umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alexiadou, N
    et al.
    Dovemark, M
    Erixon Arreman, I
    Holm, A-S
    Lundahl, L
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Managing inclusion – Shifting paradigms of social justice in the Swedish Upper Secondary School2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alexiadou, Nafsika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Erixon-Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Managing inclusion in competitive school systems: The cases of Sweden and England2016In: Research in Comparative and International Education, ISSN 1745-4999, E-ISSN 1745-4999, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 13-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last 40 years have seen great political attention paid to issues of inclusion in education, both from international organisations and also individual nations. This flexible concept has been adopted enthusiastically in education reforms concerned with increased standardisation of teaching and learning, decentralisation of education management, reduced teacher autonomy and marketisation of school systems. This paper draws from a research project that explores inclusion as part of the education transformations in England and Sweden. These two countries have been very different in their state governance and welfare regimes, but have been following similar directions of reform in their education systems. The paper evaluates the changing policy assumptions and values in relation to inclusion in the schooling changes of the last few decades, through an analysis of policy contexts and processes, and a presentation of selected empirical material from research in the two countries. We argue that, despite the similar dominant discourses of competition and marketisation, the two education systems draw on significantly different paradigms of operationalising inclusion, with distinct outcomes regarding equality.

  • 3.
    Carlbaum, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Andersson, Eva
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Utvärdering av Läslyftets utprövningsomgång2015Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Tema: Skolan och marknaden2017In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Carlbaum, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Lena
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    School evaluation  in Sweden: a local perspective2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation has expanded at all levels of governance as part of the broad doctrine of New Public Management (NPM) (Hood 1991; Pollitt and Bouckaert 2011). According to this doctrine, market mechanisms should be introduced to enhance efficiency and, in the context of school governance, to support competition between schools, free school choice, improved educational quality, and school effectiveness (Lubienski 2009; Lundahl 2013 et al; Merki 2011). Education systems guided by NPM and characterized by results-based management and local autonomy increasingly rely on evaluation at all levels (Mintrop and Trujillo 2007; OECD 2013). Strengthened accountability is assumed to enhance education quality and promote school development (OECD 2015; SOU 2015:22), and a combination of control- and improvement-oriented evaluation systems has been institutionalized at various levels of the school system to promote school development and enhance education quality. However, this development is contested by research claiming that the consequences of growing accountability pressure are problematic for school practice (Hoyle and Wallace 2009; Ravitch 2010). It may create multiple accountability problems, i.e. uncertainty among target groups as to which evaluation system is supposed to do what and for whom and with what authority (Schillemans and Bovens, 2011). Teachers are subjected to too much accountability that can have negative effects on professionals and education (Green 2011; Koretz 2009; Lingard and Sellar, 2013; Hargreaves 1994, Day 2002, Ball 2003, Mausethagen 2013a, 2013b).

    Although evaluation is a cornerstone in local school governance it has not been studied much in this context. Local school governance refers to all the public and private school actors’ and institutions’ (e.g. education committees, opposition parties, school principals, teachers and parents) steering of local schools and education. We need more knowledge of the role and consequences of evaluation systems at the local governance level, and into how local school actors respond to these systems. What local decision makers, school providers, principals, and teachers consider relevant, useful, and actionable knowledge (Stehr & Grundmann 2012) is crucial in understanding the role of evaluation in local school governance.

    This paper explores how local school actors in Swedish compulsory education have responded to prevailing evaluation systems and the growing accountability pressure emerging from the recentralization, marketization, and globalization of education governance. It synthesizes results from a Swedish research project (see method) and aims to improve our understanding of the role and consequences of evaluation in local school governance. It contributes with knowledge of the role and consequences of evaluation at the municipal, school, classroom, and parent/citizen levels. Special attention is paid to the value and consequences of various evaluations for local school development. A close look at evaluation in Sweden is an illustrative case as the education evaluation arena is overcrowded and the decentralised education system provides freedom of choice that actors operating in other education systems in Europe (OECD, 2015; Lawn, 2011) and elsewhere can learn from.

