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  • 1.
    Alaish, Ram
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Werner, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Safety of azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease naive to thiopurine treatment2017In: International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, ISSN 0946-1965, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 594-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine if 6-mercaptopurine (MP) is better tolerated than azathioprine (AZA) as the initial thiopurine treatment in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Switching patients with IBD from AZA to MP is advocated in patients intolerant to AZA. However, no study has determined if MP is more suited than AZA as a first-line treatment for patients who are naive to thiopurine treatment. Study: The tolerance of AZA and MP treatments in clinical practice was retrospectively evaluated from start to 12 months after initiating treatment in 113 patients with IBD who were all naive to thiopurines (82 patients treated with AZA and 31 patients with MP). Results: 65% of the patients treated with AZA and 61% of the patients treated with MP tolerated their treatment during 12 months (i.e., no group difference, p = 0.742). No difference in reported side effects between the two treatments was observed. The mean equivalent initial dose (0.92 vs. 0.61 mg/kg; p < 0.001) and the mean equivalent dose at 12 months (1.98 vs. 1.65 mg/kg; p = 0.014) was significantly higher in the MP group vs. the AZA group. The proportion of patients with.MCV = 7 at 12 months was numerically higher in the MP group than in the AZA group (53% vs. 31%; p = 0.090). Conclusions: In this retrospective observational study, no differences in tolerance or adherence between AZA and MP were observed in patients naive to thiopurines. However, MP treatment was at a higher equivalent thiopurine dose than AZA treatment, which tended to be associated with better treatment response.

  • 2. Andersen, Vibeke
    et al.
    Chan, Simon
    Luben, Robert
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kaaks, R.
    Grip, Olof
    Bergmann, M. M.
    Boeing, H.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Overvad, Kim
    Oldenburg, Bas
    Opstelten, Jorrit
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Racine, Antoine
    Key, Timothy
    Masala, Giovanna
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, R.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Riboli, Elio
    Hart, Andrew
    Fibre intake and the development of inflammatory bowel disease: A European prospective multi-centre cohort study (EPIC-IBD)2018In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: Population-based prospective cohort studies investigating fibre intake and development of inflammatory bowel disease are lacking. Our aim was to investigate the association between fibre intake and the development of Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC] in a large European population.

    Methods: In total, 401 326 participants, aged 20-80 years, were recruited in eight countries in Europe between 1991 and 1998. At baseline, fibre intake [total fibres, fibres from fruit, vegetables and cereals] was recorded using food frequency questionnaires. The cohort was monitored for the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Each case was matched with four controls and odds ratios [ORs] for the exposures were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses according to smoking status were computed.

    Results: In total, 104 and 221 participants developed incident CD and UC, respectively. For both CD and UC, there were no statistically significant associations with either quartiles, or trends across quartiles, for total fibre or any of the individual sources. The associations were not affected by adjusting for smoking and energy intake. Stratification according to smoking status showed null findings apart from an inverse association with cereal fibre and CD in non-smokers [Quartile 4 vs 1 OR = 0.12, 95% confidence interval = 0.02-0.75, p = 0.023, OR trend across quartiles = 0.50, 95% confidence interval = 0.29-0.86, p = 0.017].

    Conclusion: The results do not support the hypothesis that dietary fibre is involved in the aetiology of UC, although future work should investigate whether there may be a protective effect of specific types of fibre according to smoking status in CD.

  • 3. Angelison, L.
    et al.
    Almer, S.
    Eriksson, A.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Fagerberg, U.
    Halfvarson, J.
    Thörn, M.
    Björk, J.
    Hindorf, U.
    Löfberg, R.
    Bajor, A.
    Hjortswang, H.
    Hammarlund, P.
    Grip, O.
    Torp, J.
    Marsal, J.
    Hertervig, E.
    Long-term outcome of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis: a Swedish multicentre study of 250 patients2017In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Real-life long-term data on infliximab treatment in ulcerative colitis are limited. Aim To study the long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in chronic active ulcerative colitis and possible predictors of colectomy and response were also examined. Methods A retrospective multi-centre study of infliximab treatment in 250 patients with chronic active ulcerative colitis with inclusion criteria: age 18 years, ambulatory treated, steroid-dependent or intolerant and/or immunomodulator refractory or intolerant. Results Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 123/250 patients (49.2%) at 12 months and in 126/250 patients at a median follow-up of 2.9 years (50.4%). Primary response at 3 months was achieved by 190/250 (76.0%) patients and associated with a high probability of response 168/190 (88.4%) at 12 months and 143/190 (75.3%) at follow-up. Long-term rate of colectomy in primary responders was 6/190 (3.2%) at 12 months and 27/190 (14.2%) at last follow-up. Failure to achieve response at 3 months was associated with a high risk of subsequent colectomy, 29/60 (48.3%) at 12 months and 41/60 (68.3%) at follow-up. Response at 12 months was associated with a low risk of subsequent colectomy, 14/181 (7.7%) compared with non-response 19/34 (55.9%) (P < 0.0001). Non-response at 3 months was an independent predictor of subsequent colectomy (HR = 9.40, 95% CI = 5.10-17.35, P < 0.001). Concomitant azathioprine therapy did not influence outcome in terms of colectomy. Conclusions Long-term efficacy of infliximab treatment in chronic active ulcerative colitis is excellent especially in patients who respond to induction treatment. Conversely, non-response at 3 months predicts a poor outcome, with a high risk of subsequent colectomy.

  • 4. Beyder, Arthur
    et al.
    Mazzone, Amelia
    Strege, Peter R.
    Tester, David J.
    Saito, Yuri A.
    Bernard, Cheryl E.
    Enders, Felicity T.
    Ek, Weronica E.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Lindberg, Greger
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Gazouli, Maria
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Neri, Matteo
    Portincasa, Piero
    Bellini, Massimo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Camilleri, Michael
    Locke, G. Richard, III
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Ackerman, Michael J.
    Farrugia, Gianrico
    Loss-of-Function of the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Na(V)1.5 (Channelopathies) in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome2014In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 146, no 7, p. 1659-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: SCN5A encodes the a-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Many patients with cardiac arrhythmias caused by mutations in SCN5A also have symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether patients with IBS have SCN5A variants that affect the function of Na(V)1.5. METHODS: We performed genotype analysis of SCN5A in 584 persons with IBS and 1380 without IBS (controls). Mutant forms of SCN5A were expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells, and functions were assessed by voltage clamp analysis. A genome-wide association study was analyzed for an association signal for the SCN5A gene, and replicated in 1745 patients in 4 independent cohorts of IBS patients and controls. RESULTS: Missense mutations were found in SCN5A in 13 of 584 patients (2.2%, probands). Diarrhea-predominant IBS was the most prevalent form of IBS in the overall study population (25%). However, a greater percentage of individuals with SCN5A mutations had constipation-predominant IBS (31%) than diarrhea-predominant IBS (10%; P < .05). Electrophysiologic analysis showed that 10 of 13 detected mutations disrupted Na(V)1.5 function (9 loss-of-function and 1 gain-of-function function). The p. A997T-Na(V)1.5 had the greatest effect in reducing Na(V)1.5 function. Incubation of cells that expressed this variant with mexiletine restored their sodium current and administration of mexiletine to 1 carrier of this mutation (who had constipation-predominant IBS) normalized their bowel habits. In the genome-wide association study and 4 replicated studies, the SCN5A locus was strongly associated with IBS. CONCLUSIONS: About 2% of patients with IBS carry mutations in SCN5A. Most of these are loss-of-function mutations that disrupt Na(V)1.5 channel function. These findings provide a new pathogenic mechanism for IBS and possible treatment options.

