umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Antretter, E
    et al.
    Dunkel, D
    Haring, C
    Corcoran, P
    De Leo, D
    Fekete, S
    Hawton, K
    Kerkhof, A J F M
    Lönnqvist, J
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Van Heeringen, K
    Wasserman, D
    The factorial structure of the Suicide Intent Scale: a comparative study in clinical samples from 11 European regions.2008In: International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, ISSN 1049-8931, E-ISSN 1557-0657, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the Suicide Intent Scale (SIS) is a widely used instrument in research on suicidal behavior, comparative research on the latent structure of the SIS has been neglected. To determine whether a general factor model of the SIS is supported, alternative factor models of the SIS were evaluated comparatively in 11 clinical samples. The SIS was applied as part of a structured clinical interview to patients after an episode of non-fatal suicidal behavior. The samples were drawn from 11 study centers within the frame of the WHO/EURO multicenter study on suicidal behavior. Three different two-factor and two three-factor models of the SIS were examined in each sample using principal component analysis with orthogonal Procrustes rotation. The factorial structure of the 'subjective part' of the SIS (items 9-14) was strongly supported, whereas an acceptable model fit for the 'objective part' was not found. Possible future revisions of 'objective' SIS items may be worth consideration. As a limitation, the results of the study might not generalize to other samples that use different definitions of non-fatal suicidal behavior.

  • 2.
    Armelius, Bengt-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Borderline diagnosis from hospital records:  reliability and validity of Gunderson's diagnostic interview for Borderlines (DIB)1985In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 173, no 1, p. 32-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two trained and experienced clinical psychologists and two nontrained students rated the sections in Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) on the basis of hospital records for 16 patients (DIB-R). The results showed that both reliability and validity, i.e., correlations with an actual interview, were unexpectedly high, around .80 for the trained judges and around .55 for the nontrained judges. The conclusion is that the DIB may be used for retrospective diagnosis of borderline patients from hospital records.

  • 3. Beckman, Karin
    et al.
    Lindh, Åsa
    Waern, Margda
    Strömsten, Lotta M. J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Runesson, Bo
    Dahlin, Marie
    Impulsive suicide attempts among young people: a prospective multicentre cohort study in Sweden2019In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 243, p. 421-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We aimed to compare the prevalence of impulsive suicide attempts (ISA) among young adults and those over 25 who present at hospital in connection with attempted suicide. We also aimed to identify factors associated with ISA in young adults and to assess medical severity as well as the probability of repeated suicide attempts in this age group.

    Method: A prospective multicentre cohort study included hospital known cases of suicide attempt (N = 666). The prevalence of ISA was compared between young adults (18-25) and adults aged > 26. We used logistic regression models to identify factors associated with ISA, associations of ISA with high medical severity and prediction of new fatal or non-fatal suicide attempts within 6 months.

    Results: 43.7% of the young patients had made an ISA, and 30.2% among those aged > 26 (p = 0.001). Among the young, substance use disorder was associated with ISA; crude odds ratio (OR) 2.0 (1.0-4.2), and adjusted OR 2.1 (0.99-4.4). Affective disorder and unemployment/sickness absence implied lower odds of ISA. ISA resulted in injuries of high medical severity as often as more planned attempts and non-fatal or fatal repetition within 6 months was equally common (30%) in both groups.

    Limitations: The study was set in psychiatric emergency services, which limits the generalizability.

    Conclusions: Clinicians should acknowledge that suicide attempts among youth often occur without previous planning and may result in medically severe injuries. The probability of new fatal or non-fatal suicide attempts should be kept in mind also after an impulsive suicide attempt.

  • 4. Bille-Brahe, U
    et al.
    Andersen, K
    Wasserman, D
    Schmidtke, A
    Bjerke, T
    Crepet, P
    De Leo, D
    Haring, C
    Hawton, K
    Kerkhof, A
    Lönnqvist, J
    Michel, K
    Phillippe, A
    Querejeta, I
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Temesváry, B
    The WHO-EURO Multicentre Study: risk of parasuicide and the comparability of the areas under study.1996In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 15 areas under study in the WHO/Euro Multicentre Study on Parasuicide vary considerably with regard to socio-economic factors, culture, life-styles, etc. In this paper, the authors discuss whether the traditional high risk factors for suicidal behavior (such as unemployment, abuse, divorce, etc.) take on different weights depending on local societal and cultural settings. Results from analyzing covariations between various background factors characteristic of the different areas under study and the frequency of attempted suicide showed weak or insignificant correlations, indicating that high-risk factors can only be identified from international pooled data with great care.

  • 5. Bille-Brahe, U
    et al.
    Kerkhof, A
    De Leo, D
    Schmidtke, A
    Crepet, P
    Lonnqvist, J
    Michel, K
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Stiles, T C
    Wasserman, D
    Aagaard, B
    Egebo, H
    Jensen, B
    A repetition-prediction study of European parasuicide populations: a summary of the first report from part II of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Parasuicide in co-operation with the EC concerted action on attempted suicide.1997In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 81-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the aims of the European Study on Parasuicide, which was initiated by the Regional Office for the European Region of the World Health Organization in the mid-1980s, was to try to identify social and personal characteristics that are predictive of future suicidal behaviour. A follow-up interview study (the Repetition-Prediction Study) was designed, and to date 1145 first-wave interviews have been conducted at nine research centres, representing seven European countries. The present paper provides an abridged version of the first report from the study. The design and the instrument used (The European Parasuicide Study Interview Schedules, EPSIS I and II) are described. Some basic characteristics of the samples from the various centres, such as sex, age, method of suicide attempt, and history of previous attempts, are presented and compared. The male/female sex ratio ranged from 0.41 to 0.85; the mean age range for men was 33-45 years and that for women was 29-45 years. At all of the centres, self-poisoning was the most frequently employed method. On average, more than 50% of all respondents had attempted suicide at least once previously. The representativeness of the samples is discussed. There were differences between the centres in several respects, and also in some cases the representativeness of the different samples varied. Results obtained from analyses based on pooled data should therefore be treated with caution.

  • 6. Bille-Brahe, U
    et al.
    Kerkhof, A
    De Leo, D
    Schmidtke, A
    Crepet, P
    Lönnqvist, J
    Michel, K
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Stiles, T C
    Wasserman, D
    Egebo, H
    A repetition-prediction study on European parasuicide populations. Part II of the WHO/Euro Multicentre Study on Parasuicide in cooperation with the EC Concerted Action on Attempted Suicide.1996In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the aims of the inter-European study on parasuicide, which was initiated by WHO/Euro in the mid-1980s, was to try and identify social and personal characteristics predictive of future suicidal behavior. A follow-up interview study (the Repetition-Prediction Study) was designed, and so far 1145 interviews have been carried out at nine research centers, representing seven European countries. The study and the instrument used (the European Parasuicide Study Interview Schedules, EPSIS I and II) are described here. Some basic characteristics of the material from the various centers are presented and compared, and the representativeness of the samples are discussed. There were differences between the centers in several respects. Results from analyses based on pooled data have to be treated with some caution because of the possible lack of representativeness.