    The paper is developed as part of a larger research project; Consequences of evaluation for school praxis –steering, accountability and school development, financed by the Swedish Research Council (2012-2015). The project explores evaluation in compulsory schools (age 13-15) in four municipalities, and this paper synthesises and discusses the results presented in detail five separate papers.

    Methods

    The conceptual framework, developed in a separate article (Hanberger, manuscript), pays attention to the role of evaluation in three models of decentralised governance, the state model, the local government and the multi-actor model. It focuses on three main possible functions that evaluation can have in local school governance, steering, accountability and school development. It presumes that a governance model intends to steer evaluation to meet the governance models’ and governing actors’ evaluation needs, and that evaluations (performance measurements, stand-alone evaluations, synthesis reports and informal/concrete evaluations) can contribute to these functions. Evaluations may also affect governance in unintended and unexpected ways (Hanberger, 2012). Hence, the framework also accounts for constitutive effects (Dahler-Larsen, 2013) of evaluation systems, that is, to tacit or indirect effects, for example, how evaluation (systems) can shape discourses, defining what is important in education and school systems.

    Four medium-sized municipalities with populations of 75,000–100,000 were selected strategically to reflect differing local conditions and contextual factors that may affect education and the role of evaluation in local school governance. The municipalities differ in political majority, school performance, and share of independent schools, and eight schools were selected for in-depth interviews. The municipalities are anonymized, being referred to as “North”, “West”, “East”, and “South”.

    The paper is based on the analysis of documents, reports, and studies treating global and national evaluation systems, national and municipal policy documents treating school governance and evaluation, minutes from municipal education committee meetings (2011–2013), municipal websites, and 76 interviews. Four politicians from majority parties and three from opposition parties, 10 administrators (i.e. Head of the Education Department, senior administrators, and evaluation experts), five politically elected local auditors, three representatives of independent schools, eight school principals, and 43 teachers were interviewed in person or, in a few cases, by phone. In addition, an electronic questionnaire sent to teachers was used to complement the interviews with them, to obtain an overview of teachers’ experiences of evaluation in the studied municipalities. Conclusions about the functions, effects, and consequences of evaluation were generated by interpreting interviewees’ responses and various texts (e.g. policy documents, minutes, and websites).

    Expected outcomes

    This study shows that multiple accountability problems emerge as a result of overlapping evaluation systems and that local decision makers set up their own evaluation systems to meet the needs of municipal school governance.

    Most of the evaluation systems identified in Swedish compulsory education (for students aged 13–15 years) produce quantitative data capturing measurable aspects of education, whereas data capturing other parts of the curriculum, more difficult or impossible to measure (e.g. how schools have succeeded in achieving democracy, sustainability, and solidarity objectives), are lacking. A few key performance measures are used in several systems.

    The identified evaluation systems induce local school actors and institutions to think and act according to the principles of NPM; these are aligned with most decision makers’ and managerial-oriented principals’ endeavours but not with those of all local school actors. This indicates that evaluations in local school governance serve to support and legitimize the applied governance model and current education policy. Stakeholder evaluations that can provide a more multifaceted understanding, including critical accounts that school actors can use for informed deliberation about the status of schools, consequences of current school policy, and where to go in the future, are not found in our case communities.

    The workload and accountability pressure have increased for both principals and teachers. The consequences have been the most negative for teachers, however, as external evaluations have questioned their professional competence and authority, unintentionally damaging teacher motivation. The external evaluation systems had little or no value in terms of helping teachers improve their teaching practice. Instead, teachers used their own evaluations regarding what works for various groups and students to continuously improve teaching and schools. A few school providers and principals succeeded in developing evaluations addressing the needs of teachers and were used in developing teaching and daily practices.

