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  • 1.
    Aggestål, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Employing voluntary sports organisations in the implementation of physical activity policy2018In: Routledge handbook of physical activity policy and practice / [ed] Joe Piggin, Louise Mansfield and Mike Weed, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 359-370Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aggestål, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Managing Sport for Public Health: Approaching Contemporary Problems with Traditional Solutions2015In: Social Inclusion, ISSN 2183-2803, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 108-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the area of public health, civil society involvement in attaining government objectives on physical activity participation is often carried out by voluntary sport organizations (Agergaard & Michelsen la Cour, 2012; Österlind & Wright, 2014; Skille, 2009; Theeboom, Haudenhuyse, & De Knop, 2010). In Sweden, this responsibility has been given to the Swedish Sport Confederation (SSC), a voluntary and membership-based non-profit organization, granted government authority to govern Swedish sport towards government objectives (Bergsgard & Norberg, 2010; Bolling, 2005). Research has pointed to difficulties for sport organizations to shoulder such responsibilities due to the deeply rooted logic of competition in sport and organizational structures adapted for competitive sport (Skille, 2011; Stenling & Fahlén, 2009). This article focuses on how public health is being constructed, implemented and given meaning within the SSC. Drawing on a critical discourse approach (Fairclough & Fairclough, 2012) this study explores the SSC’s role and position in public health promotion by interviewing SSC representatives and National Sport Organizations’ (NSO) general managers. Results indicate how discourses on democracy, equality and physical activity are used to legitimize the SSC’s role in public health. Also, how these discourses are compromised in practice, posing challenges for organized sport in meeting objectives of public health.

  • 3.
    Bergsgard, Nils Asle
    et al.
    Department of Sports, Physical Education and Outdoor Studies, University College of Southeast Norway, Bø, Norway.
    Borodulin, Katja
    National Institute for Health and Welfare, Health Monitoring Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Høyer-Kruse, Jens
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Bundgård Iversen, Evald
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    National structures for building and managing sport facilities: a comparative analysis of the Nordic countries2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 525-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport facilities are instrumental in keeping the population fit and healthy. Governments worldwide are thus engaged in devising policies, programs and projects for building such facilities, with the aim of providing citizens with opportunities for a healthy lifestyle. This feature is prominent in the Nordic countries, which have incorporated sport, leisure and physical activity into their universal welfare models. Understanding policies and politics for building sports facilities has therefore become a cornerstone in the understanding of conditions for sport and physical activity for all. In this paper, we investigate and compare the national structures for building and managing sports facilities in the Nordic countries, in order to add to the understanding of how policies and politics for building sport facilities can add to or hamper the sport-for-all ambitions salient in most of today’s western societies.

  • 4. Bergsgard, Nils Asle
    et al.
    Borodulin, Katja
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Høyer-Kruse, Jens
    Bundgård Iversen, Evald
    National structures for building and managing sport facilities: a comparative analysis of the Nordic countries2019In: Sport, Outdoor Life and the Nordic World / [ed] Nils Asle Bergsgard, Solfrid Bratland-Sanda, Richard Giulianotti and Jan Ove Tangen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fahlen, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organising for "new" demands: the organization of spontaneous sports2014In: Book of Abstracts: 19th annual Congress of the European College of Sport Sciences, 2014, p. -168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Commonly voiced critique against organised club sport concerns the shutting out of underprivileged groups and the sortingout of less talented participants. In response, governments and sport organisations launch interventions to develop sport to meet newpreferences and demands. In Sweden, the Swedish Sports Confederation has launched “Drive-in-sport” in an effort to engage with someof the assumed mechanisms behind skewed social recruitment and early drop-outs. In the study this paper reports on, one Drive-in-sportproject was investigated with an ambition to provide an answer to the over-arching question: What happens when spontaneous sportactivities are organised, and why? Methods The project under study was launched within the latest government sport policy programmein Sweden with the aim of recruiting non-members from underrepresented groups. In the project, local sports clubs organise spontaneoussport activities where children and youth previously not involved in club sports can take part under the device “come as you are, dowhat you please, at no cost”. Aiming at an understanding of the organisation of spontaneous sport and its implications for clubs andparticipants, the results of this case study is based on an analysis of project documentation, qualitative interviews with activity leaders,structured observations of the activities and questionnaires to participants in one Drive-in-sport project. Results Results show how organisation,marketing, financing, leader’s competence, facilities, participants’ wishes, and the nature of the activities combine into activitiesvery similar to club sport activities. More specifically, they show how already club affiliated participants and activity leaders doubling ascoaches in regular club sport activities define the content and nature of the activities, making participation difficult and unattractive forbeginners and less experienced participants. They also show how the organising principles in club sport are emulated in project activitiesin terms of rewarding continuity in attendance, which lend more ambitious participants the interpretative prerogative over what Drive-insportshould be. Discussion These results can be understood by drawing on the theoretical concepts of embedded expectations andembodied knowledge. Since few beginners can match their embodied knowledge with the expectations embedded in the activitiesdefined by club affiliated participants and leaders, the intended group of participants shrinks. The increasing majority of participants withembodied club sport experiences, on the other hand, become increasingly likely to enjoy the activities which they are given mandate todefine, which in turn increases the likelihood of their continued participation. These two processes together work in homogenising theparticipant group and by that narrowing the scope of the activities further.