  • 5. Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    et al.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Bujanda, Luis
    Bresso, Francesca
    Agreus, Lars
    Andreasson, Anna
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Lindberg, Greger
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Simren, Magnus
    Walter, Susanna
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Neri, Matteo
    Portincasa, Piero
    Bellini, Massimo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Latiano, Anna
    Huebenthal, Matthias
    Thijs, Vincent
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Chang, Lin
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Camilleri, Michael
    Franke, Andre
    Zhernakova, Alexandra
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Female-Specific Association Between Variants on Chromosome 9 and Self-Reported Diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome2018In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 155, no 1, p. 168-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Genetic factors are believed to affect risk for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but there have been no sufficiently powered and adequately sized studies. To identify DNA variants associated with IBS risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the large UK Biobank population-based cohort, which includes genotype and health data from 500,000 participants. METHODS: We studied 7,287,191 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms in individuals who self-reported a doctor's diagnosis of IBS (cases; n = 9576) compared to the remainder of the cohort (controls; n = 336,499) (mean age of study subjects, 40-69 years). Genome-wide significant findings were further investigated in 2045 patients with IBS from tertiary centers and 7955 population controls from Europe and the United States, and a small general population sample from Sweden (n = 249). Functional annotation of GWAS results was carried out by integrating data from multiple biorepositories to obtain biological insights from the observed associations. RESULTS: We identified a genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9q31.2 (single nucleotide polymorphism rs10512344; P = 3.57 x 10(-8)) in a region previously linked to age at menarche, and 13 additional loci of suggestive significance (P < 5.0 x 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed that the variants at 9q31.2 affect risk of IBS in women only (P = 4.29 x 10(-10) in UK Biobank) and also [GRAPHICS] associate with constipation-predominant IBS in women (P = .015 in the tertiary cohort) and harder stools in women (P = .0012 in the population-based sample). Functional annotation of the 9q31.2 locus identified 8 candidate genes, including the elongator complex protein 1 gene (ELP1 or IKB-KAP), which is mutated in patients with familial dysautonomia. CONCLUSIONS: In a sufficiently powered GWAS of IBS, we associated variants at the locus 9q31.2 with risk of IBS in women. This observation may provide additional rationale for investigating the role of sex hormones and autonomic dysfunction in IBS.

  • 6. Chan, Simon S. M.
    et al.
    Luben, Robert
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Grip, Olof
    Key, Timothy
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Masala, Giovanna
    Kennedy, Hugh
    vanSchaik, Fiona
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Oldenburg, Bas
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Riboli, Elio
    Hart, Andrew R.
    Body Mass Index and the Risk for Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: Data From a European Prospective Cohort Study (The IBD in EPIC Study)2013In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 575-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Obesity is associated with a proinflammatory state that may be involved in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which there are plausible biological mechanisms. Our aim was to perform the first prospective cohort study investigating if there is an association between obesity and the development of incident IBD. METHODS: A total of 300,724 participants were recruited into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. At recruitment, anthropometric measurements of height and weight plus physical activity and total energy intake from validated questionnaires were recorded. The cohort was monitored identifying participants who developed either Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). Each case was matched with four controls and conditional logistic regression used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for body mass index (BMI) adjusted for smoking, energy intake, and physical activity. RESULTS: In the cohort, 177 participants developed incident UC and 75 participants developed incident CD. There were no associations with the four higher categories of BMI compared with a normal BMI for UC (P-trend = 0.36) or CD (P-trend = 0.83). The lack of associations was consistent when BMI was analyzed as a continuous or binary variable (BMI 18.5 <25.0 vs. >= 25 kg/m(2)). Physical activity and total energy intake, factors that influence BMI, did not show any association with UC (physical activity, P-trend = 0.79; total energy intake, P-trend = 0.18) or CD (physical activity, P-trend = 0.42; total energy, P-trend = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity as measured by BMI is not associated with the development of incident UC or CD. Alternative measures of obesity are required to further investigate the role of obesity in the development of incident IBD.

  • 7. Chan, Simon S. M.
    et al.
    Luben, Robert
    van Schaik, Fiona
    Oldenburg, Bas
    Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Grip, Olof
    Key, Timothy
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Masala, Giovanna
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Racine, Antoine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Boutron-Rualt, Marie-Christine
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Hart, Andrew R.
    Carbohydrate Intake in the Etiology of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis2014In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 2013-2021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diet may have a role in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease. In previous studies, the associations between increased intakes of carbohydrates, sugar, starch, and inflammatory bowel disease are inconsistent. However, few prospective studies have investigated the associations between these macronutrients and incident Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: A total of 401,326 men and women were recruited between 1991 and 1998. At recruitment, dietary intakes of carbohydrate, sugar, and starch were measured using validated food frequency questionnaires. The cohort was monitored identifying participants who developed incident CD or UC. Cases were matched with 4 controls, and odds ratios were calculated for quintiles of total carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intakes adjusted for total energy intake, body mass index, and smoking. Results: One hundred ten participants developed CD, and 244 participants developed UC during follow-up. The adjusted odds ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of total carbohydrate intake for CD was 0.87, 95% CI = 0.24 to 3.12 and for UC 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62 to 3.46, with no significant trends across quintiles for either (CD, P-trend = 0.70; UC, P-trend = 0.41). Similarly, no associations were observed with intakes of total sugar (CD, P-trend = 0.50; UC, P-trend = 0.71) or starch (CD, P-trend = 0.69; UC, P-trend = 0.17). Conclusions: The lack of associations with these nutrients is in agreement with many case-control studies that have not identified associations with CD or UC. As there is biological plausibility for how specific carbohydrates could have an etiological role in inflammatory bowel disease, future epidemiological work should assess individual carbohydrates, although there does not seem to be a macronutrient effect.

  • 8. Chan, SSM
    et al.
    Luben, R
    Olsen, A
    Tjonneland, A
    Kaaks, R
    Lindgren, S
    Grip, O
    Bergmann, MM
    Boeing, H
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Overvad, K
    Veno, SK
    van Schaik, F
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, B
    Oldenburg, B
    Khaw, K-T
    Riboli, E
    Hart, AR
    Association between high dietary intake of the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid and reduced risk of Crohn's disease2014In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0269-2813, E-ISSN 1365-2036, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 834-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There are plausible mechanisms for how dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, could prevent Crohn's disease (CD).

    Aim To conduct a prospective study to investigate the association between increased intake of DHA and risk of CD.

    Methods Overall, 229702 participants were recruited from nine European centres between 1991 and 1998. At recruitment, dietary intakes of DHA and fatty acids were measured using validated food frequency questionnaires. The cohort was monitored through to June 2004 to identify participants who developed incident CD. In a nested case-control analysis, each case was matched with four controls; odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for quintiles of DHA intake, adjusted for total energy intake, smoking, other dietary fatty acids, dietary vitamin D and body mass index.

    Results Seventy-three participants developed incident CD. All higher quintiles of DHA intake were inversely associated with development of CD; the highest quintile had the greatest effect size (OR=0.07; 95% CI=0.02-0.81). The OR trend across quintiles of DHA was 0.54 (95% CI=0.30-0.99, P-trend=0.04). Including BMI in the multivariate analysis, due to its correlation with dietary fat showed similar associations. There were no associations with the other dietary fatty acids studied.

    Conclusion There were inverse associations, with a biological gradient between increasing dietary docosahexaenoic acid intakes and incident Crohn's disease. Further studies in other populations should measure docosahexaenoic acid to determine if the association is consistent and the hypothesis tested in randomised controlled trials of purely docosahexaenoic acid supplementation.

  • 9. Ek, Weronica E.
    et al.
    Reznichenko, Anna
    Ripke, Stephan
    Niesler, Beate
    Zucchelli, Marco
    Rivera, Natalia V.
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Magnusson, Patrik
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    Holliday, Elizabeth G.
    Houghton, Lesley
    Gazouli, Maria
    Karamanolis, George
    Rappold, Gudrun
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Surowy, Harald
    Rafter, Joseph
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Li, Ling
    Papadaki, Evangelia
    Gambaccini, Dario
    Marchi, Santino
    Colucci, Rocchina
    Blandizzi, Corrado
    Barbaro, Raffaella
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Walter, Susanna
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Tornblom, Hans
    Bresso, Francesca
    Andreasson, Anna
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Simren, Magnus
    Agreus, Lars
    Lindberg, Greger
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Bellini, Massimo
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Daly, Mark J.
    Camilleri, Michael
    Wouters, Mira M.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Exploring the genetics of irritable bowel syndrome: a GWA study in the general population and replication in multinational case-control cohorts2015In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 64, no 11, p. 1774-1782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective IBS shows genetic predisposition, but adequately powered gene-hunting efforts have been scarce so far. We sought to identify true IBS genetic risk factors by means of genome-wide association (GWA) and independent replication studies. Design We conducted a GWA study (GWAS) of IBS in a general population sample of 11 326 Swedish twins. IBS cases (N=534) and asymptomatic controls (N=4932) were identified based on questionnaire data. Suggestive association signals were followed-up in 3511 individuals from six case-control cohorts. We sought genotype-gene expression correlations through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-expression quantitative trait loci interactions testing, and performed in silico prediction of gene function. We compared candidate gene expression by real-time qPCR in rectal mucosal biopsies of patients with IBS and controls. Results One locus at 7p22.1, which includes the genes KDELR2 (KDEL endoplasmic reticulum protein retention receptor 2) and GRID2IP (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 (Grid2) interacting protein), showed consistent IBS risk effects in the index GWAS and all replication cohorts and reached p=9.31 x 10(-6) in a meta-analysis of all datasets. Several SNPs in this region are associated with cis effects on KDELR2 expression, and a trend for increased mucosal KDLER2 mRNA expression was observed in IBS cases compared with controls. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that general population-based studies combined with analyses of patient cohorts provide good opportunities for gene discovery in IBS. The 7p22.1 and other risk signals detected in this study constitute a good starting platform for hypothesis testing in future functional investigations.