  • 6.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Carlbaum, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hult, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Lena
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    School evaluation in Sweden in a local perspective: a synthesis2016In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 349-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article synthesises the role of evaluation at the municipal, school, classroom and parental levels of governance, and discusses the results of the articles appearing in this special issue. The discussion concerns the role of evaluation in school governance, the value of evaluation for local school development, the constitutive effects of evaluation, what explains the present results, how knowledge produced by evaluation can be used, and methodological issues. The results indicate that evaluation systems legitimise and support governance by objectives and results, parental school choice, and accountability for fairness and performance. Evaluation systems emphasise measurable aspects of curricula and foster a performance-oriented school culture. The most important evaluations for improving teaching and schools are teachers' own evaluations. The article suggests two explanations for the actual roles of evaluation in local school governance. First, both the governance structure and applied governance model delimit and partly shape the role of evaluation at local governance levels. Second, how local school actors use their discretion and interpret their role in the education system, including how they respond to accountability pressure, explains how their roles are realised and the fact that actors at the same level of governance can develop partly different roles.

  • 7.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lindgren, Lena
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Navigating the evaluation web: evaluation in Swedish local school governance2016In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the use, functions and constitutive effects of evaluation systems in local school governance, and identifies how contextual factors affect various uses of evaluation in this context. This case study of three Swedish municipalities demonstrates that local evaluation systems are set up to effectively sustain local school governance and ensure compliance with the Education Act and other state demands. Local decision makers have learned to navigate the web of evaluations and developed response strategies to manage external evaluations and to take into account what can be useful and what cannot be overlooked in order to avoid sanctions. The study shows that in contexts with high issue polarisation, such as schooling, the use of evaluation differs between the political majority and opposition, and relates to how schools perform in national comparisons and school inspections. Responses to external evaluations follow the same pattern. Some key performance indicators from the National Agency of Education and the School Inspectorate affect local school governance in that they define what is important in education, and reinforce the norm that benchmarking is natural and worthwhile, indicating constitutive effects of national evaluation systems.

  • 8.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Intentions and Knowledge Guiding Local Safety Policy Work: Policy analysis of two Swedish cities’ safety policy work2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Mårald, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Intentions and knowledge shaping local safety policy: A comparison of two Swedish cities2015In: Journal of Safety Research, ISSN 0022-4375, E-ISSN 1879-1247, Vol. 55, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This article explores how intentions and knowledge shape two Swedish cities' local safety policy (LSP). Method: The applied framework is derived from the integration of governance and implementation research and the theory of knowledge and its use. Results: The study shows that LSPs are shaped by amix of intentions and different kinds of knowledge, and intentions and knowledge interplay and intertwine in many ways. Key-persons construct LSPs when they work out solutions to urgent safety problems and take departure in the local context, its pre-conditions, and their experience-based and professional knowledge. The state governs LSP softly through management by objectives in the background, butmore often key-actor intentions and commitments, local safety problems, and events initiated and influenced LSPs. Conclusions: The article contributes to a better understanding of conditions for LSPs in multi-level governance. Practical applications: The article can be used to improve governance, identify implementation problems and knowledge needs that will improve LSPs and the overall safety situation in the community. The study has implications for how LSPs should be evaluated; many different evaluation criteria can be appropriate, such as relevance, legitimacy, achievement of key actors' objectives, sustainability of policy solutions, and creation of a local safety culture.

  • 10.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Mårald, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Local safety policy: The approach of two Swedish cities to urgent safety problems2013In: Public Policy and Administration, ISSN 0952-0767, E-ISSN 1749-4192, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 383-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores local safety policy (LSP) developed to resolve urgent safety problemsin two Swedish municipalities. It shows that local safety actors conceive and constructsafety problems in ways that make them manageable, and that LSP evolves as aweb of interactions between safety actors in the public and private sectors. The actorsuse established safety solutions and routines while exploring new ways of managing theproblems. The municipalities’ problem-solving structures differ mainly in that differentactors and institutions are involved. The policy process and features of LSP correspondwell to how policy is portrayed in other cross-sectoral policy domains. Local safetypolicy development cannot easily be separated from policy implementation, nor cansafety policy be separated from safety work, for they evolve together. The implication ofthis study for governance is that policy workers at different levels and from differentorganisations create LSP. Although LSP is partly initiated and legitimised at the political–administrative level, it is not from this level that it evolves.

