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  • 1.
    Antonyuk, Svetlana V
    et al.
    Molecular Biophysics Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool.
    Strange, Richard W
    Molecular Biophysics Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Hasnain, S Samar
    Molecular Biophysics Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool.
    The structure of human extracellular copper-zinc superoxide dismutase at 1.7 A resolution: insights into heparin and collagen binding2009In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 388, no 2, p. 310-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) is a homotetrameric copper- and zinc-containing glycoprotein with affinity for heparin. The level of SOD3 is particularly high in blood vessel walls and in the lungs. The enzyme has multiple roles including protection of the lungs against hyperoxia and preservation of nitric oxide. The common mutation R213G, which reduces the heparin affinity of SOD3, is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarctions and stroke. We report the first crystal structure of human SOD3 at 1.7 A resolution. The overall subunit fold and the subunit-subunit interface of the SOD3 dimer are similar to the corresponding structures in Cu-Zn SOD (SOD1). The metal-binding sites are similar to those found in SOD1, but with Asn180 replacing Thr137 at the Cu-binding site and a much shorter loop at the zinc-binding site. The dimers form a functional homotetramer that is fashioned through contacts between two extended loops on each subunit. The N- and C-terminal end regions required for tetramerisation and heparin binding, respectively, are highly flexible. Two grooves fashioned by the tetramer interface are suggestive as the probable sites for heparin and collagen binding.

  • 2.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Graffmo, Karin S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Changes in the spinal cord proteome of an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis murine model determined by differential in-gel electrophoresis2009In: Molecular and cellular proteomics, ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1306-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of motor neurons resulting in progressive paralysis. To date, more than 140 different mutations in the gene encoding CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) have been associated with ALS. Several transgenic murine models exist in which various mutant SOD1s are expressed. We have used differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to analyze the changes in the spinal cord proteome induced by expression of the unstable SOD1 truncation mutant G127insTGGG (G127X) in mice. Unlike mutants used in most other models, G127X lacks SOD activity and is present at low levels, thus reducing the risk of overexpression artifacts. The mice were analyzed at their peak body weights, just before onset of symptoms. Variable importance plot (VIP) analysis showed that 420 of 1,800 detected protein spots contributed significantly to the differences between the groups. By MALDI-TOF MS analysis, 54 proteins were identified. One spot was found to be a covalently linked mutant SOD1 dimer, apparently analogous to SOD1 immunoreactive bands migrating at double the molecular weight of SOD1 monomers previously detected in humans and mice carrying mutant SOD1s and in sporadic ALS cases. Analyses of affected functional pathways, and the subcellular representation of alterations suggest that the toxicity exerted by mutant SODs induces oxidative stress and affects mitochondria, cellular assembly/organization, and protein degradation.

  • 3.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Srivastava, Vaibhav
    Graffmo, Karin S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Superoxide dismutase-1 and other proteins in inclusions from transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice2010In: Journal of Neurochemistry, ISSN 0022-3042, E-ISSN 1471-4159, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 408-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through a cytotoxic mechanism of unknown nature. A hallmark in ALS patients and transgenic mouse models carrying human SOD1 (hSOD1) mutations are hSOD1-immunoreactive inclusions in spinal cord ventral horns. The hSOD1 inclusions may block essential cellular functions or cause toxicity through sequestering of other proteins. Inclusions from four different transgenic mouse models were examined after density gradient ultracentrifugation. The inclusions are complex structures with heterogeneous densities and are disrupted by detergents. The aggregated hSOD1 was mainly composed of subunits that lacked the native stabilizing intra-subunit disulfide bond. A proportion of subunits formed hSOD1 oligomers or was bound to other proteins through disulfide bonds. Dense inclusions could be isolated and the protein composition was analyzed using proteomic techniques. Mutant hSOD1 accounted for half of the protein. Ten other proteins were identified. Two were cytoplasmic chaperones, four were cytoskeletal proteins, and 4 were proteins that normally reside in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The presence of ER proteins in inclusions containing the primarily cytosolic hSOD1 further supports the notion that ER stress is involved in ALS.

  • 4.
    Bergh, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Graffmo, Karin Sixtensdotter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Jonsson, P. Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Structural and kinetic analysis of protein-aggregate strains in vivo using binary epitope mapping2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 14, p. 4489-4494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite considerable progress in uncovering the molecular details of protein aggregation in vitro, the cause and mechanism of protein-aggregation disease remain poorly understood. One reason is that the amount of pathological aggregates in neural tissue is exceedingly low, precluding examination by conventional approaches. We present here a method for determination of the structure and quantity of aggregates in small tissue samples, circumventing the above problem. The method is based on binary epitope mapping using anti-peptide antibodies. We assessed the usefulness and versatility of the method in mice modeling the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which accumulate intracellular aggregates of superoxide dismutase-1. Two strains of aggregates were identified with different structural architectures, molecular properties, and growth kinetics. Both were different from superoxide dismutase-1 aggregates generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. The strains, which seem kinetically under fragmentation control, are associated with different disease progressions, complying with and adding detail to the growing evidence that seeding, infectivity, and strain dependence are unifying principles of neurodegenerative disease.

  • 5.
    Birve, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Neuwirth, Christoph
    Weber, Markus
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Nilsson, Ann-Charloth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Jonsson, Per Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    A novel SOD1 splice site mutation associated with familial ALS revealed by SOD activity analysis2010In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 19, no 21, p. 4201-4206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 145 mutations have been found in the gene CuZn-Superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The vast majority are easily detected nucleotide mutations in the coding region. In a patient from a Swiss ALS family with half-normal erythrocyte SOD1 activity, exon flanking sequence analysis revealed a novel thymine to guanine mutation 7 bp upstream of exon 4 (c.240-7T>G). The results of splicing algorithm analyses were ambiguous, but five out of seven analysis tools suggested a potential novel splice site that would add six new base pairs to the mRNA. If translated, this mRNA would insert Ser and Ile between Glu78 and Arg79 in the SOD1 protein. In fibroblasts from the patient, the predicted mutant transcript and the mutant protein were both highly expressed, and despite the location of the insertion into the metal ion-binding loop IV, the SOD1 activity appeared high. In erythrocytes, which lack protein synthesis and are old compared with cultured fibroblasts, both SOD1 protein and enzymic activity was 50% of controls. Thus, the usage of the novel splice site is near 100%, and the mutant SOD1 shows the reduced stability typical of ALS-associated mutant SOD1s. The findings suggests that this novel intronic mutation is causing the disease and highlights the importance of wide exon-flanking sequencing and transcript analysis combined with erythrocyte SOD1 activity analysis in comprehensive search for SOD1 mutations in ALS. We find that there are potentially more SOD1 mutations than previously reported.