  • 7. Bursztein Lipsicas, Cendrine
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Apter, Alan
    De Leo, Diego
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Michel, Konrad
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sayil, Isik
    Schmidtke, Armin
    van Heeringen, Cornelis
    Värnik, Airi
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Attempted suicide among immigrants in European countries: an international perspective2012In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 241-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study compares the frequencies of attempted suicide among immigrants and their hosts, between different immigrant groups, and between immigrants and their countries of origin.

    METHODS: The material, 27,048 persons, including 4,160 immigrants, was obtained from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour, the largest available European database, and was collected in a standardised manner from 11 European centres in 1989-2003. Person-based suicide-attempt rates (SARs) were calculated for each group. The larger immigrant groups were studied at each centre and compared across centres. Completed-suicide rates of their countries of origin were compared to the SARs of the immigrant groups using rank correlations.

    RESULTS: 27 of 56 immigrant groups studied showed significantly higher, and only four groups significantly lower SARs than their hosts. Immigrant groups tended to have similar rates across different centres. Moreover, positive correlation between the immigrant SAR and the country-of-origin suicide rate was found. However, Chileans, Iranians, Moroccans, and Turks displayed high SARs as immigrants despite low suicide rates in the home countries.

    CONCLUSIONS: The similarity of most immigrant groups' SARs across centres, and the correlation with suicidality in the countries of origin suggest a strong continuity that can be interpreted in either cultural or genetic terms. However, the generally higher rates among immigrants compared to host populations and the similarity of the rates of foreign-born and those immigrants who retained the citizenship of their country of origin point to difficulties in the acculturation and integration process. The positive correlation found between attempted and completed suicide rates suggests that the two are related, a fact with strong implications for suicide prevention.

  • 8.
    Caldera, Trinidad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Herrera, Andrés
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Suicide intent among parasuicide patients in Nicaragua.: A surveillance and follow-up study.2007In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 351-360Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Caldera, Trinidad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Herrera, Andrés
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Parasuicide in a low income country: results from a three year hospital surveillance in Nicaragua.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 349-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: A study was undertaken to assess the incidence of parasuicide in Nicaragua, to identify groups at risk, and to describe the characteristics of parasuicides, such as methods used and seasonal and diurnal patterns. Method: All hospital-admitted parasuicide cases in the area of León, Nicaragua, were assessed over a three-year period using standardized instruments. Results: Two hundred and thirty-three parasuicide cases were identified in the catchment area giving a parasuicide rate of 66.3/100,000 inhabitants per year based on the population 10 years and older. Corresponding figure for 15 years and older was 71.3. A majority were females (68.8%), who were significantly younger than the males (mean 20.8 years vs. mean 24.6 years). The highest rates were found in the age group 15 - 19 years with a female rate three times higher than the male rate (302.9 vs. 98.9). Pesticides, a highly lethal substance, were used as method in 19.1% of the attempts. Consistent seasonal variation with peaks in May - June and September - October were found over the years. Among parasuicide cases, 46.5% had been in contact with the healthcare system within 6 months before attempting suicide. Conclusions: Parasuicides represent a significant health problem among young people in Nicaragua. Preventive efforts should be directed especially towards the life situation for young girls, limitation of availability of suicide means, increased awareness in schools concerning suicidal problems, as well as improved management of patients with mental health problems within primary healthcare.

  • 10.
    Chotai, Jayanti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Season of birth variations in suicide methods in relation to any history of psychiatric contacts support an independent suicidality trait.2002In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 69, no 1-3, p. 69-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Due to reports on season of birth variations in suicidal behaviour as well as in cerebrospinal fluid levels of monoamine metabolites, we investigated season of birth variations in suicide methods for completed suicides in relation to any history of psychiatric contacts. Relationships with the psychiatric diagnoses for those with psychiatric contacts were also studied. METHODS: Sociodemographic variables and suicide methods were examined for all the 693 suicide victims during 1961-1980 in Västerbotten, Sweden. Information on any history of psychiatric contacts was obtained from psychiatric in-patient and out-patient records. RESULTS: Gender differences in the choice of suicide method were found in the group without any history of psychiatric contacts, but not in those with such a history. Only those without a history of psychiatric contacts showed season of birth variations for suicide methods -- those born during February to April were significantly more likely, and those born during October to January significantly less likely, to have preferred hanging rather than poisoning or petrol gases. These associations were stronger for the determined suicides, for males, and for urban residence. Suicide victims with a history of psychiatric contacts were significantly younger than those without. LIMITATIONS: No psychological autopsies for those without psychiatric contacts. No information on eventual contacts with general practitioners. No measures of monoamine neurotransmitters were available. CONCLUSIONS: Season of birth association for suicide methods is likely to be mediated by a suicidality trait independently of specific major psychiatric disorders. Monoamine neurotransmitters, particularly serotonin, are likely to underlie such a trait.

  • 11.
    Chotai, Jayanti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Asberg, M
    Season of birth variations in dimensions of functioning evaluated by the diagnostic interview for borderline patients.2000In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 132-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In view of recent reports showing that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of monoamine metabolites exhibit season of birth variations, and that they are also associated with section II (impulse action patterns) of the diagnostic interview for borderline patients (DIB), we analyzed two samples of data to investigate the relationship between the season of birth and the DIB. The first sample comprised 202 patients participating in psychobiological research in Stockholm, and the second sample comprised 130 patients who had committed suicide in Västerbotten in northern Sweden. Those with intermediate score for section II (impulse action patterns) were significantly more likely to have been born during the season October to January in the pooled data, and this tendency persisted in separate analyses for the two samples and for the two diagnostic groups mood disorders and schizophrenia, respectively. Those with high score for section IV (psychosis) were significantly more likely to have been born during February to April in the pooled sample and in the nonschizophrenic group. In the group with schizophrenia, those born during February to April had significantly high scores for section III (affects). These results throw further light on the role of season of birth in suicidology and in psychiatric morbidity.

