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  • 1.
    Bengrid, Tarek
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Nicoll, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Zhao, Ying
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Capital Med Univ, Beijing Anzhen Hosp, Dept Ultrasound, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Schmermund, Axel
    Bethanien Hosp, Frankfurt, Germany.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Coronary calcium score is superior to exercise tolerance testing in predicting significant coronary artery stenosis2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 168, no 2, p. 1697-1699Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Henein, Michael Y
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Zhao, Ying
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Nicoll, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Sun, Lin
    Khir, Ashraf W
    Franklin, Karl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    The human heart: application of the golden ratio and angle2011In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 150, no 3, p. 239-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The golden ratio, or golden mean, of 1.618 is a proportion known since antiquity to be the most aesthetically pleasing and has been used repeatedly in art and architecture. Both the golden ratio and the allied golden angle of 137.5° have been found within the proportions and angles of the human body and plants. In the human heart we found many applications of the golden ratio and angle, in addition to those previously described. In healthy hearts, vertical and transverse dimensions accord with the golden ratio, irrespective of different absolute dimensions due to ethnicity. In mild heart failure, the ratio of 1.618 was maintained but in end-stage heart failure the ratio significantly reduced. Similarly, in healthy ventricles mitral annulus dimensions accorded with the golden ratio, while in dilated cardiomyopathy and mitral regurgitation patients the ratio had significantly reduced. In healthy patients, both the angles between the mid-luminal axes of the pulmonary trunk and the ascending aorta continuation and between the outflow tract axis and continuation of the inflow tract axis of the right ventricle approximate to the golden angle, although in severe pulmonary hypertension, the angle is significantly increased. Hence the overall cardiac and ventricular dimensions in a normal heart are consistent with the golden ratio and angle, representing optimum pump structure and function efficiency, whereas there is significant deviation in the disease state. These findings could have anatomical, functional and prognostic value as markers of early deviation from normality.

  • 3.
    Lindqvist, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Zhao, Ying
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Bajraktari, Gani
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Aortic valve replacement normalizes left ventricular twist function2011In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 701-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of aortic valve replacement (AVR) on left ventricular (LV) twist function. We studied 28 severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients with normal LV ejection fraction (EF) before and six months after AVR. LV long axis function was assessed using M-mode and tissue Doppler and twist function using speckle tracking echocardiography. The data were compared with 28 age and sex-matched normal controls. In patients, LVEF remained unchanged after AVR. LV long axis function was reduced before surgery but normalized after AVR. LV twist was increased before (19.7 ± 5.7° vs. 12.9 ± 3.2°, P<0.001) and normalized after AVR (14.4 ± 5.2 °, P < 0.001). In normals, LV twist correlated with LV fractional shortening (r = 0.81, P<0.001) but not with EF. This relationship was reversed in patients before ( r= 0.52, P < 0.01) and after AVR (r = 0.34, P = ns). In patients with severe AS and normal EF, LV twist is exaggerated suggesting potential compensation for the reduced long axis function. These disturbances normalize within six months of AVR but lose their relationship with basal LV function.

  • 4.
    Nicoll, Rachel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Zhao, Ying
    Diederichsen, A.
    Mickley, H.
    Ovrehus, K.
    Zamorano, J.
    Gueret, P.
    Schmermund, A.
    Maffei, E.
    Cademartiri, F.
    Budoff, M.
    Henein, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Gender and age effects on risk factor-based prediction of coronary artery calcium in symptomatic patients: a Euro-CCAD study2016In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 252, p. 32-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The influence of gender and age on risk factor prediction of coronary artery calcification (CAC) presence in symptomatic patients is unclear.

    Methods: From the European Calcific Coronary Artery Disease (EURO-CCAD) cohort, we retrospectively investigated 6309 symptomatic patients, 62% male, from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and USA. All had risk factor assessment and CT scanning for CAC scoring.

     Results: The prevalence of CAC among females was lower than among males in all age groups. Using multivariate logistic regression, age, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes and smoking were independently predictive of CAC presence in both genders. In addition to a progressive increase in CAC with age, the most important predictors of CAC presence were dyslipidaemia and diabetes (β = 0.64 and 0.63 respectively) in males and diabetes (β = 1.08) followed by smoking (β = 0.68) in females; these same risk factors were also important in predicting increasing CAC scores. There was no difference in the predictive ability of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia in either gender for CAC presence in patients aged <50 and 50-70 years. However, in patients aged >70, only dyslipidaemia predicted CAC presence in males and only smoking and diabetes were predictive in females. 

