1046-669X, Vol. 9, no 1/2, p. 93-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The choice of an organizational architecture for providing after-sales services to customers spans two extremes. A firm may either supply the services itself, or it can supply them through an independent distribution network. Because of the importance of after-sales services both in establishing a firm's competitive advantage and in sustaining profitability, the choice of organizational design would appear to be of significant strategic importance. In order to explore this association, a comparative empirical study was made of the after-sales networks of two firms supplying international markets-one directly and the other through a network. Although there were trade-offs in the two organizations, there was equal success in providing customer service, which would suggest that a structure for this purpose does not exist. Instead, it was observed that contact near customer usage and devolved decision making were important in service success. Integrative devices, concerning both culture and knowledge, seemed to play a further role in maintaining these firms' competitive edge. In interpreting these results, network and temporary concepts were useful in describing processes of each organization. It was noted that the distribution channels for services were different from product distribution in both cases, which undoubtedly is of strategic importance in managing these operations.

  • 5. Anell, Barbro
    et al.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Prescripts: Creating Competitive Advantage in the Knowledge Economy2002In: Competitiveness review, ISSN 1059-5422, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 26-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One recurring theme in the discourse on global competition is the major shift in thinking about what constitute resources in the economy. It is assumed that the economists' traditional categorization into land, labor and capital has been superseded by knowledge as the prime resource. As a consequence, this belief has led to an increased interest in human resource management, human capital, and the problem of attracting and keeping good knowledge workers. It is maintained in this paper that attracting and keeping good knowledge workers will be essential for survival in the knowledge economy, but that it will not necessarily lead to a competitive advantage. Instead, the competitive advantage resides in the competence of the firm to depersonalize knowledge and codify it into software “prescripts” that can be used to duplicate markets or marketed worldwide.

  • 6.
    Anell, Barbro
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Marketing Department, Clarion University, Clarion, Pennsylvania, USA..
    The flexible firm and the flexible co-worker2000In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, E-ISSN 1758-7859, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the discourse on modern management, the concept of flexibility is often mentioned as a desirable characteristic of firms and employees. Flexible organizations exhibit an ability to change in response to market changes. It should be clear, however, that a range of possibilities exist between “rigid” organizations and truly flexible ones. This range is discussed. Further, a firm’s ability to demonstrate flexibility depends to a large degree on the flexibility exhibited by its employees. Firms exhibiting different degrees of flexibility have different demands on the flexibility of their coworkers, which means that a matching between supply and demand exists. Employee flexibility has several dimensions, which are also discussed as well as some conditions for a flexible work- cum lifestyle. The starting point for the discussion is the assumption that neither the firms themselves nor the surrounding society are especially adapted to a lifestyle of flexible work. Some measures to alleviate these conditions are proposed.

  • 7.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Introduction to the special issue: changing paradigms in competition and competitiveness2010In: Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal incorporating Journal of Global Competitiveness, ISSN 1059-5422, Vol. 20, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    On productivity in project organizations2009In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 591-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to look at the underlying unit cost considerations in project conduct at the firm level and an established business unit concept is extended to multi-project organizations. The approach and background are described along with apparent implications. Design/methodology/approach – The methodology developed by Gold is extended to cover multi-project organizations. The adaptation of the productivity network is demonstrated using a hypothetical case. Findings – The focus of the paper is on demonstrating an approach. Generally, productivity in an organization is found not to be dictated by a single input, but by the multiplicative outcome of each together. In particular, the number of projects handled each year appears to be of strategic importance in productivity. Research limitations/implications – The paper is conceptual, so applicability depends upon the nature of the particular organization to which it is applied. Implications, of course, will depend upon the degree to which actual data match the model. Practical implications – The approach permits managers to get a handle on productivity in their organizations. It is particularly attractive insofar as it largely depends upon available accounting information for input. This paper seeks to fuel greater interest and debate by practitioners and project management academics about the topic. Originality/value – Although the paper is conceptual, the authors believe that it may among the first to quantitatively treat productivity in multi-project organizations. The approach can be used to understand the productivity as well as some elements of effectiveness of multi-project organizations.

  • 9.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Project Marketing: Strategy, Tactics, Differentiation and Integration2008In: Projects and Profits, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable interest in the management of projects, but little attention has been devoted to their marketing. This study was undertaken to ascertain the apparent strategy and tactics used by firms in a cross-section of situations. Observations suggest that the approach used was contingent upon the offering, not the type of market served. Necessarily, project managers used to get involved in marketing. Basically, the tendency was to use project managers in sales capacity where it seemed useful. They then might get operational responsibility when proposals were successful.