  • 12. Crane, Catherine
    et al.
    Williams, J Mark G
    Hawton, Keith
    Arensman, Ella
    Hjelmeland, Heidi
    Bille-Brahe, Unni
    Corcoran, Paul
    De Leo, Diego
    Fekete, Sandor
    Grad, Onja
    Haring, Christian
    Kerkhof, Ad J F M
    Lonnqvist, Jouko
    Michel, Konrad
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, Armin
    van Heeringen, Cornelius
    Wasserman, Danuta
    The association between life events and suicide intent in self-poisoners with and without a history of deliberate self-harm: a preliminary study2007In: Journal of Suicide and Life-threatening Behaviour, ISSN 0363-0234, E-ISSN 1943-278X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 367-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The associations between life events in the 12 months preceding an episode of self-poisoning resulting in hospital attendance (the index episode), and the suicide intent of this episode were compared in individuals for whom the index episode was their first, episode and in individuals in whom it was a recurrence of DSH. Results indicated a significant interaction between independent life events, repetition status, and gender in the prediction of suicide intent, the association between life events and intent being moderated by repetition status in women only. The results provide preliminary evidence to suggest the presence of a suicidal process in women, in which the impact of negative life events on suicide intent diminishes across episodes.

  • 13. De Leo, D
    et al.
    Padoani, W
    Lonnqvist, J
    Kerkhof, A J F M
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Michel, K
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Wasserman, D
    Caon, F
    Scocco, P
    Repetition of suicidal behaviour in elderly Europeans: a prospective longitudinal study.2002In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 291-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess any predictive factors for repeated attempted suicide and completed suicide in a 1-year follow-up on a sample of elderly European suicide attempters (60 years and over). From 1990 to 1993, 63 subjects completed the first interview and were recontacted after 1 year. At follow-up, eight subjects (12.7%) had taken their lives and seven (11.1%) had repeated at least one suicide attempt. On comparison of repeaters and non-repeaters, differences emerged in terms of death of the father in childhood and for mean Suicidal Intent Score. At the end of follow-up period, repeaters reported a more frequent desire to repeat suicidal behaviour and judged their mental health and social assistance received to be worse. Suicides and non-repeaters differed especially in relation to death of father during childhood and number of contacts with General Practitioner. Interpretation of the results must take into account the smallness of the test sample, the difficulties in obtaining complete data for the follow-up interview, the lack of a control group and a diagnosis formulated in a hospital consultation setting. The study confirms, however, the high risk of repetition of suicidal behaviour in the elderly. In old age suicidal ideation is often sustained over long periods of time and requests for help are addressed to relatives and GPs. An interesting finding is the more frequent death of the father during childhood among repeaters.

  • 14. De Leo, D
    et al.
    Padoani, W
    Scocco, P
    Lie, D
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Arensman, E
    Hjelmeland, H
    Crepet, P
    Haring, C
    Hawton, K
    Lonnqvist, J
    Michel, K
    Pommereau, X
    Querejeta, I
    Phillipe, J
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Fricke, S
    Weinacker, B
    Tamesvary, B
    Wasserman, D
    Faria, S
    Attempted and completed suicide in older subjects: results from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study of Suicidal Behaviour.2001In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 300-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stockholm (Sweden), Pontoise (France) and Oxford (UK) had the highest suicide attempts rates. In most centres, the majority of elderly who attempted suicide were widow(er)s, often living alone, who used predominantly voluntary drug ingestion. Non-fatal suicidal behaviour decreased with increasing age, whereas suicide rates rose. The ratio between fatal and non-fatal behaviours was 1:2, that for males/females almost 1:1. In the years considered, substantial stability in suicide and attempted suicide rates was observed. As their age increased, suicidal subjects displayed only a limited tendency to repeat self-destructive acts. Moreover, there was little correlation between attempted suicide and suicide rates, which carries different clinical implications for non-fatal suicidal behaviour in the elderly compared with younger subjects in the same WHO/EURO study.

  • 15. De Leo, D
    et al.
    Scocco, P
    Marietta, P
    Schmidtke, A
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Kerkhof, A J
    Lonnqvist, J
    Crepet, P
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wasserman, D
    Michel, K
    Bjerke, T
    Physical illness and parasuicide: evidence from the European Parasuicide Study Interview Schedule (EPSIS/WHO-EURO).1999In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, ISSN 0091-2174, E-ISSN 1541-3527, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 149-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More careful attention to somatic conditions and their subjective implications would probably augment chances of effectively preventing suicide.

  • 16. Haglund, Axel
    et al.
    Lindh, Asa U.
    Lysell, Henrik
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Waern, Margda
    Runeson, Bo
    Interpersonal violence and the prediction of short-term risk of repeat suicide attempt2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this multi-center cohort study, suicide attempters presenting to hospital (N = 355, 63% women) were interviewed using the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) and followed-up by medical record review. Main outcome was non-fatal or fatal repeat suicide attempt within six months. Also, repeat attempt using a violent method was used as an additional outcome in separate analyses. Data were analyzed for the total group and for men and women separately. Repeat attempts were observed within six months in 78 persons (22%) and 21 (6%) of these used a violent method. KIVS total score of 6 or more was associated with repeat suicide attempt within six months (OR = 1.81, CI 1.08-3.02) and predicted new attempts with a sensitivity of 62% and a specificity of 53%. A three-fold increase in odds ratio was observed for repeat attempt using a violent method (OR = 3.40, CI 1.22-9.49). An association between exposure to violence in adulthood and violent reattempt was seen in women (OR = 1.38, CI 1.06-1.82). The overall conclusions are that information about interpersonal violence may help predict short-term risk for repeat suicide attempt, and that structured assessment of interpersonal violence may be of value in risk assessment after attempted suicide.

  • 17. Hawton, K
    et al.
    Arensman, E
    Wasserman, D
    Hultén, A
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Bjerke, T
    Crepet, P
    Deisenhammer, E
    Kerkhof, A
    De Leo, D
    Michel, K
    Ostamo, A
    Philippe, A
    Querejeta, I
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Temesváry, B
    Relation between attempted suicide and suicide rates among young people in Europe.1998In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 191-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rates of attempted suicide and suicide in the young covary. The recent increase in attempted suicide rates in young male subjects in several European countries could herald a further increase in suicide rates.