     

    Conclusion:  In symptomatic patients, there are significant differences in the ability of conventional risk factors to predict CAC presence between genders and between patients aged <70 and ≥70, indicating the important role of age in predicting CAC presence.

  • 5.
    Okamoto, Sadahisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Zhao, Ying
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Backman, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Ericzon, Bo-Göran
    Center for Surgical Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wijayatunga, Priyantha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Development of cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation in Swedish hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) patients2011In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 200-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent studies of liver transplanted (LTx) familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) patients have shown a progression of cardiomyopathy in some patients after LTx, but knowledge of the underlying factors remains limited.

    Methods: Seventy-five patients, who had undergone LTx from 1996 to 2008, were included. They had all been examined by echocardiography 1-16 months before LTx. Fifty-four had been re-examined 7-34 months, and forty-two 36-137 months after LTx.

    Results: A significant increase in interventricular septum (IVS) thickness occurred after LTx (p < 0.01), particularly in males (p = 0.002) and late onset patients (p = 0.003). The development of post-LTx cardiomyopathy was related to patient's age at onset of the disease, male gender and pre-LTx IVS thickness. On multivariate regression analysis, however, age at onset was the only significant predictor for the development of cardiomyopathy (odds ratio = 1.14, 95% confident interval 1.01-1.30, p = 0.04).

    Conclusion: An increase of IVS thickness can be observed in FAP patients after LTx. Age at onset of the disease is the main predictor for increased IVS thickness and for the development of cardiomyopathy after liver transplantation.

  • 6.
    Zhao, Ying
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Effect of valve replacement for aortic stenosis on ventricular function2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAortic stenosis (AS) is the commonest valve disease in the West. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the only available management for AS and results in improved symptoms and recovery of ventricular functions. In addition, it is well known that AVR results in disruption of LV function mainly in the form of reversal of septal motion as well as depression of right ventricular (RV) systolic function. The aim of this thesis was to study, in detail, the early and mid-term response of ventricular function to AVR procedures (surgical and TAVI) as well as post operative patients’ exercise capacity.

    MethodsWe studied LV and RV function by Doppler echocardiography and speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) in the following 4 groups; (1) 30 severe AS patients (age 62±11 years, 19 male) with normal LV ejection fraction (EF) who underwent AVR, (2) 20 severe AS patients (age 79±6 years, 14 male) who underwent TAVI, (3) 30 healthy controls (age 63±11 years, 16 male), (4) 21 healthy controls (age 57±9 years, 14 male) who underwent exercise echocardiography.

    Results: After one week of TAVI, the septal radial motion and RV tricuspid annulus peak systolic excursion (TAPSE) were not different from before, while surgical AVR had significantly reversed septal radial motion and TAPSE dropped by 70% compared to before. The extent of the reversed septal motion correlated with that of TAPSE (r=0.78, p<0.001) in the patients as a whole after AVR and TAVI (Study I). Compared with controls, the LV twist function was increased in AS patients before and normalized after 6 months of surgical AVR. In controls, the LV twist correlated with LV fractional shortening (r=0.81, p<0.001), a relationship which became weak in patients before (r=0.52, p<0.01) and after AVR (r=0.34, p=ns) (Study II). After 6 months of surgical AVR, the reversed septal radial motion was still significantly lower than before. The septal peak displacement also decreased and its time became prolonged. In contrast, the LV lateral wall peak displacement increased and the time to peak displacement was early. The accentuated lateral wall peak displacement correlated with the septal peak displacement time delay (r=0.60, p<0.001) and septal-lateral time delay (r=0.64, p<0.001) (Study III). In 21 surgical AVR patients who performed exercise echocardiography, the LV function was normal at rest but different from controls with exercise. At peak exercise, oxygen consumption (pVO2) was lower in patients than controls. Although patients could achieve cardiac output (CO) and heart rate (HR) similar to controls at peak exercise, the LV systolic and early diastolic myocardial velocities and strain rate as well as their delta changes were significantly lower than controls. pVO2 correlated with peak exercise LV myocardial function in the patients group only, and the systolic global longitudinal strain rate (GLSRs) at peak exercise was the only independent predictor of pVO2 in multivariate regression analysis (p=0.03) (Study IV).