  • 10.
    Eklöf, Vincy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wikberg, Maria L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Edin, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfgren Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The combined diagnostic value of faecal haemoglobin and calprotectin in colorectal cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Eklöf, Vincy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zingmark, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Edin, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Alexeyev, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Wikberg, Maria L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Cancer-associated fecal microbial markers in colorectal cancer detection2017In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 141, no 12, p. 2528-2536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer death in the western world. An effective screening program leading to early detection of disease would severely reduce the mortality of CRC. Alterations in the gut microbiota have been linked to CRC, but the potential of microbial markers for use in CRC screening has been largely unstudied. We used a nested case-control study of 238 study subjects to explore the use of microbial markers for clbA+ bacteria harboring the pks pathogenicity island, afa-C+ diffusely adherent Escherichia coli harboring the afa-1 operon, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in stool as potential screening markers for CRC. We found that individual markers for clbA+ bacteria and F. nucleatum were more abundant in stool of patients with CRC, and could predict cancer with a relatively high specificity (81.5% and 76.9%, respectively) and with a sensitivity of 56.4% and 69.2%, respectively. In a combined test of clbA+ bacteria and F. nucleatum, CRC was detected with a specificity of 63.1% and a sensitivity of 84.6%. Our findings support a potential value of microbial factors in stool as putative noninvasive biomarkers for CRC detection. We propose that microbial markers may represent an important future screening strategy for CRC, selecting patients with a "high-risk" microbial pattern to other further diagnostic procedures such as colonoscopy.

  • 12.
    Englund, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lidén K., Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Sundström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Radiation exposure in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome in the years 2001-20112017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 300-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cumulative ionizing radiation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for the years 2001-2011. To study how radiation exposure change over time in patients with newly diagnosed IBD and factors associated with radiation exposure.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: All radiological investigations performed between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2011 were retrospectively recorded in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) (n = 103), ulcerative colitis (UC) (n = 304) and IBS (n = 149). Analyses were done with Mann-Whitney and Chi-Square test.

    RESULTS: The median total cumulative radiation exposure in mSv for CD (20.0, inter quartile range (IQR) 34.8), UC (7.01, IQR 23.8), IBS (2.71, IQR 9.15) and the proportion of patients who had been exposed for more than 50 mSv during the study period (CD 19%, UC 11%, IBS 3%) were significantly higher in the patients with CD compared to patients with UC (p < .001) and IBS (p < .001), respectively. In turn, patients with UC had significantly higher doses than patients with IBS (p = .005). Risk factors for radiation exposure were female gender (CD), early onset (UC), ileocolonic location (CD), previous surgery (CD and UC), depression (IBS) and widespread pain (IBS). In newly diagnosed CD, there was a significant decline in median cumulative radiation dose in mSv (17.2 vs. 12.0; p = .048) during the study period.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with CD are at greatest risk for high cumulative radiation exposure, but there is a decline in exposure during the late 2000s. Non-colectomized patients with UC and patients with IBS have a relatively low risk of cumulative radiation exposure.

  • 13. Eriksson, Carl
    et al.
    Marsal, Jan
    Bergemalm, Daniel
    Vigren, Lina
    Bjork, Jan
    Eberhardson, Michael
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Soderman, Charlotte
    Myrelid, Par
    Cao, Yang
    Sjoberg, Daniel
    Thorn, Mari
    Karlen, Per
    Hertervig, Erik
    Strid, Hans
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Almer, Sven
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Long-term effectiveness of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease: a national study based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SWIBREG)2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 6-7, p. 722-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, these findings may not reflect the clinical practice. Therefore, we aimed to describe a vedolizumab-treated patient population and assess long-term effectiveness.

    Materials and methods: Patients initiating vedolizumab between 1 June 2014 and 30 May 2015 were identified through the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD. Prospectively collected data on treatment and disease activity were extracted. Clinical remission was defined as Patient Harvey Bradshaw index <5 in Crohn’s disease (CD) and Patient Simple Clinical Colitis Activity index <3 in ulcerative colitis (UC).

    Results: Two-hundred forty-six patients (147 CD, 92 UC and 7 IBD-Unclassified) were included. On study entry, 86% had failed TNF-antagonist and 48% of the CD patients had undergone ≥1 surgical resection. After a median follow-up of 17 (IQR: 14–20) months, 142 (58%) patients remained on vedolizumab. In total, 54% of the CD- and 64% of the UC patients were in clinical remission at the end of follow-up, with the clinical activity decreasing (p < .0001 in both groups). Faecal-calprotectin decreased in CD (p < .0001) and in UC (p = .001), whereas CRP decreased in CD (p = .002) but not in UC (p = .11). Previous anti-TNF exposure (adjusted HR: 4.03; 95% CI: 0.96–16.75) and elevated CRP at baseline (adjusted HR: 2.22; 95% CI: 1.10–4.35) seemed to be associated with discontinuation because of lack of response. Female sex was associated with termination because of intolerance (adjusted HR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.16–6.48).

    Conclusion: Vedolizumab-treated patients represent a treatment-refractory group. A long-term effect can be achieved, even beyond 1 year of treatment.

  • 14. Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo
    et al.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Bujanda, Luis
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Lindberg, Greger
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Simren, Magnus
    Walter, Susanna
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Neri, Matteo
    Portincasa, Piero
    Bellini, Massimo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Jonkers, Daisy
    Eswaran, Shanti
    Chey, William D.
    Kashyap, Purna
    Chang, Lin
    Mayer, Emeran A.
    Wouters, Mira M.
    Boeckxstaens, Guy
    Camilleri, Michael
    Franke, Andre
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Increased Prevalence of Rare Sucrase-isomaltase Pathogenic Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients2018In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1673-1676Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 15. Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Diekmann, Lena
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Kuech, Eva-Maria
    von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren
    Thingholm, Louise B.
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Dierks, Claudia
    Heine, Martin
    Philipp, Ute
    Distl, Ottmar
    Money, Mary E.
    Belheouane, Meriem
    Heinsen, Femke-Anouska
    Rafter, Joseph
    Nardone, Gerardo
    Cuomo, Rosario
    Usai-Satta, Paolo
    Galeazzi, Francesca
    Neri, Matteo
    Walter, Susanna
    Simrén, Magnus
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Agreus, Lars
    Andreasson, Anna
    Mayer, Emeran
    Baines, John F.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Portincasa, Piero
    Bellini, Massimo
    Stanghellini, Vincenzo
    Barbara, Giovanni
    Chang, Lin
    Camilleri, Michael
    Franke, Andre
    Naim, Hassan Y.
    D'Amato, Mauro
    Functional variants in the sucrase-isomaltase gene associate with increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome2018In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: IBS is a common gut disorder of uncertain pathogenesis. Among other factors, genetics and certain foods are proposed to contribute. Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID) is a rare genetic form of disaccharide malabsorption characterised by diarrhoea, abdominal pain and bloating, which are features common to IBS. We tested sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene variants for their potential relevance in IBS.

    DESIGN: We sequenced SI exons in seven familial cases, and screened four CSID mutations (p.Val557Gly, p.Gly1073Asp, p.Arg1124Ter and p.Phe1745Cys) and a common SI coding polymorphism (p.Val15Phe) in a multicentre cohort of 1887 cases and controls. We studied the effect of the 15Val to 15Phe substitution on SI function in vitro. We analysed p.Val15Phe genotype in relation to IBS status, stool frequency and faecal microbiota composition in 250 individuals from the general population.