  • 10.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Lindbergh, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Sweden: Bank of Year Recognition & Performance2015In: Services Marketing Quarterly, ISSN 1533-2969, E-ISSN 1533-2977, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish banking has been recognized for financial prudence, innovations and service provision.  Bank of the Year winners are characterized in terms of their prize-winning performance.  It details and then generalizes items that led to awards and quantifies the financial rewards that come from providing superior performance.  In most cases, growth slowed, but winners still tended to attain above average performance.  It would appear that 1.) service really is the foundation for recognition; 2.) more recently, sound management, innovation and financial performance have come into play, and 3.) it is easier to be recognized if the organization is small.

  • 11.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Increased competition in the Swedish banking industry: A transition to customer values2004In: Competition Forum, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 415-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Swedish banking: A competitive update2008In: Competitive Forum, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Swedish retail banking: A competitive update2009In: Competitiveness Review, ISSN 1059-5422, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 379-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The present paper aims to extend an ongoing study of Swedish trade journal's, PrivataAffärer, recognition of the “bank of the year.”

    Design/methodology/approach – The information used in this paper came from Privata Affärer, which annually recognizes a “best” bank in Sweden. Each issue containing the annual recognition provides the rationale for selecting the specific bank as well as interviews with their CEOs. The data base is robust – every bank in Sweden is surveyed, so results come not from a sample, but a census of banks and banking practice; 17 year's selections are now available.

    Findings – Results are interpreted in terms of Porter's five forces model and Stabell-Fjeldstaad value model. For eight of the last 11 years, new entrants have dominated the award; in fact, in the last five years one winner was a virtual bank and another was a subsidiary of a retail grocery chain.

    Research limitations/implications – It is tempting to extend results to the USA and elsewhere in the industrialized world, but of course results relate only to Sweden. Nevertheless, it is suggested that competitors who enter with significantly new services can, and do, become popular leaders in this industry.

    Practical implications – Sweden tends to be a leader in service theory and development. Consequently, a model exists for developing a competitive edge in other countries.

    Originality/value – This paper provides an independent confirmation of service models of competition, which generally are lacking in the literature.

  • 14.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Zackariasson, Peter
    Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    CAD and Consequences in the Swedish Architectural Industry2003In: Services Marketing Quarterly, ISSN 1533-2969, E-ISSN 1533-2977, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 25-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As an example of technology shaping the marketing environment, this paper reports on the impact of the introduction of computer assisted design (CAD) capabilities into the architectural industry in Sweden. Change is addressed at three levels-in the process of producing output, in the output itself, and in the industry as an apparent consequence of the technological introduction. It is observed that there has been a division in the industry-one segment representing a rather traditional approach to architectural services, the other a more business-oriented, adopter segment. Results are interpreted in terms of a structurational theory of technology. Understanding is discussed both in terms of technology adoption as well as the nature of professional services.

  • 15.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Zackariasson, Peter
    Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Technology and Change in a Professional Service Industry2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Boström, Gert-Olof
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Zackariasson, Peter
    Gothenburg Research Institute.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Technology and Change in the Swedish Architectural Industry2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki Finland.
    Harri, Juri
    Industrial Start-Up, Finland.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Nascent entrepreneurial teams managing in networks: mobilization, utilization and saturation2017In: Motivating SMEs to cooperate and internationalize: a dynamic perspective / [ed] George Tesar and Zsuzsanna Vincze, New York: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017, p. 133-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure in this paper is based on the research question: How do nascent entrepreneurs build and maintain value networks in early phases of venture creation? We study 7 firms and 23 respondents. Interviews and visualization techniques were used as base for data collection. We study a three-phase startup process; conceptualization, newly founded and newly established. We contribute to research by illustrating the dynamics in these phases. Our study shows that the value network, in each phase, can be understood as an ongoing modification of three networking activities; network mobilization, network utilization and network saturation. That is, the use of the network lack precision as the venture becomes more mature, thus the entrepreneur experiences a sense of network equivocality. Hence, the entrepreneur manages network equivocality in order to create a higher precision in the value output from the network.

  • 18.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Integrating service practice into project management: a matter of “do or die”?2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 5-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze service management practices within a project management context.

    Design/methodology/approach: This research supporting conceptual developments was both exploratory and qualitative in nature and utilized an in-depth case study of a major product development project.

    Findings: The conceptual framework developed is applied to empirical observations of product development project. Because there is an adequate fit with observations, elements of a service management approach appear to be viable in the description, managing, and control of projects.

