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  • 1.
    Bergenmar, Jenny
    et al.
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Autism and the Question of the Human2015In: Literature and medicine, ISSN 0278-9671, E-ISSN 1080-6571, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 202-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how normative notions of emotions and interaction are active in constructions of the categories of “human” and “animal” in different discourses about autism: scientific and autobiographical. In the scientific discourse of autistic emotionality, a deficit perspective of autism is central. The general affective deficit discourse relies on normative discursive notions of “humanity” or “human emotionality.” Thus, neurotypicals are produced as real “humans” and neurotypical emotionality as “normal” human emotionality. This human normativity is challenged in the Swedish autobiographical texts by Gunilla Gerland (b. 1963), Iris Johansson (b. 1945) and Immanuel Brändemo (b. 1980). Along with American authors of autobiographies about autism, such as Temple Grandin’s Thinking in Pictures (1995) and Dawn Prince-Hughes’ Songs of the Gorilla Nation (2004) they destabilize the categories of “human” and “animal” by identifying with nonhuman animals, describing themselves as such, or feeling disqualified as real humans

  • 2. Bergenmar, Jenny
    et al.
    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lönngren, Ann-Sofie
    Autism and the Question of the Human2015In: Literature and medicine, ISSN 0278-9671, E-ISSN 1080-6571, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 202-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how normative notions of emotions and interaction are active in constructions of the categories of "human" and "animal" in different discourses about autism: scientific and autobiographical. In the scientific discourse of autistic emotionality, a deficit perspective of autism is central. The general affective deficit discourse relies on normative discursive notions of "humanity" or "human emotionality." Thus, neurotypicals are produced as real "humans" and neurotypical emotionality as "normal" human emotionality. This human normativity is challenged in the Swedish autobiographical texts by Gunilla Gerland (b. 1963), Iris Johansson (b. 1945) and Immanuel Brändemo (b. 1980). Along with American authors of autobiographies about autism, such as Temple Grandin's Thinking in Pictures (1995) and Dawn Prince-Hughes' Songs of the Gorilla Nation (2004) they destabilize the categories of "human" and "animal" by identifying with nonhuman animals, describing themselves as such, or feeling disqualified as real humans.

  • 3.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    A special kind of married men: Notions of marriage and married men in the Swedish gay press 1954-19862012In: Journal of Historical Sociology, ISSN 0952-1909, E-ISSN 1467-6443, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 106-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has long been ambivalence in the LGBT movement and related research as to the meaning of gay identity in relation to marriage. The article explores changing homonormative discourses of marriage and married men within the Swedish gay press from the mid 1950s to the mid 1980s. Expressions of the changes are a shift in language and in views of extramarital relationships, openness, and gay male identity. As a result of the shift, “married men,” including both “married homosexuals” and “bisexuals,” came to be distinguished from “gays.”

  • 4.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Att berätta bögberättelser: från sexliberalism till homoidentitetsretorik i svensk homopress under 1960-1980-talet2011In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 9-40Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Becoming an ‘Autistic Couple’: Narratives of Sexuality and Couplehood Within the Swedish Autistic Self-advocacy2014In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 351-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on sexuality and autism is dominated by a sexually deficit view of autism. According to this view, people with autism are considered different from neurotypicals and in need of sexual education that is specially adapted to the social impairments of people with autism. Perspectives on sexuality, couplehood, and autism are gradually changing, and this is partly because of alternative views on autism expressed and advocated within autistic self-advocacy movements. The present paper explores discourses within the Swedish autistic self-advocacy movement of an ‘autistic’ sexuality and couplehood (sexuality and couplehood on people with autism’s own terms). The analysis is based on articles in a Swedish magazine, Empowerment, published between 2002 and 2009 that was produced by and aimed at adults with autism.

  • 6.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Exploring meanings of leisure among people with autism: “To have some fun on your own”2018In: Research and practice in intellectual and developmental disabilities, ISSN 2329-7018, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how meanings of leisure are formulated among people with autism in relation to different notions of autism and leisure. The analysis is based on a discursive psychological analysis of articles in the Swedish magazine Empowerment (2002–2009), which was produced by and aimed at adults with autism. In relation to deficit notions of autistic special interests, the articles in the magazine formulated an alternative discourse that stressed the possibilities for meaningful leisure for people with autism, enabled by the right support, and on the continuum of leisure activities of non-autistic people. Central in the formulation of this ideal of meaningful leisure is its conditionality; by being socially functional or productive; as both self-developing and socially constructive.

