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  • 1. Allas, Ular
    et al.
    Toom, Lauri
    Selyutina, Anastasia
    Maeorg, Uno
    Medina, Ricardo
    Merits, Andres
    Rinken, Ago
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Tenson, Tanel
    Antibacterial activity of the nitrovinylfuran G1 (Furvina) and its conversion products2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-Bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl) furan (G1 or Furvina) is an antimicrobial with a direct reactivity against thiol groups. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi. By reacting with thiol groups it causes direct damage to proteins but, as a result, is very short-living and interconverts into an array of reaction products. Our aim was to characterize thiol reactivity of G1 and its conversion products and establish how much of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects are due to the primary activity of G1 and how much can be attributed to its reaction products. Stability of G1 in growth media as well as its conversion in the presence of thiols was characterized. The structures of G1 decomposition products were determined using NMR and mass-spectroscopy. Concentration-and time-dependent killing curves showed that G1 is bacteriostatic for Escherichia coli at the concentration of 16 mu g/ml and bactericidal at 32 mu g/ml. However, G1 is inefficient against non-growing E. coli. Addition of cysteine to medium reduces the antimicrobial potency of G1. Nevertheless, the reaction products of G1 and cysteine enabled prolonged antimicrobial action of the drug. Therefore, the activity of 2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl) furan is a sum of its immediate reactivity and the antibacterial effects of the conversion products.

  • 2.
    Andresen, Liis
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Tenson, Tanel
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Cationic bactericidal peptide 1018 does not specifically target the stringent response alarmone (p)ppGpp2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial stringent response is a key regulator of bacterial virulence, biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance, and is a promising target for the development of new antibacterial compounds. The intracellular nucleotide (p)ppGpp acts as a messenger orchestrating the stringent response. A synthetic peptide 1018 was recently proposed to specifically disrupt biofilms by inhibiting the stringent response via direct interaction with (p) ppGpp (de la Fuente-Nunez et al. (2014) PLoS Pathogens). We have interrogated the specificity of the proposed molecular mechanism. When inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic and biofilm growth is tested simultaneously in the same assay, peptides 1018 and the control peptide 8101 generated by an inversion of the amino acid sequence of 1018 are equally potent, and, importantly, do not display a preferential activity against biofilm. 1018 inhibits planktonic growth of Escherichia coli equally efficiently either when the alleged target, (p) ppGpp, is essential (MOPS media lacking amino acid L-valine), or dispensable for growth (MOPS media supplemented with L-valine). Genetic disruption of the genes relA and spoT responsible for (p) ppGpp synthesis moderately sensitizes-rather than protects-E. coli to 1018. We suggest that the antimicrobial activity of 1018 does not rely on specific recognition of the stringent response messenger (p) ppGpp.

  • 3.
    Andresen, Liis
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Varik, Vallo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Tozawa, Yuzuru
    Jimmy, Steffi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lindberg, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Auxotrophy-based High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of Bacillus subtilis stringent response inhibitors2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 35824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stringent response is a central adaptation mechanism that allows bacteria to adjust their growth and metabolism according to environmental conditions. The functionality of the stringent response is crucial for bacterial virulence, survival during host invasion as well as antibiotic resistance and tolerance. Therefore, specific inhibitors of the stringent response hold great promise as molecular tools for disarming and pacifying bacterial pathogens. By taking advantage of the valine amino acid auxotrophy of the Bacillus subtilis stringent response-deficient strain, we have set up a High Throughput Screening assay for the identification of stringent response inhibitors. By screening 17,500 compounds, we have identified a novel class of antibacterials based on the 4-(6-(phenoxy) alkyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazole core. Detailed characterization of the hit compounds as well as two previously identified promising stringent response inhibitors-a ppGpp-mimic nucleotide Relacin and cationic peptide 1018 - showed that neither of the compounds is sufficiently specific, thus motivating future application of our screening assay to larger and more diverse molecular libraries.

  • 4. Arenz, Stefan
    et al.
    Abdelshahid, Maha
    Sohmen, Daniel
    Payoe, Roshani
    Starosta, Agata L.
    Berninghausen, Otto
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Beckmann, Roland
    Wilson, Daniel N.
    The stringent factor RelA adopts an open conformation on the ribosome to stimulate ppGpp synthesis2016In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 44, no 13, p. 6471-6481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Under stress conditions, such as nutrient starvation, deacylated tRNAs bound within the ribosomal A-site are recognized by the stringent factor RelA, which converts ATP and GTP/GDP to (p)ppGpp. The signaling molecules (p) ppGpp globally rewire the cellular transcriptional program and general metabolism, leading to stress adaptation. Despite the additional importance of the stringent response for regulation of bacterial virulence, antibiotic resistance and persistence, structural insight into how the ribosome and deacylated-tRNA stimulate RelA-mediated (p)ppGpp has been lacking. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of RelA in complex with the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with an average resolution of 3.7 angstrom and local resolution of 4 to > 10 angstrom for RelA. The structure reveals that RelA adopts a unique 'open' conformation, where the C-terminal domain (CTD) is intertwined around an A/T-like tRNA within the intersubunit cavity of the ribosome and the N-terminal domain (NTD) extends into the solvent. We propose that the open conformation of RelA on the ribosome relieves the autoinhibitory effect of the CTD on the NTD, thus leading to stimulation of (p)ppGpp synthesis by RelA.