    Research limitations/implications: Because the research was built on a case study, one has the limitations common with that approach. Conversely, case studies are acknowledged as useful in the identification of important variables in situations in which there is little control over events in a real-world context.

    Practical implications: Customer satisfaction is a requirement of project organizations, which is an inherent requisite of any service organization. Consequently, one turns to those elements in the practice of service management that lead to best management practices.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes with a practice-based understanding of how project management is based on integrated service practice.

  • 19.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY AND GROWTH THROUGH INTRAPRENEURSHIP: A SWEDISH APPROACH2014In: Proceedings of 2014 NEDSI Conference / [ed] Minoo Tehroni, 2014, p. 509-521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach a specific firm has made to renew itself is examined through two lenses commonly used to analyze such efforts – 1.) as a platform project and 2.) as an intrapreneurship effort.  Three interrelated projects were run by a special product development organization that supported two brands with product development.  The platform project approach emphasized the special importance the effort had and the attendant organization that developed.  The intrapreneurship insight provided appreciation for the processes that developed for implementation.  It is argued that, flagship projects as studied here, in particular, infuse parallel and collective activities since such projects call for significant organizational self-renewal.

  • 20.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Hanken School of Economics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Fuzzy projects: a qualitative investigation of project leaders’ role2015In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 221-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through an in-depth case study this paper explores the role that chief project managers (CPMs) take in transformative, coopetitive fuzzy projects during the concept phase.  Service management concepts, primarily SERVQUAL and triangular communication, are combined with a project management background to illustrate the role these key individuals play in conducting complex projects.  A setting with three interrelated projects was studied, where the products in focus had a high degree of novelty.  This setting demanded that all actors in the project needed to find new ways of working, and previous organizational values were challenged.  A combination of interviews, observations and secondary data provided a holistic view of the different activities under study. It was found that in order to bring clarity into fuzziness CPMs spend a substantial amount of time on people issues. The role of the CPM in fuzzy projects therefore tends to be defined as a service leadership role in which soft skills are important.

  • 21.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics .
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Intrapreneurial ambidexterity: a platform project, Swedish approach2015In: Management Research Review, ISSN 2040-8269, E-ISSN 2040-8277, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1172-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationship between projects and intrapreneurial self-renewal activities.  In particular, the approach a specific firm has made to renew itself is examined through two lenses commonly used to analyze such efforts – 1.) as a platform project and 2.) as an intrapreneurship effort. 

    Method: An in-depth case study was conducted in a manner that the contextually sensitive, empirical research for which Nordic studies are known.  The common denominator in these studies is a fascination on the practitioners.  In other words, what the project managers say and do are of particular interest.  Initially, 68 in-depth interviews were performed, which were complemented by observations and secondary information.

    Findings: The platform project approach recognized chief project managers and requirement managers as essential elements in development.  Further, it suggested there was no obvious champion in the project, nor did slack resources appear as a prerequisite.  On the other hand, an intrapreneurship insight provided appreciation for the processes that developed for implementation.

    Practical implications: It is argued that, flagship projects as studied here, in particular, infuse parallel and collective activities since such projects call for significant organizational self-renewal.

    Originality/value: Intrapreneurship tends to be neglected at the expense of entrepreneurship.  This study focuses on the former in a Swedish environment in which a major firm bets its future.  Observations are interpreted in terms of both platform project and intrapreneurship concepts.

  • 22.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Requirement managers’ roles in industrial, platform development2014In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 493-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To describe and analyze the role of requirement managers in new product development (NPD) projects.

     

    Method

    This paper is based on a case study of an industrial platform project. Sixty-eight persons were interviewed and project prerequisites and requirement specifications documents were studied. The roles of specific individuals and their formal role as requirement managers are reported.

                         

    Findings

    The requirement manager’s role fulfillment is performed through five major activities described as developing, anchoring, re-organizing, routinizing, and positioning. These activities are essential in order to manage working with a large flagship project.

     

    Practical implications

    This paper argues that functional roles should not be taken for granted. Even though significant efforts may have been performed in order to establish a new function within a project management setting, the process of establishing new work practices is complex. Managers should therefore investigate inter-functional integration on ongoing bases.

     

    Originality/value

    This paper provides important insights into aspects of requirement manager’s ongoing project activities.

