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  • 1. Barber, Fionna
    et al.
    Hansson, HeidiUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.Dybris McQuaid, Sara
    Ireland and the North2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ireland and the North is an edited collection engaging with the relationship between Ireland and the Nordic countries. As a spatial and geographical point of reference for the formation of political and cultural identities in Ireland, the idea of 'the North' encourages the identification of overlooked connections between Ireland and the Nordic countries, which, like Ireland, are also small nation states on the periphery of Europe. Importantly, the book employs a double conceptualisation of 'the North' to include Northern Ireland. Moving beyond the nation state as a key framework for analysis of human activity, this collection engages with the transnational and transcultural in a mapping of connectivity and exchange.  Chapters are drawn from a wide-ranging field of study that includes art history, literary history and theory, archaeology, antiquarianism, and media studies in addition to political analysis. Relationships explored are imaginary and material exchanges, civic and personal linkages, literary adaptation and appropriation, transfers of cultural artefacts, political institutions and ideas. With three sections on Material Culture, Political Culture and Print Culture, the book moves beyond the predominant literary paradigm in Irish Studies to make a significant contribution to the expanding and developing field.

  • 2. Berglund, Per
    et al.
    Dannetun, Per
    Chan, Wai Lee
    Gold, Julie
    Han, Sam
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Harvey, Simon
    Huang, Jun Song
    Larsson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linton, Steven
    McInerney, Gerald
    Magnell, Marie
    Popov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Quttineh, Nils-Hassan
    Richards, Tobias
    Song, Juha
    Switzer, Adam D.
    Tegler Jerselius, Kristina
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wikström, Martin
    Yu, Kang Yang Trevor
    Yeo, Jesvin Puay-Hwa
    Zary, Nabil
    Pohl, Hans
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Linking education and research: a roadmap for higher education institutions at the dawn of the knowledge society2019In: Linking education and research: the results of an international Summer School, Stockholm: The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT) , 2019, p. 11-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an era characterized by a move towards a "knowledge society", universities are central in fostering "knowledgeability", that is the reflexive understanding of knowledge in knowledge societies. The objective of "knowledgeability" can be met through creating a stronger link between education and research. Furthermore, overall student performance, for example in critical thinking and problem solving, can be improved if research-related activities are incorporated into the curriculum.

    The aim of this paper is to use international examples to discuss the research-education nexus from four different perspectives, namely context, policy, implementation and quality, with case studies from higher education institutions in Singapore and Sweden. We suggest that different integrative technologies can be used to enhance the links, but it will be essential to consider the inputs of training, service and support in using new technology. Interestingly, the act of evaluating the link between education and research will increase awareness of this linkage by stakeholders involved in both education and research. In turn the link can be strengthened, contributing to increased quality in both education and research

  • 3. Dybris McQuaid, Sara
    et al.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Barber, Fionna
    A new geography of reference2019In: Ireland and the North / [ed] Fionna Barber, Heidi Hansson and Sara Dybris McQuaid, Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2019, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Hansson, HeidiUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Journal of Northern Studies2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Nordiska språk.
    Hansson, HeidiUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Journal of Northern Studies 1, 20082008Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Comparative Literature and Scandinavian Languages.
    Hansson, HeidiUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Journal of Northern Studies (tidskrift): No. 1-2, 2007 (årg. 1)2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Journal of Northern Studies is a peer-reviewed academic publication issued twice a year. The journal has a specific focus on human activities in northern spaces, and articles concentrate on people as cultural beings, people in society and the interaction between people and the northern environment. In many cases, the contributions will represent exciting interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches. Apart from scholarly articles, the journal contains a review section, a section with reports from conferences etc. and information about upcoming events relevant for Northern Studies.

  • 7.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    An Arctic Eden: Alexande Hutchinson's Try Lapland and the Hospitable North2012In: Northern Review, ISSN 0835-3433, E-ISSN 1929-6657, Vol. Spring, no 35, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As tourism boomed in the latter half of the nineteenth century, depictions of the Scandinavian North as a testing place for heroes gave way to representations where the region emerges as accessible and hospitable. Travel narratives like Alexander Hutchinson’s Try Lapland: A Fresh Field for Summer Tourists (1870) played an important role in modifying the previously dominant paradigm. This article discusses Hutchinson’s travel book as a transitional text where the North is transformed from a place of danger to a place of leisure. The redefinition of the region includes, among other things, a female gendering of the area compared to the masculine image of the Arctic conveyed in exploration narratives and a projection of the author as visitor and consumer rather than conqueror and explorer. The representation of place is inextricably bound up with the representation of self in the text, and by presenting himself as a middle-class tourist, Hutchinson presents Swedish Lapland as closer to English suburbia than to the North Pole. In this way, he contributes to the place-making that designs Lapland as a tourist destination in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

  • 8.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Anne Enright and postnationalism in the contemporary Irish novel2009In: Irish literature since 1990: Diverse voices, Manchester: Manchester University Press , 2009, p. 216-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anne Enright has been hailed as one of the most exciting voices in contemporary Irish fiction, but it is very difficult to find a place for her in contemporary Irish criticism. To some extent this is a result of the preoccupation with issues of national identity and the state of Irish society that informs so much of current criticism, which means that literature that avoids these themes easily gets overlooked. Another explanation may be found in Enright’s fragmented storytelling, which means that themes are not always easily detected or obvious.