  • 6.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Att utveckla näridrottsplatser2015In: Idéer för idrottsutveckling / [ed] Josef Fahlén och Staffan Karp, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2015, p. 211-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bra bok om sports develoment: Recension av Management of Sports Development, Vassil Girginov (red)2009In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224, no 2009-11-25Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Clashing interests – local sport policy through interorganizational networks2010In: 7th European Sport Sociology Congress. Porto, Portugal, May 5-8, 2010 / [ed] University of Porto, Faculty of Sport, Porto: University of Porto, Faculty of Sport , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Contemporary Sport Management av Janet B. Parks, Jerome Quarterman & Lucie Thibault (red)2007In: Idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Det breda anslagets paradox – den generiska sport management-litteraturens främsta utmaning2018In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recension av Trish Bradbury and Ian O’Boyle (eds.), Understanding Sport Management: International Perspectives, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge 2017, ISBN 978-1-138-10063-3.

  • 11.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Drop in-idrott: En mötesplats för ungdomar: En utvärdering av satsningen på organiserad spontanidrott i Umeå2011Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Elitidrott ur ett svenskt perspektiv2016In: Idrottsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Susanna Hedenborg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, p. 233-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Norges idrottshögskola.
    Elitidrottens organisering2018In: Sport management: del 1. Idrottens organisationer i en svensk kontext / [ed] Åsa Bäckström, Karin Book, Bo Carlsson och PG Fahlström, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2018, p. 92-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    En bok för alla: Lysande analys av Skid-VM i Oslo 2011. Recension av Dag Vidar Hanstad (red), Ski-VM 2011: Planleggning og gjennomføring, Oslo: Akilles 2012Ski-VM 2011: Planleggning og gjennomføring, Oslo: Akilles 20122012In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224, Vol. 31 oktober, p. 1-3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Från Ulf Sterner till Harry Harkimo: En analys av transformeringen av svensk ishockey 1967 – 20002007In: Idrott, historia och samhälle: Svenska idrottshistoriska föreningens årsskrift, ISSN 0280-2775Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Going Professional: An Analysis of Change in Swedish Ice HockeyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Grassroot pitches and spontaneous play ­2007In: Proceedings of the 4th European Sport Sociology Congress, Munster, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Grassroot pitches and spontaneous play ­: Stratification and crowding2007In: Proceedings of the 15th European Sport Management Congress, Turin, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Idrottens organisering2011In: Blå boken: årsbok / [ed] Sveriges centralförening för idrottens främjande - SCIF, Stockholm: SCIF , 2011, årg. 104, p. 76-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Managing Sports Organizations av Daniel Covell, al. (red).2008In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Näridrottsplatser = spontanidrott = bättre hälsa hos barn och unga2007In: Svensk idrottsforskning, Vol. 16, no 3/4, p. 38-42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Näridrottsplatser och spontanidrott2008Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organisera det spontana2012In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 3, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Spontanidrott pekas ofta ut som föreningsidrottens motsats. Den laddas med förväntningar om att vara roligare, mindre konkurrensinriktad och att den ger nya grupper möjligheter att delta. Men om föreningen organiserar spontanidrott, vad händer då?