  • 23.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The Role of After-Sales Managers in Industrial Product Development: A Swedish Case Study2017In: NFF Proceedings: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of after-sales managers in project development projects tends to be understudied. This paper therefore builds on the research question “How do after-sales managers go about affecting strategies in product development projects?”  It reports on a vehicle platform project where the participating organizations typically organized product development through cross-functional projects and is built on three months of observations and 64 interviews.  Inherent in the observations is that due to the high level of novelty in the project, old perceptions of brand boundaries and cross-functional boundaries had to be re-negotiated and renewed. It is found that compared to other cross-functional managers, after-sales managers conducted their role on a different temporary/permanent logic than other participants.  Consequently, an engagement paradox is identified. Just as other managers, after-sales managers engaged heavily in the early phases of development; however, after this early engagement, years characterized with distance and low engagement followed. Then, when the product was finalized and introduced on the market, and most other cross-functional managers left the project, the project started “for real” for the after-sales managers.

  • 24.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The role of the chief project manager (CPM) in fuzzy projects2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The texture of tension: complexity, uncertainty and equivocality2018In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 458-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The premise of this paper is that tension exists among participants and parties engaged in projects. The uniqueness of development virtually assures this. The purpose of this paper is to propose that tension is a product of the precursors of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality, and an attempt is made to characterize tension as it arises in projects - its genesis and its nature. 

    Design/methodology/approach

    An in-depth case study was conducted in a manner in which the contextually sensitive empirical researches for which Nordic studies are known. Within discussions on the strategy, decision making, intra-and inter-project interdependencies and managing across development sites associated with a flagship project, 77 statements concerning tension were identified for analysis. Through a literature review, 12 tension-driving factors were identified. These factors were used as base for analysis. 

    Findings

    These statements were analyzed for content to produce a model associating tension with its precursors and the literature on tension. It is found that due to innovation turbulence, tension-driving factors are cascaded in and around organization(s). Tension is manifested in various ways for different stakeholders and tension management is performed through cognitive and emotional responses. The texture of tension is characterized by fluidity, multiplicity and parallelism. 

    Research limitations/implications

    Case studies can of course not be generalized; they are valuable, however, in indicating important observations for further studies. 

    Practical implications

    A contribution is made to management theory where knowledge about project context is seen as essential in order to understand best practices for project execution and effectiveness. 

    Originality/value

    Although common, even virtually assured in projects, tension tends to be neglected in successful management. This study associates the genesis of tension through the underlying contributions of complexity, uncertainty and equivocality. It is believed to be the first study of its type.

  • 26. Burström, Thommie
    et al.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Exploring the relationship between flagship platform projects and intrapreneurial self-renewal activities: Managing intrapreneurial equivocality2015In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 38, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between flagship projects and intrapreneurial self-renewal activities in an explorative, in-depth case study of the concept phase in a multi-project setting. Five renewal processes (design management, project control, system engineering, time management, and decision making) stood out in the study; each of which had an impact on organizational performance. These five processes were of an equivocal character and should be seen as entrepreneurial because they influenced organizational performance. In line with previous literature, it is proposed that, in general, any type of business project would infuse intrapreneurial activities; however, flagship projects in particular increase the level of intrapreneurial equivocality and infuse parallel and collective development of intrapreneurial activities because such projects call for significant organizational self-renewal. Our particular contribution is that we define and introduce the concept of intrapreneurial equivocality.

  • 27.
    Falcone, Thomas W.
    et al.
    Eberly College of Business and Information Technology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Establishing a regional comparative advantage: Business location decisions insemi-rural areas2006In: Competitive Forum, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Graff, Jens
    et al.
    Woosong Educational Foundation .
    Lindbergh, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Reflections on Porter: South Korea, Sweden and the United States2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29. Graff, Jens
    et al.
    Lucian Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    On the Development of Competence: The Role of Mentorship2015In: 23rd NORDIC ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE: BUSINESS IN SOCIETY, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the goals of the Nordic Academy of Management is the “Fostering (of) the development of competence in research and education in the field of business administration in the Nordic countries” (Conference, 2015).  The premise of this paper is that mentoring can and should play a role in competence development.  The purpose of this paper is to link mentoring to learning as it must be – the meaning of mentoring being to teach another person or persons some understanding, skills, or competences, which the mentor has him/her-self and is seen as useful for the mentee.   In general, as explained in Bloom’s taxonomy, learning has many levels (Graff, 2008). In classrooms one can progress in the taxonomy through learning methods, which in varied degrees address different learning outcomes.  An individual can hardly, however, reach the highest levels of the taxonomy through formal education. It demands practicing.  Mentoring has its force in learning from experienced individuals. Typically, mentors have some years of training in the trade in which the mentoring takes place. It is a kind of apprentice learning, although the mentee can be of whatever age.  Motivation plays a role and can be internally or externally driven. The mentor can by motivating the mentee enhance the mentee’s learning and actually also his own learning. It is said that if one wants to get a thorough understanding of a subject one should teach it.   A parallel might be drawn between academic institutions and professional service firms (PSFs) in which a professor is the equivalent of a PSF senior partner. 