  • 18.
    Herrera, Andrés
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Caldera, Trinidad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Suicidal expressions among young people in Nicaragua: a community-based study2006In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 41, no 9, p. 692-697Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Herrera, Andrés
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Caldera, Trinidad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Pena, Rodolfo
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Attitudes towards suicide among young people in Nicaragua: a community-based studyManuscript (Other academic)
  • 20. Hultén, A
    et al.
    Wasserman, D
    Hawton, K
    Jiang, G X
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Bjerke, T
    Kerkhkof, A
    Michel, K
    Querejeta, I
    Recommended care for young people (15-19 years) after suicide attempts in certain European countries.2000In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 100-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on recommended care for young people aged 15-19 years after attempted suicide from nine European research centres during the period 1989-1992 were analysed in terms of gender, history of previous suicide attempt and methods used. Altogether 438 suicide attempts made by 353 boys and 1,102 suicide attempts made by 941 girls were included. Analyses of the total data from all centres showed that young people with a history of previous suicide attempt and those using violent methods had significantly higher chance of being recommended aftercare than first-time attempters or those choosing self-poisoning. There were no significant differences of being recommended care between genders. Logistic regression analyses of the material were performed and the results were similar. Both having previous attempted suicide (odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.53-2.61) and using "hard" methods (odds ratio 1.71, 95% CI 1.49-1.96) were significantly associated with increased possibility of being recommended aftercare. When individual centres were analysed, large disparities of recommended care after suicide attempts were found and there were no uniform criteria of recommending care for young suicide attempters in Europe.

  • 21.
    Idenfors, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Professional care after deliberate self-harm: a qualitative study of young people's experiences2015In: Patient Preference and Adherence, ISSN 1177-889X, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 9, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is increasingly common among young people. At the same time, treatment and support after DSH are often hampered by low compliance. Aim: To explore young people's perceptions of care and support during a 6-month period following their first contact for DSH. Methods: We conducted nine semistructured interviews with young people aged 16-24 years 6 months after their first contact for DSH. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Three main themes were extracted from the interviews. "Am I really in good hands?" describes whether the participants felt they were being listened to and taken seriously and whether they could rely on the competence of the professionals and the appropriateness of treatment, including keeping agreements and communication with other relevant agencies. "Help should match life circumstances" comprises how basic practicalities such as travel possibilities affect treatment and concomitant assistance in everyday living. Financial matters and jobseeking were perceived as necessary for optimal treatment and well-being. "Making yourself better" includes participants' efforts to manage on their own, through realizing their own responsibility to be engaged and actively take part in treatment planning. Conclusion: Flexibility and responsiveness to young people's own views and specific needs in treatment arrangements are of crucial importance. The significance of basic practical help cannot be underestimated and should not be overlooked.

  • 22.
    Idenfors, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Professional Care as an Option Prior to Self-Harm A Qualitative Study Exploring Young People's Experiences2015In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is a growing problem among young people and is a major risk factor for suicide. Young adults experiencing mental distress and suicidal ideation are reluctant to seek help, requiring new strategies to reach this group. Aims: The present study explored young people's views of professional care before first contact for DSH, and factors that influenced the establishing of contact. Method: Interviews with 10 young individuals, shortly after they had harmed themselves, were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants emphasized the importance of receiving more knowledge on where to turn, having different help-seeking options, and receiving immediate help. Family and friends were vital for support and making health care contact. The quality of the professional contact was stressed. Several reasons for not communicating distress were mentioned. Two themes were identified: "A need for a more flexible, available and varied health care" and "A struggle to be independent and yet being in need of reliable support." Conclusion: These findings suggest that easy and direct access to professional help is a decisive factor for young people experiencing psychological problems and that health services must find new ways of communicating information on seeking mental health help.

  • 23.
    Idenfors, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Strömsten, Lotta M. J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Are Non-Psychiatric Hospitalisations Before Self-Harm Associated with Increased Risk of Unnatural Deaths Among Young People?2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 66-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Idenfors, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Strömsten, Lotta M.J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Non-psychiatric inpatient care preceding admission for self-harm in young people2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 88, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Many young people contact health services before they harm themselves intentionally. However, they often seek care for non-suicidal or non-psychiatric causes despite having suicidal thoughts. We investigated the non-psychiatric hospital diagnoses received by young people during the year before their first admission to hospital for self-harm.

    Methods

    From a national register, we selected people who were hospitalised for an episode of self-harm during the period 1999-2009, at which time they were aged 16 to 24. We compared them with matched controls regarding the probability for being admitted with different diagnoses during the year preceding the self-harm admission.

    Results

    The study included 48,705 young people (16,235 cases and 32,470 controls). Those admitted for self-harm were more likely than controls to have been hospitalised for non-psychiatric reasons, which included symptomatic diagnoses such as abdominal pain, syncope/collapse, unspecified convulsions, and chest pain. Certain chronic somatic illnesses were also overrepresented, such as epilepsy, diabetes mellitus type 1, and asthma.

    Conclusions

    Symptomatic diagnoses were more common in those who had been admitted for self-harm. It is possible that psychiatric problems could have been the cause of the symptoms in some of these admissions where no underlying illness could be found, and if this was not uncovered it might lead to a delay in suicide risk assessment. For several chronic illnesses, when admitted to hospital, a psychiatric evaluation might be indicated.

  • 25.
    Idenfors, Hans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Strömsten, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Are non-psychiatric hospitalisations before self-harm associated with an increased risk for suicide among young people?2019In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 120, p. 96-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate any increased risk for suicide in young people with admission for self-harm and if the risk is further increased due to somatic inpatient admissions before a first act of self-harm.

    Methods: This register study included 16,235 cases in the ages 16–24, with a first admission for self-harm, and 32,465 matched controls. All admissions and diagnoses were recorded from the year preceding cases first admission for self-harm. Subjects were followed until death or end of study, registering the cause of death for all deceased. Group differences were analysed using survival analysis with death by suicide as primary outcome.

    Results: In cases with a previous somatic admission, the risk for death by suicide during the study period was higher than in cases without a somatic admission (457 and 316 suicides per 100,000 people and year, respectively, p = 0.01). For cases with a somatic admission, the hazard ratio was 1.43 (95% confidence interval 1.04–1.98) compared with those without somatic admissions (controlled for age, sex and psychiatric admission). Survival of cases with a previous somatic admission compared with those without was 98.4% versus 99.2% after the first year, 97.8% versus 98.9% after the second year, and 95.5% versus 96.9% after the tenth year.

    Conclusions: This study suggests that admission for physical illness before self-harm is associated with a higher risk for suicide among young people, and that their contact with healthcare due to physical problems could provide an opportunity to detect suicide risk.