  • 5. Beljantseva, Jelena
    et al.
    Kudrin, Pavel
    Andresen, Liis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Shingler, Vicky
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Negative allosteric regulation of Enterococcus faecalis small alarmone synthetase RelQ by single-stranded RNA2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 14, p. 3726-3731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmone nucleotides guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) and tetraphosphate (ppGpp), collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp, are key regulators of bacterial growth, stress adaptation, pathogenicity, and antibiotic tolerance. We show that the tetrameric small alarmone synthetase (SAS) RelQ from the Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecalis is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein. RelQ's enzymatic and RNA binding activities are subject to intricate allosteric regulation. (p)ppGpp synthesis is potently inhibited by the binding of single-stranded RNA. Conversely, RelQ's enzymatic activity destabilizes the RelQ: RNA complex. pppGpp, an allosteric activator of the enzyme, counteracts the effect of RNA. Tetramerization of RelQ is essential for this regulatory mechanism, because both RNA binding and enzymatic activity are abolished by deletion of the SAS-specific C-terminal helix 5 alpha. The interplay of pppGpp binding, (p)ppGpp synthesis, and RNA binding unites two archetypal regulatory paradigms within a single protein. The mechanism is likely a prevalent but previously unappreciated regulatory switch used by the widely distributed bacterial SAS enzymes.

  • 6. Beljantseva, Jelena
    et al.
    Kudrin, Pavel
    Jimmy, Steffi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Ehn, Marcel
    Pohl, Radek
    Varik, Vallo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). 1University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Tozawa, Yuzuru
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Tenson, Tanel
    Rejman, Dominik
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). 1University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Molecular mutagenesis of ppGpp: turning a RelA activator into an inhibitor2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 41839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmone nucleotide (p) ppGpp is a key regulator of bacterial metabolism, growth, stress tolerance and virulence, making (p) ppGpp-mediated signaling a promising target for development of antibacterials. Although ppGpp itself is an activator of the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase RelA, several ppGpp mimics have been developed as RelA inhibitors. However promising, the currently available ppGpp mimics are relatively inefficient, with IC50 in the sub-mM range. In an attempt to identify a potent and specific inhibitor of RelA capable of abrogating (p) ppGpp production in live bacterial cells, we have tested a targeted nucleotide library using a biochemical test system comprised of purified Escherichia coli components. While none of the compounds fulfilled this aim, the screen has yielded several potentially useful molecular tools for biochemical and structural work.

  • 7.
    Brodiazhenko, Tetiana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Takada, Hiraku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Nissan, Tracy
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Murina, Victoriia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Elimination of Ribosome Inactivating Factors Improves the Efficiency of Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell-Free Translation Systems2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 3041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cell-free translation systems based on cellular lysates optimized for in vitro protein synthesis have multiple applications both in basic and applied science, ranging from studies of translational regulation to cell-free production of proteins and ribosome-nascent chain complexes. In order to achieve both high activity and reproducibility in a translation system, it is essential that the ribosomes in the cellular lysate are enzymatically active. Here we demonstrate that genomic disruption of genes encoding ribosome inactivating factors – HPF in Bacillus subtilis and Stm1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae – robustly improve the activities of bacterial and yeast translation systems. Importantly, the elimination of B. subtilis HPF results in a complete loss of 100S ribosomes, which otherwise interfere with disome-based approaches for preparation of stalled ribosomal complexes for cryo-electron microscopy studies.