  • 30.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Academic writing: getting published2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Learning from crises in projects2010In: Euram 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of permanent, project-intensive organizations to learn from projects has been questioned.  Clearly this topic is important because of the growing importance of projects in industrial activity.  In this paper concepts of learning are extended to the special case where individuals must deal with crises in projects.  An ethnographic study of field construction projects produced 13 examples of crises during a total of 10 weeks of onsite observations for each project in the sample.  From these examples, four of different types are described and the learning from them is discussed in this paper.

  • 32.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Mini-muddling: Learning from project plan deviations2007In: Journal of Workplace Learning, ISSN 1366-5626, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 92-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the informal and incidental learning that takes place in project work among individuals who must adapt to deviations from project plans.

    Design/methodology/approach – Reflections in the study are built on four power plant projects found in an integrated provider of projects of this type. The projects were followed by participative observations during ten weeks of onsite visits. Furthermore, 26 interviews were done among participants in the organisation on working practices and implications. Data included interviews, reports, minutes-of-meetings, observations, and e-mail correspondence that characterised the cases.

    Findings – The paper finds that learning occurred at two levels. First, there was the learning that occurred as each of the deviations was handled. The second aspect of learning involved the patterns in which remedies were handled.

    Research limitations/implications – Because research was built on case studies, one has the reservations common with that approach. Nevertheless, the learning architecture that Sense related to intra-project learning has features that relate to the situation where learning has occurred from projects. Further, by associating observations with the background provided by Lindblom and Simon, suggestions carry inherent credibility.

    Practical implications – The organisation that was set up seemed particularly effective in handling the deviations. Also, intuition came into play. Both these items may interest consultants and trainers as well as academics.

    Originality/value – Although the need to handle project deviations is appreciated in practice, it is not clear that there is an understanding of how response occurs. The paper documents response across the stages of projects, which is original. Value is associated with the interpretation.

  • 33.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Projects-as-practice: a new approach2008In: Projects & Profits, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As projects have unique activities, they are inherently uncertain and this article addresses a challenge to our present treatment of projects. Instead of treating them as a managerial form the organization does, they are seen as something that people do. Consequently, project management requires the management of the unexpected—the deviations from plan that occur in the real world.

  • 34.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    The nature and management of crises in construction projects: projects-as-practice observations2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 830-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The uniqueness of projects introduces aspects of management associated with disruptions that threaten progress and crises that affect the organisations that conduct them. The purpose of this paper thus is to review the nature of crises and their remedies that have interfered with project progress of an international construction company. Fifteen crises were studied in a “projects-as-practice” approach. Characterisation was made of both the nature of these crises and how they were managed.

  • 35.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Opportunities for learning from crises in projects2011In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 196-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Concepts of learning are extended to the non-routine case of crises in projects.

    Design/methodology/approach: The multiple case protocol described by Yin and his six sources of evidence were utilized in the study. Observations were contemporaneous and somewhere between direct and participative. Bias was avoided by having the observer on site, but not part of the project team. A diary recorded events; company notes and records substantiated observations.

    Findings: The study contributes to the understanding of the need that project managers have to adapt to changes from plan and the coincidental learning that occurs in the workplace. Both cumulative and abrupt crises treated by project/site teams and corporate staff are described. A necessary and sufficiency approach was used to rationalize the organizational learning. The necessary condition was that the episodes could be described in terms used by Gherardi in her treatment of routine learning. As a sufficiency condition we discussed the systemic approach in which these episodes are handled.

    Research limitations/implications: Because research was built on case studies, one has the reservations commonly associated with this approach. Extension from and agreement with previous studies, however, lend to acceptance of the study.

    Practical implications: Results suggest that crises can be managed in accordance with four general responses associated with learning within the organization. The responses themselves are associated with five organizational practices that aid management in general.

    Originality/value: The value of the work is that it extends basic concepts of organizational learning to treating crises in projects, which are both by definition unique.