    RESULTS: CSID mutations were more common in patients than asymptomatic controls (p=0.074; OR=1.84) and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference sequenced individuals (p=0.020; OR=1.57). 15Phe was detected in 6/7 sequenced familial cases, and increased IBS risk in case-control and population-based cohorts, with best evidence for diarrhoea phenotypes (combined p=0.00012; OR=1.36). In the population-based sample, 15Phe allele dosage correlated with stool frequency (p=0.026) and Parabacteroides faecal microbiota abundance (p=0.0024). The SI protein with 15Phe exhibited 35% reduced enzymatic activity in vitro compared with 15Val (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS: SI gene variants coding for disaccharidases with defective or reduced enzymatic activity predispose to IBS. This may help the identification of individuals at risk, and contribute to personalising treatment options in a subset of patients.

  • 16. Henström, Maria
    et al.
    Hadizadeh, Fatemeh
    Beyder, Arthur
    Bonfiglio, Ferdinando
    Zheng, Tenghao
    Assadi, Ghazaleh
    Rafter, Joseph
    Bujanda, Luis
    Agreus, Lars
    Andreasson, Anna
    Dlugosz, Aldona
    Lindberg, Greger
    Schmidt, Peter T.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Talley, Nicholas J.
    Simren, Magnus
    Walter, Susanna
    Wouters, Mira
    Farrugia, Gianrico
    D'Amato, Mauro
    TRPM8 polymorphisms associated with increased risk of IBS-C and IBS-M2017In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 1725-1727Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Högberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Diagnosing colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease in primary care: The usefulness of tests for faecal haemoglobin, faecal calprotectin, anaemia and iron deficiency: A prospective study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal complaints are common reasons to consult primary care but they are seldom caused by colorectal cancer (CRC), high-risk adenomas (HRAs), or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Reliable diagnostic aids would be helpful in deciding which patients to refer for bowel imaging. Our aim was to assess the value of a faecal immunochemical test (FIT) and a faecal calprotectin (FC) test in detecting CRC, HRAs and IBD in primary care, and the value of combining these tests with anaemia and iron-deficiency tests.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study included 373 consecutive patients that received a FIT or a FC test ordered by a primary care physician. We collected samples for FITs, FC tests, full blood counts and iron-deficiency tests. Physicians were instructed to refer patients with a positive FIT or FC test (cut-off ≥100μg/g) for bowel imaging. The patients' presenting symptoms were recorded. Patients were followed for 2 years.

    RESULTS: The best test for detecting CRC and IBD was the combination of the FIT and haemoglobin concentration. This test had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 100%, 61.7%, 11.7% and 100%, respectively. The FIT detected a significantly larger proportion of CRC, HRAs and IBD than the FC test (0.92 versus 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.67).

    CONCLUSION: A negative FIT combined with a normal haemoglobin concentration could rule out CRC and IBD with a high degree of safety. This could be useful in prioritising referrals for bowel imaging from primary care.

  • 18.
    Högberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Diagnosis of colorectal cancer: Patients' symptoms and faecal immunochemical test results in primary care. A prospective studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Högberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lilja, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Ljung, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Immunochemical faecal occult blood tests in primary care and the risk of delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 209-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the value, risks, and shortcomings of immunochemical faecal occult blood tests (iFOBTs) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) in patients initially presenting to primary care. Design. A retrospective population-based study. Setting and subjects. All 495 cases of CRC and adenomas with HGD diagnosed in the county of Jamtland, Sweden from 2005 to 2009. Results. Of 495 patients 323 (65%) initially presented to primary care. IFOBTs were performed in 215 of 323 (67%) patients. The sensitivity of iFOBT for CRC and adenomas with HGD was 88% (83% when patients with a history of rectal bleeding were excluded). Of 34 patients with anaemia found en passant, 10 had negative iFOBTs. Time to diagnosis was longer for patients with negative iFOBTs (p < 0.0005). Conclusion. IFOBT might be helpful in selecting which patients to refer for colonoscopy. However, iFOBT has a limited sensitivity as a diagnostic test for CRC and adenomas with HGD. Relying only on iFOBT for colonoscopy referral could delay diagnosis, especially for patients with anaemia found en passant.

  • 20.
    Ibrahim, Aghil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Dahlqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Werner, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The clinical course after glucocorticoid treatment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease is linked to suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: a retrospective observational study2017In: Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, ISSN 1756-283X, E-ISSN 1756-2848, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 829-836Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adrenal insufficiency (AI) secondary to treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but little is known about the relationship between AI and the clinical course in IBD. The aim of the study was to compare the clinical course in IBD patients with normal adrenal function versus patients with subnormal adrenal function.

    Methods: A retrospective observational study on 63 patients with IBD who had performed a low-dose short Synacthen test (LDSST) (1 μg) immediately (1-7 days) after a standard course of GCs. A subnormal LDSST was defined as serum cortisol <550 nmol/L. Outcomes were time to next flare and fecal calprotectin levels.

    Results: Sixty-three percent (n = 40) of the IBD patients had a subnormal LDSST. Patients who were steroid-free (n = 41) after the LDSST were observed for 3 years. Patients with a peak serum cortisol <400 nmol/L immediately after GC treatment had significantly longer time until the next flare-up of their IBD and tended to use a lower cumulative prednisolone dose during the study period in comparison to the other subgroups. Fecal calprotectin levels were significantly lower in patients with a peak s-cortisol <550 nmol/L versus patients with peak s-cortisol ⩾550 nmol/L (median 336 µg/g (IQR 521) versus 955 µg/g (IQR 1867); p = 0.012).

    Conclusions: GC-induced AI is common in patients with IBD and is associated with lower disease activity. This suggests a link between responsiveness to GC treatment and suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in IBD.

  • 21.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Abrahamsson, Hasse
    Dolk, Anders
    Hallböök, Olof
    Hellström, Per M
    Knowles, Charles H
    Kjellström, Lars
    Lindberg, Greger
    Lindfors, Per-Johan
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Schmidt, Peter T
    Sjölund, Kristina
    Sjövall, Henrik
    Walter, Susanne
    Function and dysfunction of the colon and anorectum in adults: working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG)2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, ISSN EISSN1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 646-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptoms of fecal incontinence and constipation are common in the general population. These can, however, be unreliably reported and are poorly discriminatory for underlying pathophysiology. Furthermore, both symptoms may coexist. In the elderly, fecal impaction always must be excluded. For patients with constipation, colon transit studies, anorectal manometry and defecography may help to identify patients with slow-transit constipation and/or pelvic floor dysfunction. The best documented medical treatments for constipation are the macrogols, lactulose and isphagula. Evolving drugs include lubiprostone, which enhances colonic secretion by activating chloride channels. Surgery is restricted for a highly selected group of patients with severe slow-transit constipation and for those with large rectoceles that demonstrably cause rectal evacuatory impairment. For patients with fecal incontinence that does not resolve on antidiarrheal treatment, functional and structural evaluation with anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance (MR) of the anal canal may help to guide management. Sacral nerve stimulation is a rapidly evolving alternative when other treatments such as biofeedback and direct sphincter repair have failed. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology as a guide to treatment of patients with constipation and fecal incontinence is a continuing important goal for translational research. The content of this article is a summary of presentations given by the authors at the Fourth Meeting of the Swedish Motility Group, held in Gothenburg in April 2007.

  • 22.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Danielsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    No difference in symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome between healthy subjects and patients with recurrent depression in remission2007In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 896-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is bidirectional comorbidity between anxiety/depression and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To investigate the prevalence of IBS symptoms, and factors associated with gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with recurrent depressive disorder. Patients (n = 95) with recurrent type of major depression according to DSM-IV criteria and sex- and age-matched controls (n = 190) were sent questionnaires investigating symptoms of IBS [Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS)-IBS] and symptoms of anxiety and depression [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)]. Medical records were checked over a 10-year period for chronic somatic symptoms or diseases. Seventy-three patients with unipolar disorder (mean age 63.6 years SD 13.8; range 23–86 years) and 156 controls (mean age 59.2 years SD 11.6, range 21–85 years) responded. Patients with recurrent depression had higher GSRS-IBS scores and showed a strong correlation between symptoms of IBS and anxiety-depression (rs = 0.54; P < 0.001). IBS symptoms were also associated with multiple pain symptoms, higher health-seeking behaviour and selective-serotonin-reuptake inhibitor intake. However, patients with recurrent depression (n = 46) in remission (HADS-Depression score <8) did not have more symptoms of IBS than controls (GSRS-IBS median score 6.0 vs 6.5; P = 0.46). There is a strong association between symptoms of IBS and symptoms of anxiety and depression, whereas depressive patients in remission do not have more IBS symptoms than controls.