    This paper considers Anne Enright’s 2001 novel What Are You Like? as a ‘postnationalist’ text, showing how both her narrative strategies and the themes she addresses can be linked to a position beyond nationalism. In the national story, the search for identity can usually be satisfied through information about genetic – and by extension ethnic – background and identification with the nation, but Enright demythologises many of the staples of earlier Irish fiction, such as rural farm life, family relationships and the moral superiority of nuns, and she does not replace these old stabilities with a new belief in genetics which could have been logical, since the story concerns twins. Instead of showing the primacy of heredity Enright argues, like so many postmodern writers, that identity is in constant process. Such a view is at odds with a vision of nationality founded on ethnic origin, and so both the characters’ personal search for selfhood and Enright’s deconstruction of common Irish myths can be linked to a postnationalist position.

    A postnationalist reading of Enright’s novel obviously accepts the centrality of ‘nation’ in Irish literature to some extent, and overlooks other aspects of the work, such as its relationship to feminism or how early separation may affect the lives of twins, which is, after all, the novel’s most obvious theme. Given the preoccupation with questions of nation in present-day Irish literature and criticism, however, it is important to include also women’s writing in this context and to add expressions of postnationalism to the equation. The paper therefore primarily considers those elements in What Are You Like? that can be related to a postnationalist outlook.

  • 9.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Arctic crime discourse: Dana Stabenow’s Kate Shugak Series2010In: Arctic Discourses / [ed] Anka Ryall, Johan Schimanski, and Henning Howlid Wærp, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars , 2010, p. 218-239Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Arctopias: the Arctic as No Place and New Place in fiction2015In: The new Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen and Øyvind Paasche, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 69-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In fiction written from the outside, i. e., not by the indigenous population, an Arctic setting has long been used to emphasise the tough and heroic qualities of predominantly male main characters. The primary genres have been adventure stories and thrillers, with the region depicted as a natural rather than a social world. But there is also a counter-tradition where the Arctic is perceived as the route to or the place of an alternative world. Such utopian, or Arctopian works, appear in the nineteenth century when Arctic exploration maintained public interest and seem to reappear in the form of so-called cli-fi or climate fiction today. The works usually describe new forms of social organisation, and as a result, they contribute to changing persistent ideas about the Arctic as pristine nature. At the same time, genre characteristics rely on conventional ideas of the Arctic as empty space, which means that fantasies of the region continue to play a comparatively important role, despite increasing knowledge about actual conditions.

  • 11.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Battles in the Garden: Emily Lawless’s A Garden Diary 1899-1900 and the Boer War2016In: Women Writing War: Ireland 1880-1922 / [ed] Tina O’Toole, Gillian McIntosh and Muireann O’Cinnéide, Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 2016, p. 39-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages. Engelska.
    Bayard Taylor and the Genders of the North2006In: Edda: Nordisk tidskrift for litteraturforskning, ISSN 9 770013 08 1037, no 1, p. 18-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nineteenth-century travelogues, representations of nature as feminine commonly serve to underscore constructions of masculinity as dominant, controlled and rational. Feminine language is more readily utilised to describe southern than northern spaces, however. Thus, southern landscapes are quite often seen as picturesque and coded as feminine, whereas northern landscapes are frequently described as awe-inspiring and sublime and given masculine properties. To some extent, the American travel writer Bayard Taylor’s Northern Travel: Summer and Winter Pictures of Sweden, Lapland and Norway (1858) conforms to a model which genders the land feminine and the traveller masculine. But a factor that seems to influence how a region is discursively gendered is to what degree the writer is presented as separated from or integrated with the environment. To some extent, Taylor’s representation of the North as a physically demanding region where the traveller is vulnerable works to undermine the conventionally masculine position of much nineteenth-century travel writing. As a result, the narrative vacillates between reinforcing and undermining essentialist gender polarities, highlighting the problem of gendering physical space.