  • 7.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Knowing what to do: exploring meanings of development and peer support aimed at people with autism2019In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 174-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-autistic people is frequently described as best positioned to provide support to autistic people. But what could autistic peer support, where the support actor is another person with autism, mean? The aim of this paper is to explore different meanings of development and peer support at an autistic-only work place in Sweden. The analyses in this paper is based on data from a field work among a group of autistic self-advocates in Sweden. The group is working together in a three-year autist led project aiming at supporting young adults with autism with life strategies and with peer-to-peer mentoring as well as educating employers about autistic abilities. In the group ideas of an alternative autistic development to be nurtured and supported by autistic peer support is brought forward. Support to autistic people has to be based on understandings on autistic functionality and ways of developing and learning. This includes support in executive function, formulating goals and future aspirations, support in to get to know your abilities, embrace and cherish your strengths and interests, and get to know your difficulties including strategies to manage them, without reinforcing a sense of failure.

  • 8.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Practice, practice: notions of training and normality among adults with Asperger Syndrome2012In: Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ), ISSN 1041-5718, E-ISSN 2159-8371, Vol. 32, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People with autism are objects of interventions, such as social training, that construct a normate (i.e., neurotypical) subject position. The emerging neurodiverse movements are reconceptualizing the meaning of autism. This paper examines expressions of an emerging counter-hegemonic discourse of Asperger subjectivity in the Swedish neurodiverse movement by exploring an ambivalent discourse of adaptation among adults with autism. The material was gathered during three months of ethnographic fieldwork in an educational setting in Sweden among adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. The key meanings linked to the discourse of adaptation concern meaningful versus meaningless training, adaptation to an NT environment or to the person with autism, the meaning of affirmation, and the possibility of understanding the experience of autism. An understanding of adaptation is treated as integral to producing a counter-hegemonic discourse of "normal for an Asperger" and alternative forms of autistic normalcy formulated by adults with autism.

  • 9.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The politics of joking: narratives of humour and joking among adults with Asperger’s syndrome2012In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, ISSN 0968-7599, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 235-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to analyse how humour and narratives about humour are used in a natural group of adults with Asperger’s syndrome. Narratives about humour and use of humour in the group are analysed from a discursive psychological perspective, informed by insights from both disability studies and critical autism studies. The setting of the research is ethnographic fieldwork in an educational setting in Sweden. In the paper, I show the use of three storylines among a natural group of people with autism (PWA) when talking about humour: the storyline of humourless PWA that dominates within Swedish society; and two alternatives, a storyline of alternative humour among PWA and another storyline in line with the social model of disability, of neurotypical humour or disabling humour. When invoking these two alternative storylines, PWA challenge both the humourlessness storyline and the lack of social accessibility within mainstream neurotypical settings.

  • 10.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Andersson, Catrine
    Bad Sex, Good Love: Homonormativity in the Swedish Gay Press, 1969–862016In: GLQ - A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, ISSN 1064-2684, E-ISSN 1527-9375, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss “love” as a rhetorical strategy in the Swedish gay press, 1969–86, in relation to shifting meanings of sex and love. During this period, meanings of homosexual subjectivity were rapidly changing at several societal levels. New ideals of openness and monogamous love became more dominant and tended to exclude expressions of sexual practices based primarily on pleasure. Using the analytical terms unconditioned versus conditioned, we discern a shifting relative strength between discursive constructions of unconditioned sex/sex conditioned on love, and love for love's sake/love conditioned on coupledom.

  • 11.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ambivalent Spaces: The Emergence of a New Gay Male Norm Situated Between Notions of the Commercial and the Political in the Swedish Gay Press, 1969–19862015In: Journal of Homosexuality, ISSN 0091-8369, E-ISSN 1540-3602, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 763-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within sexual geographies, sexual struggles over urban public spaces are frequently explored. Less common is research on sexual struggles within sexually shared spaces and gay spaces. The aim of the article is to examine discursive struggles of meanings of gay male identity enacted in discussions of commodification/capitalism, disclosure, and space in Swedish gay press during 1969–1986. We trace theambivalent feelings or the emergence of a new gay male norm situated between commercialism and non-commercialism within the Swedish gay press back to the 1970s. In the article we show how a monosexualization process was taking place in both the Swedish gay press as well as within sexualspaces. We explore rhetorical struggles between two competing discursive meanings of (ideal homonormative) male homosexuality, gay culture, and space: one wider (inclusive) and one narrower (exclusive).