  • 23.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Danielsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Söderström, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Del-Favero, Jurgen
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    The relationship between the val158met catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism and irritable bowel syndrome.2011In: PloS one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 3, p. e18035-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme has a key function in the degradation of catecholamines and a functional polymorphism is val158met. The val/val genotype results in a three to fourfold higher enzymatic activity compared with the met/met genotype, with the val/met genotype exhibiting intermediate activity. Since pain syndromes as well as anxiety and depression are associated to low and high COMT activity respectively and these conditions are all associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) we wanted for the first time to explore the relationship between the polymorphism and IBS.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    867 subjects (445 women) representative of the general population and 70 consecutively sampled patients with IBS (61 women) were genotyped for the val158met polymorphism and the IBS patients filled out the Hospital-Anxiety-and-Depression-Scale (HADS) questionnaire, and an IBS symptom diary.

    Results

    There was a significantly higher occurrence of the val/val genotype in patients compared with controls (30% vs 20%; Chi2 (1) 3.98; p = 0.046) and a trend toward a lower occurrence of the val/met genotype in IBS patients compared with controls (39% vs 49%; Chi2 (1) 2.89; p = 0.089). Within the IBS patients the val/val carriers exhibited significantly increased bowel frequency (2.6 vs 1.8 stools per day; Chi2 (1) 5.3; p = 0.03) and a smaller proportion of stools with incomplete defecation (41% vs 68%; Chi2 (1) 4.3; p = 0.04) compared with the rest (val/met+met/met carriers). The val/val carriers also showed a trend for a smaller proportion of hard stools (0% vs 15%; Chi2 (1) 3.2; p = 0.08) and a higher frequency of postprandial defecation (26% vs 21%; Chi2 (1) 3.0; p = 0.08).

    Conclusions/Significance

    In this study we found an association between the val/val genotype of the val158met COMT gene and IBS as well as to specific IBS related bowel pattern in IBS patients.

  • 24.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eklöf, Vincy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Improved monitoring of inflammatory activity in patients with ulcerative colitis by combination of faecal tests for haemoglobin and calprotectin2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Faecal calprotectin (FC) tests and faecal immunological tests (FIT) for haemoglobin have been used to monitor disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) but used alone they have some limitation concerning the predictive ability. We aimed to test if an FC test used in combination with FIT could improve the predictive ability. Consecutive out-patients with UC (n = 93) who were admitted for colonoscopy completed a single faecal sample before the start of bowel preparation. A quantitative CALPRO (R) calprotectin ELISA test and a qualitative FIT (cut-off < 40 ng/mL) were analyzed. An estimated Mayo score and a score of histological inflammation was performed blinded to the result of the faecal tests. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value for endoscopic inflammation (Mayo score > 1) was for FIT 85%, 83%, 96%, 57% and for FC > 186 mu g/g 73%, 87%, 87%, 54%. Corresponding results for FIT*FC > 186 mu g/g (at least one test positive) were 92%, 69%, 97%, 43%. For detecting moderate/severe histological inflammation the results were for FIT 69%, 79%, 92%, 43%, for FC > 75 mu g/g 95%, 62%, 98%, 41%, and for FIT*FC > 75 mu g/g 100%, 60%, 100%, 36%. None of the markers alone or in combination were useful to predict deep remission (Mayo score = 0 and no histological inflammation). We conclude that using the combination of an FC test and FIT shows minor improvement in predictive ability for inflammatory activity and remission in patients with UC.

  • 25.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Maripuu, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Association between gastrointestinal symptoms and affectivity in patients with bipolar disorder2016In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 22, no 38, p. 8540-8548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study if anxiety, depression and experience of stress are associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder.

    METHODS: A total of 136 patients with bipolar disorder (mean age 49.9 years; 61% women) and 136 controls from the general population (mean age 51.0 years; 60% women) were included in the study. GI symptoms were assessed with The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale-irritable bowel syndrome (GSRS-IBS), level of anxiety and depression with The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and stress-proneness with Perceived Stress Questionnaire. Over a ten year period, all visits in primary care were retrospectively recorded in order to identify functional GI disorders.

    RESULTS: In subjects with low total HADS-score, there were no significant differences in GI-symptoms between patients and controls (GSRS-IBS 7.0 vs 6.5, P = 0.513). In the patients with bipolar disorder there were significant correlations between all GSRS and HADS subscores for all symptom clusters except for "constipation" and "reflux". Factors associated to GI symptoms in the patient group were female sex (adjusted OR = 2.37, 95%CI: 1.07-5.24) and high HADS-Depression score (adjusted OR = 3.64, 95%CI: 1.07-12.4). These patients had also significantly more visits for IBS than patients with low HADS-Depression scores (29% vs 8%, P = 0.008). However, there was no significant differences in consulting behaviour for functional GI disorders between patients and controls (25% vs 17%, P = 0.108).

    CONCLUSION: Female patients and patients with high HADS depression score reported significantly more GI symptoms, whereas patients with low HADS scores did not differ from control subjects.

  • 26.
    Karling, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hypersuppression Is Associated with Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Major Depression2016In: Journal of neurogastroenterology and motility, ISSN 2093-0879, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 292-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Gastrointestinal symptoms and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction are frequently observed in patients with major depression. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between HPA-axis function and self-perceived functional gastrointestinal symptoms in major depression.

    Methods: Patients with major depression (n = 73) and controls representative of the general population (n = 146) underwent a weight-adjusted very low dose dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Patients and controls completed the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale-Irritable Bowel Syndrome (GSRS-IBS) and the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale. Medical records of the patients were screened over a ten year period for functional gastrointestinal disorder and pain conditions.

    Results: Patients with high GSRS-IBS scores (above median) exhibited HPA-axis hypersuppression more often than controls (defined by the lowest 10% cutoff of the post-DST cortisol values among controls, adjusted OR 7.25, CI 1.97-26.7) whereas patients with low GSRS-IBS scores did not differ from controls concerning their post-DST cortisol values. Patients who had consulted primary care for functional gastrointestinal disorder (P= 0.039), lumbago (P = 0.006) and chronic multifocal pain (P= 0.057) also exhibited an increased frequency of hypersuppression.

    Conclusions: HPA-axis hypersuppression is associated with functional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with major depression.

  • 27. Lu, Yunxia
    et al.
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Chan, Simon
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Ward, Heather
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Luben, Robert
    Opstelten, Jorrit L.
    Oldenburg, Bas
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Grip, Olof
    Key, Timothy
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Masala, Giovanna
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Racine, Antoine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Scalbert, Augustin
    Riboli, Elio
    Hart, Andrew R.
    Dietary Polyphenols in the Aetiology of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis-A Multicenter European Prospective Cohort Study (EPIC)2017In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 2072-2082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Oxidative stress may be involved in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease and whether dietary polyphenols, which possess antioxidants properties, prevent its development is unknown.

    Methods: A total of 401,326 men and women aged 20 to 80 years from 8 countries were recruited between 1991 and 1998 and at baseline completed validated food frequency questionnaires. Dietary polyphenol intake was measured using Phenol-Explorer, a database with information on the content of 502 polyphenols. Incident cases of Crohn's diseases (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) were identified during the follow-up period of up to December 2010. A nested case–control study using conditional logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals, for polyphenol intake (categories based on quartiles) and developing CD or UC.

    Results: In total, 110 CD (73% women) and 244 UC (57% women) cases were identified and matched to 440 and 976 controls, respectively. Total polyphenol intake was not associated with CD ( P trend = 0.17) or UC ( P trend = 0.16). For flavones and CD, there were reduced odds for all quartiles, which were statistically significant for the third (OR 3rd versus 1st quartile = 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.69) and there was an inverse trend across quartiles ( P = 0.03). Similarly, for resveratrol, there was an inverse association with CD (OR 4th versus 1st quartile = 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20–0.82) with an inverse trend across quartiles ( P = 0.02). No significant associations between subtypes of polyphenols and UC were found. Effect modification by smoking in CD was documented with borderline statistical significance.

    Conclusions: The data supports a potential role of flavones and resveratrol in the risk of developing CD; future aetiological studies should investigate these dietary components and further examine the potential for residual confounding.