  • 36.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Burström, Thommie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The Role of Transition in Temporary Organizations: Linking Temporary to the Permanent2013In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 576-586Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This research note puts the role of transition back in the center of the temporary organization and lends to understanding the temporary organization as a transitory unit within the permanent organization. The purpose is to reactivate theory development within this field of research and promote a dialog that will point to a possible way forward.

    Design/methodology/approach – An intra-organizational perspective is taken. Backgrounds of the two theories are covered and then the temporary organization as a transitory unit, and the role of transition are addressed. One basic transformation is made in the theory of the temporary organization and then the model superposed on the behavioral theory of the firm.

    Findings – In total, four things were achieved. First, the conceptualization of temporary organization was simplified – five variables have been reduced to four in eliminating “action” as an element of description. Second, the conceptualization was extended to include constructs of the permanent organization. Third, the theory was strengthened by providing an extended framework that potentially could be examined to check observations against theory. Finally, some directions were suggested for future theory development to take.

    Research limitations/implications – The research note is conceptual, so applicability depends upon the nature of the particular organization to which it is applied.

    Originality/value – Although the paper is conceptual, the authors believe that the approach can be used to understand the interrelatedness of the temporary and permanent organization and to promote a dialog within this field of research – a dialog that hopefully will reactivate theory development.

  • 37.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?2015In: NFF Conference Proceedings, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What’s past is prologue.  Or is it? 40% under budget and 25% faster than anticipated! The construction of the Empire State Building (ESB) was not only the fastest erection of a really tall building ever, but the construction company that took on the job allegedly began with nothing on hand as they had no equipment or supplies that would be adequate for the job. The project was also completed ahead of schedule and under budget. Instead of taking 18 months as initially anticipated, it only took 1 year and 45 days. With the iconic building completed, the construction costs totaled $24.7 million instead of the estimated $43 million. So, we ask how this was possible and is there something we could learn from this? Based on a review of existing literature describing the history of the ESB, we aim at outlining strategic, operational and contextual based explanations to what appears to be a great success from a project management perspective. In the paper we illustrate how, for example, inspiration from Henry Ford’s assembly line technique, the uniqueness of the logistics during the construction period, the economic decline of the Depression, and early ideas of concurrent engineering and fast-track construction, enabled the successful accomplishment. Utilization of private capital compared to public funds may also have been a factor. Our conclusion is that there are lessons to be learned in going back to basics. Nevertheless, somewhere along the line progress in management seems to have deviated from learning from history.  Consequently, the development of expectations of construction projects coming in late and over budget is traced through the metrics associated with major installations. 

  • 38.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Partnering hierarchy of needs2014In: Management Decision, ISSN 0025-1747, E-ISSN 1758-6070, Vol. 52, no 10, p. 1907-1927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – First, the purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the role of the components in the creation of a partnering way of working; second, to illustrate how the achievement of such collaborative state is dependent on a hierarchy of constructs. Design/methodology/approach – The paper builds on a large case study of a successful Swedish partnering project. The case, studied through extensive interviews and observations, was process-oriented and analyzed using a theoretically driven thematic analysis.

    Findings – It is shown that components exist on different levels and constitute different types of building blocks in striving toward a “true” collaborative climate. It is also shown that as the project progressed, even the non-partnering sub-projects were infused with a collaborative way of working. To this end it is suggested that there might be a certain stickiness related to this way of working. As trust, openness, and mutual understanding are constructs on an interpersonal level, it is on the interpersonal level partnering endeavors are won or lost.

    Research limitations/implications – The paper provides a new conceptualization of the partnering components and also an understanding of how the components contribute to the creation of a collaborative climate. Because the research was built on a case study, one has the limitations common with that approach.

    Practical implications – The importance of understanding that individual expectations are the basis for the action and learning that interact in a constant feedback loop, as the partnering pyramid is climbed. Originality/value – This understanding should be of interest for both practitioners and academics working with partnering. 

  • 39.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    The construction company as a service firm2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mintzberg, in reflecting on management, suggests that we should be looking for new ways to look at things. In this regard, the construction industry is unique as it exists midway between manufacturing and service production. In this paper we argue that although the outputs of the industry are physical, operations tend to be service oriented. The three level model of Normann serves as the analytical framework and empirical illustrations come from a Swedish project that appears to mandate understanding at all three levels. At the macro level, a strong service management system was developed in part as an outcome of a partnering agreement; success at the intermediate level came as a result of some steps taken to blend cultures, and interactions at the micro level were implemented from the beginning by developing strong relationships with customers. These findings should have both conceptual interest for academics and practical implications for managers.