  • 12.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Being a Responsible Violent Girl?: Exploring Female Violence, Self-management, and ADHD2018In: Girlhood Studies, ISSN 1938-8209, E-ISSN 1938-8322, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 111-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how young women in Sweden negotiate their gendered subject positions in relation to psychiatric diagnoses, particularly Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and the meanings of their own violent acts. The data consists of transcripts of face-to-face interviews with young women who have experienced using aggressive and violent acts. Given that the analysis is informed by ideas developed in discursive psychology, we identified the centrality of the concepts of responsibility and self-management. In this study responsibility is connected to gendered notions of passivity and activity. What we call the ordinary girl is neither too active nor too passive, and the extraordinary girl is either too active or too passive in the managing of herself. Similar to those of a troublesome past, the narratives of ADHD enable the understanding of an intelligible violent self, and therefore make female externalized violence what we describe as narrative-able.

  • 13.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Becoming a popular girl: exploring constructions of friendships in teen magazines2018In: Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories / [ed] Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    O'Dell, Lindsay
    The Open University, UK.
    ‘An Association for All’: Notions of the Meaning of Autistic Self-Advocacy Politics within a Parent-Dominated Autistic Movement2015In: Journal of Community and Applied Social Phychology, ISSN 1052-9284, E-ISSN 1099-1298, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 219-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we seek to explore the tensions between advocacy and self advocacy autistic movements in a Swedish context with a special focus on the meanings that enable the production of particular understandings of autism and the autistic subject. Drawing on articles written for the Swedish advocacy magazine Empowerment written for and by people with autism, the discourse analysis explores two competing discourses: a reformist and a radical. The reformist discourse underlines a goal of (political) representation expressed in Empowerment. It may be understood as an important part of producing a legitimate autistic political subject–positioned as a full member, with a full membership–within a parent-dominated autistic advocacy movement. The reformist discourse can be viewed as a result of a negotiation, where full membership is conditioned on the parents' terms and granted on specific terms. These include working together (neuro-inclusively), advocacy based on interest rather than identity/position as a specific target/member group, agreement upon a definition of autism as a disability (a deficit) a person has rather than an identity. In relation to this, an alternative legitimate autistic subject is produced through invoking the counter-hegemonic radical discourse. Such a narrative produces the ‘Asperger’ or ‘Aspie’. Here, the ‘full membership’ refers to a sense of identification with sense of belonging to and being at home with other people with autism. It contains a certain amount of autistic solidarity within the group of adults with autism.

  • 15.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, 4350, Australia.
    O’Dell, Lindsay
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
    Mapping the social geographies of autism: online and off-line narratives of neuro-shared and separate spaces2013In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 367-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws together empirical work that has been produced by the authors in two different autistic spaces: the Swedish magazine Empowerment produced by and aimed at adults with autism, and English-speaking autistic communities online. While the two points of data collection are quite different, there are important points of commonality that enable us to explore central issues concerning autistic and neurotypical space and the meanings assigned to these in different contexts. The paper aims to introduce the notion of social geographies of autism, based on talks among adults with autism and a social movement to promote autistic identities, giving examples from our previous work that has spanned both online and off-line spaces. Key issues discussed in the paper include a focus on autistic political platforms and the carving out of both social and political spaces for people with autism. In doing so, neuro-separate and neuro-shared spaces must be negotiated.

  • 16.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    O’Dell, Lindsay
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
    The citizen-worker: ambivalent meanings of ‘real jobs’, ‘full citizenship’ and adulthoodin the case of autistic people2014In: The Australian Community Psychologist, ISSN 1835-7393, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss the experiences of autistic people in engaging with the workplace, and hence becoming an active citizen, within dominant constructions of adulthood. We focus on transition into work as a key way in which children become adults in many societies. Such a transition to adulthood is seen to be less straightforward for children with ‘disabilities’, including those with a diagnosis of autism (or self defining as autistic). We draw on data from our previous and ongoing research examining neurodiverse spaces for children and adults with autism, and the importance of such spaces. Issues for neurodiverse spaces are also key in the workplace and the implications for refocusing an examination on transitions into work by autistic people through a lens of neurodiversity are far reaching in terms of how autistic people fashion their own positive citizenship identities, how service providers negotiate opportunities for some, and how workplaces shift in terms of accommodating difference. We argue that there is a need for inclusive and diverse workspaces, where the strengths of some adults with autism can be part of a shared neurodiverse and non-autistic (neurotypical) space. We therefore argue that by attending to the workplace from a neurodiverse perspective community psychologists can work to support a diverse range of young people into working activities, if they choose to participate.