    Conclusion: Surgical AVR is an effective treatment for AS patients, but results in reversed septal radial motion and reduced TAPSE. The newly developed TAVI procedure maintains RV function which results in preservation of septal radial motion. In AS, the LV twist function is exaggerated, normalizes after AVR but loses its relationship with basal LV function. While the reversed septal motion results in decreased and delayed septal longitudinal displacement which is compensated for by the accentuated lateral wall displacement and the time early. These patients remain suffering from limited exercise capacity years after AVR.

  • 7.
    Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Mörner, Stellan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Gustavsson, Sandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Residual compromised myocardial contractile reserve after valve replacement for aortic stenosis2012In: European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2404, E-ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 353-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Despite recovery of left ventricular (LV) function and morphology after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS), its relationship with exercise capacity remains unknown. Twenty-one AVR patients (age 61 +/- 12 years, 14 male) with normal ejection fraction (EF, 64 +/- 7%) and 21 age- and sex-matched controls (57 +/- 9 years, 10 male, EF 68 +/- 8%) were studied.Methods and results: All subjects performed semi-supine bicycle exercise and speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) study. Peak oxygen consumption (pVO(2)) was collected during semi-supine bicycle exercise. Systolic (GLSRs) and early diastolic (GLSRe) longitudinal strain rate using STE and Doppler echocardiographic parameters were measured at rest, submaximal, peak exercise, and 4 min after exercise. The two groups had comparable resting echocardiographic measurements. At peak exercise, pVO(2) was lower in patients than controls (18.5 +/- 4.5 vs. 22.1 +/- 4.3 L/min/kg, P < 0.05). GLSRs (0.98 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.55 +/- 0.30 1/s, P < 0.001), septal Sm (7.9 +/- 1.4 vs. 11.1 +/- 2.3 cm/s, P < 0.001) and their changes between rest and peak exercise (Delta GLSRs: 0.16 +/- 0.33 vs. 0.68 +/- 0.27 1/s, P < 0.001; Delta Sm 2.29 +/- 2.23 vs. 4.63 +/- 2.29 cm/s, P < 0.01) were significantly lower in patients than controls. There was no correlation between pVO(2) and any echocardiographic measurements in controls. In patients, pVO(2) correlated with peak exercise GLSRs (r = 0.60, P = 0.0007), septal Sm (r = 0.65, P = 0.002), and Em (r = 0.57, P = 0.009). In a multivariate model, peak exercise GLSRs (beta = 7.18, P = 0.03) was the only independent predictor of pVO(2) in the patients group.Conclusion: Exercise capacity is subnormal after AVR for AS, irrespective of normal LVEF suggesting residual compromised myocardial functional reserve.

  • 8.
    Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå Heart Centre.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre.
    Accentuated left ventricular lateral wall function compensates for septal dyssynchrony after valve replacement for aortic stenosis2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 164, no 3, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The interventricular septal motion becomes reversed after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) despite maintained stroke volume (SV). We hypothesis that left ventricular (LV) lateral wall compensates for such disturbances, in order to secure normal SV. METHODS: We studied 29 severe AS patients (age 63±11years, 18 males) with normal ejection fraction (EF) before, 6months and 12months after AVR and compared them with 29 age- and gender-matched controls, using speckle tracking echocardiography. RESULTS: In patients, the LVEF and SV remained unchanged throughout. Before AVR, the septal radial motion, septal and lateral strain were reduced (p<0.001). Peak septal and lateral displacements, times from QRS to peak displacement were all not different from controls. Six months after AVR, septal radial motion reversed (p<0.001), lateral strain increased (p<0.05), peak septal displacement reduced (p<0.01) while lateral displacement increased (p<0.05). Time to peak septal displacement delayed (p<0.01) in contrast to lateral displacement which became early (p<0.05), resulting in a significant septal-lateral time delay (p<0.01). The accentuation of LV lateral wall correlated with septal displacement time delay (r=0.60, p<0.001) and septal-lateral time delay (r=0.64, p<0.001). SV correlated with lateral displacement (r=0.39, p<0.05). The systolic strain was correlated with opposite wall displacement (p<0.05 for both). There was no correlation between these measurements before and 12month after AVR. CONCLUSIONS: Accentuated lateral wall displacement compensates for septal dyssynchrony in order to maintain normal LVEF and SV. The continuing recovery of these disturbances 12months after complete mass regression suggests an ongoing reverse remodeling.