  • 8. Crowe-McAuliffe, Caillan
    et al.
    Graf, Michael
    Huter, Paul
    Takada, Hiraku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Abdelshahid, Maha
    Novácek, Jirí
    Murina, Victoriia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Wilson, Daniel N.
    Structural basis for antibiotic resistance mediated by the Bacillus subtilis ABCF ATPase VmlR2018In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 36, p. 8978-8983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria employ ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) to confer resistance to clinically important antibiotics. In Bacillus subtilis, the RPP VmlR confers resistance to lincomycin (Lnc) and the streptogramin A (SA) antibiotic virginiamycin M (VgM). VmlR is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein of the F type, which, like other antibiotic resistance (ARE) ABCF proteins, is thought to bind to antibiotic-stalled ribosomes and promote dissociation of the drug from its binding site. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which VmlR confers antibiotic resistance, we have determined a cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of an ATPase-deficient B. subtilis VmlR-EQ(2) mutant in complex with a B. subtilis ErmDL-stalled ribosomal complex (SRC). The structure reveals that VmlR binds within the E site of the ribosome, with the antibiotic resistance domain (ARD) reaching into the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) of the ribosome and a C-terminal extension (CTE) making contact with the small subunit (SSU). To access the PTC, VmlR induces a conformational change in the P-site tRNA, shifting the acceptor arm out of the PTC and relocating the CCA end of the P-site tRNA toward the A site. Together with microbiological analyses, our study indicates that VmlR allosterically dissociates the drug from its ribosomal binding site and exhibits specificity to dislodge VgM, Lnc, and the pleuromutilin tiamulin (Tia), but not chloramphenicol (Cam), linezolid (Lnz), nor the macrolide erythromycin (Ery).

  • 9.
    Dzhygyr, Ievgen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Cut-back analysis reveals the role of RelA's individual domains in its activation by 'starved' ribosomal complexes and pppGpp alarmone nucleotideManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gaca, Anthony O.
    et al.
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    Kudrin, Pavel
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Colomer-Winter, Cristina
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    Beljantseva, Jelena
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Liu, Kuanqing
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Anderson, Brent
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Wang, Jue D.
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Rejman, Dominik
    Prague, Czech Republic.
    Potrykus, Katarzyna
    Gdańsk, Poland; Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Cashel, Michael
    Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Lemos, Jose A.
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    From (p)ppGpp to (pp)pGpp: characterization of Regulatory Effects of pGpp Synthesized by the Small Alarmone Synthetase of Enterococcus faecalis2015In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 197, no 18, p. 2908-2919Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial stringent response (SR) is a conserved stress tolerance mechanism that orchestrates physiological alterations to enhance cell survival. This response is mediated by the intracellular accumulation of the alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp, collectively called (p) ppGpp. In Enterococcus faecalis, (p) ppGpp metabolism is carried out by the bifunctional synthetase/hydrolase E. faecalis Rel (Rel(Ef)) and the small alarmone synthetase (SAS) RelQ(Ef). Although Rel is the main enzyme responsible for SR activation in Firmicutes, there is emerging evidence that SASs can make important contributions to bacterial homeostasis. Here, we showed that RelQ(Ef) synthesizes ppGpp more efficiently than pppGpp without the need for ribosomes, tRNA, or mRNA. In addition to (p) ppGpp synthesis from GDP and GTP, RelQ(Ef) also efficiently utilized GMP to form GMP 3'-diphosphate (pGpp). Based on this observation, we sought to determine if pGpp exerts regulatory effects on cellular processes affected by (p) ppGpp. We found that pGpp, like (p) ppGpp, strongly inhibits the activity of E. faecalis enzymes involved in GTP biosynthesis and, to a lesser extent, transcription of rrnB by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Activation of E. coli RelA synthetase activity was observed in the presence of both pGpp and ppGpp, while RelQ(Ef) was activated only by ppGpp. Furthermore, enzymatic activity of RelQ(Ef) is insensitive to relacin, a (p) ppGpp analog developed as an inhibitor of "long" RelA/SpoT homolog (RSH) enzymes. We conclude that pGpp can likely function as a bacterial alarmone with target-specific regulatory effects that are similar to what has been observed for (p) ppGpp. IMPORTANCE Accumulation of the nucleotide second messengers (p) ppGpp in bacteria is an important signal regulating genetic and physiological networks contributing to stress tolerance, antibiotic persistence, and virulence. Understanding the function and regulation of the enzymes involved in (p) ppGpp turnover is therefore critical for designing strategies to eliminate the protective effects of this molecule. While characterizing the (p) ppGpp synthetase RelQ of Enterococcus faecalis (RelQ(Ef)), we found that, in addition to (p) ppGpp, RelQ(Ef) is an efficient producer of pGpp (GMP 3'-diphosphate). In vitro analysis revealed that pGpp exerts complex, target-specific effects on processes known to be modulated by (p) ppGpp. These findings provide a new regulatory feature of RelQ(Ef) and suggest that pGpp may represent a new member of the (pp) pGpp family of alarmones.