  • 17.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    O'Dell, Lindsay
    “What’s the point of having friends?”: Reformulating Notions of the Meaning of Friends and Friendship among Autistic People2015In: Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ), ISSN 1041-5718, E-ISSN 2159-8371, Vol. 35, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the notion of 'autistic friendship'. Drawing on articles published in the Swedish advocacy magazine Empowerment, written for and by autistic people, a thematic analysis explores two interrelated themes: the meaning and performance of friendship in non-autistic (NT) and autistic (AS) worlds and the meaning of space in social interaction and community. Articles published in the magazine frequently discuss autistic only spaces as safe places in which to make friends with other autistic people and also in which to perhaps learn how to manage social interactions with the dominant non-autistic (NT) culture.

  • 18.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    Change and continuity in journal priorities2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 281-283Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    (Dis)abling practices and theories?: exploring chronic illness in disability studies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Katsui, Hisayo
    McLaughlin, Janice
    Editorial Review: Touring the Archive 1999-2017 and Mapping the Future of Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research is now an Open Access Journal from this issue onwards. We are particularly pleased that not only new articles, but also our full archive are included in the publishing agreement with Stockholm University Press. To celebrate this turning point in the Journal's history, we have revisited trends in its development, considered what recent and newly published articles say about its direction, and have explored what we see as important possibilities for our future. This editorial is our reflections on what we have found.

  • 21.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Keisu, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Adaption or recognition of the autistic subject? - reimagining an autistic work life: deconstructing the notion of ‘real jobs’ within the Swedish neurodiverse movement2012In: Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, ISSN 1052-2263, E-ISSN 1878-6316, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 203-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several researchers stress the importance of listening to autistic adults’ own experiences of work and related issues.This paper critically explores an ambivalent discourse of empowerment using notions of employment and work life in the Swedishautistic self-advocacy movement. The discourse analysis is based on articles from the Swedish autistic self-advocacy magazineEmpowerment. In the data, three key themes linked to the notion of work are identified: alternative meanings of a “real job”,formulations of work-related problems, and solutions to these problems. We identify two storylines. The first, more dominantone, we call the recreated norm storyline. This storyline, in line with an individual/medical perspective on autism as deficit,represents autism as causing people with autism to have difficulties finding and keeping jobs in the open labour market and asentailing employment support. The second, counter narrative we call the challenged norm storyline. In line with the social modelof disability, it focuses on structural barriers and discrimination against people with autism on the labour market.

  • 22.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Lövgren, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Doing adulthood through parenthood: notions of parenthood among people with cognitive disabilities2013In: Alter;European Journal of Disability Research ;Journal Europeen de Recherche Sur le Handicap, ISSN 1875-0672, E-ISSN 1875-0680, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 56-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perspectives on reproduction and developmental disabilities are gradually changing in Sweden. Through this change parents with developmental disabilities are gradually being included within an emergent discourse of “good enough parenting” on certain conditions. The present article explores discourses of reproduction and parenting among adults with developmental disabilities in two Swedish contexts: in a Swedish magazine, “Empowerment”, produced by and aimed at adults with autism, and interviews with people with intellectual disabilities in Sweden. Common to the materials from both studies are a normative reprosexual discourse of parenting and an underlying assumption that parenthood relates to adulthood in the sense that it requires maturity. The stories in the magazine “Empowerment” can be seen as expressing an emergent counter-hegemonic conditional discourse of “good enough parenting” which regards some people with autism as “good enough” parents. In general terms, the stories about parenting in the interview study depict parenting as related to age awareness and, unlike what is found in the material from “Empowerment”, there is no discussion of or reflection on whether or how impairment affects one's opportunity/ability to become a parent.