  • 24.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organizational Structure – Perceived Consequences for Professionals and Volunteers: A comparative study of two Swedish elite ice hockey clubs2005In: Aktuell beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning: SVEBI:S årsbok 2005, 2005, p. 45-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organizational structure – perceived consequences for professionals and volunteers: A comparative study of two Swedish elite ice hockey clubs2005In: Aktuell beteende- och samhällsvetenskaplig idrottsfoskning, ISSN 084-4672, p. 45-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organizational Structures in Sport Clubs: Exploring the Relationship between Individual Perceptions and Organizational Positions2005In: The Sport Journal, Vol. 8, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organizational Structures of Swedish Elite Ice Hockey Clubs2006In: Sport und Gesellschaft – Sport and Society, ISSN 1610-3181, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 57-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    School yard infrastructure and play time culture: Promoting physical activity by redesigning the school environment2009In: Proceedings of the 6th Conference of the European Association for Sociology of Sport, Rome: EASS , 2009, p. 153-153Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sector-specific environmental factors in organized sport in Sweden: Implications for elite ice hockey clubs2004In: Proceedings of the 12th European Sport Management Congress. Ghent, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sport clubs in Sweden2015In: Sport Clubs in Europe: A Cross-National Comparative Perspective / [ed] Harold Van Der Werff, Remco Hoekman and Christoph Breuer, New York: Springer, 2015, p. 343-368Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sport management - området låter sig inte sammanfattas i en volym: recension av George B. Cunningham (red.), Sport Management, Cheltenham, Glos: Edward Elgar2014In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Structures beyond the frameworks of the rink: On organization in Swedish ice hockey2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a dissertation on organization in Swedish ice hockey based on four articles. The purpose of the thesis is to contribute knowledge on the direction, management and practice of sport using Swedish elite ice hockey as an example. Knowledge is created by examining four separate but mutually contingent aspects of organizations. Article I contributes to the overall purpose with knowledge on the professionalization of Swedish ice hockey, the reasons behind and the consequences of it. Focusing on the timeframe 1967-2000 the article highlights how norms, values and ideals changed over time and contributed to a change from ice hockey as an amateur sport based on idealistic motives and volunteer efforts to a professional sport based on entertainment and commercial forces. Article II contributes knowledge on the structural organization of Swedish elite ice hockey clubs and contributing factors. The article compares eleven elite ice hockey clubs and shows how they vary in relation to each other from low to high specialization, standardization and centralization but also how they present many similar characteristics such as organizational form, subsidiary businesses, cooperation with farm clubs and upper secondary schools, types of employments and division of workload. Article III contributes with knowledge on how organizational structures are experienced by individuals working or volunteering in the clubs. Comparing experiences in two structurally different clubs, the article shows how more developed structures are experienced more positively than less developed structures are. However, both groups agree that more developed structures are desirable and they also have similar opinions on issues concerning formal education and training, the elite program vs. the youth program, strategic vs. operative tasks and personal freedom. Article IV contributes knowledge on how experiences of mentioned structures are affected by remuneration, authority and centrality. Exploring four positions differing from each other with regard to hierarchical position, distance to the club’s core activities and payment, the article shows that individual experiences of organizational structure vary depending on where in the club the individual works. This variation is shown to result in tensions between the different positions. The knowledge offered in the thesis is based on three data collections. Data have been gathered from official and unofficial documentation from and on the Swedish sports confederation, the Swedish ice hockey association and 11 clubs represented in the highest division 2000/2001, and from individuals working or volunteering in these clubs as board members, general managers, marketing assistants, coaches, volunteers in the youth programs and arena personnel. The studies are carried out within an institutional theory framework and the analysis of the results taken together shows how the structures in elite ice hockey clubs are affected by surrounding environment and societal environments. Norms and ideals concerning legitimate ways of organizing are mediated by authorities, educational establishments, trade organizations and successful models in neighbouring industries. These norms and ideals have changed as new actors such as television networks, commercial sponsors and employed staff have entered ice hockey and as the roles of the government, the associations, the coaches and the players have changed. These ongoing changes are combining to a new context and new circumstances for the direction, management and practice of Swedish ice hockey.