  • 6. Brotherton, Terrell
    et al.
    Polak, Meraida
    Kelly, Crystal
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Andersen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Glass, Jonathan D
    A novel ALS SOD1 C6S mutation with implications for aggregation related toxicity and genetic counseling2011In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and other Motor Neuron Disorders, ISSN 1466-0822, E-ISSN 1743-4483, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 215-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report we describe an ALS family with a novel missense SOD1 mutation with substitution of serine for cysteine at the sixth amino acid (C6S). This mutation has interesting implications for the role of disulfides in causing disease. After identification of the ALS proband, we examined 17 members of an extended family and performed DNA mutation analysis on 21 family members. The level and activity of SOD1 in C6S carriers and wild-type family members was analyzed in erythrocytes. We found that the C6S mutation results in disease with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and markedly reduced penetrance. The S6 mutated protein demonstrates high stability relative to the C6 wild-type protein. The specific dismutation activity of S6 SOD1 is normal. In conclusion, C6S is a novel FALS associated mutation with reduced disease penetrance, long survival time and a phenotype very different from the other SOD1 mutations reported in codon C6. This mutation may provide insight into the role of SOD1 structural changes in disease.

  • 7.
    Bruce, Stephen J
    et al.
    Umeå Plant Science Center, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cloarec, Olivier
    Technologie Servier, 45000 Orleans, France.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå Plant Science Center, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Evaluation of a protocol for metabolic profiling studies on human blood plasma by combined ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: From extraction to data analysis2009In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 372, no 2, p. 237-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The investigation presented here describes a protocol designed to perform high-throughput metabolic profiling analysis on human blood plasma by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). To address whether a previous extraction protocol for gas chromatography (GC)/MS-based metabolic profiling of plasma could be used for UPLC/MS-based analysis, the original protocol was compared with similar methods for extraction of low-molecular-weight compounds from plasma via protein precipitation. Differences between extraction methods could be observed, but the previously published extraction method was considered the best. UPLC columns with three different stationary phases (C8, C18, and phenyl) were used in identical experimental runs consisting of a total of 60 injections of extracted male and female plasma samples. The C8 column was determined to be the best for metabolic profiling analysis on plasma. The acquired UPLC/MS data of extracted male and female plasma samples was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projections to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS–DA). Furthermore, a strategy for compound identification was applied here, demonstrating the strength of high-mass-accuracy time-of-flight (TOF)/MS analysis in metabolic profiling.

  • 8. Danielsson, Jens
    et al.
    Awad, Wael
    Saraboji, Kadhirvel
    Kurnik, Martin
    Lang, Lisa
    Leinartaite, Lina
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Logan, Derek T
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Global structural motions from the strain of a single hydrogen bond2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 10, p. 3829-3834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin and biological role of dynamic motions of folded enzymes is not yet fully understood. In this study, we examine the molecular determinants for the dynamic motions within the beta-barrel of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which previously were implicated in allosteric regulation of protein maturation and also pathological misfolding in the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Relaxation-dispersion NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and crystallographic data show that the dynamic motions are induced by the buried H43 side chain, which connects the backbones of the Cu ligand H120 and T39 by a hydrogen-bond linkage through the hydrophobic core. The functional role of this highly conserved H120-H43-T39 linkage is to strain H120 into the correct geometry for Cu binding. Upon elimination of the strain by mutation H43F, the apo protein relaxes through hydrogen-bond swapping into a more stable structure and the dynamic motions freeze out completely. At the same time, the holo protein becomes energetically penalized because the twisting back of H120 into Cu-bound geometry leads to burial of an unmatched backbone carbonyl group. The question then is whether this coupling between metal binding and global structural motions in the SOD1 molecule is an adverse side effect of evolving viable Cu coordination or plays a key role in allosteric regulation of biological function, or both?

  • 9.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Iron stores and HFE genotypes are not related to increased risk of ischemic stroke.: a prospective nested case-referent study2007In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High iron levels can increase the formation of noxious oxygen radicals, which are thought to contribute to cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this prospective study was to determine if iron status and HFE genotypes constitute risk factors for stroke.

    Methods: First-ever stroke cases (231 ischemic and 42 hemorrhagic) and matched double referents from the population-based Northern Sweden cohorts were studied in a nested case-referent setting.

    Results: For total iron binding capacity, an increased risk of ischemic stroke was seen in the highest quartile (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.14-2.83; p for trend 0.012). The highest quartile of transferrin iron saturation showed a decreased risk of ischemic stroke in men (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.22-0.87; p for trend 0.028), but not in women. There was an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke in the second (OR 4.07; 95% CI 1.09-15.20) and third quartile (OR 4.22; 95% CI 1.08-16.42) of ferritin. Neither quartiles of plasma iron concentrations nor the HFE C282Y and H63D genotypes were associated with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.

    Conclusions: Iron stores were not positively related to increased risk of ischemic stroke. Furthermore, HFE genotypes did not influence the risk of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 10.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Iron stores and HFE genotypes are not related to increased risk of first-time myocardial infarction: a prospective nested case-referent study2011In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 150, no 2, p. 169-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Our objectives were to study the relationship between iron stores, HFE genotypes and the risk for first-ever myocardial infarction.

    Methods: First-ever myocardial infarction cases (n=618) and double matched referents from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort Study were studied in a prospective nested case-referent setting. Plasma iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin iron saturation and ferritin were analyzed, as well as several confounders. HFE C282Y and H63D genotypes were determined.

    Results: There was an inverse risk association for myocardial infarction in the highest quartiles of iron (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.48-0.96) and transferrin iron saturation (OR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.89) in men. This association, however, was lost after adjusting for C-reactive protein. Women homozygous for H63D had a higher risk for myocardial infarction.