  • 40.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The Construction Company Through the Lens of Service Management: Inferences From Sweden2012In: Services Marketing Quarterly, ISSN 1533-2969, E-ISSN 1533-2977, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 155-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction industry and firms within it are unique insofaras they exist midway between manufacturing and services production.In this article, we suggest that, even if the outputs arephysical, operations tend to be service oriented. Two approachesare taken to clarify the service aspects of a current project inSweden. First, the model of Normann is used to describe the firmand secondly, a blueprint is made to illustrate the fitting withservice theory. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first timethe industry has been analyzed in this manner. Consequently,the findings should have both conceptual and practical relevance.

  • 41.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tinkerbell and the Empire State Building: Recalling what seems to be forgotten2018In: PM World Journal, ISSN 2330-4480, Vol. VII, no VII, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “I do believe in fairies! I do! I do!!” (Peter Pan)

    In the 1905 play “Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up”, Sir James Matthew Barrie described how Peter Pan, through his strong beliefs, brought the fairy Tinkerbell back to life. In this short essay, we aim to initiate discussions on the role of strong beliefs and the so-called “Tinkerbell effect” in upholding taken-for-granted assumptions within the construction industry.

    As the basis for the discussion, the essay reports on a recently published journal article in Business Horizons entitled “Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: Have we forgotten something?” (Jacobsson and Wilson, 2018). Presently the article is also sold as a case study and teaching case by Harvard Business Review. (The case study can be accessed at https://tinyurl.com/HBRcasestudy and the teaching case at https://tinyurl.com/HBPEcase)

  • 42.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE). School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Revisiting the construction of the Empire State Building: have we forgotten something?2018In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 47-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What's past is prologue. Or is it? The construction of the Empire State Building (ESB) was not only the fastest erection of a skyscraper ever, but the construction company that took on the job allegedly began with no equipment or supplies that would be adequate for the job. The project was completed ahead of schedule and under budget; instead of 1 year and 6 months as anticipated, it only took 1 year and 45 days. The costs totaled $24.7 million instead of the estimated $43 million. So, we ask, how was this possible and is there something we could learn? Based on a review of existing literature describing the history and construction of the ESB, we outline strategic, operational, and contextual explanations for what appears to be a truly successful megaproject. We illustrate how, for example, inspiration from Henry Ford's assembly line technique, the uniqueness of the logistics during the construction period, the economic decline of the Depression, and early ideas of concurrent engineering and fast-track construction enabled the success. Our conclusion is that there are lessons to be learned in going back to basics when tackling a megaproject.

  • 43.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The stickiness of partnering: Towards a layer cake conceptualizations2013In: Proceedings of the 22nd Nordic Academy of Management Conference (NFF), Reykjavik, Island, August 21-23, 2013. Track 11., 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To mitigate adversarial behavior in the construction industry, partnering was introduced as a way to establishing good working relations through commitment and trust among partners. Previous research has provided a number of components to outline the fluent boundaries of the phenomenon. These components have however been criticized for being a mix between procedures and outcomes. This paper attempts to sort out this confusion by viewing partnering as a way of working. The aim of the paper is twofold; first, to describe and analyze the role of the components in the creation of a partnering way of working; secondly, to illustrate how the achievement of such collaborative state is dependent on a hierarchy of constructs. Through the review, and based on a case study, it is shown that components exist on different levels and constitute different types of building blocks in achieving a ‘true’ collaborative climate. It is also shown that as the project progressed, even the non- partnering sub-projects were infused with a collaborative way of working. Once the collaborative state was achieved – what we call “the top of the layer cake” – it did not just disappear. To this end we suggest that there might be a certain stickiness related to this way of working. As trust, openness, and mutual understanding are constructs on an interpersonal level, it is on the interpersonal level partnering endeavors are won or lost. The paper makes two main contributions; it 1) provides a new conceptualization of the partnering components; and 2) produces an understanding of how the components aid to a collaborative climate.

  • 44.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    On the Shoulders of Giants2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Rediscovering intellectual efforts2011In: On the Shoulders of Giants / [ed] T. Jensen, T. Wilson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2011, 1, p. 13-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Johnston, Wesley
    et al.
    Low, Brian
    Wilson, Timothy L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Scientific muddling: Decision making through a Lindblomian lens2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 717-719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction reviews the history and core principles of Charles Lindblom's concept of muddling and its application across a wide array of business decisions. The approach recognizes certain decisions as sequential. strategic practices and thus finds applications in a wide variety of business decisions. This article provides a brief summary of the 15 contributions that follow and take up on this theme. The authors extend a note of appreciation to the reviewers of the papers in the issue and to the editor of Joumal of Business Research, Arch Woodside. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Lindberg, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bohman, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hulten, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Enhancing students' entrepreneurial mindset: a Swedish experience2017In: Education + Training, ISSN 0040-0912, E-ISSN 1758-6127, Vol. 59, no 7-8, p. 768-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on the test of a pedagogical intervention to enhance students' entrepreneurial mindset on a university course.