  • 11. Goormaghtigh, Frederic
    et al.
    Fraikin, Nathan
    Putrins, Marta
    Hallaert, Thibaut
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Garcia-Pino, Abel
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI–Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kasvandik, Sergo
    Udekwu, Klas
    Tenson, Tanel
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Van Melderen, Laurence
    Reassessing the Role of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Formation of Escherichia coli Type II Persister Cells2018In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e00640-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistence is a reversible and low-frequency phenomenon allowing a subpopulation of a clonal bacterial population to survive antibiotic treatments. Upon removal of the antibiotic, persister cells resume growth and give rise to viable progeny. Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were assumed to play a key role in the formation of persister cells in Escherichia coli based on the observation that successive deletions of TA systems decreased persistence frequency. In addition, the model proposed that stochastic fluctuations of (p)ppGpp levels are the basis for triggering activation of TA systems. Cells in which TA systems are activated are thought to enter a dormancy state and therefore survive the antibiotic treatment. Using independently constructed strains and newly designed fluorescent reporters, we reassessed the roles of TA modules in persistence both at the population and single-cell levels. Our data confirm that the deletion of 10 TA systems does not affect persistence to ofloxacin or ampicillin. Moreover, microfluidic experiments performed with a strain reporting the induction of the yefM-yoeB TA system allowed the observation of a small number of type II persister cells that resume growth after removal of ampicillin. However, we were unable to establish a correlation between high fluorescence and persistence, since the fluorescence of persister cells was comparable to that of the bulk of the population and none of the cells showing high fluorescence were able to resume growth upon removal of the antibiotic. Altogether, these data show that there is no direct link between induction of TA systems and persistence to antibiotics. IMPORTANCE Within a growing bacterial population, a small subpopulation of cells is able to survive antibiotic treatment by entering a transient state of dormancy referred to as persistence. Persistence is thought to be the cause of relapsing bacterial infections and is a major public health concern. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems are small modules composed of a toxic protein and an antitoxin protein counteracting the toxin activity. These systems were thought to be pivotal players in persistence until recent developments in the field. Our results demonstrate that previous influential reports had technical flaws and that there is no direct link between induction of TA systems and persistence to antibiotics.

  • 12. Goormaghtigh, Frederic
    et al.
    Fraikin, Nathan
    Putrins, Marta
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Garcia-Pino, Abel
    Udekwu, Klas
    Tenson, Tanel
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Van Melderen, Laurence
    Reply to Holden and Errington, "Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems and Persister Cells"2018In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e01838-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Small Alarmone Synthetases as novel bacterial RNA-binding proteins2017In: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 14, no 12, p. 1695-1699Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmone nucleotides guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) and tetraphosphate (ppGpp), collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp, are key regulators of bacterial growth, stress adaptation, antibiotic tolerance and pathogenicity. We have recently shown that the Small Alarmone Synthetase (SAS) RelQ from the Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecalis has an RNA-binding activity (Beljantseva et al. 2017). RelQ's activities as an enzyme and as an RNA-binding protein are mutually incompatible: binding of single-stranded RNA potently inhibits (p)ppGpp synthesis in a sequence-specific manner, and RelQ's enzymatic activity destabilizes the RNA: RelQ complex. RelQ's allosteric regulator, pppGpp, destabilizes RNA binding and activates RelQ's enzymatic activity. Since SAS enzymes are widely distributed in bacteria, and, as has been discovered recently, are also mobilized by phages (Dedrick et al. 2017), RNA binding to SASs could be a widespread mechanism. The initial discovery raises numerous questions regarding RNA-binding function of the SAS enzymes: What is the molecular mechanism underlying the incompatibility of RNA: SAS complex formation with pppGpp binding and (p)ppGpp synthesis? What are the RNA targets in living cells? What is the regulatory output of the system - (p)ppGpp synthesis, modulation of RNA structure and function, or both?

  • 14.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Murakami, Katsuhiko S.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for RNA Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Gerdes, Kenn
    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Recent functional insights into the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial physiology2015In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, ISSN 1740-1526, E-ISSN 1740-1534, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 298-309Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate (collectively referred to as (p) ppGpp) are involved in regulating growth and several different stress responses in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of (p) ppGpp metabolism and (p) ppGpp-mediated regulation. In this Review, we summarize these recent insights, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms governing the activity of the RelA/SpoT homologue (RSH) proteins, which are key players that regulate the cellular levels of (p) ppGpp. We also discuss the structural basis of transcriptional regulation by (p) ppGpp and the role of (p) ppGpp in GTP metabolism and in the emergence of bacterial persisters.

  • 15. Kaldalu, Niilo
    et al.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Persisters - as elusive as ever2016In: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, ISSN 0175-7598, E-ISSN 1432-0614, Vol. 100, no 15, p. 6545-6553Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Persisters-a drug-tolerant sub-population in an isogenic bacterial culture-have been featured throughout the last decade due to their important role in recurrent bacterial infections. Numerous investigations detail the mechanisms responsible for the formation of persisters and suggest exciting strategies for their eradication. In this review, we argue that the very term "persistence" is currently used to describe a large and heterogeneous set of physiological phenomena that are functions of bacterial species, strains, growth conditions, and antibiotics used in the experiments. We caution against the oversimplification of the mechanisms of persistence and urge for a more rigorous validation of the applicability of these mechanisms in each case.