  • 13.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Best of the millennium: rebuilding the traditional canon2004In: Moderna Språk, ISSN 0026-8577, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Between Nostalgia and Modernity: Competing Discourses in Travel Writing about the Nordic North2011In: Iceland and Images of the North / [ed] Sumarliði Isleifsson with the collaboration of Daniel Chartier, Québec: Presses de l’Université du Québec , 2011, p. 255-282Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In travel narratives by nineteenth-century visitors, the Nordic North generally emerges as pre-modern and uncivilised. Yet the most widespread view of the Nordic countries today is that they are socially progressive, liberal and politically advanced. The connection between present-day socio-political discourses and cultural discourses of the past thus seems to be very weak or even absent. When a micro-perspective is applied, however, it becomes clear that the idea of a northern modernity has a long history. Current interpretations of the region as a site of progress do not break with previous depictions but constitute the continuation of a counter-discourse that was always present. Nineteenth-century works frequently contain both images of fairy-tale forests and descriptions of modern cities, and sometimes manage to combine the idea of the demanding, masculine-coded North with a view that foregrounds women’s emancipation and opportunities in society. To function as an alternative and an inspiration, however, the region needs to be modern in a different way than London or Paris. It could be said that the modernity the Nordic North was made to represent in the second half of the nineteenth and at the beginning of the twentieth century built on the same features that led to nostalgic interpretations of the region.

  • 15.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Beyond Local Ireland in The Wig My Father Wore2011In: Anne Enright / [ed] Claire Bracken och Susan Cahill, Dublin: Irish Academic Press , 2011, p. 51-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Biography Matters: Carol Shields, Mary Swann, A. S. Byatt, Possession, Deborah Crombie, Dreaming of the Bones2003In: Orbis Litterarum, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 353-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Book reviews; Gamle Norge and nineteenth-century British women travellers in Norway, by Kathryn Walchester, London and New York, Anthem Press, 2014, 223 pp., ISBN 978-1-7830-8365-7: This review is based on the e-book2015In: Journal of Tourism History, ISSN 1755-182X, E-ISSN 1755-1838, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 190-192Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Byatt and Fowles: postmodern romances with feminism1997In: The interpretation of culture and the culture of interpretation: proceedings from the first graduate conference at the Department of Literature in Uppsala April 20-21 1996 / [ed] Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Erik Peurell, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 1997, p. 27-43Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Catherine Morris, Alice Milligan and the Irish Cultural Revival.2013In: The Latchkey: Journal of New Woman Studies, Vol. 5Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Character, community and critical nostalgia: Love and Summer2013In: William Trevor: revaluations / [ed] Paul Delaney and Michael Parker, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013, p. 198-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Den fullkomliga qvinnan.: En studie av artonhundratalets rådgivande litteratur2002In: Kvinnovetenskaplig Tidskrift, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 79-82Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Emily Lawless 1845-1913: writing the interspace2007Book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Emily Lawless and Botany as a Foreign Science2011In: Journal of Literature and Science, ISSN 1754-646X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 59-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Emily Lawless and History as Story2015In: The Irish Short Story: Tradition and Trends / [ed] Elke D’hoker and Stephanie Eggermont, Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2015, p. 61-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Ett landskap utan identitet?: utländska resenärer i Värmland under artonhundratalet2003In: Vad är värmländskt?: mångvetenskapliga studier i den regionala identiteten / [ed] Dag Nordmark, Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2003, p. 130-145, 238Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    "Ett Sveriges paradis": Friedrich Wilhelm von Schubert i Norrland2004In: Norden und Süden: festschrift für Kjell-Åke Forsgren zum 65. Gebrutstag / [ed] Mareike Jendis, Anita Malmqvist & Ingela Valfridsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för moderna språk , 2004, p. 75-85Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Farligheter och familjeliv: nordlighet som exotism och vardag2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Feminine Poles: Josephine Diebitsch-Peary's and Jennie Darlington's polar narratives2009In: Cold matters: cultural perceptions of snow, ice and cold, Umeå: Umeå University and the Royal Skyttean Society , 2009, p. 105--123Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    From the Eurocentric or Anglo-American point of view, the Arctic and the Antarctic have often been perceived and presented as the last masculine preserves on earth. Outside constructions of the masculine Arctic obviously also disregard the circumstance that people have lived in the region for very long, but there are also non-indigenous women who have spent time or lived in both areas, to begin with usually as companions to their husbands, but in later years as researchers in their own right. Two early narratives about life in the far North and the far South, respectively, are Josephine Diebitsch-Peary’s My Arctic Journal: A Year Among Ice-Fields and Eskimos (1893) and Jennie Darlington’s My Antarctic Honeymoon: A Year at the Bottom of the World (1956). Both women describe life in the polar areas in ways compatible with the gender ideologies of their time. In many respects, however, Diebitsch-Peary’s account presents more radical suggestions for how women might live in the masculine polar environment than Darlington whose conclusion is that the Antarctic should remain a men-only continent.