    Design/methodology/approach – The course where the authors tested the new course design is a mandatory one in the business school’s undergraduate business program. Pre- and post-evaluations of the students’ opportunity recognition (OR) and individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) were carried out to measure the effects of an intervention aimed at enhancing these capabilities.

    Findings – The results from paired-samples t-tests indicate significant positive changes (enhancements) of the students’ OR and IEO. The positive effects of the intervention methods are accounted for as evidence of the benefits of applying pedagogical methods that fit the learning style of young adults.

    Practical implications – The findings suggest that students’ mindsets can be positively affected by an intervention tailored to enhance their OR and IEO capabilities. The findings have implications for curriculum development because the strengthening of these capabilities is a precondition for further development of the participants’ innovative and creative thinking, as well as their entrepreneurial orientation.  Since innovative and entrepreneurial activities have a positive impact on economies worldwide, the authors encourage the adaption of the intervention methods applied in this study in other settings.

    Originality/value – This paper reports the results of a pedagogical intervention aimed at enhancing students’ entrepreneurial mindset. The findings from the study demonstrate that the applied intervention method supports the development of functional skills, which complement the conceptual knowledge gained from other courses in the undergraduate program.

  • 48.
    Lindberg, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Management by objectives: The Swedish experience in upper secondary schools2011In: Journal of Educational Administration, ISSN 0022-0639, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 62-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper seeks to explore how managing by objectives (MBO) has been adopted in Swedish schools and to reflect on some of the consequences in a longitudinal study. Results relate to whether introduction has increased student performance and whether it works as a tool for the principals to create more effective schools. Design/methodology/approach – A comparative cross-sectional study was made on the adoption of MBO as perceived by principals in upper secondary schools in Sweden. Initially, a mail questionnaire was distributed to every principal in Swedish upper secondary schools, which determined the extent to which mandated MBO practices were being implemented. Ten years later, the study was replicated, which made initial and subsequent practices comparable. Findings – Principals' perceptions suggest that the effects of MBO have diminished over the ten-year period. Ancillary measures of student performance correlated to MBO practices appeared statistically insignificant, or perhaps even negative. Thus, the change appears to have produced unimproved student performance, frustrated principals and perhaps somewhat less stressed teachers. Practical implications – These findings have implications on the direction the management of upper secondary schools subject to central direction may take. Although MBO may improve efficiency in staff performance, it appears to have little effect on effectiveness, if student performance is used as a criterion. Originality/value – Adoption measures of MBO have been obtained and associated with student performance for the first time.

  • 49.
    Lindberg, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Small Business Marketing: Self-directed learning at Umeå University1996In: Enhanding Knowledge Development in Marketing / [ed] Cathy Owens Swift, 1996, p. 17-23Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lindbergh, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Olofsson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Wilson, Timothy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Public Housing in Sweden: The Umeå Two-Step2017In: NFF Proceedings: Bodö, 23-25 August 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparative housing analyses often find that Swedish public housing represents an interesting story because it provides a good class of rental housing to all sections of the population. This approach has been called the “Swedish public housing model”. An in-depth case study has been used to develop a system-wide understanding of a participant’s involvement in its housing market. In this case study, the public utility/energy and water-sewage/solid waste companies played a significant role in the company’s ability to serve the local community. It thus behooves us to compare and connect the different components in the public housing company business model to complete the analysis of success in the value chain. Two-levels describe the situation. At the first level, the municipal public housing (MPH) organization is seen as functioning as a tenant-oriented, quasi-municipal utility within a value network composed of the municipality + the energy utility + the water-sewage/solid waste company. At the second level, a Shaffer analysis shows general harmony among the operations of each organization.  In particular, the MPH provides value-for-money rentals within the municipality and helps tenants turn their flats into homes. Additionally, continued appreciation of its base assets and apparent economies of scale were instrumental in the success of the operations at the tactical level. Insofar as the Swedish public housing model is undergoing a shift to be more “business-like”, this study indicates how the model successfully works at the individual company level. Because there are certain commonalities with other organizations in public management, observations may be relevant in their successful operations.

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