  • 16. Kaldalu, Niilo
    et al.
    Maiväli, Ülo
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Reanalysis of Proteomics Results Fails To Detect MazF-Mediated Stress Proteins2019In: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e00949-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kasari, Villu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Margus, Tonu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Marcus J. O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). 3 University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Ribosome profiling analysis of eEF3-depleted Saccharomyces cerevisiae2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 3037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to the standard set of translation factors common in eukaryotic organisms, protein synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires an ABCF ATPase factor eEF3, eukaryotic Elongation Factor 3. eEF3 is an E-site binder that was originally identified as an essential factor involved in the elongation stage of protein synthesis. Recent biochemical experiments suggest an additional function of eEF3 in ribosome recycling. We have characterised the global effects of eEF3 depletion on translation using ribosome profiling. Depletion of eEF3 results in decreased ribosome density at the stop codon, indicating that ribosome recycling does not become rate limiting when eEF3 levels are low. Consistent with a defect in translation elongation, eEF3 depletion causes a moderate redistribution of ribosomes towards the 5' part of the open reading frames. We observed no E-site codon-or amino acid-specific ribosome stalling upon eEF3 depletion, supporting its role as a general elongation factor. Surprisingly, depletion of eEF3 leads to a relative decrease in P-site proline stalling, which we hypothesise is a secondary effect of generally decreased translation and/or decreased competition for the E-site with eIF5A.

  • 18. Kudrin, Pavel
    et al.
    Dzhygyr, Ievgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Ishiguro, Kensuke
    Beljantseva, Jelena
    Maksimova, Elena
    Oliveira, Sofia Raquel Alves
    Varik, Vallo
    Payoe, Roshani
    Konevega, Andrey L.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Suzuki, Tsutomu
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    The ribosomal A-site finger is crucial for binding and activation of the stringent factor RelA2018In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1973-1983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During amino acid starvation the Escherichia coli stringent response factor RelA recognizes deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site. This interaction activates RelA-mediated synthesis of alarmone nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp, collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp. These two alarmones are synthesized by addition of a pyrophosphate moiety to the 3' position of the abundant cellular nucleotide GTP and less abundant nucleotide GDP, respectively. Using untagged native RelA we show that allosteric activation of RelA by pppGpp increases the efficiency of GDP conversion to achieve the maximum rate of (p) ppGpp production. Using a panel of ribosomal RNA mutants, we show that the A-site finger structural element of 23S rRNA helix 38 is crucial for RelA binding to the ribosome and consequent activation, and deletion of the element severely compromises (p) ppGpp accumulation in E. coli upon amino acid starvation. Through binding assays and enzymology, we show that E. coli RelA does not form a stable complex with, and is not activated by, deacylated tRNA off the ribosome. This indicates that in the cell, RelA first binds the empty A-site and then recruits tRNA rather than first binding tRNA and then binding the ribosome.

  • 19. Kudrin, Pavel
    et al.
    Varik, Vallo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Oliveira, Sofia Raquel Alves
    Beljantseva, Jelena
    Santos, Teresa Del Peso
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Dzhygyr, Ievgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Rejman, Dominik
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Tenson, Tanel
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Subinhibitory Concentrations of Bacteriostatic Antibiotics Induce relA-Dependent and relA-Independent Tolerance to beta-Lactams2017In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 61, no 4, article id e02173-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleotide (p) ppGpp is a key regulator of bacterial metabolism, growth, stress tolerance, and virulence. During amino acid starvation, the Escherichia coli (p) ppGpp synthetase RelA is activated by deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site. An increase in (p) ppGpp is believed to drive the formation of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells, prompting the development of strategies to inhibit (p) ppGpp synthesis. We show that in a biochemical system from purified E. coli components, the antibiotic thiostrepton efficiently inhibits RelA activation by the A-site tRNA. In bacterial cultures, the ribosomal inhibitors thiostrepton, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline all efficiently abolish accumulation of (p) ppGpp induced by the Ile-tRNA synthetase inhibitor mupirocin. This abolishment, however, does not reduce the persister level. In contrast, the combination of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor trimethoprim with mupirocin, tetracycline, or chloramphenicol leads to ampicillin tolerance. The effect is independent of RelA functionality, specific to beta-lactams, and not observed with the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin. These results refine our understanding of (p) ppGpp's role in antibiotic tolerance and persistence and demonstrate unexpected drug interactions that lead to tolerance to bactericidal antibiotics.

  • 20.
    Kuzmenko, Anton
    et al.
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology ; Molecular Biology Department, Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University.
    Atkinson, Gemma C
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology.
    Levitskii, Sergey
    Molecular Biology Department, Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University.
    Zenkin, Nikolay
    Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
    Tenson, Tanel
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology.
    Kamenski, Piotr
    Molecular Biology Department, Faculty of Biology, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University.
    Mitochondrial translation initiation machinery: conservation and diversification2014In: Biochimie, ISSN 0300-9084, E-ISSN 1638-6183, Vol. 100C, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly streamlined mitochondrial genome encodes almost exclusively a handful of transmembrane components of the respiratory chain complex. In order to ensure the correct assembly of the respiratory chain, the products of these genes must be produced in the correct stoichiometry and inserted into the membrane, posing a unique challenge to the mitochondrial translational system. In this review we describe the proteins orchestrating mitochondrial translation initiation: bacterial-like general initiation factors mIF2 and mIF3, as well as mitochondria-specific components - mRNA-specific translational activators and mRNA-nonspecific accessory initiation factors. We consider how the fast rate of evolution in these organelles has not only created a system that is divergent from that of its bacterial ancestors, but has led to a huge diversity in lineage specific mechanistic features of mitochondrial translation initiation among eukaryotes.

  • 21. Kuzmenko, Anton
    et al.
    Derbikova, Ksenia
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Insitute of Technology, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.
    Kamenski, Piotr
    Aim23 is an yeast mitochondrial translation initiation factor 3 which is unnecessary for protein synthesis2015In: Yeast, ISSN 0749-503X, E-ISSN 1097-0061, Vol. 32, no Suppl. 1, p. S192-S193Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria are essential organelles of virtually all eukaryotic cells. They have their own genome and are able to transcribe and translate their genetic material. The system of mitochondrial protein synthesis is organized in a manner close to that of prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial DNA contains just a few protein-coded genes (9 in yeast, 13 in humans), so the mitochondrial translation system deals with a limited number of mRNAs. The mitochondrial translation machinery is also somewhat lineage-specific, with various components being gained and lost in different taxonomic groups. The classical bacterial initiation factors (IFs) IF1, IF2 and IF3 are universal in prokaryotes, but only IF2 is universal in mitochondria (mIF2). No IF1 has been identified in mitochondria of any organism. An insertion in mIF2 has been suggested to functionally compensate for the absence of mIF1. Mitochondrial IF3 (mIF3), although known to be present in various eukaryotes, has not been identified for many years in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the model organism for studying mitochondrial translation in vivo. In 2012, we have proven that IF3 does present in yeast mitochondria, and it is Aim23 protein. In the present study, we have characterized the effects of AIM23 gene deletion on yeast mitochondrial function. One could suggest that such a deletion would lead to a complete loss of respiration, translation and other molecular processes in mitochondria. However, this was not the case: the growth of AIM23∆ yeast on clycerol-containing media was suppressed in first 1-2 days only and reached the levels of wild-type in 3-4 days. AIM23∆ cells also were able to respire. Interestingly, we observed a very unusual pattern of mitochondrially-synthesized proteins in the ΔAIM23 strain. The amount of several proteins is decreased in the mutants compared to the wild-type but the amount of some others is increased. We conclude that the yeast cells are able to adapt somehow to the absence of Aim23p.

  • 22. Kuzmenko, Anton
    et al.
    Derbikova, Ksenia
    Salvatori, Roger
    Tankov, Stoyan
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Ott, Martin
    Kamenski, Piotr
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Aim-less translation: loss of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation initiation factor mIF3/Aim23 leads to unbalanced protein synthesis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 18749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mitochondrial genome almost exclusively encodes a handful of transmembrane constituents of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Coordinated expression of these genes ensures the correct stoichiometry of the system's components. Translation initiation in mitochondria is assisted by two general initiation factors mIF2 and mIF3, orthologues of which in bacteria are indispensible for protein synthesis and viability. mIF3 was thought to be absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae until we recently identified mitochondrial protein Aim23 as the missing orthologue. Here we show that, surprisingly, loss of mIF3/Aim23 in S. cerevisiae does not indiscriminately abrogate mitochondrial translation but rather causes an imbalance in protein production: the rate of synthesis of the Atp9 subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase (complex V) is increased, while expression of Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3 subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) is repressed. Our results provide one more example of deviation of mitochondrial translation from its bacterial origins.