    Conclusions: No risk association between high iron stores and first-ever myocardial infarction was found. The higher risk in female H63D homozygotes is probably not related to iron metabolism.

  • 11.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Medicinkliniken, Skellefteå lasarett.
    Osterman, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Plasma Bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 Are Not Protective Factors Against First-Time Myocardial Infarction in a Prospective, Nested Case–Referent Setting2010In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, ISSN 1942-325X, E-ISSN 1942-3268, no 3, p. 340-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bilirubin, an effective antioxidant, shows a large variation in levels between individuals and has been positively associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. A major reason for the variability is a common promoter polymorphism, UGT1A1*28, which reduces the transcription of the enzyme that conjugates bilirubin, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. The aim of the study was to evaluate a possible protective effect of plasma bilirubin and the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism against myocardial infarction in a prospective case-referent setting.

    Methods and Results: 618 subjects with a first-ever myocardial infarction (median event age 60.5 years, median lag time 3.5 years) and 1184 matched referents were studied. Plasma bilirubin was lower in cases vs. referents. Despite a strong gene-dosage effect on bilirubin levels in both cases and referents, the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism did not influence the risk of myocardial infarction. Among multiple other variables, serum iron showed one of the strongest associations with bilirubin levels.

    Conclusion: We found no evidence for a protective effect of the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism against myocardial infarction and consequently neither for bilirubin. The lower bilirubin levels in cases might be caused by decreased production, increased degradation or increased elimination.

  • 12.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Osterman, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Response to letter regarding article "Plasma bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are not protective factors against first-time myocardial infarction in a prospective nested case-referent setting"2011In: Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, ISSN 1942-325X, E-ISSN 1942-3268, Vol. 4, no 1, p. e2-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Johansson, Lars
    Osterman, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are not associated with lower risk for ischemic stroke in a prospective nested case-referent setting.2010In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 590-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bilirubin, an antioxidant, has been associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. A major cause of elevated plasma bilirubin is the common UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism in the gene of the bilirubin-conjugating enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1, which reduces transcription by 70%. Earlier studies reporting a protective effect of bilirubin on stroke have not included analysis of UGT1A1*28. The purpose of this study is to investigate if bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are protective against ischemic stroke in a prospective case-referent setting. Methods: Cases with first-ever ischemic stroke (n = 231; median lag time 4.9 years) and 462 matched referents from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort were included. Plasma bilirubin was measured and UGT1A1*28 was analyzed by fragment analysis. Results: Plasma bilirubin was lower in cases than in referents, but the difference reached significance only for women. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism (allele frequency 30%) showed a strong gene-dose relationship with bilirubin levels both among cases and referents, but was not associated with risk for stroke. Among multiple other variables analyzed, the strongest correlation with bilirubin was found for plasma iron. Conclusions: There was no evidence for a protective effect of the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism against stroke and consequently neither for bilirubin. The findings suggest that other factors influencing the risk for stroke might also affect bilirubin levels.

  • 14.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Johansson, Lars
    Medicinkliniken, Skellefteå lasarett.
    Osterman, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Bilirubin and UGT1A1*28, are not associated with lower risk for ischemic stroke in a prospective nested case-referent settingArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bilirubin, an antioxidant, has been associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. A major cause of elevated plasma bilirubin is the common UGT1A1*28 promoter polymorphism in the gene of the bilirubin-conjugating enzyme UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-1A1, which reduces transcription by 70%. Earlier studies reporting a protective effect of bilirubin on stroke, have not included analysis of UGT1A1*28. The purpose of this study is to investigate if bilirubin and UGT1A1*28 are protective against ischemic stroke in a prospective case-referent setting.

    Methods: Cases with first-ever ischemic stroke (n=231; median lag time 4.9 years), and 462 matched referents from the The Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort were included. Plasma bilirubin was measured and UGT1A1*28 was analyzed by fragment analysis.

    Results: Plasma bilirubin was lower in cases than in referents, but the difference reached significance only for women. The UGT1A1*28 polymorphism (allele frequency 30%), showed a strong gene-dose relationship with bilirubin levels both among cases and referents, but was not associated with risk for stroke. Among multiple other variables analysed the strongest correlation with bilirubin was found for plasma iron.

    Conclusions: There was no evidence for a protective effect of the UGT1A1*28 polymorphism against stroke and consequently neither for bilirubin. The findings suggest that other factors influencing the risk for stroke also might affect bilirubin levels.

  • 15.
    Ekblom, Kim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Iron Biomarkers in Plasma, HFE Genotypes, and the Risk for Colorectal Cancer in a Prospective Setting2012In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 337-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: High iron levels can increase the formation of noxious oxygen radicals, which are thought to promote carcinogenesis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether iron biomarkers and HFE genotypes, which influence iron regulation, constitute risk factors for colorectal cancer. DESIGN: This is a prospective nested case-referent study. SETTINGS: The study was performed within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. PATIENTS: The study included 226 cases of colorectal cancer and 437 matched referents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Conditional regression analysis was performed. Adjustments for smoking, smoking and BMI, and HFE C282Y and H63D were performed. RESULTS: The highest quintile of total iron-binding capacity showed significantly higher risk for colorectal cancer, unadjusted OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.38-4.02). When stratified by sex, the findings were only present in women (OR 3.34 (95% CI 1.59-7.02)). Ferritin was associated with reduced risk throughout quintiles 2 to 5 both in univariate and multivariate models. LIMITATIONS: Colorectal cancer may influence iron markers because of occult bleeding. Homozygotes for HFE C282Y were too few to make conclusions for this group. The relatively short follow-up time might be insufficient to detect risk of iron biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: High iron levels do not increase the risk of colorectal cancer. HFE genotypes influencing iron uptake had no effect on colorectal cancer risk.

