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  • 1.
    Adhikari, Deepak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Flohr, Gilian
    Hogeschool Leiden, Zernikedreef 11,2333 CK Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Gorre, Nagaraju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yang, Hairu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lan, Zijian
    University of Louisville Health Sciences Center, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Disruption of Tsc2 in oocytes leads to overactivation of the entire pool of primordial follicles2009In: Molecular human reproduction, ISSN 1360-9947, E-ISSN 1460-2407, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To maintain the length of reproductive life in a woman, it is essential that most of her ovarian primordial follicles are maintained in a quiescent state to provide a continuous supply of oocytes. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control the quiescence and activation of primordial follicles is still in its infancy. In this study, we provide some genetic evidence to show that the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (Tsc2), which negatively regulates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), functions in oocytes to maintain the dormancy of primordial follicles. In mutant mice lacking the Tsc2 gene in oocytes, the pool of primordial follicles is activated prematurely due to elevated mTORC1 activity in oocytes. This results in depletion of follicles in early adulthood, causing premature ovarian failure (POF). Our results suggest that the Tsc1-Tsc2 complex mediated suppression of mTORC1 activity is indispensable for maintenance of the dormancy of primordial follicles, thus preserving the follicular pool, and that mTORC1 activity in oocytes promotes follicular activation. Our results also indicate that deregulation of Tsc/mTOR signaling in oocytes may cause pathological conditions of the ovary such as infertility and POF.

  • 2.
    Adhikari, Deepak
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zheng, Wenjing
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gorre, Nagaraju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hämäläinen, Tuula
    Cooney, Austin J
    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo
    Lan, Zi-Jian
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Tsc/mTORC1 signaling in oocytes governs the quiescence and activation of primordial follicles2010In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 397-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To maintain the female reproductive lifespan, the majority of ovarian primordial follicles are preserved in a quiescent state in order to provide ova for later reproductive life. However, the molecular mechanism that maintains the long quiescence of primordial follicles is poorly understood. Here we provide genetic evidence to show that the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (Tsc1), which negatively regulates mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), functions in oocytes to maintain the quiescence of primordial follicles. In mutant mice lacking the Tsc1 gene in oocytes, the entire pool of primordial follicles is activated prematurely due to elevated mTORC1 activity in the oocyte, ending up with follicular depletion in early adulthood and causing premature ovarian failure (POF). We further show that maintenance of the quiescence of primordial follicles requires synergistic, collaborative functioning of both Tsc and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and that these two molecules suppress follicular activation through distinct ways. Our results suggest that Tsc/mTORC1 signaling and PTEN/PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) signaling synergistically regulate the dormancy and activation of primordial follicles, and together ensure the proper length of female reproductive life. Deregulation of these signaling pathways in oocytes results in pathological conditions of the ovary, including POF and infertility.

  • 3. Cheng, Fang
    et al.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St. Paul ’ s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6.
    Mohanasundaram, Ponnuswamy
    Lindstrom, Michelle
    Ivaska, Johanna
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Eriksson, John E.
    Vimentin coordinates fibroblast proliferation and keratinocyte differentiation in wound healing via TGF-beta-Slug signaling2016In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 30, p. E4320-E4327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vimentin has been shown to be involved in wound healing, but its functional contribution to this process is poorly understood. Here we describe a previously unrecognized function of vimentin in coordinating fibroblast proliferation and keratinocyte differentiation during wound healing. Loss of vimentin led to a severe deficiency in fibroblast growth, which in turn inhibited the activation of two major initiators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), TGF-beta 1 signaling and the Zinc finger transcriptional repressor protein Slug, in vimentin-deficient (VIM-/-) wounds. Correspondingly, VIM-/- wounds exhibited loss of EMT-like keratinocyte activation, limited keratinization, and slow reepithelialization. Furthermore, the fibroblast deficiency abolished collagen accumulation in the VIM-/- wounds. Vimentin reconstitution in VIM-/- fibroblasts restored both their proliferation and TGF-beta 1 production. Similarly, restoring paracrine TGF-beta-Slug-EMT signaling reactivated the transdifferentiation of keratinocytes, reviving their migratory properties, a critical feature for efficient healing. Our results demonstrate that vimentin orchestrates the healing by controlling fibroblast proliferation, TGF-beta 1-Slug signaling, collagen accumulation, and EMT processing, all of which in turn govern the required keratinocyte activation.