  • 11.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Mårald, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Rolfsman, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Departement of Educational Measurement.
    Säkerhetsarbetets relevans och effekter: slutrapport från ett femårigt forskningsprogram2013Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    School of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    “Living with market forces”: Principals’ perceptions of market competition in Swedish Upper Secondary School Education2011In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, ISSN ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 601-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish education system has undergone major restructuring since the early 1990s. The newpolicy, including e.g. decentralisation, accountability, school choice and a tax-funded voucher system,has led to an expanding “school market”. This article explores how upper secondary school principalsperceive the increased competition among schools and its impact on their work and the school organisation.The data emanate from interviews with principals at eight schools in five municipalities.The presence of the market in everyday work is perceived as a reality, even if its significance varies.The principals argue that competition increases the staff’s efforts and improves school development.However, it is also perceived as problematic since it causes increased stress and uncertainty. The principals’professional identities seem to have changed from a pedagogical role to a more economics ditto.Most principals are pragmatic and make efforts to handle the new policy context the best they can.

  • 13.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Borås högskola.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    "Vi måste lära oss leva med marknadskrafterna och dom marknadskrafterna måste man utnyttja": Gymnasierektorers uppfattningar om konkurrens på "skolmarknaden"2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hult, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Edström, Charlotta
    Umeå University. Umeå universitet.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Balancing external and internal demands: School principals as evaluation agents2015In: Abstract Book, NERA 4-6 March 2015: Marketisation and Differentiation in Education, 2015, p. -174Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School principals have increasingly become key-actors in the school systems, their responsibilities are extended and ‘effective school leadership’ is demanded. Educational management in Sweden has been professionalized, promoted by state policies, underpinned by NPM and inspired by managerial moods, which has led to an institutional separation between teachers and school principals (Jarl, et al. 2012). The responsibility for evaluation is a core component in this development, which in official statements often is expressed in discourses of school development and/or systematic quality work (Lundström 2014).

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse school principals’ responses to and use of internal and external evaluations. Their experiences of being governed and of governing teachers will be highlighted as well as their work as evaluation agents in terms of pedagogical and/or administrative leadership.

    Broadly drawing on a governance perspective changes from more traditional government to governance, involving a wider number of actors and institutions (Pierre and Peters 2000) is taken into consideration. These changes comprise the rescaling and reconstruction of a “competition state”(Lingard 2011) including new NPM influenced mechanisms. In short, Swedish school principals work in a quasi-market where evaluations are considered central for improving results, which might influence their responses to and use of different evaluations.

    Based on Evetts’ (2011) concepts occupational and organizational professionalism in depth interviews with school principals at eight schools in four municipalities are analysed. The interviews are complemented with results from a questionnaire to all principals in the four municipalities.

    Preliminary results indicate a variation among school principals in their responses to external evaluations ­– from trying hard to live up to external demands to a more autonomous stance seeking to unburden the teachers of at least some of these demands. There is also variation as to what degree the school principals emphasise the use of evaluations for developing pedagogy and broad goals of schooling vis-a-vis for control and managerial purposes.  Many of the external evaluations, other than the ones from the governing bodies (municipalities/ independent school owners), often seems to be of less importance for principal work.

