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  • 1.
    Bergvall-Kåreborn, Birgitta
    et al.
    LTU.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    User Driven Service Design and Innovation Platforms2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bodén, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Jegers, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lidström, Mattias
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Point or click?: Evaluating two input modalities for mobile games2007In: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research in computer games have focused on user experience from the perspectives of game content, graphics, interactivity and underling game story while missing to address the effect of a certain input modality on the user experience. In this paper we report from two user studies that focus on players' experience and performance in relation to the use of two different input modalities for the same game and whether it changes the flow and gameplay in any way. The overall research was according to this whether a game can be more fun to play with a certain input modality? The paper presents the results from these studies and draws conclusions based on these data in relation to computer games and user experiences in the context of mobile game playing.

  • 3.
    Croon Fors, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Digital Materiality as Imprints and Landmarks: the case of Northern Lights2010In: International Journal of Information Ethics, ISSN 1614-1687, Vol. 12, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Dalton, Nicholas S
    et al.
    Schnädelbach, HolgerWiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.Varoudis, Tasos
    Architecture and interaction: human-computer interaction in time and place2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 5. Dalton, Nick
    et al.
    Green, Keith Evan
    Dalton, Ruth
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Hoelscher, Christoph
    Mathew, Anijo
    Schnädelbach, Holger
    Varoudis, Tasos
    Interaction and architectural space: Nick Dalton, Keith Evan Green, Ruth Dalton, Mikael Wiberg, Christoph Hoelscher, Anijo Mathew, Holger Schnädelbach, Tasos Varoudis2014In: CHI '14 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For many in the field of HCI, location and space are synonymous; yet, as we move from the mobile era to the ubiquitous era, computing becomes entangled with notions of space. This workshop critically examines the role of space in human-computer interfaces. The objective is to bring together diverse perspectives of space, drawing from architecture, philosophy, art, geography, design, dance, spatial-cognition, mathematics, computing, and still other domains, towards foregrounding space in theoretical discussions and explorations within the CHI community. Expected outcomes are the reporting of fresh insights into the impact and role of space in the interaction process.

  • 6.
    Dalton, Sheep
    et al.
    Northumbria University.
    Schnädelbach, Holger
    University of Nottingham.
    Varoudis, Tasos
    University College London.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Architects of information2016In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 62-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interaction design is increasingly about embedding interactive technologies in our built environment; architecture is increasingly about the use of interactive technologies to reimagine and dynamically repurpose our built environment. This forum focuses on this intersection of interaction and architecture

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Edenius, Mats
    Uppsala universitet.
    Managing Open Innovation Technologies2012Book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Inside-Out Interaction: An Interaction Technique for Dealing with Large Interface Surfaces such as Web Pages on Small Screen Displays2004In: International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques: ACM SIGGRAPH 2004 Sketches, 2004, p. 106-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics. Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    ScrollPad: Tangible Scrolling with Mobile Devices2004In: Proceedings of the 37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS'04), 2004, p. 6-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we approach the problem of managing large visual sets of data on small mobile devices. While current approaches either focuses on 1) scrolling on the mobile device, or 2) reducing the content in various ways (e.g. zooming, automatic redesign depending on the screen size of a mobile device, etc) our approach is to scroll with the mobile device itself (i.e. object in the world scrolling) over a large virtual area. We present the background for this project and working prototype called Scrollpad developed to illustrate this concept. We then present an initial user study conducted and relate this project to similar efforts made before concluding the paper.