  • 26. Ineland, Lisa
    et al.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sjölander, Per
    Attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric treatment--changes over time in a Swedish population.2008In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 192-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years a lot of research of attitudes towards mental disorders, towards people with mental illness and towards psychiatric services and treatment have shown a persistent negative attitude. There are, however, few studies on changes over time. The aim of this study was to compare responses to a questionnaire on attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric patients and the perception of psychiatric treatment in a community in northern Sweden in 1976 and 2003. In 1976 a random sample of 391 persons 18-70 years of age were asked and in 2003 a new sample of 500 persons from the same community were approached with the same questions. There are considerable changes over time. In 2003, almost 90% agree to the statement that mental illness harms the reputation more than physical illness, compared with 50% in 1976. In 2003, 51% agreed to the statement "Most people with mental disorders commit violent acts more than others" compared with 24% in 1976. There is an apparent ambivalence towards psychiatric treatment. Whilst 88% would advice a person with mental problems to contact a psychiatrist, still 26% would not like themselves to be referred to a psychiatrist. We argue that improving treatment methods is as important as changing attitudes through accurate information.

  • 27.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    On suicide and suicide prevention as a public health issue.1999In: Medicinski arhiv, ISSN 0350-199X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 175-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is becoming one of the major causes of death especially amongst men. In Europe suicide is the second most common cause of death in the ages of 15-44 years. For women in the same age group suicide is the fourth most common cause of death. Suicide causes a lot of suffering not only in the victim but also in persons close to him. As the causative factors are complex, and suicide also costs the community a lot of money suicide and self destructive behavior must be considered an important public health issue. A couple of models which are helpful when trying to develop treatment and preventive strategies for suicided persons are presented. The basic principles for contemporary suicide prevention programmes are also described.

  • 28. Jessen, G
    et al.
    Jensen, B F
    Arensman, E
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Crepet, P
    De Leo, D
    Hawton, K
    Haring, C
    Hjelmeland, H
    Michel, K
    Ostamo, A
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Temesvary, B
    Wasserman, D
    Attempted suicide and major public holidays in Europe: findings from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Parasuicide.1999In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 99, no 6, p. 412-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There appears to be a transposition of a significant number of suicide attempts from before (and during) a major public holiday until after it. The division of holidays into non-working and working days showed that a 'holiday effect' could only be found around major public holidays, particularly Christmas, Easter and Whitsun. These findings support the theory of the 'broken-promise effect' for major public holidays.

  • 29.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nordström, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hazardous drinking and drinking patterns among the reindeer-herding Sami population in Sweden2011In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1318-1327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate hazardous drinking among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2007, which included the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami were compared with urban and rural reference populations of 1,393 persons. Data were analyzed with regard to population, gender, age group, education, anxiety, depression, and work-related stress. The Sami population did not report a higher prevalence of hazardous drinking compared with the reference groups; however, subgroups of Sami men with symptoms of depression were revealed as at risk, in contrast to Sami women who were not found to be at risk at all. Limitations of the study are discussed.

  • 30.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näckter, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Experiences of Being a Young Female Sami Reindeer Herder: A Qualitative Study from the Perspective of Mental Health and Intersectionality2015In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ruong, Terje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Experiences of being a young male Sami reindeer herder: a qualitative study in perspective of mental health2013In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 72, no 20926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To explore experiences of what it is to be a young male Sami reindeer herder in Sweden, a group with previously known stigma and specific health issues, and to understand experiences in perspective of mental health.

    Methods. A qualitative content analysis was employed. Data were collected by in-depth interviews with 15 strategically selected reindeer herders aged 18–35 years old.

    Results. The analysis resulted in 5 sub-themes: (a) being “inside” or “outside” is a question of identity; (b) a paradox between being free/bound; (c) an experience of various threats and a feeling of powerlessness; (d) specific norms for how a “real” reindeer herder should be; and (e) the different impacts and meanings of relations. The overarching theme is summarized thus: being a young reindeer herder means so many (impossible) dreams and conditions. Overall, the experience of the informants was that being a reindeer herder is a privileged position that also implies many impossibilities and unjust adversities they have no control over, and that there is nothing they can do but “bite the bullet or be a failure.”

    Conclusions. Knowledge about this group's experiences can be used to understand difficulties faced by young reindeer herders and its consequences regarding mental health problems. This also implies a need for a broader perspective when discussing future interventions aimed at preventing mental health problems in this group.

  • 32.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Suicidal expressions among the Swedish reindeer-herding Sami population2012In: Suicidology Online, ISSN 2078-5488, E-ISSN 2078-5488, no 3, p. 102-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate suicidal expressions among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. Subjects: A total of 315 reindeer-herding Sami (167 men, 148 women) were compared with geographically matched reference populations comprising 1354 persons (652 men, 702 women). Methods: A questionnaire measuring different aspects of suicidal behaviour, such as exposure to suicide and suicidal ideation in significant others, own suicidal problems and attitudes towards suicide, was distributed to members of Sami villages through community leaders and to the reference group by post. Data were analysed with regard to population, gender, age group, mental health, alcohol use, work strain and formal education. Results: Comparison between groups did not reveal any differences in attitudes towards suicide; however, it did show significantly higher exposure to both suicide and suicidal behaviour in significant others in the Sami group. Compared to the reference group, both Sami women and especially Sami men reported a higher prevalence of various types of suicidal problems, particularly suicidal ideation. In addition, anxiety and alcohol use were associated with suicidal expressions in the Sami group. Conclusion: The study identifies reindeer-herding Sami men and women to be at particular risk for suicidal expressions. Specific attention should be paid to young and middle-aged Sami men with hazardous alcohol consumption and anxiety.

  • 33.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Sjölander, Per
    Southern Lapland Research Department.
    Edin Liljegren, Anette
    Southern Lapland Research Department.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Depression and anxiety in the reindeer-herding Sami population of Sweden2010In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 383-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate symptoms and predicting factors of depression and anxiety among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. Study design. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami (168 men, 151 women) were compared with urban and rural reference populations comprising 1,393 persons (662 men, 731 women). Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire study on mental health, which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data were analysed with regard to population, gender, age group, education and work-related stress. Results. The Sami population disclosed higher mean values for both depression and anxiety than the reference groups, with Sami men reporting the highest rates. Work-related stress was associated with anxiety and depression in the Sami group. Conclusions. By comparing Sami men and women with reference groups of men and women living in urban and rural areas in northern Sweden, this study identified that reindeer-herding Sami men require special attention with regard to mental health problems.

  • 34. Knizek, Birthe Loa
    et al.
    Hjelmeland, Heidi
    Skruibis, Paulius
    Fartacek, Reinhold
    Fekete, Sandor
    Gailiene, Danute
    Osvath, Peter
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Rohrer, Rudolf R
    County council politicians' attitudes toward suicide and suicide prevention: a qualitative cross-cultural study.2008In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 123-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to compare county council politicians' attitudes toward suicide and suicide prevention in five European countries. A questionnaire was distributed and here the responses to the open-ended questions are analyzed qualitatively. Considerable differences were found in what the politicians in the five countries believed to be the most important causes of suicide and how suicide can be prevented. There were also differences in to what degree the politicians revealed a judgmental attitude toward suicide, which seemed to be related to the magnitude of the problem in the respective countries. A certain implicit inconsistency in the logic directing the politicians' responses was found when their views on causes to suicide and suicide prevention strategies were compared. The responses indicate a need for increased consciousness and knowledge about suicide and suicide prevention among politicians in all the five countries. This is important since they are responsible for initiating and funding suicide preventive efforts.