  • 4.
    Fallah, Mahsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brodén, Jessica
    Bäckman, Assar
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Liu, Kui
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen activation is required for the development of radiation-induced dermatitis2018In: Cell Death and Disease, ISSN 2041-4889, E-ISSN 2041-4889, Vol. 9, no 11, article id 1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin damage caused by radiation therapy (radiodermatitis) is a severe side effect of radiotherapy in cancer patients, and there is currently a lack of effective strategies to prevent or treat such skin damage. In this work, we show with several lines of evidence that plasminogen, a pro-inflammatory factor, is key for the development of radiodermatitis. After skin irradiation in wild type (plg+/+) mice, the plasminogen level increased in the radiated area, leading to severe skin damage such as ulcer formation. However, plasminogen-deficient (plg−/−) mice and mice lacking plasminogen activators were mostly resistant to radiodermatitis. Moreover, treatment with a plasminogen inhibitor, tranexamic acid, decreased radiodermatitis in plg+/+ mice and prevented radiodermatitis in plg+/ mice. Together with studies at the molecular level, we report that plasmin is required for the induction of inflammation after irradiation that leads to radiodermatitis, and we propose that inhibition of plasminogen activation can be a novel treatment strategy to reduce and prevent the occurrence of radiodermatitis in patients.

     

     

  • 5.
    Fallah, Mahsa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Viklund, Emil
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bäckman, Assar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Blomqvist, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen enhances the healing of radiation-induced wounds via decreased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factorsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen: a novel inflammatory regulator that promotes wound healing2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The plasminogen activator (PA) system has been shown to be intimately involved in wound healing. However, the role of this system in the initiation and resolution of inflammation during healing process remained to be determined. The aims of this thesis were to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction between the PA system and the inflammatory system during wound healing and to explore the therapeutic potential of plasminogen in various wound-healing models.

    The role of plasminogen in the inflammatory phase of the healing process of acute and diabetic wounds was studied first. Our data showed that administration of additional plasminogen to wild-type mice accelerates the healing of acute wounds. After injury, both endogenous and exogenous plasminogen are bound to inflammatory cells and are transported to the wound site, which leads to activation of inflammatory cells. In diabetic db/db mice, wound-specific accumulation of plasminogen does not take place and the inflammatory response is impaired. However, when additional plasminogen is injected, plasminogen accumulates in the wound, the inflammatory response is enhanced, the signal transduction cascade is activated and the healing rate is significantly increased. These results indicate that administration of plasminogen may be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat different types of wounds, especially chronic wounds in diabetes.

    The role of plasminogen at the later stage of wound healing was also studied in plasminogen-deficient mice. Our data showed that even if re-epithelialization is achieved in these mice, a prolonged inflammatory phase with abundant neutrophil accumulation and persistent fibrin deposition is observed at the wound site. These results indicate that plasminogen is also essential for the later phases of wound healing by clearing fibrin and resolving inflammation.

    The functional role of two physiological PAs during wound healing was further studied in a tympanic membrane (TM) wound-healing model. Our data showed that the healing process was clearly delayed in urokinase-type PA (uPA)-deficient mice but not in tissue-type PA (tPA)-deficient mice. Less pronounced keratinocyte migration, abundant neutrophil accumulation and persistent fibrin deposition were observed in uPA-deficient mice. These results indicate that uPA plays a central role in the generation of plasmin during the healing of TM perforations.

    Finally the therapeutic potential of plasminogen in the TM wound-healing model was studied. Our data showed that local injection of plasminogen restores the ability to heal TM perforations in plasminogen-deficient mice in a dose-dependent manner. Plasminogen supplementation also potentiates healing of acute TM perforations in wild-type mice, independent of the administration method used. A single local injection of plasminogen in plasminogen-deficient mice can initiate healing of chronic TM perforations resulting in a closed TM with a continuous but rather thick outer keratinocyte layer. Three plasminogen injections lead to a completely healed TM with a thin keratinizing squamous epithelium covering a connective tissue layer that can start to reorganize and further mature to its normal appearance. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasminogen is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of chronic TM perforations in humans. 

    Taken together, our data indicate that plasminogen is a novel inflammatory regulator that promotes wound healing.