  • 10.
    Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Department of Architecture and Design, Politecnico di Torino, Italy.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Thinking with Interactive Artifacts: Reflection as a Concept in Design Outcomes2018In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflection is a recurring notion in the HCI/interaction design literature. Throughout the years reflection has been highlighted as a key dimension of design thinking and as an important ingredient of design processes. In this paper we take stock in our community's interest in reflection, and we suggest that while it has been acknowledged as a cornerstone for design processes, it has been less explored as a basis for design outcomes. Given this extensive literature study, it seems that 1) the interest in this area is growing, and we present tables that illustrate this growing interest over time; 2) reflection and behavioral change are two interrelated notions; and 3) these notions are well-explored in our field. Further, we suggest that as interaction design is increasingly exploring the design of tangible, smart, connected, and even intelligent artifacts, we should think about how reflection and our ability to think with artifacts can be extended to include the design of interactive artifacts. In this paper we suggest how that might be done, and we point at a design space for designing such interactive artifacts to think with.

  • 11. Ghajargar, Maliheh
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Designing IoT Systems that Support Reflective Thinking: A Relational Approach2018In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 21-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems are, to a large extent, about relationships between people, activities, objects, technologies, and places. A systems approach focuses on how things are interrelated, and what the different parts can accomplish together. In similar terms, reflective thinking is also relational. We think often with each other when we talk about and share our experiences and memories. We are also increasingly using smart objects for our everyday activities. However, designing IoT (Internet of Things) devices typically relies on artifacts rather than relationships. In this paper, we present a modeling technique for the design and analysis of IoT artifacts and systems that is fundamentally relational in its approach. Having outlined the need for relational approaches to designing IoT systems, we first present three examples, where we demonstrate how our relational approach allows for the analysis of existing smart objects designed to function in different relationships with the user, user activity and the situation. Accordingly, we present these IoT systems from the perspectives of the augment me, the comply with me, and the engage me relational models. Having presented these three examples that illustrate how IoT systems can be analyzed as systems of relationships, we then present the prototype of an IoT artifact intended to support reflection in the user. With this fourth example, we introduce the make me think relationship, and also show how our modeling technique can be useful for design of new IoT systems. Accordingly, we suggest a modeling technique that can be used as a tool for designing and analyzing IoT systems. We believe this modeling technique can contribute to a relational approach toward IoT. We conclude this paper suggesting that our proposed modeling technique cannot only help to model relationships between a user and a smart object, but can also be scaled, allowing for the modeling of more complex IoT systems, where there are an increased number of users using many smart objects in different places, but still integrated as a complex system.

  • 12.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lost in translation: Investigating the ambiguity of availability cues in an online media space2007In: Behaviour & Information Technology: An international journal on the human aspects of computingArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of an online media space addressing the question of how availability is managed in an interaction-intensive organization. We relied on three different data collection techniques and analysed our data in relation to three different work modes. During this study we participated in an online media space, for approximately six months making spot checks and observing the population from which ten subjects were selected for interviews. Our results show how techniques and strategies for availability management are developed and continuously adapted to a shared common ground. Further, our results show how having the communication channel open, and regulating availability on a social level instead of on a solely technical level, has the advantage of better coping with the ever-changing dynamics in group works. Finally, we show that there exists an ambiguity of availability cues in online media spaces that is smoothly handled by individuals.

  • 13.
    Harr, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Whittaker, Steve
    UCSC.
    Understanding search behavior in professional social networks2011In: Human Technology, ISSN 1795-6889, E-ISSN 1795-6889, ISSN 1795-6889, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 194-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an empirical study of social interaction in a professional social network. As the point of departure, we take previous research into distributed work and information foraging theory to explore interaction search behavior of individuals active in professional networks, examining how social factors govern their behavior. For this exploration, we focused on the process through which relevant collaborators are chosen to execute shared work tasks in the area of logistics, and identified six characteristics of the explored processes. We recognized the “survival of the social” as a cornerstone for efficient and long-term professional networks and outlined design implications arising from our findings. More specifically, we found that participants are oriented to solutions that involve active social agents and social relations, rather than optimizing based on task characteristics, efficiency, and cost. These behaviors motivate the need for the concept of social interaction foraging.