  • 35.
    Kullgren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    An empirical study of borderline personality disorder and psychiatric suicides.1986In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 174, no 6, p. 328-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is closely related to suicidal behavior, and suicide attempts per se are considered a diagnostic criterion. However, there has been no previous study of completed suicides and BPD. The present study is based on a population of 134 consecutive psychiatric suicides from 1961 to 1980 in a catchment area of 250,000 inhabitants. Clinical records were retrospectively diagnosed according to the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-III. There was a progressive increase in proportion of borderline suicides during the time period. The overall proportion of BPD, however, was only 12%, indicating that borderline patients are not seriously overrepresented among patients committing psychiatric suicides. Demographic variables, earlier psychiatric care, and suicidal behavior in the borderline group are described and analyzed.

  • 36.
    Lindgren, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Molin, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundström, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Strömbäck, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Ringnér, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Does a new spatial design in psychiatric inpatient care influence patients’ and staff’s perception of their care/working environment?: A study protocol of a pilot study using a single-system experimental design2018In: Pilot and Feasibility Studies, ISSN 2055-5784, Vol. 4, article id 191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research shows that worn-out physical environments are obstacles to psychiatric inpatient care. Patients want better relationships with staff and things to do; staff want an environment that offers hope, a calm atmosphere, and joint activities. A county council in northern Sweden and Philips Healthcare partnered to create solutions to the environmental challenges of psychiatric inpatient care. One ward at a county psychiatric clinic was selected for a pilot project to test solutions that could improve the care environment for patients, staff, and relatives. The aim of the overall project is to evaluate the effects of a newly designed psychiatric inpatient ward on patients and staff in terms of quality of care and stress. In this study, we focus on the feasibility through testing questionnaires and exploring barriers to recruiting staff and patients.

    Methods: This study had a single-system experimental design, comparing a psychiatric unit pre- and post-implementation of the novel spatial design, using repeated measures with the same questionnaires twice a week during baseline and intervention phases. Primary outcomes were quality interactions (patients) and perceived stress (staff). Secondary outcomes were levels of anxiety and depression (patients), and stress of conscience (staff). A process evaluation was aimed to describe contextual factors and participant experiences of the new design. Data was collected using questionnaires and semi-structured individual interviews with patients and focus group discussions with staff. Both visual and statistical methods were used to analyse the quantitative data and content analysis for the qualitative data.

    Discussion: The findings will contribute insights into whether and how a new spatial design might contribute to quality interactions and reduced stress. This is relevant both nationally and internationally, as similar interventions are needed but sparse. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations.

    Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03140618, registered 4 May 2017.

  • 37. Lindh, Åsa U.
    et al.
    Waern, Margda
    Beckman, Karin
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Dahlin, Marie
    Runeson, Bo
    Short term risk of non-fatal and fatal suicidal behaviours: the predictive validity of the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale in a Swedish adult psychiatric population with a recent episode of self-harm2018In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 18, article id 319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) is a relatively new instrument for the assessment of suicidal ideation and behaviour that is widely used in clinical and research settings. The predictive properties of the C-SSRS have mainly been evaluated in young US populations. We wanted to examine the instrument's predictive validity in a Swedish cohort of adults seeking psychiatric emergency services after an episode of self-harm. Methods: Prospective cohort study of patients (n = 804) presenting for psychiatric emergency assessment after an episode of self-harm with or without suicidal intent. Suicidal ideation and behaviours at baseline were rated with the C-SSRS and subsequent non-fatal and fatal suicide attempts within 6 months were identified by record review. Logistic regression was used to evaluate separate ideation items and total scores as predictors of non-fatal and fatal suicide attempts. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed for the suicidal ideation (SI) intensity score and the C-SSRS total score. Results: In this cohort, the median age at baseline was 33 years, 67% were women and 68% had made at least one suicide attempt prior to the index attempt. At least one non-fatal or fatal suicide attempt was recorded during follow-up for 165 persons (20.5%). The single C-SSRS items frequency, duration and deterrents were associated with this composite outcome; controllability and reasons were not. In a logistic regression model adjusted for previous history of suicide attempt, SI intensity score was a significant predictor of a non-fatal or fatal suicide attempt (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.03-1.12). ROC analysis showed that the SI intensity score was somewhat better than chance in correctly classifying the outcome (AUC 0.62, 95% CI 0.57-0.66). The corresponding figures for the C-SSRS total score were 0.65, 95% CI 0.60-0.69. Conclusions: The C-SSRS items frequency, duration and deterrents were associated with elevated short term risk in this adult psychiatric cohort, as were both the SI intensity score and the C-SSRS total score. However, the ability to correctly predict future suicidal behaviour was limited for both scores.

  • 38. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Apter, Alan
    Bobes, Julio
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Michel, Konrad
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    van Heeringen, Kees
    Vaernik, Airi
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Immigration and recommended care after a suicide attempt in Europe: equity or bias?2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 63-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the investigation of care recommendations in the medical system across European countries to immigrants who attempted suicide. Data from seven European countries with 8865 local and 2921 immigrant person-cases were derived from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour and ensuing MONSUE (Monitoring Suicidal Behaviour in Europe) project. The relationship between immigrant status and type of aftercare recommended was analysed with binary logistic regression, adjusting for gender, age, method of attempt and the Centre collecting the data. Clear disparities were identified in the care recommendation practices toward immigrants, compared with hosts, over and above differing policies by the European Centres.