  • 16.
    Ekhtiari Bidhendi, Elaheh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Bergh, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Two superoxide dismutase prion strains transmit amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like disease2016In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 2249-2253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset degeneration of motor neurons that is commonly caused by mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Both patients and Tg mice expressing mutant human SOD1 (hSOD1) develop aggregates of unknown importance. In Tg mice, 2 different strains of hSOD1 aggregates (denoted A and B) can arise; however, the role of these aggregates in disease pathogenesis has not been fully characterized. Here, minute amounts of strain A and B hSOD1 aggregate seeds that were prepared by centrifugation through a density cushion were inoculated into lumbar spinal cords of 100-day-old mice carrying a human SOD1 Tg. Mice seeded with A or B aggregates developed premature signs of ALS and became terminally ill after approximately 100 days, which is 200 days earlier than for mice that had not been inoculated or were given a control preparation. Concomitantly, exponentially growing strain A and B hSOD1 aggregations propagated rostrally throughout the spinal cord and brainstem. The phenotypes provoked by the A and B strains differed regarding progression rates, distribution, end-stage aggregate levels, and histopathology. Together, our data indicate that the aggregate strains are prions that transmit a templated, spreading aggregation of hSOD1, resulting in a fatal ALS-like disease.

  • 17.
    Ekhtiari Bidhendi, Elaheh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Bergh, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Pakkenberg, Bente
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Mutant superoxide dismutase aggregates from human spinal cord transmit amyotrophic lateral sclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Forsberg, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Glial nuclear aggregates of superoxide dismutase-1 are regularly present in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2011In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 623-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1). Since there is evidence for the involvement of non-neuronal cells in ALS we searched for signs of SOD1 abnormalities focusing on glia. Spinal cords from 9 ALS patients carrying SOD1 mutations, 51 patients with sporadic or familial ALS who lacked such mutations, and 46 controls were examined by immunohistochemistry. A set of anti-peptide antibodies with specificity for misfolded SOD1 species was used. Misfolded SOD1 in the form of granular aggregates was regularly detected in the nuclei of ventral horn astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes in ALS patients carrying and as well as lacking SOD1 mutations. There was negligible staining in neurodegenerative and non-neurological controls. Misfolded SOD1 appeared occasionally also in nuclei of motoneurons of ALS patients. The results suggest that misfolded SOD1 present in glial and motoneuron nuclei may generally be involved in ALS pathogenesis.

  • 19.
    Forsberg, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Graffmo, Karin S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Bergh, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    High expression of wild-type human superoxide dismutase-1 gives a model of sporadic ALSManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Forsberg, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Graffmo, Karin S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jacobsson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Rosquist, Roland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Novel antibodies reveal inclusions containing non-native SOD1 in sporadic ALS patients2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 7, p. e11552-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and are found in 6% of ALS patients. Non-native and aggregation-prone forms of mutant SOD1s are thought to trigger the disease. Two sets of novel antibodies, raised in rabbits and chicken, against peptides spaced along the human SOD1 sequence, were by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunocapture method shown to be specific for denatured SOD1. These were used to examine SOD1 in spinal cords of ALS patients lacking mutations in the enzyme. Small granular SOD1-immunoreactive inclusions were found in spinal motoneurons of all 37 sporadic and familial ALS patients studied, but only sparsely in 3 of 28 neurodegenerative and 2 of 19 non-neurological control patients. The granular inclusions were by confocal microscopy found to partly colocalize with markers for lysosomes but not with inclusions containing TAR DNA binding protein-43, ubiquitin or markers for endoplasmic reticulum, autophagosomes or mitochondria. Granular inclusions were also found in carriers of SOD1 mutations and in spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) patients and they were the major type of inclusion detected in ALS patients homozygous for the wild type-like D90A mutation. The findings suggest that SOD1 may be involved in ALS pathogenesis in patients lacking mutations in the enzyme.

  • 21.
    Forsgren, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lehmann, Manuela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Weygandt Mathis, Mackenzie
    Keskin, Isil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Nijssen, Jik
    Lowry, Emily
    Garcia, Alejandro
    Sandoe, Jackson
    Hedlund, Eva
    Wichterle, Hynek
    Henderson, Christopher
    Eggan, Kevin
    Kiskinis, Evangelos
    Andersen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Gilthorpe, Jonathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Enhanced protein misfolding in patient-derived models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Forsgren, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordin, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nordström, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rofougaran, Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Gilthorpe, Jonathan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    A Novel mutation D96Mfs*8 in SOD1 identified in a Swedish ALS patient results in a truncated and heavily aggregation-prone proteinManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Graffmo, Karin S.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of wild-type human superoxide dismutase-1 in mice causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis2013In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 51-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase-1. There is evolving circumstantial evidence that the wild-type protein can also be neurotoxic and that it may more generally be involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. To test this proposition more directly, we generated mice that express wild-type human superoxide dismutase-1 at a rate close to that of mutant superoxide dismutase-1 in the commonly studied G93A transgenic model. These mice developed an ALS-like syndrome and became terminally ill after around 370 days. The loss of spinal ventral neurons was similar to that in the G93A and other mutant superoxide dismutase-1 models, and large amounts of aggregated superoxide dismutase-1 were found in spinal cords, but also in the brain. The findings show that wild-type human superoxide dismutase-1 has the ability to cause ALS in mice, and they support the hypothesis of a more general involvement of the protein in the disease in humans.

  • 24.
    Graffmo, Karin S
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Forsberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    ALS patients with the SOD1 D90A mutation show both spinal cord and frontal cortical pathologyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ingre, Caroline
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Press, R
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Erythrocyte SOD1 enzyme activity in ALS patients is not modulated by a 50 bp deletion in the alleged SOD1 promotorManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A known cause of ALS are mutations in the SOD1 gene. There is also evidence that SOD1 may be involved in cases lacking mutations in the gene. A 50 bp deletion located 1684 bp upstream of the start codon of SOD1 has been suggested to reduce transcription of SOD1, affect enzymatic activity and to be associated with later disease onset in ALS patients. The findings have been challenged by a study of Italian ALS patients, and here we examined the 50 bp deletion in Swedish ALS patients and controls. 

    Methods Blood samples from 543 Swedish ALS patients and 356 Swedish controls were analysed for the 50 bp deletion and for SOD1 enzymic activity. The results were related to the disease phenotype of the patients.

    Results The frequency of the 50 bp deletion was the same in the patient and control cohorts, and both were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium regarding the deletion. In relation to the different genotypes, no differences were detected in SOD1 enzymic activity, duration of disease, age of onset or site of onset.

    Conclusions When interpreting the present results together with previous results from other populations, we find it unlikely that the 50 bp deletion region has any regulatory function for the SOD1 gene, nor any effects on the phenotype of ALS.