  • 14. Henfridsson, Ola
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Lindgren, Rikard
    SeamlessTalk: User-controlled session management for sustained car conversations2004In: The Interaction Society: Practice, Theories, and Supportive Technologies, 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Industrial informatics design use and innovation2010Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Holmström, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Industrial informatics: what we know and what we don't know2010In: Industrial informatics design use and innovation / [ed] Holmström, Jonny, Wiberg, Mikael & Lund, Andreas, IGI Global , 2010, p. 1-4Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hyuk Park, Jong
    et al.
    Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea.
    AU, Oscar C.
    Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Hong Kong, China.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lee, Changhoon
    Hanshin University, Yangsan-dong, Osan Korea.
    Recent advances and future directions in multimedia and mobile computing2011In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, ISSN 1380-7501, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 237-242Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Pervasive gaming meets CSCW: Continuity, Collaboration & Context2005In: "Computer games & CSCW" workshop at the 9th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW ´05), 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Pervasive Gaming in the Everyday World2006In: IEEE Pervasive Computing, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Jegers, Kalle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    User Behavior in Pervasive Gaming2004In: IEEE Pervasive computing: Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: work-in-progress paper, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 35-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lassinantti, Josefin
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile e-Services and Open Data in e-Government Processes: concept and Design2015In: Mobile Web and Intelligent Information Systems: 12th International Conference, MobiWis 2015, Rome, Italy, August 24-26, 2015, Proceedings / [ed] Muhammad Younas, Irfan Awan, Massimo Mecella, Springer, 2015, Vol. 9228, p. 149-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional service life cycle starts with the formulation of required needs and ends with the adoption and ownership of the service. In an e-government context, this takes the form of citizens consuming services provided by the public sector bodies. We examine how a combination of mobile e-services and open data can extend and allow possible citizen-driven continuation of the service life cycle. The chosen method is a concept-driven approach, manifesting our concept in a digital prototype, which allows citizens to generate and acquire open data, as well as develop and publish their own e-services. 

  • 22.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lassinantti, Josefin
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile e-Services and Open Data in e-Government Processes: Transforming Citizen Involvement2015In: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Information Integration and Web-based Applications & Services (iiWAS2015) / [ed] Maria Indrawan-Santiago, Matthias Steinbauer, Ismail Khalil, Gabriele Anderst-Kotsis, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 58-67Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile computing is one of the most important paradigms to influence and enhance modern e-services, mainly due to its anytime and anywhere availability adding value to the delivered service. In a traditional e-government context, the service life cycle takes the form of citizens consuming services provided by public sector bodies. In this paper, we use a novel concept combining mobile e-services and open data to extend and allow possible citizen-driven continuation of the service life cycle. The concept is evaluated throughout the design process, and also becomes the subject of a focus group. Our most important conclusions are that the concept design extends the service life cycle within the public sector context, and also creates new entrances for citizens to participate in generating and acquiring open data, thus transforming citizens' involvement. The result is increased co-operation, as well as increased adoption and availability of data and e-services, enhancing citizen participation.

  • 23. Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Application Mobility: Concept and Design2015In: Recent Advances in Ambient Intelligence and Context-Aware Computing / [ed] Kevin Curran, USA: IGI Global, 2015, p. 169-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility has become an omnipresent part of our modern IT society. Alongside the general taxonomy of mobile users, terminals, sessions, and services, there are also more specialized forms of mobility. Context-Awareness Supported Application Mobility (CASAM) or “Application Mobility” is one such form that is explored in this chapter. CASAM builds on the idea of using context to move an application between different devices during its execution in order to provide relevant information and/or services. The authors use a concept-driven approach to advance mobile systems research, integrating it with a more traditional user-centric method and a case study, further exploring the concept of CASAM. To empirically situate our design work they conducted an empirical study of a home care service group serving the Swedish municipality of Skellefteå, followed by an exercise in matching the properties of the CASAM concept in relation to problems within current workflow.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Dan
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Conceptually Advancing “Application Mobility” Towards Design2012In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence, ISSN 1941-6245, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobility has become an omnipresent part of our modern IT society. Alongside the general mobility taxonomy of mobile users, terminals, sessions and services, there are also more specialized forms of mobility. Context Awareness Supported Application Mobility (CASAM) or “Application Mobility” is one such form that is explored in this paper. CASAM builds on the idea of using context to move an application between different devices during its execution, in order to provide relevant information and/or services. In this article we use a concept-driven approach to advance mobile systems research, integrating it with a more traditional user-centric method and a case study, further exploring the concept of CASAM. To empirically situate our design work we conducted an empirical study of a home care service group serving the Swedish municipality of Skellefteå, followed by an exercise in matching the properties of the CASAM concept in relation to problems within current workflow (e.g. scheduling, travel, care situation, communication and debriefing). The result is a proposal for an IT artifact manifesting the CASAM concept, attending to all the identified problems while at the same time validating the concept.