  • 23.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Nordlund, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Developing an authentic sex: deconstructing developmental–psychological discourses of transgenderism in a clinical setting2014In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 20-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is based on a broader study of the use of discourses of transgenderism among sex-reassignment evaluators in Sweden. In this paper we explore how a developmental–psychological discourse was reproduced by the evaluators in their discursive negotiations of transsexualism. We found that maturity and authenticity are two key concepts that illuminate how the developmental–psychological discourse both clashes with and works together with a medical–pathological discourse of transgenderism. The developmental–psychological discourse can help to produce a definition of transgenderism that is more diverse regarding male/female dichotomies. This in turn can create a wider range of possible subject positions for patients who are seeking help. The developmental–psychological discourse also imposes additional limitations regarding the subject positions available to transgender persons through a demand for maturity and for having gone through all of the steps in the expected identity development process. The developmental–psychological repertoire casts transgenderism as an identity crisis.

  • 24.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Hennes egen tid: Internet som en arena för sexuell frigörelse2012In: Tanten, vem är hon?: En (t)antologi / [ed] Marianne Liliequist & Karin Lövgren, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2012, p. 165-181Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    et al.
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    O’Dell, Lindsay
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
    Editorial: Special edition on work, community and citizenship2014In: The Australian Community Psychologist, ISSN 1835-7393, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    et al.
    University of Southern Queensland, Australia.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    O'Dell, Lindsay
    The Open University, UK.
    Exploring the potential for social networking among people with autism: challenging dominant ideas of‘friendship’2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within dominant approaches to autism and relationships, people with autism are assumed to be either unable to form relationships or are in need for educational interventions to be better equipped at managing relationships in a social world dominated by non-autistic people (neurotypicals). In this paper, we argue that broader constructions of friendship are needed in order to best account for the desire and abilities of high-functioning people with autism to have satisfying friendships and that the engagement with online social networking may provide a useful tool in achieving this.

  • 27.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, 4350, Australia.
    O’Dell, Lindsay
    Faculty of Health and Social Care, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Commentary: Challenging Representations of Autism: ExploringPossibilities for Broadcasting the Self on YouTube2013In: Journal of Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 1188-9136, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 90-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YouTube offers potential for many to broadcast their own ideas and concepts to a broad international audience. The take up of YouTube by people with autism as a space for advocacy and awareness raising is discussed in this paper, and the benefits of the environment for enabling people with autism to portray autism in positive and enabling ways are considered. The distinction between knowledge of autism produced within a scientific, medicalised deficit framework as opposed to an experiential knowledge of those with autism themselves is as evident in online spaces such as YouTube as it is in face to face environments, and the wider potential impacts of online spaces on face to face environments will be considered. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 28.
    Lövgren, Veronica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    ‘More time for what?’: Exploring intersecting notions of gender, work, age and leisure time among people with cognitive disabilities2015In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 263-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores intersecting notions of leisure among middle-aged people with intellectual disabilities in the setting of the Swedish welfare state. The participants are recipients of long-term disability services and have experienced the changing ideological frameworks of the welfare effort, which has recently focused on normalisation, inclusion and participation. Structured activities are arranged by disability services in order to normalise living conditions and provide recreation for disabled people. However, the range of activities is constrained by financial resources, by notions of gender and age and by an institutionalised emphasis on the work ethic – leading to constructions of leisure partly as ‘time beside’ where ‘free time’ activities should not interfere with the duties of the working week. The participants’ limited resources and their lack of a strong voice limit their ability to demand their legal rights and leave many of them with ‘too much time with too little to do’.

  • 29.
    Nouf-Latif, Faten
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Markström, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Narratives of ideal and second-option jobs among young adults with high functioning autism2019In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 104-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The meaning of work is different for people in different social groups, and research exploring perceptions of meaningful work among adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) is scarce. The aim of this paper is to explore how narratives of satisfactory and meaningful future jobs are portrayed relative to two alternative discourses of work – the 'obligation to work' discourse, and the 'disability rights' discourse. This group of individuals are high functioning on the one hand, while at the same time holding legally-mandated special disability rights, an exploration of how this group reason about work-life and satisfactory jobs is particularly interesting. Through ethnographic fieldwork in Sweden, seven young adults with HFA were followed, and 17 interviews were conducted. The main findings and conclusions are that jobs that are individually assessed to be ‘ideal’, are put aside in favor of jobs that are more compatible with general labor market demands, as long as enjoyment and meaningfulness can still be experienced.