  • 28.
    Lundgren, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Eklöf, Vincy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Proton pump inhibitor use is associated with elevated faecal calprotectin levels. A cross-sectional study on subjects referred for colonoscopy2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Faecal Calprotectin (FC) is a sensitive marker for gut inflammation. However, slightly elevated FC levels are also common in subjects without inflammation. We investigated the association between FC and clinical factors including concomitant use of medical therapy in patients with a normal colonoscopy.Material and methods: Out-patients (n=1263) referred for colonoscopy, performed FC test (CALPRO) the day before the start of bowel preparation. All subjects answered questionnaires that included questions on the present and past health history, concomitant medical treatment and gastrointestinal symptoms (GSRS). A medical record chart review was performed to check for concomitant disease, cause of referral and the result of the colonoscopy including biopsies. Inclusion criteria were a normal colonoscopy. Exclusion criteria were inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer and high-grade dysplasia.Results: Five hundred ninety subjects fulfilled the inclusion criteria and completed the study. Thirty-six per cent of the subjects had a FC >50 mu g/g. In a logistic regression analysis, age (adjusted OR: 1.051; CI: 1.032-1.071), and the use of proton pump inhibitors (adjusted OR: 3.843; CI: 2.338-6.316), non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (adjusted OR: 2.411; CI: 1.162-5.002) and acetylsalicylic acid (adjusted OR: 2.934; CI: 1.085-3.448) were significantly associated with an elevated FC (>50 mu g/g).Conclusions: More than one-third of the patients with a normal colonoscopy performed in clinical routine had a slightly elevated FC level. Our results emphasise the need for attention to age, the use of proton pump inhibitors, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and acetylsalicylic acid in the interpretation of FC tests in clinical practice.

  • 29.
    Lundgren, David
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Eklöf, Vincy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Patients with longstanding ulcerative colitis in remission do not have more irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms than controls2016In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 16, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is more common in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) than expected. The prevalence of IBS in patients with UC with longstanding disease is not known. We investigated the prevalence of IBS-like symptoms in patients with UC in remission and longstanding disease in comparison to control subjects.

    METHODS: Sixty-eight patients with UC and 33 patients with hereditary familiar colon cancer and who underwent colonoscopy surveillance were included. Faecal calprotectin (FC), Gastrointestinal Symptoms Rating Scale-Irritable Bowel Syndrome (GSRS-IBS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale were fulfilled prior to endoscopy. UC in remission was define by steroid-free clinical remission, a Mayo Score ≤ 1 on endoscopy, a FC ≤ 200 μg/g and no significant active inflammation on colon biopsies.

    RESULTS: Fifty-five UC patients met the criteria for being in remission. The median disease duration was 17 years. The patients with UC in remission tended to have lower scores on total GSRS-IBS score (6 vs 10.5; p = 0.062) and lower or equal scores on all specific IBS symptoms in comparison to controls. There was a moderate but significant correlation between diarrhoea scores and FC levels (in the span ≤ 200 μg/g) (rs 0.38; p = 0.004) in the UC in remission group.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with UC with longstanding disease and in remission do not have more IBS symptoms than controls. In UC patients in remission the FC level in the lower span showed a moderate correlation to symptoms of diarrhoea.

  • 30.
    Lämås, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Åtgärder vid förstoppning2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Marberg, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Söderberg, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Wixner, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Self-reported gastrointestinal symptoms are more common in liver transplanted transthyretin amyloidosis patients than in healthy controls and in patients transplanted for end-stage liver disease2019In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 26, p. 47-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Maripuu, Martin Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Relative hypocortisolism is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in recurrent affective disorders2016In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 71, p. 64-65Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Bipolar patients at risk for developing hypocortisolism: Long-term lithium treatment is preventiveManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Hyper- and hypocortisolism in bipolar disorder: A beneficial influence of lithium on the HPA-axis?2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 213, p. 161-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) is a well-known phenomenon in bipolar disorder (BD). However, hypocortisolism has also been described and found associated with depression, low quality of life and cardiovascular risk factors in BD patients. Although the pathophysiology related to hypocortisolism in BD is largely unknown, hypocortisolism is associated with chronic stress exposure and after inducing an initial rise in cortisol long-term stress may result in a transition to hypocortisolism. BD patients are throughout life often exposed to chronic stress. We therefore hypothesized that higher age would be associated with lower HPA-axis activity especially among patients without previous mood stabilizing treatment. Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of 159 bipolar outpatients and 258 controls. A low-dose-dexamethasone-suppression-test (DST) was used to measure HPA-axis activity. Results: Patients with BD showed a negative association between post DST cortisol and age (-3.0 nmol/l per year; p=0.007). This association gradually increased in subgroups that were naive to lithium (-7.7 nmol/l per year; p=0.001) and "all mood stabilizers" (-11.4 nmol/l per year; p=0.004). Patients exhibiting hypercortisolism were characterized by younger age and female gender, whereas patients exhibiting hypocortisolism were characterized by long disease duration without prophylactic lithium treatment as well as absence of current lithium medication. Limitations: Cross sectional study design. Conclusions: There was a negative association between HPA-axis activity and age in BD, rendering BD patients at risk for developing hypocortisolism. This association was most pronounced among patients without previous or current lithium prophylaxis.

  • 35.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Relative hypocortisolism is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in recurrent affective disordersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrback, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Relative hypocortisolism is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome in recurrent affective disorders2016In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 204, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the main causes of excess deaths in affective disorders. Affective disorders are associated with increased frequencies of CVD risk-factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. Stress-induced chronic cortisol excess has been suggested to promote obesity and metabolic syndrome. Chronic stress with frequent or persisting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis) hyperactivity may, over time, lead to a state of low HPA-axis activity, also denoted hypocortisolism. A low-dose weight-adjusted dexamethasone-suppression-test (DST) is considered to be a sensitive measure of hypocortisolism.

    Methods: 245 patients with recurrent depression or bipolar disorder and 258 controls participated in a low-dose DST and were also examined with regard to metabolic status.

    Results: Patients with hypocortisolism (low post-DST cortisol) compared with patients without hypocortisolism (normal or high post-DST cortisol) exhibited increased odds ratios (OR) for obesity (OR=4.0), overweight (OR=4.0), large waist (OR=2.7), high LDL (OR=4.2), low HDL (OR=2.4), high LDL/HDL ratio (OR=3.3), high TC/HDL ratio (OR=3.4) and metabolic syndrome (OR=2.0). A similar pattern but less pronounced was also found in the control sample.

    Limitations: The cross sectional study design and absence of analyses addressing lifestyle factors.

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a substantial portion of the metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk factors seen in recurrent affective disorders are found among individuals exhibiting hypocortisolism. This might indicate that long-term stress is a central contributor to metabolic abnormalities and CVD mortality in recurrent affective disorders.

  • 37.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrbäck, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Relative Hypo- and Hypercortisolism are Both Associated with Depression and Lower Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 73-74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Maripuu, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Wikgren, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Norrbäck, Karl-Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Relative Hypo-and Hypercortisolism Are Both Associated with Depression and Lower Quality of Life in Bipolar Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, article id e98682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression in unipolar and bipolar disorders is associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis (HPA-axis) hyperactivity. Also, unipolar disorder has recently been shown to exhibit HPA-axis hypoactivity. We studied for the first time how HPA-axis hypo-and hyperactivity relate to depression and disease burden in bipolar disorder. We were interested in studying hypocortisolism; characterized by increased HPA-axis negative feedback sensitivity and lower basal cortisol levels together with the opposite HPA-axis regulatory pattern of hypercortisolism. Methods: This cross-sectional study includes 145 type 1 and 2 bipolar outpatients and 145 matched controls. A dexamethasone-suppression-test (DST) measures the negative feedback sensitivity and a weight-adjusted very-low-dose DST was employed, which is sensitive in identifying hypocortisolism and hypercortisolism. The 25th and 75th percentiles of control post-DST values were used as cut-offs identifying patients exhibiting relative hypo-, and hypercortisolism. Self-report questionnaires were employed: Beck-Depression-Inventory (BDI), Montgomery-Asberg-Depression-Rating-Scale (MADRS-S), World-Health-Organization-Quality-of-Life-Assessment-100 and Global-Assessment-of-Functioning. Results: Patients exhibiting relative hypocortisolism expectedly exhibited lowered basal cortisol levels (p = 0.046). Patients exhibiting relative hypercortisolism expectedly exhibited elevated basal levels (p<0.001). Patients exhibiting relative hypocortisolism showed 1.9-2.0 (BDI, p = 0.017, MADRS-S, p = 0.37) and 6.0 (p<0.001) times increased frequencies of depression and low overall life quality compared with patients exhibiting mid post-DST values (eucortisolism). Adjusted Odds Ratios (OR:s) for depression ranged from 3.8-4.1 (BDI, p = 0.006, MADRS-S, p = 0.011) and was 23.4 (p<0.001) for life quality. Patients exhibiting relative hypercortisolism showed 1.9-2.4 (BDI, p = 0.017, MADRS-S, p = 0.003) and 4.7 (p<0.001) times higher frequencies of depression and low overall life quality compared with patients exhibiting eucortisolism. Adjusted OR: s for depression ranged from 2.2-2.7 (BDI, p = 0.068, MADRS-S, p = 0.045) and was 6.3 (p = 0.008) for life quality. Limitations: The cross-sectional design and lack of pre-established reference values of the DST employed. Conclusions: Relative hypocortisolism and relative hypercortisolism were associated with depression and lower life quality, providing novel insights into the detrimental role of stress in bipolar disorder.