  • 25. Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, USA.
    Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts2017In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 53, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As materiality of interactive artifacts is diversified with integrated physical and digital materials, metaphoric design approaches in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) go beyond resembling the appearance of physical objects, exploring novel materials and forms of interactive artifacts. The hybrid materialities and forms of artifacts influence how interactivity is perceived, reframing the concept of affordances according to its evolving relationship to metaphors and materialities. By conceptualizing interactive forms in their surface, behavioral and systemic aspects, we examine multifaceted roles of metaphors in HCI from concealing and revealing a formal system to expanding and reifying its meaning; and propose a morphologic perspective on affordances as an invitation for making variations of interactive forms by compositing multiple design resources.

  • 26.
    Kakihara, Masao
    et al.
    London School of Economics.
    Sorensen, Carsten
    London School of Economics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Fluid interaction in mobile work practices2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kaptelinin, Victor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Björnfot, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Danielsson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mobile Remote Presence Enhanced with Contactless Object Manipulation: An Exploratory Study2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Press, 2017, p. 2690-2697Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A telepresence robot is a mobile telecommunication device, remotely controlled by its "pilot", which supports an embodied presence of the pilot in a different location (the "local setting"). A common problem with telepresence robots is their limited capability of interacting with the physical environment. A potential solution, explored in the present study, is supporting "double remote control" interaction, that is, making it possible for the pilot, in addition to remotely controlling the robot, to also remotely control objects in the local setting. In the study we enacted meaningful scenarios of employing telepresence robots with and without double remote control capabilities. The evidence collected in the study allows us to tentatively assess the effects of double remote control interaction on user experience and social context. Issues for future research are discussed.

  • 28.
    Keller, Christina
    et al.
    Jönköping.
    Wiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.Ågerfalk, PärUppsala universitet.Eriksson, JennyUppsala universitet.
    Nordic Contributions in IS Research: Proceedings of the Third Scandinavian Conference on Information Systems, SCIS 20122012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lund, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Ambient Displays Beyond Conventions2004In: Designinig for Attention Workshop: Workshop at HCI 2004, Design for Life. The 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference., 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Lund, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Boden, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    On the making of things: taking a risk with 3D printing2015In: PIN-C 2015 reframing design: proceedings of the 4th participatory innovation conference 2015 / [ed] Rianne Valkenburg, Coen Dekkers and Janneke Sluijs, Hauge: The Hauge University of applied sciences , 2015, Vol. 1, p. 485-499Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how the tradition of craft can be re-visited to assist a move beyond 3D-printed objects. While CAD, 3D modeling and 3D printing do offer precise tools for the repetitive manufacturing of small objects we argue that the closeness to "the materials at hand" is lost at the current moment. Via a practical design case we illustrate how we have experimented with ways of re-introducing craftsmanship both as an opportunity and as a necessity for moving forward. We combine this explorative/maker approach with an analytical approach, and analyze the process using the viewpoint of David Pye's (1968) notions of "workmanship of risk" and "workmanship of certainty".