  • 33.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Svensk idrott på ny värdegrund2006In: Svensk idrottsforskning, no 2, p. 46-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Swedish sport policy and the struggle over interpretation: a programme theory analysis of direction and organization2011In: People in motion - bridging the local and global: The 8th European Association for Sociology of Sport Conference / [ed] Tor Söderström, Josef Fahlén and Kim Wickman, Umeå: Department of Education, Umeå University , 2011, p. 128-128Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The corporal dimension of sports-based interventions: understanding the role of embedded expectations and embodied knowledge in sport policy implementation2017In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, ISSN 1012-6902, E-ISSN 1461-7218, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 497-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to show how the corporal character of activities commonly provided in sports-based policy interventions has implications for the results of policy implementation. By employing the theoretical concepts of embedded expectations and embodied knowledge, this paper examines how expectations embedded in such activities interact with experiences embodied by the participants and combine in availing or restricting the possibilities for participation – thereby affecting the outcome of policies for increased participation in organised sport. The paper builds on data from a case study of a sports-based intervention that aimed to usher so-called un-associated youth in to participation in regular sport-club activities by offering 'organised spontaneous sports' in 'drop-in' sessions that focus on the intrinsic characteristics of non-competitive sports and participants’ wishes. Findings from interviews, the intervention's internal documentation, and observations show how expectations embedded in these activities require a very specific embodied knowledge of the individual participant. Instead of challenging dominant notions of what sport 'is' and 'can be', the activities reproduce existing preconceptions and, in extension, existing patterns of sport participation instead of supporting the formation of new ones as aimed for by policy makers. The findings are discussed in relation to the wider discussion about policy implementation in sport and highlight the necessity for understanding the content of the activities offered in sports-based interventions relative to the previous experiences of the pronounced recipients.

  • 36.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The institutionalization of spontaneous sport – unpacking the paradox2013In: The World Congress of Sociology of Sport: Book of Abstracts, Vancouver, 2013, p. 34-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The trust–mistrust dynamic in the public governance of sport: exploring the legitimacy of performance measurement systems through end-users’ perceptions2017In: International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, ISSN 1940-6940, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 707-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With increased government involvement in sport has followed a perceived need to audit the performance of sport organisations. This has created a wide range of performance measurement systems aiming at producing information to assist in managerial decisions and policymaking. Although thought of as improving organisational performance, it has also been argued that performance regimes, especially in the government/third-sector nexus, are threatening the self-determination of autonomous organisations. Thus, the purpose of this article is to add to the existing understanding of how audits and measurements affect the organisations they are supposed to monitor, not only in terms of minor and negligible side effects, but more importantly in terms of pervasive alterations of the autonomous club sport practice. To do so, data from 43 interviews with representatives from 20 sport clubs were analysed. Findings show how the performance measurement system under study leads to an alteration of sport clubs’ activities to maximise performance measures; a centralisation of work associated with measurement within the club; and an undermining of trust between the voluntary and public sectors, which challenges the legitimacy of this relationship. Thus, this study shows that performance measurement systems are dependent on the legitimacy bestowed by the agents affected by it.

  • 38.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Tråkig pedagogik, svag forskningsanknytning: Recension av Risk Management in Sport and Recreation, John O. Spengler, Daniel P. Connaughton & Andrew T. Pittman2009In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224, no 2009-06-06Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Urgent expectations and silenced knowledge: on spontaneous sport space as public health promoter and sport stimulator2011In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 167-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses how socio-economic and cultural variables have impacted on sports participation in Switzerland across time. Theories in behavioural economics are used to formulate a core model assessing the central budget restrictions to sports participation. The analysis is expanded to include intercultural differences between the three Swiss language regions and a longitudinal time perspective. Data is taken from nine waves of the Swiss Household Panel (2000–2008). A descriptive account of trends in sports participation and the variables influencing it over time is followed by regression analyses. Results show a continuation of significant inequalities in Swiss sports participation (in terms of age, income, education) as well as sociocultural differences across language groups. Nonetheless, it can be seen that sport has become more socially permeable over time (socio-economic convergence), and there are also clear signs of sociocultural convergence processes.

  • 40.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Utmärkt om styrning av idrottsorganisationer: Recension av Russell Hoye & Graham Cuskelly: Sport Governance, ISBN 978-0-7506-6999-32010In: idrottsforum.org, ISSN 1652–7224Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Fahlén, Josef
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Utom tävlan? : En studie av föreningsorganiserad spontanidrott2012Report (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aggestål, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ambitioner mot traditioner2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 24-28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aggestål, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Målstyrningens paradox: Om lokal idrottspolitik genom interorganisatoriska nätverk2009In: Idrottsforskaren, no 4, p. 8-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aggestål, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Vision 2010: En utvärdering av Umeå kommuns fritidspolitiska program2009Report (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Eliasson, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Wickman, Kim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Resisting self-regulation: an analysis of sport policy programme making and implementation in Sweden2015In: International journal of sport policy and politics, ISSN 1940-6940, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 391-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political programming of sport has become the new orthodoxy in many countries where the strive for a more healthy and civically engaged population is intertwined with an ambition to encourage and make responsible individuals and organizations for meeting societal goals. Although much effort has been put into studying this phenomenon, there is still a shortage of understanding of how, why and with what results sport policy programmes are made and implemented. To address this shortage this article reports on a study of the largest government intervention in sport in Sweden with the purpose of exploring processes of responsibilization and self-regulation at play in the relationship between the government and sport as well as between sport organizations on different levels. Results show how sport has received a more salient position on the government agenda, where more instrumental goals have been accompanied by increased resources to aid in their attainment. This process has assisted in the ambitions to modernize sports organizations by encouraging development through self-regulation. The sports organizations involved have embraced the new goals and resources. However, instead of self-regulating in the desired direction, each organizational level in the sports system has forwarded the responsibility for development to the next level below. This process has left the sports clubs with the full responsibility of meeting the government goals, a responsibility they have not accepted. Understandings of these phenomena and processes are discussed by pointing to the specific institutional landscape and tradition of Swedish sport.

  • 46.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ferry, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Governing by numbers: the homogenization and standardization of sport club activities through policy implementation systems2016In: Book of Abstract EASS 2016: Sport in the City – Mobility, Urbanity and Social Change / [ed] Adam B. Evans, Glen Nielsen, Lone Friis Thing and Laila Ottesen, Copenhagen: University of Copenhagen, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport 2016 , 2016, p. 55-55Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This abstract reports on a study of the implementation of a digitalized reporting system for local authority financial support to voluntary and membership-based sport club activities. It focuses on consequences of the implementation for sport clubs’ organisation, leadership and activities by drawing on data from qualitative and semi-structured interviews with 43 sport club representatives representing 20 sport clubs in four Swedish municipalities. Respondents and clubs were strategically sampled based on characteristics recognized in the literature as influential in sport policy implementation (e.g. May, Harris & Collins, 2013). The background of this interest is the focus in existing literature on policy content in general and specifically on the implementation of policies with the content of aiming at widening the social role for sport (e.g. Coalter, 2007). While valuable in our understanding of the implementation of social policies in sport, such studies have limited power in furthering our understanding of sport policy implementation per se. So by building on the argument put forward by Stenling and Fahlén (2014) that sport clubs’ propensity to act as policy implementers are contingent on an alignment between what a sport club is actually doing and what any given policy asks of it, this particular study aimed at examining the implementation of a policy tool seemingly devoid of policy content in order to be able to zoom in more on the consequences of the actual implementation process. Results show how the implementation process itself contributes to homogenizing sport clubs’ activities (cf. Sjöblom & Fahlén, 2010) and to standardizing what sport ‘is’ and ‘is not’ (cf. Fahlén, 2015). By extension, it contributes to limiting access for participants and volunteers in direct contravention of local as well as national sport policy goals. These findings are discussed in the light of recent debates on measures for increased sport participation.

  • 47.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Ferry, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Resursfördelning och jämställdhet2018In: Resurser, representation och "riktig" idrott: om jämställdhet inom idrotten / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Faskunger, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2018, p. 96-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Forsberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Näridrott i skolmiljö, etapp II: En utvärdering av användningen av Tegs Näridrottsplats i Umeå2007Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Karp, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Access denied: The new 'Sports for all' - programme in Sweden and the reinforcement of the 'Sports performance' - logic2010In: Sport & EU Review, ISSN 2040-5847, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 3-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Fahlén, Josef
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Karp, StaffanUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Idéer för idrottsutveckling2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna antologi, skriven av några av landets främsta idrottsforskare, ges olika exempel och perspektiv på att utveckla idrott. Övergripande handlar det om utveckling av fyra olika teman: utveckling av det idrottsliga ledarskapet, utveckling av idrott för underrepresenterade grupper, utveckling av idrottens samverkan med skolan, samt utveckling av idrottens anläggningar. Bokens fjorton kapitel bjuder på nyanserad och varierad läsning som får dig att se utvecklingsprocessen i ett nytt ljus. Förhoppningen är att du och din förening ska få inspiration och idéer till fortsatta framsteg som även kan konkretiseras i den dagliga verksamheten. Antologin är därutöver en viktig kunskapskälla för aktörer som stöttar och samverkar med föreningslivet, till exempel förbund, kommuner och skolor. Den kan också användas på utbildningar med idrottsvetenskaplig inriktning. 

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