  • 7.
    Shen, Yue
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Du, Chun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hellström, Sten
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mice deficient in urokinase-type plasminogen activator have delayed healing of tympanic membrane perforations2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12, p. e51303-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mice deficient in plasminogen, the precursor of plasmin, show completely arrested healing of tympanic membrane (TM) perforations, indicating that plasmin plays an essential role in TM healing. The activation of plasminogen to plasmin is performed by two plasminogen activators (PAs), urokinase-type PA (uPA) and tissue-type PA (tPA). To elucidate the functional roles of PAs in the healing of TM perforations, we investigated the phenotypes of single gene-deficient mice lacking uPA (uPA(-/-)) or tPA (tPA(-/-)) after TM perforation. Delayed healing of TM perforations was observed in uPA(-/-) mice but not tPA(-/-) mice. The migration of keratinocytes was clearly delayed and seemed to be misoriented in uPA(-/-) mice. Furthermore, fibrin deposition and the inflammatory response were persistent in these mice. Our findings demonstrate that uPA plays a role in the healing of TM perforations. The observed phenotypes in uPA(-/-) mice are most likely due to the reduced generation of plasmin.

  • 8.
    Shen, Yue
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mikus, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sulniute, Rima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Li, Jinan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen is a key proinflammatory regulator that accelerates the healing of acute and diabetic wounds2012In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 119, no 24, p. 5879-5887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite decades of research on wound healing, effective biologic agents for the treatment of chronic wounds, especially diabetic wounds, are still lacking. In the present study, we report that the inert plasma protein plasminogen (plg) acts as a key regulatory molecule that potentiates wound healing in mice. Early in the healing process, plg bound to inflammatory cells is transported to the wound area, where the level of plg is increased locally, leading to the induction of cytokines and intracellular signaling events and to a potentiation of the early inflammatory response. Systemic administration of additional plg not only accelerates the healing of acute burn wounds in wild-type mice, but also improves the healing of chronic diabetic wounds in a mouse model of diabetes. Our results suggest that the administration of plg may be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat many different types of wounds, especially chronic wounds such as those caused by diabetes. (Blood. 2012; 119(24):5879-5887)

  • 9.
    Shen, Yue
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Li, Jinan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hellström, Sten
    Department of Audiology and Neurotology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen initiates and potentiates the healing of acute and chronic tympanic membrane perforations in mice2014In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 12, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Most tympanic membrane (TM) perforations heal spontaneously, but approximately 10-20% remain open as chronic TM perforations. Chronic perforations can lead to an impaired hearing ability and recurrent middle ear infections. Traditionally, these perforations must be surgically closed, which is costly and time consuming. Therefore, there is a need for simpler therapeutic strategies. Previous studies by us have shown that plasminogen (plg) is a potent pro-inflammatory regulator that accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice. We have also shown that the healing of TM perforations is completely arrested in plg-deficient (plg(-/-)) mice and that these mice develop chronic TM perforations. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of local plg injection in acute and chronic TM perforation mice models. Methods: Plg(-/-) mice and wild-type mice were subjected to standardized TM perforations followed by local injection of plg into the soft tissue surrounding the TM. TM perforations with chronic characteristics were induced by leaving TM perforations in plg(-/-) mice untreated for 9 days before treatment. The healing process was observed through otomicroscope and finally confirmed by immunostaining. The quality of TM healing was evaluated based on the morphology of the TM. Result: Daily local injections of plg into the soft tissue surrounding the TM restored the ability to heal TM perforations in plg(-/-) mice in a dose-dependent manner, and potentiated the healing rate and quality in wild-type mice. A single local injection of plg initiated the healing of the chronic-like TM perforations in these mice, resulting in a closed TM with a continuous but rather thick outer keratinocyte layer. However, three plg injections led to a completely healed TM with a thin keratinizing squamous epithelium covering a connective tissue layer. Conclusion: Our data suggests that plg is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of chronic TM perforations in humans.

  • 10.
    Sulniute, Rima
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ahlskog, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Li, Jinan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is a well-orchestrated, complex process leading to the repair of injured tissues. Two major proteolytic systems, the matrix metalloproteases and the plasminogen activator system, are involved in this process. The lack of plasminogen (plg) has previously been reported to cause a delay in wound closure in mice, and to be complemented by matrix metalloproteases. However, our previous finding that tympanic membrane perforations in plgdeficient mice do not heal indicated that plg has more important function in wound healing than previously regarded. In later studies, we have found that plg accumulates in the wound early during the healing process and potentiates the inflammatory response and the healing. In the present study, we have used incision and burn wound models in wild-type and plgdeficient mice to further investigate the role of plg in the later phases of the healing process, including its role after re-epithelization. In addition to the earlier observed delay of wound reepithelizationin plg-deficient mice, we have found that the tissue remodeling processes that take place after re-epithelization is also impaired in these mice. By morphological and immunohistochemical analyses, we found that plg-deficient mice had delayed granulationtissue formation, and were unable to clear the provisional matrix. Extensive fibrin deposition and persistent neutrophil infiltration even at day 60 post-wounding indicate that the inflammation was present subcutaneously in plg-deficient mice even at later time points. Importantly, intravenous or subcutaneous supplementation of plg-deficient mice by human plg led to a restored healing rate, and a healing pattern that was comparable to that in wildtype mice. Therefore, in addition to its important function in early stages of cutaneous wound healing, plg is also crucial for later phases, by clearing fibrin deposits and resolving inflammation after full re-epithelization of the wound. Our results suggest that plg may be a potential therapeutic agent for improving the healing of different types of skin wounds.

  • 11.
    Sulniute, Rima
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Yong-Zhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Fallah, Mahsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ahlskog, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Olena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brodén, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Boija, Hege
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Moghaddam, Aliyeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Li, Jinan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wilczynska, Malgorzata
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ny, Tor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing2016In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 1001-1009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment.

  • 12.
    Wu, Zhihong
    et al.
    Department of Traditional Chinese Integrated Western Medicine, Qi Lu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, People’s Republic of China.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gong, Kebo
    Qi Lu Children’s Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250022, People’s Republic of China.
    Wu, Zhihua
    Qi Lu Children’s Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250022, People’s Republic of China.
    Zhang, Tingguo
    Department of Pathology, Qi Lu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, People’s Republic of China.
    Zhang, Xiaodan
    Department of Traditional Chinese Integrated Western Medicine, Qi Lu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, People’s Republic of China.
    Li, Shuling
    Department of Traditional Chinese Integrated Western Medicine, Qi Lu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, 250012, People’s Republic of China.
    Increased osteopontin expression is associated with progression from vulvar precancerous lesions to vulvar squamous cell carcinoma2014In: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, ISSN 0932-0067, E-ISSN 1432-0711, Vol. 289, no 3, p. 637-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC) contributes to about 3-5 % of all gynecological cancers. Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and vulvar lichen sclerosus (VLS) are regarded as precancerous lesions. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions may prevent development of VSCC. Osteopontin (OPN) has been shown to be involved in many physiological and pathological processes, such as tumor progression, by promoting cancer cell invasion and metastasis. As a result of these findings, OPN has been described as a potential marker for tumor progression in some malignancies. In this study, we investigated the expression of OPN in vulvar tissue specimens and compared its expression between different histopathological grades. In the present study, the expression patterns of OPN in 80 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens, including 25 VSCC samples, 21 VIN lesions and 21 VLS, in addition to 13 normal vulvar samples, were examined by the immunohistochemical method and chromogenic in situ hybridization. The intensity of OPN expression steadily increased according to the pathological grades. In addition, OPN staining was found in the extracellular matrix in VSCC. Expression levels of OPN increased from VLS and VIN to VSCC, and steadily increased with the pathological stage of VSCC. Our results suggest that OPN may be associated with the progression of VSCC.

  • 13.
    Zheng, Wenjing
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gorre, Nagaraju
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Shen, Yue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Noda, Tetsuo
    Ogawa, Wataru
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Liu, Kui
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Maternal phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signalling is crucial for embryonic genome activation and preimplantation embryogenesis2010In: EMBO Reports, ISSN 1469-221X, E-ISSN 1469-3178, Vol. 11, no 11, p. 890-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maternal effect factors derived from oocytes are important for sustaining early embryonic development before the major wave of embryonic genome activation (EGA). In this study, we report a two-cell-stage arrest of embryos lacking maternal 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 as a result of suppressed EGA. Concurrent deletion of maternal Pten completely rescued the suppressed EGA and embryonic progression through restored AKT signalling, which fully restored the fertility of double-mutant females. Our study identifies maternal phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signalling as a new maternal effect factor that regulates EGA and preimplantation embryogenesis in mice.

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