  • 31. Molka-Danielsen, Judith
    et al.
    Keller, ChristinaWiberg, MikaelUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    IRIS – Selected Papers of the Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandinavia: issue theme: "IRIS 35 Designing the Interactive Society"2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Deshpande, Parag
    Wahlström, Viktoria
    Olsson, Tommy
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    A NEAT Solution: Where Interaction Design and Public Health MeetManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Office workers tend not to move about during work hours. A series of medical observational studies

    have shown that extended sitting is associated with several negative health outcomes including

    obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), breast and colon cancer and premature

    mortality. Therefore, developing ways to encourage physical activity and breaking the habit of

    prolonged sitting in offices is urgently needed. Few studies, however, have investigated the nature

    of local movement and mobility in workspaces in depth and taking a cross disciplinary approach.

    This paper reports on an ongoing cross-disciplinary research project targeted at increasing physical

    activity of office workers while reducing prolonged sitting. Our collaboration between the

    departments of Informatics, Public Health and Clinical Medicine and the Design School at Umeå

    University resulted in two ethnographic studies. This led to the development and implementation of

    two prototypes referred to as the “NEAT Lamp” and the “Talking Tree”. The “NEAT Lamp” is a

    simple sensor-based lamp that was evaluated in situ in our second ethnographic study. The results

    of this study deepened our understanding of local movement and mobility in offices and resulted in

    the design of a second prototype, the “Talking Tree”. Using the knowledge gained through our

    ethnographic studies and the experience of using the prototypes, we were able to develop a

    conceptual framework for describing the patterns of local movement and mobility of office workers.

    This paper describes the process leading to the development of this framework. Moreover, it

    highlights how this process benefited from the cross-disciplinary nature of the project.

  • 33.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Mikael, Wiberg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Creating a Sense of Unity: From Quantified Self to Qualitative Space2016In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction: Methods, Techniques, and Best Practices / [ed] Margherita Antona, Constantine Stephanidis, Springer, 2016, p. 371-381Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and usage of Personal Informatics (PI) systems have been subjects of rapidly growing interest in recent years. PI systems are typically designed to monitor individuals' physical activity and encourage them to be more active, thereby 'hacking' the habit of prolonged sitting. Most PI systems focus solely on collecting quantitative data to encourage self-reflection and are therefore sometimes discussed in terms of the Quantified Self movement. However, this perspective is wholly focused on individual bodily movements and neglects the role of architectural spaces. This paper discusses an ongoing project focused on PI systems design at the intersection of bodily movements and the office as an architectural space. Taking this as a point of departure, we introduce a simple prototype interactive lamp known as the NEAT lamp, which was designed, implemented and evaluated in relation to everyday office work. The rationale underpinning the prototype's design is presented, followed by the results of a real-world evaluation of its effects in practice. We also discuss the role of the NEAT lamp as an ambient light that promotes awareness of sedentary behavior in the office as an open architectural space. Finally, we highlight the role of ambient displays as a medium for creating a sense of unity between the self and the architectural space, and propose that this observation suggests that we should move the discussion away from "quantified selves" towards qualitative spaces.

  • 34.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Getting it going: explorations at the intersection of moving bodies, information technology and architecture2016In: Architecture and interaction: human computer interaction in space and place / [ed] Nicholas S. Dalton, Holger Schnädelbach, Mikael Wiberg, Tasos Varoudis, Springer, 2016, p. 113-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Moradi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Redesigning Work: From Sedentariness to Activeness2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the core of ‘Healthcare Information Systems’ is an idea of designing systems that are functional, practical and contained integrated solutions. As humans have always spent the majority of their hours in seated positions in work environments and workplaces, it is important to investigate these environments before applying a design for promoting daily movement and physical activity. In this paper we focus on the history of workplace design. We argue that the strategies for reaching this sedentary living style have been carried out by different means during the past 70 years of technological development. Further on, we illustrate this current paradigm through the presentation of an empirical study that shows how people compensate for a passive mode of working. In this paper, we contribute to the current development in our field by offering this alternative design paradigm and we suggest concept-driven design research as a possible way forward if we are to design information systems for active worklife.