  • 30. O’Dell, Lindsay
    et al.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ortega, Francisco
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Orsini, Michael
    Critical autism studies: exploring epistemic dialogues and intersections, challenging dominant understandings of autism2016In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 166-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how our cultural contexts give rise to different kinds of knowledges of autism and examine how they are articulated, gain currency, and form the basis for policy, practice and political movements. We outline key tensions for the development of critical autism studies as an international, critical abilities approach. Our aim is not to offer a cross-cultural account of autism or to assume a coherence or universality of ‘autism’ as a singular diagnostic category/reality. Rather, we map the ways in which what is experienced and understood as autism, plays out in different cultural contexts, drawing on the notion of ‘epistemic communities’ to explore shifts in knowledge about autism, including concepts such as ‘neurodiversity’, and how these travel through cultural spaces. The paper explores two key epistemic tensions; the dominance of ‘neuro culture’ and dominant constructions of personhood and what it means to be human.

  • 31. O'Dell, Lindsay
    et al.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Conclusion: theorising transgressive developmental trajectories and understanding children seen as 'different'2018In: Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories / [ed] Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 146-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. O'Dell, Lindsay
    et al.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Different adulthoods: Normative development and transgressive trajectories2018In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 349-354Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. O'Dell, Lindsay
    et al.
    Brownlow, CharlotteBertilsdotter Rosqvist, HannaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Different Childhoods: Non/Normative Development and Transgressive Trajectories opens up new avenues for exploring children's development as contextual, provisional and locally produced, rather than a unitary, universal and consistent process.

    This edited collection frames a critical exploration of the trajectory against which children are seen to be 'different' within three key themes: deconstructing 'developmental tasks', locating development and the limits of childhood. Examining the particular kinds of 'transgressive' development, contributors discuss instances of 'difference' including migration, work, assumptions of vulnerability, trans childhoods, friendships and involvement in crime. Including both empirical and theoretical discussions, the book builds on existing debates as part of the interrogation of 'different childhoods'.

    This book provides essential reading for students wishing to explore notions of development while also being of interest to both academics and practitioners working across a broad area of disciplines such as developmental psychology, sociology, childhood studies and critical criminology.

  • 34. O'Dell, Lindsay
    et al.
    Brownlow, Charlotte
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Introducing normative and different childhoods, developmental trajectory and transgression2018In: Different childhoods: non/normative development and transgressive trajectories / [ed] Lindsay O'Dell, Charlotte Brownlow and Hanna Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertdsdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Normal for an asperger: notions of the meanings of diagnoses among adults with asperger syndrome2012In: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 1934-9491, E-ISSN 1934-9556, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the production of a counterhegemonic discourse of "autistic normalcy" among adults with high-functioning autism by analyzing notions of diagnosis. The discourse analyses are based on material from ethnographic fieldwork in a Swedish educational setting. Study participants were 3 male and 9 female adults who had been diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. The notion of diagnosis comprises issues concerning coming out and knowledge production. The findings capture an ongoing reformulation process among people involved in the autistic self-advocacy movement when it comes to the meanings of Asperger syndrome and what it means to be a person with Asperger syndrome.

  • 36.
    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Desiring difference, desiring similarity: narratives on sexual interaction between boys and men in the Swedish homosexual press 1954-19862012In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 117-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores talk about young men and relations between younger and older men in the homonormative rhetorical context of the Swedish homosexual press from the 1950s through the 1980s. The discussion is related to meanings of sexuality for the sake of pleasure (the pleasure ideal) and sexuality for the sake of love (the love ideal). Meanings of sexual relations between boys and men are nuanced in the homosexual press: by providing a variety of descriptions of sexual desire between men and boys, representing the boy as someone who can take both an active subject position and a passive object position in the relationship, and by separating homosexual practices from paedophilic practices. An earlier homonormative ideal or at least a socially sanctioned possibility of relationships between men and boys, as a less equal couple and partner ideal, is gradually replaced though, by a more equal couple and partner ideal based on an expectation of similarity.

  • 37.
    Silfver, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Maritha, Jacobsson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Arnell, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Härgestam, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Widding, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Classroom bodies: affect, body language, and discourse when schoolchildren encounter national tests in mathematics2018In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how Swedish grade three children are discursively positioned as pupils when they are taking national tests in mathematics and when they reflect on the testing situation afterwards. With support from theories about affective-discursive assemblages, we explore children's body language, emotions, and talk in light of the two overarching discourses that we believe frame the classroom: the 'testing discourse' and the 'development discourse'. Through the disciplinary power of these main discourses children struggle to conduct themselves in order to become recognized as intelligible subjects and 'ideal pupils'. The analysis, when taking into account how affects and discourses intertwine, shows that children can be in 'untroubled', 'troubled', or ambivalent subject positions.