  • 39. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Makinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Apter, Alan
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Michel, Konrad
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    van Heeringen, Kees
    Varnik, Airi
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Gender distribution of suicide attempts among immigrant groups in European countries-an international perspective2013In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies report high rates of suicide attempts for female immigrants. This study assesses variations in the distribution of suicide attempts across gender in immigrant and non-immigrant groups in Europe. Method: Data on 64 native and immigrant groups, including 17 662 local and 3755 immigrant person-cases collected, between 1989 and 2003, in 24 million person-years were derived from the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour. Female-to-male ratios of suicide attempt rates (SARs) were calculated for all groups. Results: The cases were combined into four major categories: hosts; European and other Western immigrants; non-European immigrants; and Russian immigrants. The non-European immigrants included higher female SARs than the Europeans, both hosts and immigrants. Unlike the other groups, the majority of suicide attempters among the Russian immigrants in Estonia and Estonian hosts were male. This was also true for immigrants from Curacao, Iran, Libya and Sri Lanka. When the single groups with a male majority were excluded, the correlation between female and male SARs was relatively high among the European immigrants (r = 0.74, P < 0.0005) and lower among the non-European immigrants (r = 0.55, P < 0.03). Generalized estimating equation analysis yielded a highly significant difference (P < 0.0005) in gender ratios of suicide attempts between hosts (ratio 1.52) and both non-European immigrants (ratio 2.32) and Russian immigrants (0.68), but not the European immigrants. Conclusions: The higher suicide attempt rates in non-European immigrant females compared with males may be indicative of difficulties in the acculturation processes in Europe. Further understanding of factors underlying suicidal behaviour in immigrant and minority groups is necessary for planning effective prevention strategies.

  • 40. Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein
    et al.
    Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Apter, Alan
    Kerkhof, Ad
    Michel, Konrad
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Van Heeringen, Kees
    Värnik, Airi
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Repetition of attempted suicide among immigrants in Europe2014In: Canadian journal of psychiatry, ISSN 0706-7437, Vol. 59, no 10, p. 539-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare frequencies of suicide attempt repetition in immigrants and local European populations, and the timing of repetition in these groups.

    METHOD: Data from 7 European countries, comprising 10 574 local and 3032 immigrant subjects, were taken from the World Health Organization European Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour and the ensuing Monitoring Suicidal Behaviour in Europe (commonly referred to as MONSUE) project. The relation between immigrant status and repetition of suicide attempt within 12-months following first registered attempt was analyzed with binary logistic regression, controlling for sex, age, and method of attempt. Timing of repetition was controlled for sex, age, and the recommended type of aftercare.

    RESULTS: Lower odds of repeating a suicide attempt were found in Eastern European (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.61, P < 0.001) and non-European immigrants (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.90, P < 0.05), compared with the locals. Similar patterns were identified in the sex-specific analysis. Eastern European immigrants tended to repeat their attempt much later than locals (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.93, P < 0.05). In general, 32% of all repetition occurred within 30 days. Repetition tended to decrease with age and was more likely in females using harder methods in their index attempt (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.54, P < 0.01). Large variations in the general repetition frequency were identified between the collecting centres, thus influencing the results.

    CONCLUSIONS: The lower repetition frequencies in non-Western immigrants, compared with locals, in Europe stands in contrast to their markedly higher tendency to attempt suicide in general, possibly pointing to situational stress factors related to their suicidal crisis that are less persistent over time. Our findings also raise the possibility that suicide attempters and repeaters constitute only partially overlapping populations.

  • 41. McAuliffe, Carmel
    et al.
    Corcoran, Paul
    Keeley, Helen S
    Arensman, Ella
    Bille-Brahe, Unni
    De Leo, Diego
    Fekete, Sandor
    Hawton, Keith
    Hjelmeland, Heidi
    Kelleher, Margaret
    Kerkhof, Ad J F M
    Lönnqvist, Jouko
    Michel, Konrad
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, Armin
    Van Heeringen, Kees
    Wasserman, Danuta
    Problem-solving ability and repetition of deliberate self-harm: a multicentre study.2006In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. While recent studies have found problem-solving impairments in individuals who engage in deliberate self-harm (DSH), few studies have examined repeaters and non-repeaters separately. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether specific types of problem-solving are associated with repeated DSH.

    Method. As part of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour, 836 medically treated DSH patients (59% repeaters) from 12 European regions were interviewed using the European Parasuicide Study Interview Schedule (EPSIS II) approximately 1 year after their index episode. The Utrecht Coping List (UCL) assessed habitual responses to problems.

    Results. Factor analysis identified five dimensions – Active Handling, Passive-Avoidance, Problem Sharing, Palliative Reactions and Negative Expression. Passive-Avoidance – characterized by a pre-occupation with problems, feeling unable to do anything, worrying about the past and taking a gloomy view of the situation, a greater likelihood of giving in so as to avoid difficult situations, the tendency to resign oneself to the situation, and to try to avoid problems – was the problem-solving dimension most strongly associated with repetition, although this association was attenuated by self-esteem.

    Conclusions. The outcomes of the study indicate that treatments for DSH patients with repeated episodes should include problem-solving interventions. The observed passivity and avoidance of problems (coupled with low self-esteem) associated with repetition suggests that intensive therapeutic input and follow-up are required for those with repeated DSH.

  • 42. Michel, K
    et al.
    Ballinari, P
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Bjerke, T
    Crepet, P
    De Leo, D
    Haring, C
    Hawton, K
    Kerkhof, A
    Lönnqvist, J
    Querejeta, I
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Schmidtke, A
    Temesvary, B
    Wasserman, D
    Methods used for parasuicide: results of the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Parasuicide.2000In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 156-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need, especially for areas with high frequencies for certain methods, to understand the factors involved and to develop new and specific prevention projects and to monitor their effects. The WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Parasuicide has proved to be a useful and reliable instrument for continuous monitoring of trends in parasuicide.

  • 43.
    Mofidi, Naser
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Ghazinour, Mehdi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Salander-Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Richter, Jörg
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatry- Oslo.
    Attitudes towards suicide among Kurdish people in Iran2008In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Attitudes towards suicide represent a key stage in the pathway leading to suicide. A deeper understanding of the social, psychological and treatment-related factors influencing the development of attitudes towards suicide could guide suicide prevention strategies especially in a neglected population like Kurds.

    Methods In a cross-sectional study in Iranian Kurdistan, 1,000 households participated in the investigation from April to May 2006 selected by a cluster random sampling process. A questionnaire on attitudes towards suicide (ATTS) was used to measure suicide related attitudes and thoughts.

    Results Suicide related experiences were more often reported from the wider social network (relative, friends, acquaintances) than from family members. There is a significant accumulation of suicide related experiences when a related event was reported in the close family. The level of suicide related attitudes is related to age, gender, marital status, level of education and employment status.

    Discussion Openness towards the topic of suicide as well as abilities to communicate about it should be improved by educating the public and additionally be promoted by changing conservative value systems.