  • 36.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sociala medier - ett nät av härskartekniker?2015In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-34Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På senare tid har fenomenet näthat debatterats flitigt som en företeelse i sociala medier. Det handlar om explicita former av mobbning, utpekanden och svartmålande av individer och grupper. Näthat kan ses som en extrem form av försök att skapa maktasymmetrier mellan människor, det kan även ses som en förlängning av härskartekniker. I vår forskning har vi dock riktat vår uppmärksamhet mot ett närbesläktat, men betydligt mer subtilt sätt att utöva sociala makt- och positioneringsspel på nätet, exempelvis genom osynliggörande, förlöjligande, undanhållande av information, dubbel bestraffning, påförande av skuld och skam, våld och hot om våld samt objektifiering. Mer specifikt fokuserar vi vilka möjligheter att utöva makt som möjliggörs när dessa klassiska härskartekniker flyttar ut i sociala medier. De centrala frågorna i denna artikel är: vilka uttryck tar sig de klassiska härskarteknikerna i sociala medier, och vilka motstrategier växer fram i strävan att förhålla sig till dessa? Vår forskning bygger på en kvalitativ intervjustudie av människors användning och erfarenheter av Facebook, Instagram, Twitter och bloggar. Mot bakgrund av studien visar vi hur sociala mediers handlingsutrymmen möjliggör olika former av härskartekniker, och vi diskuterar även vilken betydelse internets och sociala mediers potentiella spridnings- och nätverkseffekter har i detta sammanhang. Vidare identifierar vi 11 motstrategier som har formats i syfte att bemöta och stävja utövande av härskartekniker i sociala medier. Avslutningsvis diskuterar vi vad medieträning för sociala medier skulle kunna innebära i ljuset av de sociala makt- och positioneringsspel som just nu utspelar sig på Facebook, Twitter, Instagram och i bloggosfären.

  • 37.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Sociala medier och härskartekniker2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En snabb kommentar, en gest eller bara en lite för lång konstpaus kan fullständigt omdefiniera det sociala rummet. Mellan två personer skapas en maktasymmetri där den ena parten använder tekniker för att ställa sig ovanför, vid sidan om, eller i avstånd från den andre. Det sker subtilt men ändå så uppenbart. Det handlar om härskartekniker.

    Sociala medier är inget undantag. Även på Twitter, Facebook, Instagram och i exempelvis bloggosfären, pågår liknande sociala makt- och positioneringsspel. I den här boken möter du nätprofilerna Johanna Frändén och Clara Lidström som båda har skapat sig en stark röst och position i de sociala medierna. Genom deras erfarenheter lär vi oss om strategier som har vuxit fram för att förhålla sig till det sociala spel som pågår på nätet.

    Bokens teoretiska utgångspunkt är de handlingsutrymmen och härskartekniker som de sociala medierna möjliggör. Författarna Annakarin Nyberg och Mikael Wiberg presenterar tio härskartekniker som idag utövas på nätet – och tio motstrategier för att utveckla ett bättre förhållningssätt till såväl subtila som tydliga härskartekniker i sociala medier.

    Sociala medier och härskartekniker vänder sig till dig som vill förstå vår digitala samtid. Boken syftar till att medvetandegöra det komplexa i det till synes ytliga i vår vardag på nätet.