  • 15.
    Hult, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Edström, Charlotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Umeå universitet.
    Balancing managerial and professional demands: school principals as evaluation brokers2016In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 283-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evaluation trend in the global education field implies new professional challenges for school principals. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyse Swedish school principals’ experiences of prevailing evaluations and the implications for the profession. Specifically, we examine: a) how principals respond to evaluations and their consequences in their schools; and b) the implications of the evaluations for the profession in light of professional responsibility and accountability. The interviewed principals are ascribed huge evaluation responsibilities and are in this respect key actors but to some extent are also ‘victims’ of external pressures. All schools are embedded in a web of evaluation systems. They share the view that evaluations that are useful for improving teaching, student achievement and everyday school life are those conducted close to practice, and involve teachers. Most of them are also aware of the risks for the reduction of the broad goals of schooling and for work overload. The principals express a desire to protect the fundamental values of professional responsibility but the total demands of the local evaluation web have involved.a shift in their professional role towards professional accountability.

  • 16.
    Kärnebro, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Utvärdering av Läslyftet. Delrapport 5: Läslyftets organisering och genomförande i förskolan2018Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Lidström, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Maximising opportunity and minimising risk? Young people's upper secondary school choices in Swedish quasi-markets.2014In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores young people's upper secondary school choices after recent reforms of school choice and competition in Sweden, drawing on interviews with students and school staff. The respondents identify important motives and strategies in students' school choices, for example, the character of school and schooling, the influence of marketing and education policy, as well as young people's identities and positions. Young people's horizons of action' and decision-making seem to vary, according inter alia to the degree of urbanity of their geographical locality and exposure to competition. Gender-, ethnicity- and social class-related factors also appear to be influential. We conclude that the school choice and competition reforms draw schools' attention to students' preferences, but the motive for the interest seems to have little to do with a concern to help young people to make educational school choices and future school-to-work transitions. Finally, we advocate modifications in the provision of career information and guidance.

  • 18.
    Lidström, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Maximising opportunity and minimising risk?: Young people's upper secondary school choices in Swedish quasi-marketsIn: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindgren, Lena
    et al.
    Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Evaluation Systems in a Crowded Policy Space: Implications for Local School Governance2016In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 237-258, article id 30202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluation systems of various types are an integral part of a country’s education policy space, within which they are supposed to have the basic functions of enhancing accountability and supporting school development. Here we argue that in a crowded policy space evaluation systems may interfere with each other in a way that can have unintended consequences and create new ‘policies by the way’ that are not the result of intentional policy decisions. To shed light on this argument, we examine five of approximately 30 evaluation systems operating in the Swedish education system. Our analysis examines a situation in which many evaluation systems are doing almost the same thing, i.e. collecting a similar and limited set of quantitative data, and addressing the same local governance actors with the primary goal of supporting school development in the same direction. By doing so, these evaluation systems could thus give rise to several unintended consequences, including a scaling down of the school law and curriculum, multiple accountability problems, increased administration and new intermediary job functions at the level of local education governance.

  • 20.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Educational marketization the Swedish way2013In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 497-517Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Gymnasiet som marknad2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Marketizacija edukacije po švedsko2016In: Komu je napoti kakovostno javno šolstvo? / [ed] Marjan Šimenc & Veronika Tašner, Ljubljana: CEPS and SVIZ , 2016, p. 85-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sl]

    Švedska je bila ponavadi prikazana kot zgleden primer socialnodemokratske ureditve države blaginje (Esping-Andersen, 1996), za katero sta značilna obsežno državno upravljanje in aktivna vključenost v vprašanja družbene dobrobiti. V zadnjih dvajsetih letih pa sta bila švedski javni sektor in edukacijski sistem podvržena radikalni in temeljiti usmeritvi v neoliberalizem, spremembi, ki je sledila obsežni decentralizaciji procesov odločanja, ko so ti prešli iz rok države na raven lokalnih skupnosti in šol. V tem besedilu bomo povzeli naravo, obseg in nekatere posledice notranje in zunanje marketizacije švedske edukacije v prvih letih novega tisočletja, še zlasti pa bomo izpostavili vpliv konkurence na notranje delovanje srednjih šol. Prišli smo do sklepa, da se je zunanja marketizacija zelo razširila in da Švedska v večini vidikov popolnoma sprejema nov javni menedžment, na primer t. i. notranjo marketizacijo edukacije. Navkljub temu pa lahko pri dodeljenih funkcijah, vrednotah in upravljanju edukacije še zmeraj zaznamo posamezne vidike stare socialnodemokratske paradigme.