  • 39. Opstelten, Jorrit L
    et al.
    Leenders, Max
    Dik, Vincent K
    Chan, Simon S M
    van Schaik, Fiona D M
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Luben, Robert
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Grip, Olof
    Key, Timothy J
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bergmann, Manuela M
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Masala, Giovanna
    Racine, Antoine
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Andersen, Vibeke
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Katzke, Verena A
    Tumino, Rosario
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Siersema, Peter D
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Hart, Andrew R
    Oldenburg, Bas
    Dairy Products, Dietary Calcium, and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results From a European Prospective Cohort Investigation.2016In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 22, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dairy products may be involved in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease by modulating gut microbiota and immune responses, but data from epidemiological studies examining this relationship are limited. We investigated the association between prediagnostic intake of these foods and dietary calcium, and the subsequent development of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).

    METHODS: In total, 401,326 participants were enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. At recruitment, consumption of total and specific dairy products (milk, yogurt, and cheese) and dietary calcium was measured using validated food frequency questionnaires. Cases developing incident CD (n = 110) or UC (n = 244) during follow-up were matched with 4 controls. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for total energy intake and smoking.

    RESULTS: Compared with the lowest quartile, the ORs for the highest quartile of total dairy products and dietary calcium intake were 0.61 (95% CI, 0.32-1.19, p trend = 0.19) and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.28-1.42, p trend = 0.23) for CD, and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.50-1.30, p trend = 0.40) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.49-1.34, p trend = 0.60) for UC, respectively. Compared with nonconsumers, individuals consuming milk had significantly reduced odds of CD (OR 0.30, 95% CI, 0.13-0.65) and nonsignificantly reduced odds of UC (OR 0.85, 95% CI, 0.49-1.47).

    CONCLUSIONS: Milk consumption may be associated with a decreased risk of developing CD, although a clear dose-response relationship was not established. Further studies are warranted to confirm this possible protective effect.

  • 40. Racine, A.
    et al.
    Carbonnel, F.
    Chan, S.
    Hart, A.
    de Mesquita, B. Bueno
    Oldenburg, B.
    VanSchaik, F.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Olsen, A.
    Dahm, C.
    Key, T.
    Luben, R.
    Kaw, K. -T
    Riboli, E.
    Grip, O.
    Lindgren, S.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    Bergman, M.
    Boeing, H.
    Buijsse, B.
    Kaaks, R.
    Katzke, V.
    Palli, D.
    Masala, G.
    Jantchou, P.
    Ruault, M. C. Boutron
    Dietary patterns and risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Europe: Results from the EPIC study2015In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 9, p. S26-S26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41. Racine, Antoine
    et al.
    Carbonnel, Franck
    Chan, Simon S. M.
    Hart, Andrew R.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Oldenburg, Bas
    van Schaik, Fiona D. M.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Key, Timothy
    Luben, Robert
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Riboli, Elio
    Grip, Olof
    Lindgren, Stefan
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Bergman, Manuela M.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Katzke, Verena A.
    Palli, Domenico
    Masala, G.
    Jantchou, Prevost
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Dietary Patterns and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Europe: Results from the EPIC Study2016In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 345-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Specific nutrients or foods have been inconsistently associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) risks. Thus, we investigated associations between diet as a whole, as dietary patterns, and UC and CD risks.

    Methods: Within the prospective EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer) study, we set up a nested matched case–control study among 366,351 participants with inflammatory bowel disease data, including 256 incident cases of UC and 117 of CD, and 4 matched controls per case. Dietary intake was recorded at baseline from validated food frequency questionnaires. Incidence rate ratios of developing UC and CD were calculated for quintiles of the Mediterranean diet score and a posteriori dietary patterns produced by factor analysis.

    Results: No dietary pattern was associated with either UC or CD risks. However, when excluding cases occurring within the first 2 years after dietary assessment, there was a positive association between a “high sugar and soft drinks” pattern and UC risk (incidence rate ratios for the fifth versus first quintile, 1.68 [1.00–2.82]; Ptrend ¼ 0.02). When considering the foods most associated with the pattern, high consumers of sugar and soft drinks were at higher UC risk only if they had low vegetables intakes.

  • 42.
    Salih, Abdulkadir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Widbom, Lovisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Smoking is associated with risk for developing inflammatory bowel disease including late onset ulcerative colitis: a prospective study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 173-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Life style factors have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but there is a lack of data on the exposure of life styles factors before the onset of IBD. Our aim was to study the association between lifestyle factors and the development of IBD in a prospective setting.

    Materials and methods: We performed a case control study of 72 patients who later developed ulcerative colitis (UC), 26 patients who developed Crohn's disease (CD) and 427 healthy controls from the Vasterbotten intervention project matched for gender, age, year of health survey and area of residence. At recruitment, participants completed validated lifestyle questionnaires including data on alcohol intake. Information from this was used to assess the connection between lifestyle factors and later developing IBD.

    Results: For CD and UC, the median age at diagnosis was 53 and 52 years and median time of survey was 4 and 6 years before diagnosis, respectively. Multivariate odds ratio (OR) showed an association between never smoking and not developing IBD, including both UC and CD, OR (95% CI) 0.341 (0.136-0.853) and 0.473 (0.259-0.864), respectively. Marital status, educational level, alcohol consumption, reported physical activity and use of moist smokeless tobacco (snus) did not differ between patients and controls.

    Conclusions: Smoking proves to be a risk factor for both CD and UC in this prospective case-control study. No association was seen for snus users, implying a non-nicotine pathogenic mechanism from combusted tobacco.

  • 43. Schmidt, Peter Thelin
    et al.
    Abrahamsson, Hasse
    Dolk, Anders
    Hausken, Trygve
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lindberg, Greger
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Simrèn, Magnus
    Sjölund, Kristina
    Stotzer, Per-Olof
    Törnblom, Hans
    Methods to assess gastric motility and sensation2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 43, no 11, p. 1285-1295Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Skärby, Rut
    et al.
    Chorell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ökat om­vårdnadsbehov främsta orsak till lång vårdtid på medicinklinik: Retrospektiv journalstudie styrker att tidig vårdplanering skulle kunna ge bättre platstillgång2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 6, p. 219-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to analyze factors of importance for how long patients are treated at a medical ward. A systematic analysis of medical records was performed in all patients admitted to the medical wards during March–May 2012 (n = 1 523) at the University Hospital of Northern Sweden in Umeå. Factors related to type of disease, disability, social background and care given were recorded and interpreted by multivariate analysis. 50% of the patients stayed in the ward <3 days, occupying 14% of all beds. 24% of the patients had a hospital stay >5 days and occupied 65% of the beds. The following factors was strongly associated with a long stay >5 days (vs 3–5 days stay): need for more elder care, the need of >1 X-ray investigations, nutritional support, hypoalbuminemia, invasive treatment (e g intravenous antibiotics) and the need for oxygen treatment >2 days.