  • 29.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Foreign North: Outside Perspectives on the Nordic North2007In: European English Messenger, ISSN 0960-4545, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 42-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Fresh Air and Decent People: Frank Hedges Butler in Lapland/Frisk luft och goda människor: Frank Hedges Butler i Lappland2008In: Looking North: Representations of Sámi in Visual Arts and Literature, Bildmuseet; Umeå University , 2008, p. 81-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    From Reformer to Sufferer: The Returning Exile in Rosa Mulholland’s Fiction2005In: Re-Mapping Exile: Realities and Metaphors in Irish Literature and History, Aarhus University Press, Aarhus , 2005, p. 89-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Förord till George Eliot, Silas Marner2018Other (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Harriet Kramer Linkin (ed.), Selena, by Mary Tighe: A Scholarly Edition2015In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, ISSN ISSN 1602-124X, Vol. 14, p. 143-146Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Henrietta Kent and the Feminised North2007In: Nordlit, ISSN 0809-1668, no 22, p. 71-96Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    History in/of the Borderlands: Emily Lawless and the Story of Ireland2009In: Liminal Borderlands in Irish Literature and Culture, Bern: Peter Lang , 2009, p. 51-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    I civilisationens utmarker: en irländska i Norrland år 18522002In: Oknytt, no 1-2, p. 33-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    In a Man’s Voice: Charlotte Brontë’s The Professor and Cross-Gendered Narration2000In: The evidence of literature: interrogating texts in English studies / [ed] Sven-Johan Spånberg, Henryk Kardela, Gerald Porter, Lublin: Marie Curie Sklodowska University Press, 2000, p. 73-88Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Introduction: Out of Context2008In: New Contexts: Re-Framing Irish Women's Prose / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Cork, Ireland: Cork University Press , 2008, p. 1-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Irishness and womanhood in nineteenth-century British writing, by Thomas Tracy: Review2010In: Irish Studies Review, ISSN 0967-0882, E-ISSN 1469-9303, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 120-122Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Isbjörn i snöstorm: bilder av regionen Norr2010In: Regionernas bilder: estetiska uttryck från och om periferin / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Maria Lindgren Leavenworth, Lennart Pettersson, Umeå: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för språkstudier , 2010, p. 15-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Istappar i skägget.: Bayard Taylors norrländska resa2004In: Oknytt, ISSN 0349-1706, no 1-2, p. 38-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    King Frost and the Ice Queen: gendered personifications of the north2008In: European English Messenger, ISSN 0960-4545, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 59-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Kinship: people and nature in Emily Lawless’s poetry2014In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both her prose writing and her poetry the Irish writer Emily Lawless (1845-1913) considers a number of environmental subjects, from mothing and dredging for shellfish and mollusks to gardening and the decline of the Irish woodland. A recurrent theme in her poetry is the concern for threatened environment, but dystopian images are balanced by portrayals of landscape as a source of spiritual wisdom and healing. Lawless’s focus is often on more insignificant examples of the natural world such as moths, crustaceans or bog-cotton rather than more conventional representations of natural beauty. Lawless was a Darwinist, and several of her poems thematise the interaction between the human and the natural world, frequently reversing the power relationship between humans and natural phenomena. A re-contextualisation of her poetry within the framework of nineteenth-century natural history, Darwinism and early ecological thought brings to the fore her exploration of the connections between nature, self and national belonging

  • 44.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Kristna samer är inte spännande: Mission, väckelse och exotism i utländska reseskildringar från norra Norden2009In: Från Sara Greta till Lilla Svarta Sara: Väckelsen i litteraturen och väckelsens litteratur / [ed] Anders Persson och Daniel Lindmark, Skellefteå: Artos , 2009, p. 62-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Kulturmöte i bastun2002In: När språk och kulturer möts: festskrift till Tuuli Forsgren 2 november 2002 / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Raija Kangassalo & Daniel Lindmark, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2002, p. 162-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Linné som PR-man: utländska resenärer i Lappland2007In: Med Linné i norr: förändringar i natur och kultur från 1700-tal till våra dagar / [ed] Mauno Lassila och Ingrid Liljenäs, Umeå: Kungl Skytteanska Samfundet , 2007, p. 41-50Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Literature as Charity:The Case of Yeats is Dead!: Nordic Irish Studies2005In: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, no 4, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Ljusets rike.: Fredrika Bremer i Norrland2003In: Samlaren, Vol. 124, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Modern Languages.
    Memory, Power, Subversion: Dave Duggan’s Scenes from an Inquiry2007In: Recovering Memory: Irish Representations of Past and Present, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    More than an Irish problem: Authority and Universality in Land-War Writing2014In: Fictions of the Irish Land War / [ed] Heidi Hansson and James H. Murphy, Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, p. 107-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 99
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