  • 23.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Marketization of education the Swedish way: Paper presented at the symposium Privatisation of education in European countries: the cases of Italy, Spain, Sweden and England2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    From expansion and integration to marketisation - and restoration: Policies of Swedish upper secondary education 1968-20082008In: Paper presented at the symposium “The Changing Forms of Knowledge in Contemporary Curriculum Reconfigurations”: The European Conference in Educational Research (ECER), Gothenburg August 10-12, 2008, Göteborg, 2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rönnberg, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Setting things right?: Swedish upper secondary school reform in a 40-year perspective2010In: European Journal of Education, ISSN 0141-8211, E-ISSN 1465-3435, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 49-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses reforms addressing and affecting the curriculum and organisation of Swedish upper secondary education over 40 years, up to an initiative by the present non-socialist government. The aim is to analyse the current reform of upper secondary education and relate it to previous reforms during a 40-year period in terms of continuity and breaks, mainly with regard to major functions of the reforms and the structuring and control of educational contents. Aiming to create a sharper division of students into three separate streams (academic and vocational education, and apprenticeship training), the reform constitutes a major break with the previously dominant trend towards greater integration. It is argued that it will result in a restriction and reformulation of the knowledge which is regarded as desirable. Similar moves are evident in relation to teacher education, which, if enacted, would involve moving from a model of high flexibility and a common core of knowledge to substantially stronger divisions between contents and programmes.

  • 26.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Att mäta det vi värderar eller värdera det vi kan mäta?: Resultatindikatorer som grund för skolval2017In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 43-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To Measure What We Value or to Value What We Can Measure? Performance Indicators as a Basis for School Choice. The main objective of this article is to examine and critically discuss indicators that represent student achievement and are used as a basis for school choice in the Swedish compulsory school. It focuses on analyzing the performance indicators in some of the commonly used evaluation systems and to what extent they represent the National curriculum. Five evaluation systems used to inform school choice are selected and analyzed in relation to the Swedish national curriculum, based on perspectives from curriculum and evaluation theories. Most indicators represent a narrow subject discourse, while the discourses that represent the broad goals of the curriculum, such as citizenship, are largely absent. The indicators constitute a conception of student achievement as easily measurable subject knowledge.

  • 27.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    From professionally oriented public service bureaucracy to marketisation and free competition: Teachers’ role in times of changed governance.2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Gymnasielärare – perspektiv på lärares arbete och yrkesutveckling. 2009Book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Inclusive and competitive?: Municipalities and schools in the intersection between social inclusion and marketisation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lärares professionella autonomi i en tid av New Public Management2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lärares professionella autonomi under New Public Management-epoken2018In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 33-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers’ Professional Autonomy During the New Public Management Epoch. The last few decades of intensive school reform has affected and continue to affect teachers’ work and the construction of the teaching profession. This article examines how upper secondary school teachers perceive and respond to the consequences for their professional autonomy of recent school reforms and restructurings. Based on empirical material from interviews of 119 teachers in three studies conducted between 2002 and 2014, the findings indicate that teacher autonomy has been reduced by school reforms and restructurings since the late 1980s. Most of these policies are neo-liberal policies or New Public Management technologies. The findings testify to the on-going emphasis on the significance of market logics as well as on how these work together with bureaucratic logics to shift occupational professionalism to organizational professionalism and licensed autonomy to regulated autonomy.