  • 26.
    Ingre, Caroline
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wuolikainen, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Press, Rayomand
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    A 50bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter lowers enzyme expression but is not associated with ALS in Sweden2016In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, E-ISSN 2167-9223, Vol. 17, no 5-6, p. 452-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A 50 base pair (bp) deletion of SOD1 has been suggested to reduce transcription and to be associated with later disease onset in ALS. This study was aimed to reveal if the 50bp deletion influenced SOD1 enzymatic activity, occurrence and phenotype of the disease in a Swedish ALS/control cohort. Blood samples from 512 Swedish ALS patients and 354 Swedish controls without coding SOD1 mutations were analysed for the 50bp deletion allele. The enzymatic activity of SOD1 in erythrocytes was analysed and genotype-phenotype correlations were assessed. Results demonstrated that the genotype frequencies of the 50bp deletion were all found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. No significant differences were found for age of onset, disease duration or site of onset. SOD1 enzymatic activity showed a statistically significant decreasing trend in the control group, in which the allele was associated with a 5% reduction in SOD1 activity. The results suggest that the 50bp deletion has a moderate reducing effect on SOD1 synthesis. No modulating effects, however, were found on ALS onset, phenotype and survival in the Swedish population.

  • 27.
    Jiye, A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Granström, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Johansson, Annika
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jiye, A
    Guangji, Wang
    Dynamic modification of blood erythrocytes metabolism based on GC/TOF-MS analysis2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28. Jiye, A
    et al.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gullberg, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Marklund, Stefan
    Global analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds in human plasma using GC/TOF-MS2004In: DRUG METABOLISM REVIEWS, ISSN 0360-2532, Vol. 36, p. 246-246Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed a method for analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds (LMWC) in human plasma involving extraction of metabolites by organic solvents, derivatization of extract and final analysis by GC/TOF-MS. The overall strategy for the development of the method was based on using design-of-experimental (DOE), and data evaluation based on multivariate statistical tools like PCA and PLS. The results showed that the extraction efficiency for different solvents varied, and that methanol was important for high reproducibility. More than 300 compounds could be detected in one analysis. Forty five of them were identified, including amino acids, lipids and free fatty acids, organic acids, carbohydrates and so on. The quantitative data of these metabolites showed, with two exceptions, high precision and good linearity between response and concentration. By using this method it is now possible to analyze plasma samples with high throughput to identify metabolic biomarkers for different kinds of diseases.

  • 29. Johansson, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    Vestling, Monika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Lang, Lisa
    Leinartaite, Lina
    Karlstrom, Mikael
    Danielsson, Jens
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Cytotoxicity of Superoxide Dismutase 1 in Cultured Cells Is Linked to Zn2+ Chelation2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 4, p. e36104-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurodegeneration in protein-misfolding disease is generally assigned to toxic function of small, soluble protein aggregates. Largely, these assignments are based on observations of cultured neural cells where the suspect protein material is titrated directly into the growth medium. In the present study, we use this approach to shed light on the cytotoxic action of the metalloenzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), associated with misfolding and aggregation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results show, somewhat unexpectedly, that the toxic species of SOD1 in this type of experimental setting is not an aggregate, as typically observed for proteins implicated in other neuro-degenerative diseases, but the folded and fully soluble apo protein. Moreover, we demonstrate that the toxic action of apoSOD1 relies on the protein's ability to chelate Zn2+ ions from the growth medium. The decreased cell viability that accompanies this extraction is presumably based on disturbed Zn2+ homeostasis. Consistently, mutations that cause global unfolding of the apoSOD1 molecule or otherwise reduce its Zn2+ affinity abolish completely the cytotoxic response. So does the addition of surplus Zn2+. Taken together, these observations point at a case where the toxic response of cultured cells might not be related to human pathology but stems from the intrinsic limitations of a simplified cell model. There are several ways proteins can kill cultured neural cells but all of these need not to be relevant for neurodegenerative disease.

  • 30.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology. Neurologi.
    Gredal, Ole
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked superoxide dismutase in ventral horns, liver, and kidney2008In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 63, no 5, p. 671-675Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Graffmo, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lindberg, Mikael
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Disulphide-reduced superoxide dismutase-1 in CNS of transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis models.2006In: Brain, ISSN 0006-8950, E-ISSN 1460-2156, Vol. 129, no Pt 2, p. 451-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutant forms of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by an unknown noxious mechanism. Using an antibody against a novel epitope in the G127insTGGG mutation, mutant SOD1 was studied for the first time in spinal cord and brain of an ALS patient. The level was below 0.5% of the SOD1 level in controls. In corresponding transgenic mice the content of mutant SOD1 was also low, although it was enriched in spinal cord and brain compared with other tissues. In the mice the misfolded mutant SOD1 aggregated rapidly and 20% occurred in steady state as detergent-soluble protoaggregates. The misfolded SOD1 and the protoaggregates form, from birth until death, a potentially noxious burden that may induce the motor neuron injury. Detergent-resistant aggregates, as well as inclusions of mutant SOD1 in motor neurons and astrocytes, accumulated in spinal cord ventral horns of the patient and mice with terminal disease. The inclusions and aggregates may serve as terminal markers of long-term assault by misfolded SOD1 and protoaggregates.

  • 32.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Graffmo, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Patologi.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology. Neurologi.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry. Klinisk kemi.
    Motor neuron disease in mice expressing the wild type-like D90A mutant superoxide dismutase-1.2006In: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0022-3069, E-ISSN 1554-6578, Vol. 65, no 12, p. 1126-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Graffmo, Karin S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Superoxide dismutase in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients homozygous for the D90A mutation2009In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 421-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-associated superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutations, D90A, differs from others in its high structural stability and by the existence of both recessive and dominant inheritance. Here SOD1 in CNS and peripheral organs from five ALS patients homozygous for D90A were compared to controls. In most areas, including ventral horns, there were no significant differences in SOD1 activities and Western blotting patterns between controls and D90A cases. The SOD1 activities in areas vulnerable to mutant SOD1s, ventral horns and precentral gyrus were intermediate among CNS areas and much lower than in kidney and liver. Thus, the vulnerability of motor areas is not explained by high SOD1 content. The findings argue against the idea of expression-reducing protective factors being present near the D90A locus in recessive pedigrees. The similarity to wild-type SOD1 prompts speculations on the involvement of the latter in sporadic ALS.

  • 34. Jung, Oliver
    et al.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Xia, Ning
    Busse, Rudi
    Brandes, Ralf P
    Inactivation of extracellular superoxide dismutase contributes to the development of high-volume hypertension.2007In: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol, ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 470-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Juul, Klaus
    et al.
    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Heegaard, Niels H H
    Steffensen, Rolf
    Sillesen, Henrik H
    Jensen, Gorm B
    Nordestgaard, BG
    [Genetically determined reduction in antioxidative protection and increased risk of ischemic heart disease--secondary publication]2005In: Ugeskr Laeger, ISSN 0041-5782, Vol. 167, no 7, p. 767-70Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36. Juul, Klaus
    et al.
    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Heegaard, Niels H H
    Steffensen, Rolf
    Sillesen, Henrik
    Jensen, Gorm
    Nordestgaard, Börge G
    Genetically reduced antioxidative protection and increased ischemic heart disease risk: The Copenhagen City Heart Study.2004In: Circulation, ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Katz, Jonathan S.
    et al.
    Katzberg, Hans D.
    Woolley, Susan C.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Combined fulminant frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with an I113T SOD1 mutation2012In: AMYOTROPH LATERAL SC, ISSN 1748-2968, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 567-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in the gene for superoxide dismutase type 1 cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but are not thought to be associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). A lack of detailed case reports is one reason, among others, for this skepticism. This case report comments on a patient with familial ALS caused by I113T mutation in the SOD1 gene presenting with progressive cognitive and behavioral decline two years before developing progressive motor degeneration. In conclusion, this case provides evidence that SOD1 mutations can be associated with FTD.

  • 38.
    Keskin, Isil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Berdynski, Mariusz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland.
    Hjertkvist, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Rofougaran, Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Glass, Jonathan D.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Comprehensive analysis to explain reduced or increased SOD1 enzymatic activity in ALS patients and their relatives2017In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, E-ISSN 2167-9223, Vol. 18, no 5-6, p. 457-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To characterise stabilities in erythrocytes of mutant SOD1 proteins, compare SOD1 enzymatic activities between patients with different genetic causes of ALS and search for underlying causes of deviant SOD1 activities in individuals lacking SOD1 mutations.Methods: Blood samples from 4072 individuals, ALS patients with or without a SOD1 mutation, family members and controls were studied. Erythrocyte SOD1 enzymatic activities normalised to haemoglobin content were determined, and effects of haemoglobin disorders on dismutation assessed. Coding SOD1 sequences were analysed by Sanger sequencing, exon copy number variations by fragment length analysis and by TaqMan Assay.Results: Of the 44 SOD1 mutations found, 75% caused severe destabilisation of the mutant protein but in 25% it was physically stable. Mutations producing structural changes caused halved erythrocyte SOD1 activities. There were no differences in SOD1 activities between patients without a SOD1 mutation and control individuals or carriers of TBK1 mutations and C9orf72(HRE). In the low and high SOD1 activity groups no deviations were found in exon copy numbers and intron gross structures. Thalassemias and iron deficiency were associated with increased SOD1 activity/haemoglobin ratios.Conclusion: Adjunct erythrocyte SOD1 activity analysis reliably signals destabilising SOD1 mutations including intronic mutations that are missed by exon sequencing.

  • 39.
    Keskin, Isil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Berdynski, Mariusz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Hjertkvist, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rofougaran, Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Glass, Jonathan D.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Comprehensive analysis to explain reduced or increased SOD1 enzymatic activity in erythrocytes in ALS patients and their relativesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective was to in blood samples from 3723 individuals including ALS patients without a coding SOD1 mutation and 372 control individuals characterize stabilities of mutant SOD1s, compare SOD1 enzymatic activities between patients with different genetic causes of ALS, and search for underlying causes of deviant SOD1 activities in individuals lacking SOD1 mutations. Erythrocyte SOD1 enzymatic activities normalized to hemoglobin content were determined. Coding SOD1 sequences were analyzed by Sanger sequencing, copy number variations by fragment length analysis and by TaqMan Assay. Hemoglobin disorders were searched for. Of the 46 SOD1 mutations found, ¾ caused severe destabilization of the mutant protein but in ¼ SOD1 was essentially physically stable. Mutations producing structural changes all caused halved SOD activities. There were no differences in SOD1 activities between controls and patients without any detected SOD1 mutations or patients with C9ORF72HRE or TBK1 mutations. In the low and high SOD1 activity groups no deviations were found in exon copy numbers and intron gross structures. Also, no uncommon variants in exon-flanking sequences were detected. Thalassemias and iron deficiency anemia were associated with increased SOD1 activity/hemoglobin ratios. In conclusion, adjunct erythrocyte SOD activity analysis is of value to signal the presence of exon and splice-site-intron mutations that influence the SOD1 structure.

  • 40.
    Keskin, Isil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lange, Dale J.
    Synofzik, Matthis
    Nordström, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Gilthorpe, Jonathan D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Low oxygen tension induces misfolding and aggregation of superoxide dismutase in ALS patient-derived motor neuronsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Keskin, Isil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lange, Dale J.
    Weber, Markus
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Synofzik, Matthis
    Gilthorpe, Jonathan D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Effects of Cellular Pathway Disturbances on Misfolded Superoxide Dismutase-1 in Fibroblasts Derived from ALS Patients2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0150133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) are a common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The neurotoxicity of mutant SOD1s is most likely caused by misfolded molecular species, but disease pathogenesis is still not understood. Proposed mechanisms include impaired mitochondrial function, induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, reduction in the activities of the proteasome and autophagy, and the formation of neurotoxic aggregates. Here we examined whether perturbations in these cellular pathways in turn influence levels of misfolded SOD1 species, potentially amplifying neurotoxicity. For the study we used fibroblasts, which express SOD1 at physiological levels under regulation of the native promoter. The cells were derived from ALS patients expressing 9 different SOD1 mutants of widely variable molecular characteristics, as well as from patients carrying the GGGGCC-repeat-expansion in C9orf72 and from non-disease controls. A specific ELISA was used to quantify soluble, misfolded SOD1, and aggregated SOD1 was analysed by western blotting. Misfolded SOD1 was detected in all lines. Levels were found to be much lower in non-disease control and the non-SOD1 C9orf72 ALS lines. This enabled us to validate patient fibroblasts for use in subsequent perturbation studies. Mitochondrial inhibition, endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy inhibition did not affect soluble misfolded SOD1 and in most cases, detergent-resistant SOD1 aggregates were not detected. However, proteasome inhibition led to uniformly large increases in misfolded SOD1 levels in all cell lines and an increase in SOD1 aggregation in some. Thus the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a principal determinant of misfolded SOD1 levels in cells derived both from patients and controls and a decline in activity with aging could be one of the factors behind the mid-to late-life onset of inherited ALS.

  • 42. Lambrechts, Diether
    et al.
    Poesen, Koen
    Fernández-Santiago, Rubén
    Al-Chalabi, Ammar
    Del Bo, Roberto
    Van Vught, Paul Wj
    Khan, Saeed
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Brockington, Alice
    Van Marion, Ingrid
    Anneser, Johanna
    Shaw, Christopher
    Ludolph, Albert
    Leigh, Nigel
    Comi, Giacomo
    Gasser, Thomas
    Shaw, Pamela J
    Morrison, Karen
    Andersen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Van den Berg, Leonard H
    Thijs, Vincent
    Siddique, Teepu
    Robberecht, Wim
    Carmeliet, Peter
    Meta-analysis of VEGF variations in ALS: increased susceptibility in male carriers of the -2578AA genotype2008In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 840-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Targeted delivery of the angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), to motor neurons prolongs survival in rodent models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), while mice expressing reduced VEGF concentrations develop motor neuron degeneration reminiscent of ALS, raising the question whether VEGF contributes to the pathogenesis of ALS. An initial association study reported that VEGF haplotypes conferred increased susceptibility to ALS in humans, but later studies challenged this initial finding.

    Methods and findings: A meta-analysis was undertaken to critically reappraise whether any of the three common VEGF gene variations (−2578C/A, −1154G/A and −634G/C) increase the risk of ALS. Over 7000 subjects from eight European and three American populations were included in the analysis. Pooled odds ratios were calculated using fixed-effects and random-effects models, and four potential sources of heterogeneity (location of disease onset, gender, age at disease onset and disease duration) were assessed. After correction, none of the genotypes or haplotypes was significantly associated with ALS. Subgroup analysis by gender revealed, however, that the −2578AA genotype, which lowers VEGF expression, increased the risk of ALS in males (OR = 1.46 males vs females; 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.80; p = 7.8 10E-5), even after correction for publication bias and multiple testing.

    Conclusions: This meta-analysis does not support the original conclusion that VEGF haplotypes increase the risk of ALS in humans, but the significant association of the low-VEGF −2578AA genotype with increased susceptibility to ALS in males reappraises the link between reduced VEGF concentrations and ALS, as originally revealed by the fortuitous mouse genetic studies.

  • 43. Lang, Lisa
    et al.
    Zetterström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Oliveberg, Mikael
    SOD1 aggregation in ALS mice shows simplistic test tube behavior2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 32, p. 9878-9883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longstanding challenge in studies of neurodegenerative disease has been that the pathologic protein aggregates in live tissue are not amenable to structural and kinetic analysis by conventional methods. The situation is put in focus by the current progress in demarcating protein aggregation in vitro, exposing new mechanistic details that are now calling for quantitative in vivo comparison. In this study, we bridge this gap by presenting a direct comparison of the aggregation kinetics of the ALS-associated protein superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in vitro and in transgenic mice. The results based on tissue sampling by quantitative antibody assays show that the SOD1 fibrillation kinetics in vitro mirror with remarkable accuracy the spinal cord aggregate buildup and disease progression in transgenic mice. This similarity between in vitro and in vivo data suggests that, despite the complexity of live tissue, SOD1 aggregation follows robust and simplistic rules, providing new mechanistic insights into the ALS pathology and organism-level manifestation of protein aggregation phenomena in general.

  • 44. Lange, Dale J.
    et al.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Remanan, Rahul
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Benjamin, Daniel
    Pyrimethamine decreases levels of SOD1 in leukocytes and cerebrospinal fluid of ALS patients: A phase I pilot study2013In: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, ISSN 2167-8421, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 199-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mutated SOD1 protein appears to have a gene dose-dependent effect on the severity and progression of ALS. Lowering of SOD1 protein levels might reduce severity and progression of the disease. The antimalarial drug pyrimethamine (PYR) was identified to cause a dose-dependent reduction in SOD1 protein levels in human cells in vitro. To determine if there was a similar effect in humans, we performed a phase I pilot study in 16 ALS patients with SOD1 mutations, 18 weeks in duration. Blood samples were obtained during all visits. The actin normalized leukocyte SOD1 levels were analyzed using Western blot. SOD1 content in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was determined by ELISA and the SOD1 enzymic activity by spectrophotometric analysis using KO2. Clinical assessment of disease severity was assessed using Appel ALS scale and ALSFRS-R. The leukocyte SOD1 levels showed a significant reduction (p < 0.0001) by the third study visit and this reduction was sustained throughout the remainder of the study. CSF also showed a decrease in SOD1 protein content and enzymic activity in the two patients so tested. Thus, PYR use may be associated with a reduction in SOD1 in ALS patients. The significance is uncertain and further detailed study is required.