  • 9.
    Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Trans-catheter aortic valve implantation: early recovery of left and preservation of right ventricular function2011In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to assess the early effect of trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) on right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) function in severe aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Twenty AS patients (age 79±6 years) were examined before, one week and six weeks after TAVI using Doppler echocardiography. LV ejection fraction (EF), long-axis [mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE)] and RV long-axis [tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE)] function, septal radial motion were studied. Results were compared with 30 AS patients before and one week after aortic valve replacement (AVR) as well as 30 normals (reference group). Before TAVI, LVEF was reduced and E/A was higher than the reference and AVR groups (P<0.05 for all). MAPSE, TAPSE and septal motion were equally reduced in TAVI and AVR patients (P<0.05 for all). One week after the TAVI, EF increased in patients with values <50% before the procedure. In contrast, AVR resulted in reversed septal motion (P<0.001) and depressed TAPSE (P<0.001). The extent of reversed septal motion correlated with that of TAPSE in the patients group as a whole after procedures (r=0.78, P<0.001). Six weeks after TAVI, RV function remained unchanged, but LVEF increased and E/A decreased (P<0.05 for both). Thus, TAVI procedure results in significant early improvement of LV systolic and diastolic function particularly in patients with reduced EF and preserves RV systolic function.

  • 10. Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Nicoll, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    He, Yi Hua
    Henein, Michael Y.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: A meta-analysis2016In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 246, p. 318-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aortic calcification has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. In view of the existing conflicting results, we aimed to provide objective evidence on the effect of statins in aortic stenosis (AS).

    Methods and results: A meta-analysis of eligible studies that used statins in AS was performed. Fourteen studies were identified, 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the 14 studies as a whole, no significant differences were found in all cause mortality (OR = 0.98, p = 0.91), cardiovascular mortality (OR = 0.80, P = 0.23) or the need for valve replacement (OR = 0.93, p = 0.45) between the statins and the control groups. LDL-cholesterol dropped in the statins groups in both <24 months and ≥24 months follow-up (p < 0.001 for both) but not in controls (p = 0.35 and p = 0.33, respectively). In the <24 months statins group, the annual increase in peak aortic velocity and peak gradient was less (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), but the mean gradient, valve area and calcification score were not different from controls. In the ≥24 months statins group, none of the above parameters was different from controls.

    Conclusions: Despite the consistent beneficial effect of statins on LDL-cholesterol levels, the available evidence showed no effect on aortic valve structure, function or calcification and no benefit for clinical outcomes.

  • 11. Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Nicoll, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    He, Yi Hua
    Henein, Michael Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    The effect of statins therapy in aortic stenosis: Meta-analysis comparison data of RCTs and observationals.2016In: Data in brief, ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 7, p. 357-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aortic stenosis has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. Fourteen studies which provided the effect of statins treatment on aortic stenosis (AS) were meta-analyzed, including 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the RCTs, statins did not have any influence on peak aortic valve velocity, peak valve gradient, mean valve gradient, aortic valve area and aortic calcification compared to controls. In the observational studies, the peak valve velocity, peak gradient and aortic valve area showed less progression in the statins group compared to controls. This article describes data related article title "The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: a meta-analysis" (Zhao et al., 2016) [1].

  • 12.
    Zhao, Ying
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre and Ultrasound Department, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
    Owen, Andrew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre and Canterbury Christ Church University.
    Henein, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Umeå Heart Centre.
    Early valve replacement for aortic stenosis irrespective of symptoms results in better clinical survival: a meta-analysis of the current evidence2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 168, no 4, p. 3560-3563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with severe, but asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) present a difficult clinical challenge. The conventional strategy is 'wait for symptoms' approach. However, some observational studies have suggested early aortic valve replacement (AVR) results in better outcome compared to late surgery. There are no randomised controlled trials comparing clinical outcome of early and late AVR. This meta-analysis is to examine the effect of the two approaches on clinical outcome in such patients. METHODS: We searched the PubMed for published studies on asymptomatic AS and treatment. Four observational studies (N=976 patients) were suitable for inclusion in the analysis. RESULTS: All four studies provided sufficient details. Using the subgroup of asymptomatic patients who underwent early surgery together or separately from the subgroup who had surgery after developing symptoms resulted in ORs of 0.17 and 0.16 respectively (p<0.00001) in favour of early AVR compared with conservational or late surgery. CONCLUSION: Meta-analysis of the available observational studies has demonstrated highly significant clinical outcome in favour of early AVR compared with late surgery, suggesting that early surgical approach offers substantial survival benefit for severe asymptomatic AS patients.

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