    Teachers’ Professional Autonomy During the New Public Management Epoch. The last few decades of intensive school reform has affected and continue to affect teachers’ work and the construction of the teaching profession. This article examines how upper secondary school teachers perceive and respond to the consequences for their professional autonomy of recent school reforms and restructurings. Based on empirical material from interviews of 119 teachers in three studies conducted between 2002 and 2014, the findings indicate that teacher autonomy has been reduced by school reforms and restructurings since the late 1980s. Most of these policies are neo-liberal policies or New Public Management technologies. The findings testify to the on-going emphasis on the significance of market logics as well as on how these work together with bureaucratic logics to shift occupational professionalism to organizational professionalism and licensed autonomy to regulated autonomy.

  • 32.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Measuring what we value, or valuing what we can measure?: Performance indicators, school choice and the curriculum2019In: New practices of comparison, quantification and expertise in education: conducting empirically based research / [ed] Christina Elde Mølstad and Daniel Pettersson, London & New York: Routledge, 2019, p. 189-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes the Swedish context, the theoretical framework and the methodology. It analyses the Swedish national curriculum and common performance indicators are described and explains regarding the discourses they represent and how they represent the national curriculum. The chapter explores knowledge about how such indicators can influence teaching and school choice, and how they interact with the national curriculum by describing and analysing the common performance indicators that are used in the Swedish school system. The evaluation systems also involve indicators representing background information, such as costs and number of pupils and teachers. Skolverkets Internetbaserade Resultat-och kvalitets Informations System is a database of statistics and general information on the Swedish National Agency of Education website. ValjaSkola is a relatively new website and is provided by the Swedish National Agency for Education. The reductive simplification of the national curriculum is exaggerated by the complete dominance of indicators representing only three school subjects: Swedish, English and mathematics.

  • 33.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Municipalities as mediators and enactors of marketisation and inclusion policies2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nyutbildade lärares erfarenheter av den första tiden i yrket: Utvecklingen av professionell identitet i en ny tid2019Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Schools in the intersection between the market and the audit society: Reflections on the presentations from a Swedish perspective2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Systematic quality work in Swedish schools: intentions and dilemmas2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2001-7405, E-ISSN 2001-7413, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 23-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the intentions and internal logic of a systematic quality work programme in Swedish schools as an example of institutionalization of an international super-standard in large public organizations. A programme theory analysis is used to illuminate the intentions, inner logic, involved actors, possible limitations and underlying assumptions of the evaluation system, which together constitute the systematic quality work. What is realistically achievable is also highlighted and analysed in relation to current research and the welfare liberal, and social democratic education policy perspectives expressed in the National curriculum. The programme analysis indicates an ambitious, all-embracing, and ever-present evaluation system and exposes inherent potential contradictions. The programme could foster improvement and mirrors the distribution of responsibilities that characterizes Swedish school governance, which implies that how the programme is enacted in schools will be decisive for its results. The potential of the programme in practice is discussed in relation to the varying local context’s inherent risks and dilemmas, concerning governance, reductionism, constitutive effects, and working conditions. 

  • 37.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Systematiskt kvalitetsarbete i skolan – en programteorianalys2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Så arbetar kommunerna med det breda säkerhetsarbetet2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Teacher autonomy in the era of New Public Management2015In: Nordic journal of studies in educational policy, Vol. 1, article id 28144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how upper secondary school teachers perceive and respond to the consequences fortheir professional autonomy of recent school reforms and restructurings. Based on empirical material frominterviews of 119 teachers in three studies conducted between 2002 and 2014, the findings indicate thatteacher autonomy has been reduced by school reforms and restructurings since the late 1980s. Regardless oftheir individual aims, these reforms have collectively created a power structure that distributes power to thestate, municipalities, principals and the school market, including ‘customers’, that is, students, at the expenseof teacher autonomy. Teacher agency follows certain policies at the discourse level, such as decentralisationand management by objectives and results, but in practice seems to be based on individuals’ and groups’capacities to exploit opportunities for agency in combination with more or less facilitative management andorganisation cultures. This development is multifaceted and varies locally, but the overall trend can bedescribed as a shift from occupational to organisational professionalism and from ‘licensed’ to ‘regulated’autonomy but emphasising the influence of market logics.