  • 44.
    Music, Emina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Suicide in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the City of Sarajevo With Special Reference to Ethnicity2014In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Besides the war experience (1992-1995), Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) constitutes an interesting area for studies on suicidal behavior from an ethnic and religious perspective with its mixed ethnic population of Bosniaks, Serbs, and Croats. Aims: The study investigates suicide in BiH and the capital city of Sarajevo before (1985-1991) and after the war (1998-2006), with special reference to gender and ethnicity. Method: Official suicide data were gathered for the two periods with regard to gender, ethnicity, and suicide methods used. Results: No differences in suicide rates were found in BiH and Sarajevo before and after the war. The male-to-female suicide rate ratio in BiH was significantly higher after the war than before the war, with an opposite tendency seen in Sarajevo. Before and after the war, the highest and stable suicide rates were among Serbs in BiH. In Sarajevo the highest suicide rates were found among Croats after the war. Hanging was the most common suicide method used, both before and after the war, while firearms were more commonly used after the war. Poisoning was a rarely used method in both periods. Conclusion: The stable suicide rates in BiH over the pre- and postwar periods indicate no evident influence of the Bosnian war on the postwar level of suicide rates, except for women in Sarajevo. Beside this exception, the findings indicate a long-established underlying pattern in suicide rates that was not immediately changed, even by war. The study supports earlier findings that the accessibility of means influences the choice of suicide method used.

  • 45.
    Music, Emina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Deliberate self-harm and ethnicity in the city of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: Suicidology Online, ISSN 2078-5488, E-ISSN 2078-5488, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to investigate deliberate self-harm (DSH) in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), with special reference to gender, age and ethnicity. Between 2001 and 2003, known hospital cases of DSH in persons aged 15 or older in the Sarajevo area were monitored using standardised methods. In total, 1428 DSH events were registered, giving an annual mean DSH event rate of 119 per 100 000 (118 for women, 120 for men) and a DSH person rate of 110 (108 for women, 111 for men). The mean person-based DSH rate was 124 for Bosniaks (Muslims), 128 for Croats (Catolics), and 88 for Serbs (Orthodox Christians). Self-poisoning was the most commonly used method in all three ethnic groups (66%), with second-most common method self-harm by a sharp object (17%). A very low proportion used guns or explosives. The rates of DSH in Sarajevo during the study period were comparable to those of many other regions in Europe, though with a quite unique pattern of higher rates among men. We identified fluctuating but significantly not different rates between ethnic groups. The general belief that religious denomination is decisive for level of DSH-rates was not supported by the findings of this study; rather the post-war situation with huge demographic changes was reflected in the results. Disruptions to social integration as a consequence of the war are put forward as possible explanations.

  • 46. Nielsen, A S
    et al.
    Bille-Brahe, U
    Hjelmeland, H
    Jensen, B
    Ostamo, A
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wasserman, D
    Alcohol problems among suicide attempters in the Nordic countries.1996In: Crisis, ISSN 0227-5910, E-ISSN 2151-2396, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 157-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to see whether and how the number of suicide attempters with alcohol problems and their drinking habits differ between the Nordic areas under study. Problem-drinkers were defined as persons who themselves felt that they had an alcohol problem. The analyses were based on data collected at five Nordic research centers participating in the WHO/Euro Multicentre Study on Parasuicide, namely: Helsinki (Finland); Umeå and Stockholm (Sweden); Słr-Trłndelag (Norway); and Odense (Denmark). The results showed that the frequency of problem-drinking among suicide attempters differed markedly between the areas under study; the Finnish male and the Danish female suicide attempters included the highest proportions of self-identified problem-drinkers. The pattern of drinking among the suicide attempters also differed between the areas. The analyses indicate that the point when alcohol becomes a problem to somebody, especially to a degree that it increases the risk of suicidal behavior, not only depends on how much and how often the person drinks alcohol; the prevailing drinking pattern, the attitudes towards drinking alcohol, and the level of social control are also important factors to take into consideration when relations between alcohol and suicidal behavior are under study.

  • 47.
    Ott, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Bernd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Werneke, Ursula
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Sunderby Research Unit – Psychiatry.
    Prognosis and outcome of severe lithium poisoning: authors' reply2017In: Journal of Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0269-8811, E-ISSN 1461-7285, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 1275-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Rajalin, Mia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci Psychiat, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    DBT-based skills training for family members of suicidal patients: open clinical feasibility trial in a psychiatric outpatient contextManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of significant others is an objective in suicide prevention and there is a need for development of interventions for this group. The aim of this open naturalistic study was to evaluate the feasibility and the preliminary efficacy of Family Connections (FC) for significant others of suicidal patients, a nine-week manualized skills training program based on dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in a clinical context.

    The intervention program aims to enhance the knowledge of symptoms and behaviors connected with attempted suicide. Furthermore it introduces stress-coping strategies and emotion regulation skills. Out of 132 participants in total, 104 (79%) completed the program. Included in the analysis were the 86 (65%) participants who completed the program, and who also had both pre- and post-intervention assessments. The Burden assessment scale, BAS, the Questions About Family Members scale, QAFM, and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, FFMQ, were used to assess perceived burden, relationship climate and five facets of mindfulness respectively.

    The results showed a significant reduction in perceived burden, measured by BAS, and a significant change in the mindfulness scale FFMQ subscale Acting with Awareness, which indicates an enhanced ability to be present in the moment. None of the four subscales in QAFM showed significant changes between the pre- and post-intervention assessments.

    The results support the feasibility and potential value of the implementation of an intervention for family members and friends of suicidal patients in psychiatric care. Randomized controlled studies are needed to generate further evidence.

  • 49.
    Rajalin, Mia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Åsberg, Marie
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci Psychiat, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Family history of suicide and interpersonal functioning in suicide attempters2017In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 247, p. 310-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Difficulties in interpersonal relationships are associated with a wide range of psychiatric diagnoses and have been reported as a trigger for suicidal behavior, too. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between interpersonal problems and family history of suicide in suicide attempters and to describe relevant patterns of interpersonal problems in this patient group. The study involves 181 patients having their clinical follow-up after a suicide attempt. Family history of suicide was assessed by using the Karolinska Self Harm History Interview or retrieved in patient records. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems was used to assess personal style in an interpersonal context. Suicide attempters with a family history of suicide had significantly more often an intrusive personal style. The results remained significant after adjustment for personality disorder. The specific interpersonal patterns associated with family history of suicide may interfere with the ability to create stable, long-lasting relationships. In regards to treatment, these personal qualities could cause difficulties in the alliance with health care personnel and make it harder for suicide attempters to accept or benefit from treatment. Attention to suicide attempters’ interpersonal problems is of importance to lower their distress.

  • 50. Rancans, Elmars
    et al.
    Salander Renberg, Ellinor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Major demographic, social and economic factors associated to suicide rates in Latvia 1980-98.2001In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 103, no 4, p. 275-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic and socioeconomic factors could not explain sufficiently the rapid changes in suicide rates in Latvia during the years 1980-98; psychological factors also have to be considered.

12 1 - 50 of 71
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf