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  • 1.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Credit, strategies, and female empowerment in early modern France2018In: Women and credit in pre-industrial Europe / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018, p. 253-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines female participation and strategies in French local credit markets in the eighteenth century. A sample of about 2,000 notarial loans from two rural manors of south Alsace constitutes the backbone of this analysis. This chapter posits that women's participation in credit markets was of significance not only for their household and their communities, but that it also granted them social benefits in return. This chapter is therefore a tentative exploration of the paradigm of empowerment through the prism of female credit activities.

  • 2.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Emotions of Indebted Peasants in Early Modern France, 1680-17852013Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Purdue University.
    Female peasants, patriarchy, and the credit market in eighteenth-century France2009In: Proceedings of the Western Society for French History, ISSN 2162-0423, Vol. 37, p. 61-84Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gender and politics in eighteenth-century Sweden: Queen Louisa Ulrika (1720-1782)2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book retraces the life and experience of Princess Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (1720-1782), who became queen of Sweden, with a particular emphasis on her political role and activities. As crown princess (1744-1751), queen (1751-1771) and then queen dowager (1771-1782) of Sweden, Louisa Ulrika took an active role in political matters. From the moment she arrived in Sweden, and throughout her life, Louisa Ulrika worked tirelessly towards increasing the power of the monarchy. Described variously as fierce, proud, haughty, intelligent, self-conscious of her due royal prerogatives, filled with political ambitions, and accused by many of her contemporaries of wanting to restore absolutism, she never diverted from her objective to make the Swedish monarchy stronger, despite obstacles and adversities. As such, she embodied the perfect example of a female consort who was in turn a political agent, instrument and catalyst. More than just a biography, this book places Louisa Ulrika within the wider European context, thus shedding light on gender and politics in the early modern period.

  • 5.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    How Emmanuel Macron could still lose the French presidential election2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Uppsala university.
    Indebtedness2017In: Early modern emotions: an introduction / [ed] Susan Broomhall, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 199-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Les Femmes et le Crédit dans les Communautés Rurales au 18e siècle.2014In: Traverse, revue d'histoire - Zeitschrifte für geschichte, Vol. 2, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    Cet article examine le rôle et la place des femmes dans les transactions financières d'Ancien Régime, en particulier dans les communautés rurales.

  • 8.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mechanisms of collective resentment: gender wars and the alteration of patriarchy in Eighteenth-century rural France2013In: On Resentment: Essays on the Cultural History of an Omitted Emotion / [ed] Bernardino Fantini, Dolorès Martin Moruno, and Javier Moscoso, London: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 109-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Peer-to-peer lending in pre-industrial France2019In: Financial History Review, ISSN 0968-5650, E-ISSN 1474-0052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the world of informal financial transactions and informal networks in pre-industrial France. Often considered merely as simple daily transactions made to palliate a lack of cash in circulation and to smooth consumption, the examination of private transactions reveals not only that they served various purposes, including productive investments, but also that they proved to be dynamic. The debts they incurred helped to smooth consumption but also helped to make investments. Some lenders were more prominent than others, although no one really dominated the informal market. This article also compares informal transactions with formal ones through the study of probate inventories and notarial records respectively. It compares these two credit circuits, their similarities and different characteristics, and their various networks features. The debts incurred in the notarial credit market were more substantial but did not serve a different purpose than in the informal market. Here too, the biggest lenders did not monopolise the extension of capital. Perhaps the most striking result lies in the fact that the total volume of exchange between the informal credit market and the notarial credit market (after projection) was similar.

  • 10.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Pride and prejudice: Luise Ulrike of Sweden, the Pomeranian War and the question of loyalty2017In: Frictions and failures: cultural encounters in crisis / [ed] Almut Bues, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2017, p. 77-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1757, in the midst of the Seven Year's War, Sweden declared war on Prussia. Queen Luise Ulrike of Sweden (1720-1782) faced a personal dilemma. Born and raised in Berlin, the queen remained deeply attached to her family and to the prestige of the Hohenzollern dynasty. Waging war on her fatherland – and above all on her brother Frederick the Great – was one of her greatest challenges. Yet as queen consort of Sweden her duty required her to be loyal to her country of adoption. Facing a quandary regarding her "double dynastic affiliation", Luise Ulrike rapidly chose her side in this conflict. The queen secretly passed on sensitive information to her brother and privately hoped for Sweden's defeat in the war. Interestingly, her motivations were both personal and political. How did a princess or a queen consort become assimilated to her new kingdom? How did she resolve the paradox of belonging to her old dynasty and her new one?

    This chapter focuses on the meaning of loyalty, identity, and the concepts of belongingness/foreignness in a queen consort through the example of Queen Luise Ulrike of Sweden (1720-1782). Through the particular example of the Pomeranian War, I examine Luise Ulrike's actions and decisions not only through the prism of her multiple identities (queen of Sweden/princess of Prussia) but also through her political ideals and agency.

  • 11. Dermineur, Elise
    Queens Consort in Premodern Europe: A European Research Project in Progress2014In: Frühneuzeit-Info, ISSN 0940-4007, p. 248-254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rethinking Debt: The Evolution of Private Credit Markets in Preindustrial FranceIn: Social science history, ISSN 0145-5532, E-ISSN 1527-8034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on traditional private credit markets in eighteenth-century France through the examination of notarized loan deeds and to a lesser extent civil court records. It examines in particular how credit markets functioned and how they developed in the eighteenth century. It argues that traditional credit markets featured norms of solidarity, cooperation and fairness, and allowed considerable flexibility and input from both creditors and debtors. But in the middle of the eighteenth century, this market experienced several major changes. Not only did the volume of exchange and the number of notarized credit contracts dramatically increase, engendering a standardization of contracts and a greater resort to external institutions, but a new group of investors modified the traditional norms and practices of exchange. This paper concludes that the private credit market shifted from an institution in which input, negotiation and flexibility prevailed to a more rigid institution in which rules and rigour applied.

  • 13. Dermineur, Elise
    Rethinking Debt: The Evolution of Private Credit Markets in Preindustrial France2018In: Social science history, ISSN 0145-5532, E-ISSN 1527-8034, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 317-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on traditional private credit markets in eighteenth-century France through the examination of notarized loan deeds and to a lesser extent civil court records. It examines in particular how credit markets functioned and how they developed in the eighteenth century. It argues that traditional credit markets featured norms of solidarity, cooperation and fairness, and allowed considerable flexibility and input from both creditors and debtors. But in the middle of the eighteenth century, this market experienced several major changes. Not only did the volume of exchange and the number of notarized credit contracts dramatically increase, engendering a standardization of contracts and a greater resort to external institutions, but a new group of investors modified the traditional norms and practices of exchange. This paper concludes that the private credit market shifted from an institution in which input, negotiation and flexibility prevailed to a more rigid institution in which rules and rigour applied.

  • 14.
    Dermineur, Elise
    European University Institute, Florence.
    Review of Darryl Dee's Expansion and Crisis in Louis XIV's France: Franche-Comté and Absolute Monarchy, 1674-17152011In: Canadian Journal of History, ISSN 0008-4107, E-ISSN 2292-8502, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 151-152Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of the book "Expansion and Crisis in Louis XIV's France: Franche-Comté and Absolute Monarchy, 1674-1715," by Darryl Dee is presented, which is part of the Changing Perspectives on Early Modern Europe series.

  • 15.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Purdue University.
    Review of Francisca Loetz's Dealings with God. From blasphemers in early modern Zurich to a cultural history of religiousness.2011In: The Sixteenth Century Journal, ISSN 0361-0160, E-ISSN 2326-0726, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 466-467Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Purdue University.
    Review of Peter Arnade and Michael Rocke (eds.) Power, Gender and Ritual in Europe and the Americas: Essays in Memory of Richard C. Trexler2009In: Canadian Journal of History, ISSN 0008-4107, E-ISSN 2292-8502, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 576-577Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reviews the book "Power, Gender and Ritual in Europe and the Americas: Essays in Memory of Richard C. Trexler," edited by Peter Arnade and Michael Rocke.

  • 17.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Purdue University.
    Review of Thierry Wanegffellen's Le Pouvoir Contesté: Souveraines d'Europe à la Renaissance2009In: The Sixteenth Century Journal, ISSN 0361-0160, E-ISSN 2326-0726, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 1263-1264Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Dermineur, Elise
    European University Institute, Florence.
    Rural Communities and the Reformation: Social Discipline and the Process of Confessionalization in Montbéliard, 1524-16602011In: Max Weber Programme Working Paper Series, ISSN 1830-7728, no 24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the sixteenth century, the dukes of Württemberg, also sovereigns of Montbéliard, enforced Lutheranism as the new faith in the city and its surrounding dependent villages. The dukes sought to convert the French-speaking peasants there to the new religion but stumbled on ancestral traditions, old rituals, local identity and language, part of the peasants’ mentalities, culture and set of social norms. In order to disseminate the new faith, the authorities relied on pastoral visits and teaching in order to convert the faithful, and also established a consistory to make sure social discipline and new moral norms were effectively respected.This paper explores rural communities confronted by the process of conversion and confessionalization in Montbéliard from 1524 to 1660 and intends to demonstrate that peasants adapted somehow to the new faith but kept their own beliefs, rituals and social norms, refusing therefore an acculturation process.

  • 19.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rural credit markets in 18th-century France: contracts, guarantees and land2018In: Land and credit: mortgages in the medieval and early modern European countryside / [ed] Chris Briggs and Jaco Zuijderduijn, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 205-231Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter looks at the significance of land in relation to credit in early modern France with special reference to the eighteenth century. Through a close examination of notarial contracts covering loans and credit practices, this chapter first presents the characteristics of the early modern French rural credit markets. Particular emphasis is placed on the various types of contracts available to agents in which land served as collateral. Obligations and rentes (annuities) are of particular relevance. Focusing on the credit market of a small rural community in Alsace, this chapter analyses in detail the meaning and evolution of landed guarantees over time. It argues that the significance of land as collateral decreased throughout the eighteenth century mostly because the local credit market was disrupted by a group of new investors from the emerging bourgeoisie. Socially and often geographically strangers to the local community, they began to extend credit and demanded not only stronger guarantees to secure their investments but also set rigid deadlines for repayment.

  • 20.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Single Women and the Rural Credit Market in Eighteenth-Century France2014In: Journal of social history, ISSN 0022-4529, E-ISSN 1527-1897, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 175-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the strategies, actions, and meaning of the credit activities of single women in rural credit markets in eighteenth-century France. For the purpose of this article, gender and, more importantly, marital status, are considered as critical categories of historical analysis, and this approach has yielded key data in the examination of loans records from 1733 to 1790. This article concludes that not only did single women gradually become major agents in the circulation of capital within their communities but that they also gained greater social freedom and empowerment thanks to their role as creditors.

  • 21.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sweden’s election: a vote free from meddling?2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Civil Judicial System in Early Modern France2012In: Frühnenzeit-Info, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil court records have remained until recently an obscure source for historians of early modern France. These documents have been neglected and under used mostly because scholars have preferred to focus on the more colourful study of criminality. Recently, however, a new interest in local and seigneurial courts has stimulated a significant production of doctoral dissertations and manuscripts, which use and rehabilitate civil court records in historiography. This paper examines the historical value of such documents and presents recent developments and trends in historical research concerning French early modern civil courts and civil records. But more importantly, it also proposes a few new directions for research using this particular type of source, research that could enrich not only French historiography, but also the historiography of early modern justice.

  • 23.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Lund University .
    Trust, Norms of Cooperation and the Rural Credit Market in Early Modern France2015In: Journal of Interdisciplinary History, ISSN 0022-1953, E-ISSN 1530-9169, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 485-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at trust as an object of historical analysis in micro-credit exchanges at the village level before the advent of capitalism. Based on the examination of loans recorded by the notary over the course of the eighteenth century, this paper seeks to shed light not only on the mechanisms of norms of cooperation and trust but also, and more importantly, on the paradigm of trust over time. In early modern France, the traditional local credit market was based on strong norms of cooperation and reciprocity, in which trust was taken for granted. When this market experienced several important changes and transitions over the course of the eighteenth century, the fragile social equilibrium was disturbed and the old pattern of trust was challenged. As a result, trust migrated in several new directions.

  • 24.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Uppsala university.
    Village2017In: Early modern emotions: an introduction / [ed] Susan Broomhall, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 242-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Widows' political strategies in traditional communities: negotiating marital status and authority in eighteenth-century France2016In: Gender and political culture in early modern Europe, 1400-1800 / [ed] James Daybell and Svante Norrhem, Routledge, 2016, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The social and economic status of widows in early modern France is characterized by a paradoxical dichotomy. On one hand, they gained social and political authority not only within their household but also within their communities through their new marital position, which granted them a wide spectrum of rights and duties. Indeed, widows could contract, ask for justice, appear on tax roll, lend and borrow money, or serve as collaterals. Yet, on the other hand, their position within the society was considered suspicious –women living without men- and always been subject to caution. Witchcraft trials in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, for instance, have particularly highlighted their target status. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, judicial records continued to underline the conflict and difficulties that many of them encountered in their daily life and exchange with men.

    But because their marital status could possibly weakened widows and engendered social resentment towards them, they, I argue, gradually came to negotiate their social position within their community, especially through economic means and extensive cooperation such as the re-allocation and redistribution of capital in the credit market, for instance, contributing not only to secure their old days but also, and above all, to achieve social consideration and honor.

    Through a cross analysis of loans and judicial records from 1700 to 1789, I am able to retrace widow’s political agenda and negotiations with special reference to the strengthening of their social and economic position within their community.  In the first part, I study the political status of widows in traditional communities and its evolution. Then, in a second part, I focus on their economic position and strategies in the credit market—a public and cooperative sphere—that progressively became important in a context of general indebtedness through the redistribution of wealth and allocation of capital. Finally, I argue that widows gradually developed strategies to negotiate their marital status and their honor through cooperative means.

  • 26.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Women and credit in pre-industrial Europe2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of essays  compare and discuss women's participation and experiences in credit markets in early modern Europe and highlight the characteristics, common mechanisms, similarities, discrepancies, and differences across various periods of time and regions. The essays cover various regions in Europe in different time periods and at all levels of society. The emphasis is placed particularly on their role as creditors and debtors, a topic largely ignored in traditional historiography, but also and above all on the evolution of their roles across time. Were women able to enter the credit market, and how? In what proportion? What was then the meaning of their involvement in this market? What did their involvement mean for the community and for their household? Was credit a vector of female emancipation and empowerment? What were the changes that occurred for them in the transition to capitalism?   

  • 27.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Women and credit in pre-industrial Europe: an overview2018In: Women and credit in pre-industrial Europe / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.
    Women in rural communities: Peasants, patriarchy and the local economy in Northeast France, 1650-17892011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates gender relationships and the role of women in French rural society in the seventeenth and eighteenth century from two different perspectives—economic and socio-legal. I not only show female peasants’ social importance as I demonstrate that they had a prominent role not only within their respective households but also within their communities, but I also demonstrate that women were not as passive and submissive as the traditional historiography and common assumptions have asserted. Female peasants had rights, prerogatives, and opinions oftheir own and consequently challenged the paradigm of patriarchy. Indeed, I emphasize the huge gap between theory –a patriarchal society in which women had no power and no rights especially over money- and practice –women as moneylenders and borrowers, managing their households and their estates. Using gender as a category of historical analysis, my dissertation explores how female peasants had an extremely significant position both in the market economy and within their households and communities, notably through the study of notarial and judicial records. Throughout the eighteenth century, their role in the circulation of capital and property through the credit system and the land market contradicts the common assumption that early modern women had no place and say in the extra domestic sphere.As the justice records indicate, female peasants were also very active in the defense oftheir assets, social position and prerogatives. Here, women braved patriarchy and found arelative equilibrium in their relations with men. The experience of women in rural early modern France illustrates some of the ways emerging social practices modified and altered the traditional patriarchal model, therefore adjusting the social practices to the economic and social context while skirting around legal norms. The findings of this dissertation undermine patriarchal ideology, indicative of a change in gender relations during the early modern period and contribute to a recent historiography analyzing the theory and practice of patriarchy.

  • 29.
    Dermineur, Elise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Umeå Group for Premodern Studies Annual Report 20122013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Absolutism and Society in Seventeenth-Century France: State Power and Provincial Aristocracy in Languedoc2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 149-150Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Anatomy of early modern patriarchy2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren and Virginia Langum, New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 10-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thanks to the emergence and dynamism of new research fields over the past forty years, women and gender historians have been able to (re)define essential concepts and tools of analysis in order to examine women's past. Some of these findings and observations, however, came mostly from the examination of recent historical events and experiences, and are often wrongly used and applied to other historical periods. Patriarchy is one of them. In early modern Western historiography, patriarchy is usually described as a social organization marked by the supremacy of the father/husband in the family, the legal dependence of wives and children, and the reckoning of descent and inheritance in the male line. But as patriarchy has been theorized in the light of capitalism's outcomes, this chapter argues that it should not be used as a significant parameter for premodern studies. This chapter proposes, therefore, to revisit the paradigm of patriarchy applied to early modern Europe, with special reference to France. Because it has long been assumed that patriarchy was propped up by a male monopolization of the 'public' sphere of market relations, demonstration of prominent female activity in the latter prompt a re-thinking of the reach of patriarchy in real lives. Looking at the lives and experiences of female peasants in eighteenth-century France, mostly to the light of market activities, I highlight the discrepancy between theory—i.e., the written rules, the custom and even the ancient tradition that supported patriarchy—and new social practices and norms that challenged it.

  • 32.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Common Land, Wine and the French Revolution. Rural Society and Economy in Southern France, c.1789-18202012In: European Review of History, ISSN 1350-7486, E-ISSN 1469-8293, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 332-333Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    French Historians 1900-2000: New Historical Writing in Twentieth-Century France2012In: European Review of History, ISSN 1350-7486, E-ISSN 1469-8293, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 326-327Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Memoirs of Mademoiselle de Montpensier (La Grande Mademoiselle)2016In: French History, ISSN 0269-1191, E-ISSN 1477-4542, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 429-430Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Peasants of Paris from the mid-XVth to Early XVIIth century2013In: French History, ISSN 0269-1191, E-ISSN 1477-4542, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 274-275Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Introduction2018In: Revisiting Gender in European History, 1400–1800, Routledge, 2018, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scholarly notion of gender has only recently been framed. In the aftermath of World War II, a series of social demands and protests emerged which shook the Western world. These movements placed social and political inequality at the core of their struggle. In particular, feminist movements, collectively called the second wave, blossomed throughout the Western world in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. Their powerful socio-political dimension and dynamism quickly attracted worldwide attention. This chapter also presents an overview of this book. The book covers various regions in Europe in different time periods at all levels of society. It covers a wide socio-professional spectrum, from elite women to female artisans, domestics and peasant women. The book redresses a lack of scholarship on gender and 'the dark or unofficial side of the preindustrial economy'. It examines the illness experience articulated by two late medieval mystical writers through the possibilities afforded by medicine and religious culture.

  • 37.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Introduction2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, Virginia Langum, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scholarly notion of gender has only recently been framed. In the aftermath of World War II, a series of social demands and protests emerged which shook the Western world. These movements placed social and political inequality at the core of their struggle. In particular, feminist movements, collectively called the second wave, blossomed throughout the Western world in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. Their powerful socio-political dimension and dynamism quickly attracted worldwide attention. This chapter also presents an overview of this book. The book covers various regions in Europe in different time periods at all levels of society. It covers a wide socio-professional spectrum, from elite women to female artisans, domestics and peasant women. The book redresses a lack of scholarship on gender and 'the dark or unofficial side of the preindustrial economy'. It examines the illness experience articulated by two late medieval mystical writers through the possibilities afforded by medicine and religious culture.

  • 38.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, ÅsaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.Langum, VirginiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-18002018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do women have a history? Did women have a renaissance? These were provocative questions when they were raised in the heyday of women's studies in the 1970s. But how relevant does gender remain to premodern history in the twenty-first century? This book considers this question in eight new case studies that span the European continent from 1400 to 1800. An introductory essay examines the category of gender in historiography and specifically within premodern historiography, as well as the issue of source material for historians of the period. The eight individual essays seek to examine gender in relation to emerging fields and theoretical considerations, as well as how premodern history contributes to traditional concepts and theories within women's and gender studies, such as patriarchy.

  • 39.
    Dermineur, Elise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norrhem, Svante
    Lund University.
    Luise Ulrike of Preussia, Queen of Sweden, and the search for political space2016In: Queens consort, cultural transfer and European politics, c. 1500-1800 / [ed] Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly & Adam Morton, Routledge, 2016, p. 84-108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter will discuss how Luise Ulrike, Princess of Prussia and Queen of Sweden, used culture to create political spaces (or places). The Academy of Literature, History and Antiquities founded by her in 1753 is one such space/place. The chapter will show that the Academy was one of several attempts to use culture as a tool or weapon to reach a political goal and will also put these spaces/places in a European context and discuss where Luise Ulrike got her inspiration from.

  • 40.
    Dermineur, Elise
    et al.
    Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study.
    Svetiev, Yane
    Bocconi Universita.
    The Fairness of Contractual Exchange in a Private Law Society: A Case Study of Early Modern Credit Markets2015In: European Review of Contract Law, ISSN 1614-9920, E-ISSN 1614-9939, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 229-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quite apart from the question of the justifiability – based on prior normative commitments – of legal rules controlling the substance of contractual exchange, such as a fair price rule, a common complaint against such rules is based on the difficulties of implementing and enforcing them. Rather than proceeding from first principles, it is also possible to examine the consequences of ex ante and ex post controls on the fairness of contractual exchange in contexts where they have been imposed before testing such consequences against any normative commitments. Such an approach allows both to examine whether practical constraints on enforcing rules over the fairness of exchange are truly binding and, even if they are, whether such rules can have other either beneficial or negative effects on parties and on contract law more broadly. We present a case study of credit markets in a rural community in early modern France marked by the relative absence of the State as a regulatory agent. Our analysis points to, even very provisionally, possible functions of a weak mandatory rule even when over-inclusive and difficult to enforce.

  • 41.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Umeå Group for Premodern Studies Annual Report 20132014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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