  • 23. Manav, Melek Cemre
    et al.
    Beljantseva, Jelena
    Bojer, Martin S.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Ingmer, Hanne
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Brodersen, Ditlev E.
    Structural basis for (p)ppGpp synthesis by the Staphylococcus aureus small alarmone synthetase RelP2018In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 293, no 9, p. 3254-3264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stringent response is a global reprogramming of bacterial physiology that renders cells more tolerant to antibiotics and induces virulence gene expression in pathogens in response to stress. This process is driven by accumulation of the intracellular alarmone guanosine-5'-di(tri)phosphate-3'-diphosphate ((p)ppGpp), which is produced by enzymes of the RelA SpoT homologue (RSH) family. The Gram-positive Firmicute pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, encodes three RSH enzymes: a multidomain RSH (Rel) that senses amino acid starvation on the ribosome and two small alarmone synthetase (SAS) enzymes, RelQ (SAS1) and RelP (SAS2). In Bacillus subtilis, RelQ (SAS1) was shown to form a tetramer that is activated by pppGpp and inhibited by single-stranded RNA, but the structural and functional regulation of RelP (SAS2) is unexplored. Here, we present crystal structures of S. aureus RelP in two major functional states, pre-catalytic (bound to GTP and the non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-(alpha,beta-methylene) triphosphate (AMP-CPP)), and post-catalytic (bound to pppGpp). We observed that RelP also forms a tetramer, but unlike RelQ (SAS1), it is strongly inhibited by both pppGpp and ppGpp and is insensitive to inhibition by RNA. We also identified putative metal ion-binding sites at the subunit interfaces that were consistent with the observed activation of the enzyme by Zn2+ ions. The structures reported here reveal the details of the catalytic mechanism of SAS enzymes and provide a molecular basis for understanding differential regulation of SAS enzymes in Firmicute bacteria.

  • 24. Monteferrante, C. G.
    et al.
    Jirgensons, A.
    Varik, Vallo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Hauryliuk, VVasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Goessens, W. H. F.
    Hays, J. P.
    Evaluation of the characteristics of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) inhibitor AN3365 in combination with different antibiotic classes2016In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 1857-1864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are enzymes involved in the key process of coupling an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. AN3365 is a novel antibiotic that specifically targets leucyl-tRNA synthetase, whose development was halted after evaluation in phase II clinical trials owing to the rapid selection of resistance. In an attempt to bring AN3365 back into the developmental pipeline we have evaluated the efficacy of AN3365 in combination with different classes of antibiotic and characterized its mechanism of action. Although we detect no synergy or antagonism in combination with a range of antibiotic classes, a combination of AN3365 with colistin reduces the accumulation of AN3365-resistant and colistin resistance mutations. We also demonstrate that treatment with AN3365 results in the dramatic accumulation of the alarmone (p)ppGpp, the effector of the stringent response-a key player in antibiotic tolerance.

  • 25.
    Murina, Victoriia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Kasari, Marje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Antibiotic resistance ABCF proteins reset the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome to counter translational arrest2018In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 3753-3763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several ATPases in the ATP-binding cassette F (ABCF) family confer resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS) antibiotics. MLS are structurally distinct classes, but inhibit a common target: the peptidyl transferase (PTC) active site of the ribosome. Antibiotic resistance (ARE) ABCFs have recently been shown to operate through direct ribosomal protection, but the mechanistic details of this resistance mechanism are lacking. Using a reconstituted translational system, we dissect the molecular mechanism of Staphylococcus haemolyticus VgaA(LC) and Enterococcus faecalis LsaA on the ribosome. We demonstrate that VgaA(LC) is an NTPase that operates as a molecular machine strictly requiring NTP hydrolysis (not just NTP binding) for antibiotic protection. Moreover, when bound to the ribosome in the NTP-bound form, hydrolytically inactive EQ(2) ABCF ARE mutants inhibit peptidyl transferase activity, suggesting a direct interaction between the ABCF ARE and the PTC. The likely structural candidate responsible for antibiotic displacement by wild type ABCF AREs, and PTC inhibition by the EQ(2) mutant, is the extended inter-ABC domain linker region. Deletion of the linker region renders wild type VgaA(LC) inactive in antibiotic protection and the EQ(2) mutant inactive in PTC inhibition.

  • 26.
    Turnbull, Kathryn Jane
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Centre for Bacterial Stress Response and Persistence, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dzhygyr, Ievgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lindemose, Soren
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Roghanian, Mohammad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Centre for Bacterial Stress Response and Persistence, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Intramolecular Interactions Dominate the Autoregulation of Escherichia coli Stringent Factor RelA2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 1966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amino acid starvation in Escherichia coli activates the enzymatic activity of the stringent factor RelA, leading to accumulation of the alarmone nucleotide (p)ppGpp. The alarmone acts as an intercellular messenger to regulate transcription, translation and metabolism to mediate bacterial stress adaptation. The enzymatic activity of RelA is subject to multi-layered allosteric control executed both by ligands - such as "starved" ribosomal complexes, deacylated tRNA and pppGpp - and by individual RelA domains. The auto-regulation of RelA is proposed to act either in cis (inhibition of the enzymatic activity of the N-terminal region, NTD, by regulatory C-terminal region, CTD) or in trans (CTD-mediated dimerization leading to enzyme inhibition). In this report, we probed the regulatory roles of the individual domains of E. coli RelA and our results are not indicative of RelA dimerization being the key regulatory mechanism. First, at growth-permitting levels, ectopic expression of RelA CTD does not interfere with activation of native ReIA, indicating lack of regulation via inhibitory complex formation in the cell. Second, in our biochemical assays, increasing RelA concentration does not decrease the enzyme activity, as would be expected in the case of efficient auto-inhibition via dimerization. Third, while high-level CTD expression efficiently inhibits the growth, the effect is independent of native RelA and is mediated by direct inhibition of protein synthesis, likely via direct interaction with the ribosomal A-site. Finally, deletion of the RRM domain of the CTD region leads to growth inhibition mediated by accumulation of (p)ppGpp, suggesting de-regulation of the synthetic activity in this mutant.