  • 45. Visuri, I.
    et al.
    Eriksson, C.
    Mardberg, E.
    Grip, O.
    Gustavsson, A.
    Hjortswang, H.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Montgomery, S.
    Myrelid, P.
    Olen, O.
    Ludvigsson, J. F.
    Halfvarson, J.
    Anti-TNF agent drug survival in patients with IBD: real-world comparisons of individual anti-TNF agents based on the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG)2019In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, p. S443-S444Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies comparing drug survival in different anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents in IBD patients are scarce, especially for second-line anti-TNF agents. We aimed to (A) assess drug survival and predictors of response and adverse drug reactions to first-line anti-TNF treatment and (B) examine drug survival for individual anti-TNF agents when used as second-line anti-TNF. Methods: Well-characterised patients with IBD (n = 955)  starting their first anti-TNF treatment between 2006 and 2016 (Table  1), were identified from the Swedish National Quality Registry for IBD (SWIBREG). Drug survival was examined, stratified by reason for discontinuation, that is, lack/loss of clinical effectiveness or adverse drug reactions. Multi-variable Cox regression models were used to identify predictors of drug survival. Drug survival for the second anti-TNF was assessed by type of first anti-TNF agent. Results: Risk factors at baseline for shorter drug survival, in patients with Crohn’s disease, were use of infliximab as first-line anti-TNF (compared with adalimumab, adjusted HR  =  1.95, 95% CI: 1.19‒3.18) (Figure 1A) and colonic disease (L2) (compared with ileal disease (L1) and ileocolonic disease (L3), adjusted HR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.25‒3.74). Consistently, Crohn’s disease patients who switched from adalimumab to infliximab had shorter drug survival, compared with those who switched from infliximab to adalimumab (Figure  1B). A  normalisation of CRP level at 3 months was associated with decreased risk of short drug survival in both Crohn’s disease (adjusted HR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19‒0.81) and ulcerative colitis (adjusted HR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19‒0.86). In Crohn’s disease, but not in ulcerative colitis, immunomodulators were associated with a lower risk of short drug survival due to adverse drug reactions (adjusted HR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.31‒0.82). Conclusions: Drug survival duration was longer for adalimumab compared with infliximab both when used as first anti-TNF agent and when used as second-line treatment. The consistent pattern indicates that these differences are not only explained by channelling bias (differential prescribing behaviour).

  • 46.
    Widbom, L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Schneede, Jørn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Higher plasma cotinine is associated with an increased risk for later developing IBD, especially among users of combusted tobacco2019In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 13, p. S508-S508Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rydh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Hornsten, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gastric emptying in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis: the impact of autonomic neuropathy2012In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1111-e568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are common in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and an autonomic dysfunction has been considered to explain these symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of autonomic neuropathy on gastric emptying in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and to relate these findings to nutritional status, GI symptoms, gender, and age at disease onset.

    Methods: Gastric emptying was evaluated with gastric emptying scintigraphy. Spectral analysis of the heart rate variability and cardiovascular responses after tilt test were used to assess the autonomic function. The nutritional status was evaluated with the modified body mass index (s-albumine x BMI).

    Key Results: Gastric retention was found in about one-third of the patients. A weak correlation was found between the scintigraphic gastric emptying rate and both the sympathetic (rs = -0.397, P < 0.001) and parasympathetic function (rs = -0.282, P = 0.002). The gastric emptying rate was slower in those with lower or both upper and lower GI symptoms compared with those without symptoms (median T50 123 vs 113 min, P = 0.042 and 192 vs 113 min, P = 0.003, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that age of onset (OR 0.10, CI 0.020.52) and sympathetic dysfunction (OR 0.23, CI 0.100.51), but not gender (OR 0.76, CI 0.311.84) and parasympathetic dysfunction (OR 1.81, CI 0.724.56), contributed to gastric retention.

    Conclusions and Inferences: Gastric retention is common in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis early after onset. Autonomic neuropathy only weakly correlates with gastric retention and therefore additional factors must be involved.

  • 48.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mundayat, Rajiv
    Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA.
    Karayal, Onur N
    Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    THAOS: Gastrointestinal manifestations of transthyretin amyloidosis - common complications of a rare disease2014In: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, ISSN 1750-1172, E-ISSN 1750-1172, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 61-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Transthyretin amyloidosis is a systemic disorder caused by amyloid deposits formed by misfolded transthyretin monomers. Two main forms exist: hereditary and wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis, the former associated with transthyretin gene mutations. There are several disease manifestations; however, gastrointestinal complications are common in the hereditary form. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal manifestations in transthyretin amyloidosis and to evaluate their impact on the patients' nutritional status and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    METHODS: The Transthyretin Amyloidosis Outcomes Survey (THAOS) is the first global, multicenter, longitudinal, observational survey that collects data on patients with transthyretin amyloidosis and the registry is sponsored by Pfizer Inc. This study presents baseline data from patients enrolled in THAOS as of June 2013. The modified body mass index (mBMI), in which BMI is multiplied with serum albumin, was used to assess the nutritional status and the EQ-5D Index was used to assess HRQoL.

    RESULTS: Data from 1579 patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and 160 patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis were analyzed. Sixty-three percent of those with the hereditary form and 15% of those with the wild-type form reported gastrointestinal symptoms at enrollment. Unintentional weight loss and early satiety were the most frequent symptoms, reported by 32% and 26% of those with transthyretin gene mutations, respectively. Early-onset patients (<50 years) reported gastrointestinal complaints more frequently than those with a late onset (p < 0.001) and gastrointestinal symptoms were more common in patients with the V30M mutation than in those with other mutations (p < 0.001). For patients with predominantly cardiac complications, the prevalence of gastrointestinal manifestations was not evidently higher than that expected in the general population. Both upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms were significant negative predictors of mBMI and the EQ-5D Index Score (p < 0.001 for all).

    CONCLUSIONS: Gastrointestinal symptoms were common in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis and had a significant negative impact on their nutritional status and HRQoL. However, patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis or transthyretin mutations associated with predominantly cardiac complications did not show an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal disturbances.

  • 49.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Obayashi, Konen
    Department of Diagnostic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
    Ando, Yukio
    Department of Diagnostic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Loss of gastric interstitial cells of Cajal in patients with hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis2013In: Amyloid: Journal of Protein Folding Disorders, ISSN 1350-6129, E-ISSN 1744-2818, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hereditary transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is a systemic neuropathic disorder caused by TTR gene mutations. Gastrointestinal complications are common and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) function as pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract and are important for gastrointestinal motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the densities of gastric ICC and nerves in patients with TTR amyloidosis compared to non-amyloidosis controls.

    Methods: Antral wall autopsy specimens from 11 Japanese ATTR V30M patients and 10 controls were analyzed with immunohistochemistry and computerized analysis. Antibodies to c-Kit and TMEM16A were used to assess ICC and an antibody to PGP 9.5 was used to assess nervous tissue. The study was approved by a Japanese ethical committee.

    Results: The densities of c-Kit-immunoreactive (IR) ICC were significantly lower in the circular and longitudinal muscle layers of patients compared to controls (p = 0.004 for both). Equivalent results were found for TMEM 16A-IR ICC. There were no significant differences in PGP 9.5-IR cells in the circular or longitudinal muscle layers between patients and controls (p = 0.173 and 0.099, respectively).

    Conclusions: A loss of gastrointestinal ICC may be an important factor for the digestive disturbances in hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  • 50.
    Wixner, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sundström, Torbjorn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Anan, Intissar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Outcome of gastric emptying and gastrointestinal symptoms after liver transplantation for hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis2015In: BMC Gastroenterology, ISSN 1471-230X, E-ISSN 1471-230X, Vol. 15, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hereditary transthyretin amyloid (ATTR) amyloidosis is a rare but fatal autosomal dominant condition that is present all over the world. A liver transplantation has been shown to halt the progress of the disease in selected patients and is currently considered to be the standard treatment. Gastrointestinal manifestations are common in hereditary ATTR amyloidosis and are important for the patients' morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of gastric emptying, gastrointestinal symptoms and nutritional status after liver transplantation for the disease.

    Methods: Swedish patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis transplanted between 1990 and 2012 were included. A standardized method for measuring gastric emptying with a Tc-99m-labelled meal followed by scintigraphy was utilized. Validated questionnaires were used to assess gastrointestinal symptoms and the modified body mass index (mBMI), in which BMI is multiplied by s-albumin, was used to evaluate nutritional status. Non-parametrical statistical tests were used.

    Results: Gastric emptying rates and nutritional statuses were evaluated approximately eight months before and two and five years after liver transplantation, whereas gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed in median nine months before and two and nine years after transplantation. No significant change was found in gastric emptying (median half-time 137 vs. 132 vs. 125 min, p = 0.52) or nutritional status (median mBMI 975 vs. 991 vs. 973, p = 0.75) after transplantation. Gastrointestinal symptom scores, however, had increased significantly over time (median score 7 vs. 10 vs. 13, p < 0.01).

    Conclusions: Gastric emptying and nutritional status were maintained after liver transplantation for hereditary ATTR amyloidosis, although gastrointestinal symptom scores had increased over time.

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