  • 38.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Youthful mothering?: Exploring the meaning of adulthood and youthfulness within the maternal identity work of young Swedish mothers2018In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 355-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore meanings of adulthood and youthfulness in relation to notions of life course, good motherhood, and girlhood among young mothers in Sweden. Our analysis was informed by a discursive psychological approach and was based on interview conversations with 17 mothers who were 13–25 years old at the birth of their first child. In our analysis, we identified two repertoires – the ‘social age’ repertoire and the ‘chronological age’ repertoire. The interviewees invoked the two repertoires to position themselves and others as either responsible adult mothers or as responsible youthful mothers. Meanings of adulthood are central within the idea of motherhood, and by deviating from their expected life course young mothers are often understood as non-adults who are incapable of fulfilling the developmental task of motherhood. Our work suggests that the maternal identity work of young mothers takes place within discourses of both adulthood and youthfulness.

  • 39.
    Sjöberg, Magdalena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bertilsdotter-Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Who is the mother? Exploring the meaning of grandparental support in young Swedish mothers’ narratives2017In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 318-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the western understanding of a nuclear family and the idea of good motherhood, the need for grandparental support is commonly viewed as an expression of deficient motherhood. Young mothers are often seen as incapable of maternal practices and as being in need of support from their extended family. An alternative view is that too much support might result in the grandmothers taking on the role of mother. This paper explores research around the ambivalent meanings of grandparental support in young Swedish mothers’ narratives. In this research, we identified three repertoires: inhibiting, being-there-no-matter-what and responsibility. Mothers who were following their expected life course achieved a subject position as a ‘‘real mother’’ within a functioning nuclear family. Mothers deviating from their expected life course achieved a subject position as either a ‘‘mother in becoming’’ with a functional and supportive extended family or as a ‘‘real mother’’ with a dysfunctional and non-supportive extended family. In the case of young mothers who are seen as insufficient, motherhood might become negotiable and fluid between the biological mother and the young mother’s own mother.

  • 40. Starke, Mikaela
    et al.
    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kuosmanen, Jari
    Eternal Children?: Professionals' Constructions of Women with an Intellectual Disability Who are Victims of Sexual Crime2016In: Sexuality and disability, ISSN 0146-1044, E-ISSN 1573-6717, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 315-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study intersecting meanings of age, intellectual disability, gender and sexuality, used by different professionals are explored. The main questions are: How do professionals working with individuals with ID use the concept of age? What purpose does the use of age have in their talks and reflections about persons with ID? What discourses can be identified? The analyses are based on five separate individual interviews and one group interview with professionals working in the police force, habilitation centers and special schools and who have experiences of meeting and working with individuals with ID around issues relating to sexual exposure, prostitution or similar areas, and in consequence of being a victim of crime. The results reveal that individuals with ID are constructed through the participants' comparisons between and use of both chronological and perceived age. Vulnerability is found to be a truth regime in the discourse of the participants, and that this regime supports both a protection discourse and victim discourse. In the criminal trials of non-disabled male offenders, notions of physical age are used to portray women with ID as ideal victims. Within the protection discourse, a change of behaviour among individuals with ID is promoted as a means of avoiding risk-taking behaviours. This includes strategies of fostering and education. The fostering strategy encompasses a shared understanding that as professionals they have the power to change behaviors. The education strategy encompasses the idea that persons with ID should be empowered and able to change their behavior by means of the knowledge and information provided by professionals. This study points towards power relations between groups with and without ID. It is concluded that further discussions as to how the UN declarations of Human Rights and Disability can be implemented among individuals with ID are needed.

  • 41.
    Winberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Rosenberg, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Inclusive spaces in post-secondary education: exploring the experience of educational supports for people with a neuropsychiatric disability2019In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, no 12, p. 1263-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experiences of studying among people with a neuropsychiatric disability who received support from a Supported Education (SEd) programme, and people who did not receive this support. The research employed a narrative approach, where 14 participants with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis were asked to write a short reflective narrative about their experience of studying, with/without support from a SEd intervention. The results show that the persons without support from the model relied on their family as their primary support, and that support from formal support providers was not available prior to receiving a formal diagnosis. Those who received services from SEd were generally satisfied with the support they received, and did not emphasise the family as support givers in the same way. The study points to the importance of developing neurodiverse spaces, which can serve as transitional environments and that can help supported education models adapt to the needs of this group.

1 - 41 of 41
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