  • 45. Lange, Dale J.
    et al.
    Shahbazi, Mona
    Silani, Vincenzo
    Ludolph, Albert C.
    Weishaupt, Jochen H.
    Ajroud-Driss, Senda
    Fields, Kara G.
    Remanan, Rahul
    Appel, Stanley H.
    Morelli, Claudia
    Doretti, Alberto
    Maderna, Luca
    Messina, Stefano
    Weiland, Ulrike
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience. Department of Neurology, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany.
    Pyrimethamine Significantly Lowers Cerebrospinal Fluid Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients with SOD1 Mutations2017In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 81, no 6, p. 837-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) reduction prolongs survival in SOD1-transgenic animal models. Pyrimethamine produces dose-dependent SOD1 reduction in cell culture systems. A previous phase 1 trial showed pyrimethamine lowers SOD1 levels in leukocytes in patients with SOD1 mutations. This study investigated whether pyrimethamine lowered SOD1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients carrying SOD1 mutations linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS/SOD1). Methods: A multicenter (5 sites), open-label, 9-month-duration, dose-ranging study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of pyrimethamine to lower SOD1 levels in the CSF in fALS/SOD1. All participants underwent 3 lumbar punctures, blood draw, clinical assessment of strength, motor function, quality of life, and adverse effect assessments. SOD1 levels were measured in erythrocytes and CSF. Pyrimethamine was measured in plasma and CSF. Appel ALS score, ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised, and McGill Quality of Life Single-Item Scale were measured at screening, visit 6, and visit 9. Results: We enrolled 32 patients; 24 completed 6 visits (18 weeks), and 21 completed all study visits. A linear mixed effects model showed a significant reduction in CSF SOD1 at visit 6 (p<0.001) with a mean reduction of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58.4-18.5) and at visit 9 (p<0.001) with a mean reduction of 10.5% (95% CI55.2-15.8). Interpretation: Pyrimethamine is safe and well tolerated in ALS. Pyrimethamine is capable of producing a significant reduction in total CSF SOD1 protein content in patients with ALS caused by different SOD1 mutations. Further long-term studies are warranted to assess clinical efficacy.

  • 46. Liu, Jian
    et al.
    Lillo, Concepcián
    Jonsson, P Andreas
    Vande Velde, Christine
    Ward, Christopher M
    Miller, Timothy M
    Subramaniam, Jamuna R
    Rothstein, Jeffery D
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Gredal, Ole
    Wong, Philip C
    Williams, David S
    Cleveland, Don W
    Toxicity of familial ALS-linked SOD1 mutants from selective recruitment to spinal mitochondria.2004In: Neuron, ISSN 0896-6273, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Werner, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Wahlin, Bjorn Engelbrekt
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Fecal calprotectin as a biomarker of intestinal graft versus host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, p. 7920-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diagnosis of gastrointestinal graft versus host disease (GI-GVHD) is based on clinical symptoms and histological findings. In clinical practice, it is often difficult to decide whether abdominal symptoms in an allogeneic transplant recipient are caused by GVHD or other disorders. Endoscopic biopsies are helpful in establishing the diagnosis, but endoscopy is not always possible to perform due to poor general condition of the patients. No biomarkers are routinely used to predict GVHD. The aim of fecal calprotectin and alpha-1 antitrypsin testing in our study was to find out whether determination of the concentrations of these proteins may be used as a screening method for enteric GVHD. We studied prospectively 51 patients, 8 of whom developed GI-GVHD. Our data demonstrate that elevated fecal calprotectin levels were significantly associated with presence of GI-GVHD. We found a positive association between high F-calprotectin and severe gastrointestinal GVHD. In bivariate analysis, only calprotectin but not alpha-1 antitrypsin was independently associated with GI-GVHD. Testing for fecal calprotectin after allogeneic stem cell transplantation may be a useful screening tool.

  • 48.
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hydroxymethylhydroperoxide and bis(hydroxymethyl)peroxide and their effects on certain enzymes, especially horseradish peroxidase.1972Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 49. Meehan, CF
    et al.
    Moldovan, M
    Marklund, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Graffmo, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nielsen, JB
    Hultborn, H
    Intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult G127insTGGG superoxide dismutase-1 mutant mouse in vivo: evidence for increased persistent inward currents2010In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 200, no 4, p. 361-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrated that, in vivo, at resting membrane potential, spinal motor neurones of the adult G127X mice do not show an increased excitability. However, when depolarized they show evidence of an increased PIC and less SFA which may contribute to excitotoxicity of these neurones as the disease progresses.

  • 50. Mohammedi, Kamel
    et al.
    Bellili-Muñoz, Naïma
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Driss, Fathi
    Le Nagard, Hervé
    Patente, Thiago A.
    Fumeron, Frédéric
    Roussel, Ronan
    Hadjadj, Samy
    Marre, Michel
    Velho, Gilberto
    Plasma extracellular superoxide dismutase concentration, allelic variations in the SOD3 gene and risk of myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes2015In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 14, article id 845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is involved in development of diabetes complications. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD, SOD3) is a major extracellular antioxidant enzyme and is highly expressed in arterial walls. Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and 8-iso-prostaglandin (isoprostane) are markers of oxidative stress. We investigated association of SOD3 gene variants, plasma concentrations of EC-SOD, AOPP and isoprostane with myocardial infarction and mortality in diabetic patients.

    METHODS: We studied three cohorts designed to evaluate the vascular complications of diabetes: the GENEDIAB study (469 participants with type 1 diabetes at baseline; follow-up data for 259 participants), the GENESIS study (603 participants with type 1 diabetes at baseline; follow-up data for 525 participants) and the DIABHYCAR study (3137 participants with type 2 diabetes at baseline and follow-up). Duration of follow-up was 9, 5, and 5 years, respectively. Main outcome measures were incidence of myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular and total mortality during follow-up. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SOD3 locus were genotyped in the three cohorts. Plasma concentrations of EC-SOD, AOPP, and isoprostane were measured in baseline samples of GENEDIAB participants.

    RESULTS: In GENEDIAB/GENESIS pooled cohorts, the minor T-allele of rs2284659 variant was inversely associated with the prevalence at baseline (Odds Ratio 0.48, 95% CI 0.29-0.78, p = 0.004) and the incidence during follow-up of myocardial infarction (Hazard Ratio 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.83, p = 0.003) and with cardiovascular (HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.08-0.74, p = 0.004) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21-0.73, p = 0.0006). The protective allele was associated with higher plasma EC-SOD and lower plasma AOPP concentrations in GENEDIAB. It was also inversely associated with incidence of myocardial infarction (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.94, p = 0.01) and all-cause mortality (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.79-0.97, p = 0.008) in DIABHYCAR.

    CONCLUSIONS: The T-allele of rs2284659 in the promoter of SOD3 was associated with a more favorable plasma redox status and with better cardiovascular outcomes in diabetic patients. Our results suggest that EC-SOD plays an important role in the mechanisms of vascular protection against diabetes-related oxidative stress.

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