  • 27. Van Nerom, Katleen
    et al.
    Tamman, Hedvig
    Takada, Hiraku
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Garcia-Pino, Abel
    The Rel stringent factor from Thermus thermophilus: crystallization and X-ray analysis2019In: Acta Crystallographica Section F : Structural Biology Communications, ISSN 2053-230X, Vol. 75, p. 561-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stringent response, controlled by (p)ppGpp, enables bacteria to trigger a strong phenotypic resetting that is crucial to cope with adverse environmental changes and is required for stress survival and virulence. In the bacterial cell, (p)ppGpp levels are regulated by the concerted opposing activities of RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue) enzymes that can transfer a pyrophosphate group of ATP to the 3′ position of GDP (or GTP) or remove the 3′ pyrophosphate moiety from (p)ppGpp. Bifunctional Rel enzymes are notoriously difficult to crystallize owing to poor stability and a propensity for aggregation, usually leading to a loss of biological activity after purification. Here, the production, biochemical analysis and crystallization of the bifunctional catalytic region of the Rel stringent factor from Thermus thermophilus (RelTtNTD) in the resting state and bound to nucleotides are described. RelTt and RelTtNTD are monomers in solution that are stabilized by the binding of Mn2+ and mellitic acid. RelTtNTD crystallizes in space group P4122, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 88.4, c = 182.7 Å, at 4°C and in space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 105.7, c = 241.4 Å, at 20°C.

  • 28.
    Varik, Vallo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). 1University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Oliveira, Sofia Raquel Alves
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). 1University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411 Tartu, Estonia.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Composition of the outgrowth medium modulates wake-up kinetics and ampicillin sensitivity of stringent and relaxed Escherichia coli2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 22308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition of Escherichia coli from the exponential into the stationary phase of growth induces the stringent response, which is mediated by the rapid accumulation of the alarmone nucleotide (p)ppGpp produced by the enzyme RelA. The significance of RelA's functionality during the transition in the opposite direction, i.e. from the stationary phase into new exponential growth, is less well understood. Here we show that the relaxed strain, i.e. lacking the relA gene, displays a relative delay in regrowth during the new exponential growth phase in comparison with the isogenic wild type strain. The severity of the effect is a function of both the carbon source and amino acid composition of the outgrowth media. As a result, the loss of RelA functionality increases E. coli tolerance to the bactericidal antibiotic ampicillin during growth resumption in fresh media in a medium-specific way. Taken together, our data underscore the crucial role of medium composition and growth conditions for studies of the role of individual genes and regulatory networks in bacterial phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics.

  • 29.
    Varik, Vallo
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu, Estonia.
    Oliveira, Sofia Raquel Alves
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, 50411, Tartu, Estonia.
    Tenson, Tanel
    HPLC-based quantification of bacterial housekeeping nucleotides and alarmone messengers ppGpp and pppGpp2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 11022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we describe an HPLC-based method to quantify bacterial housekeeping nucleotides and the signaling messengers ppGpp and pppGpp. We have replicated and tested several previously reported HPLC-based approaches and assembled a method that can process 50 samples in three days, thus making kinetically resolved experiments feasible. The method combines cell harvesting by rapid filtration, followed by acid extraction, freeze-drying with chromatographic separation. We use a combination of C18 IPRP-HPLC (GMP unresolved and co-migrating with IMP; GDP and GTP; AMP, ADP and ATP; CTP; UTP) and SAX-HPLC in isocratic mode (ppGpp and pppGpp) with UV detection. The approach is applicable to bacteria without the requirement of metabolic labelling with 32P-labelled radioactive precursors. We applied our method to quantify nucleotide pools in Escherichia coli BW25113 K12-strain both throughout the growth curve and during acute stringent response induced by mupirocin. While ppGpp and pppGpp levels vary drastically (40-and >= 8-fold, respectively) these changes are decoupled from the quotients of the housekeeping pool and guanosine and adenosine housekeeping nucleotides: NTP/NDP/NMP ratio remains stable at 6/1/0.3 during both normal batch culture growth and upon acute amino acid starvation.

1 - 29 of 29
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