  • 38.
    Robles, Erica Reyna
    et al.
    Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From materials to materiality: Thinking of computation from within an Ice Hotel2011In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Indiana university.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Beyond UI analysis: Modeling flows of interactivity2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Stolterman, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Concept-driven interaction design research2010In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 95-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore a concept-driven approach to interaction design research with a specific focus on theoretical advancements. We introduce this approach as a complementary approach to more traditional, and well-known, user-centered interaction design approaches. A concept-driven approach aims at manifesting theoretical concepts in concrete designs. A good concept design is both conceptually and historically grounded, bearing signs of the intended theoretical considerations. In the area of human–computer interaction and interaction design research, this approach has been quite popular but not necessarily explicitly recognized and developed as a proper research methodology. In this article, we demonstrate how a concept-driven approach can coexist, and be integrated with, common user-centered approaches to interaction design through the development of a model that makes explicit the existing cycle of prototyping, theory development, and user studies. We also present a set of basic principles that could constitute a foundation for concept driven interaction research, and we have considered and described the methodological implications given these principles. For the field of interaction design research we find this as an important point of departure for taking the next step toward the construction and verification of theoretical constructs that can help inform and guide future design research projects on novel interaction technologies.

  • 41.
    Svelander, Angelica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The Practice of Selfies2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selfies, commonly understood as those shallow pictures taken with no preparation, no thought behind them, no careful editing, no thoughtful posing, and no other purpose than showing off one?s look. Thepractice of taking photos of oneself has been around for quite a while. One can recall the days when Polaroid pictures were taken and handed out to friends and family. Nowadays, technology lets us share these self portraits online via social media, making them viewable by anyone around the globe.The phenomenon became so big that a new word was invented for it. Selfies are of course enabled by a combination of interactive materials, including social media, such as Instagram, and the camera phone. Beyond that, however, and in staying true to the socio-material approach, one sees thepractice of taking selfies as a phenomenon consisting of not only interactive materials but also social processes.

  • 42.
    Vaucelle, Cati
    et al.
    MIT Media Lab Europe.
    Africano, Diana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Institute of Design.
    Davenport, Glorianna
    MIT Media Lab.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Moving Pictures: Looking Out / Looking In2005In: Siggraph 2005 - The 32nd International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, Educators program., 2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Wiberg, Charlotte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Configuring social agents2001In: HCI International: 8th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, 2001, p. 450-454Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social agents have recently been more frequently used in the user interface. However, so far not many studies have been conducted on what impact such interfaces have on users behavior. This paper discusses this and reports on empirical findings, which focus on impact of social agents on user behavior. We talk of social agents as interfaces that act autonomously but are related to the actions of the user. However, to really figure out what social impact these interfaces have on humans, we discuss what characteristics of social agents that should be possible to configure, in order to establish, maintain and develop a fruitful relation with the user. In order to do so, we needed to explore the impact for real users. The exploration of the impact of social agents such as BonzyBuddy the Parrot and Bob, the Paper-clip guy, was done empirically through observations and interviews with users. Based on empirical data collected in the study, a user-agent interaction model was constructed. The model illustrates three dimensions for configuration of social interfaces. Given the interaction model the two agents investigate are discussed followed by a discussion on what implications these observations has for design of social agents. Having identified the need for self-examining and selfadapting social agents and related problems we then conclude the paper and points at some future work.

  • 44.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    An Architecturally Situated Approach to Place-based Mobile Interaction Design2005In: Location Awareness & Community workshop at the 9th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (ECSCW ´05)., 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    "Anytime, Anywhere" in the Context of Mobile Work2005In: Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology I-V, IDEA Group Inc. , 2005, p. 131-134Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Conversation Support for Persistent Mobile Interaction2005In: In proceedings of HCI International 2005 (HCII2005),, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Designing Interactive Architecture: ­ Lessons learned from a multi-professional approach to the design of an ambient computing environment2009In: International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    Det framväxande interaktionssamhället: En förändrad tid och plats2005In: Human IT - Tidskrift för studier av IT ur ett humanvetenskapligt perspektiv, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 96-125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Informatics.
    FolkMusic: A mobile peer-to-peer entertainment system2004In: HICSS37, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    From interactables to architectonic interaction2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 62-65Article in journal (Refereed)
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