  • 40.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Teachers’ experiences of school choice - clashing logics in a changingSwedish education system. 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Teachers’ perceptions of individual performance-related pay in practice: A picture of a counterproductive pay system2012In: Educational Management Administration & Leadership, ISSN 1741-1432, E-ISSN 1741-1440, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 376-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes and discusses Swedish upper-secondary teachers’ perceptions of the effects of individual performance-related pay (PRP) in the context of educational restructuring and governance. The empirical data were generated through semi-structured interviews of 23 teachers. Power’s distinction between programmatic and technological elements of audit is used as a frame of reference for the problematization of the pay system. The findings demonstrate a wide gap between the programmatic goals and their fulfilment in practice. The ability of the pay system to deliver its main objective, to enhance motivation by rewarding good performance, is questioned. The performance assessment criteria are neither well known nor motivate the teachers, and they perceive the appraisal as arbitrary and unfair, with a tendency to reward work of peripheral significance. Employers and teachers are supposed to engage in salary-setting dialogues, but in some cases these dialogues are neglected, and when they do occur the employers frequently do not explain how the quality of their performance is appraised. Implications for the teaching profession are discussed. The study indicates that the PRP system contributes to a shift from occupational to organizational professionalism and challenges a common work culture.

  • 42.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Teachers’ professional work and identities: Negotiating inclusive agendas and market pressures inSweden and England.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The construction of the new public management teacher in Sweden2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    The construction of upper secondary teachers in current education reforms.2010In: Advancing Quality Cultures for Teacher Education in Europe:: Tensions and Opportunities / [ed] B. Hudson, P Zgaga, B. Åstrand, Umeå: Umeå School of Education, Umeå University , 2010, p. 183-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last few decades have been characterised by extensive school reforms and the change-pace has been high in many countries. This is also true for Sweden, which could be of international interest as an example of new policy trends.  The aim of this article is to describe and discuss how the upper secondary teachers’ professional roles and projects are constructed in current policy texts. Documents from two reform periods (1988-2004 and 2008) are analysed. Using critical discourse analysis, three themes are focused: how the motives for the reforms are represented, how knowledge and tasks are defined and what the implications may be for the professional autonomy. The transition from the first to the second reform period implies substantial shifts of Swedish education policy. The long tradition of reforms aiming at integration of all students is broken and the strivings for decentralisation has come to a halt. The motives for change were during the first period described as new demands from rapid changes in the surrounding world and working life, while they in the second period are about the low quality of the present educations. There is also a shift in the construction of teachers and views on desirable knowledge. Knowledge is now defined as competence which narrows the wide definition of knowledge from the first period. Work-related learning is given priority, while other tasks for the upper secondary education are toned down. The previous emphasis on teachers’ autonomy is replaced by stronger state governing and more influence from the receivers of the students, at the cost of teachers’ discretionary power. These changes clashes with the present curriculum and teachers’ professional identities.

  • 45.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The link between quality and winners/losers in the school market2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    To Measure What We Value or to Value What We Can Measure?: Performance Indicators asa Basis for School Choice.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lundström, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    “Why should wecollaborate when we are expected to compete?”: School principals balancing marketization and inclusion in Swedish upper secondary education2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lundström, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Alexiadou, Nafsika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Transformation in English and Swedish School Systems under the influence of New Public Management2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lundström, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Erixon Arreman, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Dovemark, Marianne
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Holm, Ann-Sofie
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Teachers’ professional roles in relation to policy demands on inclusive education, raised student performance and marketization in Swedish post-16 education2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Lundström, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Hanberger, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Intentions and Knowledge Guiding two Swedish cities: Local Safety Policy and Work2012Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf