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  • 1.
    Burström, Lage
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Occupational exposure to vibration from hand-held tools: A teaching guide on health effects, risk assessment and prevention2009Book (Other academic)
  • 2. Cherniack, M
    et al.
    Brammer, A J
    Nilsson, T
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundstrom, R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Meyer, J D
    Morse, T
    Neely, Gregory
    Peterson, D
    Toppila, E
    Warren, N
    Atwood-Sanders, M
    Michalak-Turcotte, C
    Abbas, U
    Bruneau, H
    Croteau, M
    Fu, R W
    Nerve conduction and sensorineural function in dental hygienists using high frequency ultrasound handpieces.2006In: Am J Ind Med, ISSN 0271-3586, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 313-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Cherniack, Martin
    et al.
    Brammer, Anthony J
    Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, Canada.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Department of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Morse, Tim F.
    Neely, Greg
    Technical Risk Factors, National Institute for Working Life, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Tohr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Peterson, Donald
    Toppila, Esko
    Warren, Nicholas
    Diva, Ulysses
    Croteau, Marc
    Dussetschleger, Jefferey
    Syndromes from segmental vibration and nerve entrapment: observations on case definitions for carpal tunnel syndrome2008In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 661-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to assess the overlap and stability of two different case definitions of carpal tunnel syndrome CTS. The analysis considers the association between different case definitions and objective tests (sensory nerve conduction velocities, SNCVs and vibrotactile perception thresholds, TTS), and the natural history of CTS, in the context of two vibration-exposed cohorts.

    Methods: Clinical CTS cases were defined in two ways: (1) by the study physician using fixed criteria, and; (2) by questionnaire and hand diagram. SNCV in median and ulnar nerves was measured for digital, transpalmar, and transcarpal segments, and conventionally as from wrist-digit. Skin temperature was assessed as a point measurement by thermistor and regionally by thermal imaging. VTTs were determined at the bilateral fingertips of the third and fifth digits using a tactometer meeting the requirements of ISO 13091-1 (ISO 2001). The subjects were cohorts of shipyard workers in 2001 and 2004, and dental hygienists in 2002 and 2004.

    Results: Results are reported for 214 shipyard workers in 2001 and 135 in 2004, and for 94 dental hygienists in 2002 and 66 in 2004. In 2001, 50% of shipyard workers were diagnosed as CTS cases by at least one of the diagnostic schemes, but only 20% were positive by both criteria. Among study physician diagnosed cases, 64% were CTS negative in 2001, 76% were negative in 2004, 13% were positive in both years, 22% became negative after being positive, and 11% became positive after being negative. For only study physician diagnosed CTS did VTTs differ between cases differ and non-cases in digit 3; there was no such distinction in digit 5. The dental hygienists had little CTS.

    Conclusion: Clinical case definitions of CTS based on diagrams and self-assessment, and clinical evaluation have limited overlap. Combining clinical criteria to create a more narrow or specific case definition of CTS does not appear to predict SNCV. The natural history of CTS suggests a protean disorder with considerable flux in case status over time.

  • 4. Chernicak, Martin
    et al.
    Brammer, Anthony J.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Morse, Tim F.
    Neely, Greg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Nilsson, Thor
    Peterson, Donald
    Toppila, Esk
    Warren, Nicholas
    Diva, Ulysses
    Croteau, Marc
    Dussetschleger, Jeffrey
    The effect warming methods on sensory nerve coduction velocity in shipyard workers occupationally exposed to hand-arm vibration2008In: Int Arch Occup Environ Health, ISSN 0340-0131, no 81, p. 1045-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Lindros, Ola
    et al.
    Wilhelmson Aspman, Emma
    Lidestav, Gun
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Accidents in family forestry´s firewood production2008In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, Vol. 40, p. 877-886Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stress, subjective experience and cognitive performance during exposure to noise an vibration2007In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 44-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effects of noise and whole-body vibration on saliva cortisol levels and subjectively rated difficulty and stress while performing cognitive tasks. In the first experiment, 24 men completed a logical reasoning task and a short-term memory task while, on separate occasions, being exposed to noise, vibration, combined stimuli, and control conditions. The environmental stimuli were designed to simulate the exposure from a forestry vehicle. The main finding was that participants made significantly higher ratings of stress when the noise stimulus was present, either alone or in combination with vibration. There were, however, some indications that noise sensitivity might moderate both subjective and objective measures such as higher ratings of stress and elevated cortisol levels in high noise sensitive participants. A second experiment was conducted where noise sensitivity was used as an inclusion criterion. A low sensitive and a high sensitive group were created, each containing 16 participants. The results of the second experiment, found only marginal effects of noise sensitivity and no effects at all on performance or cortisol. Increased ratings of stress and difficulty were found whenever either environmental stressor was present, whether by itself or in combination. The same result was seen even when pooling the data from both experiments. The main conclusion of the study is that relatively short exposures to noise and vibration typical of those levels that are found in industrial vehicles do not significantly affect performance in cognitive tasks nor saliva cortisol levels even if work in these environments can be experienced as more difficult or stressful.

  • 7.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK.
    Parmentier, Fabrice BR
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Jones, Dylan M
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘What’s in a name?’ ‘No more than when it's mine own’. Evidence from auditory oddball distraction.2014In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 150, p. 161-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research of the distractor value of hearing the own name has shown that this self-referring stimulus captures attention in an involuntary fashion and create distraction. The behavioral studies are few and the outcomes are not always clear cut. In this study the distraction by own name compared to a control name was investigated by using a cross-modal oddball task in two experiments. In the first experiment, thirty-nine participants were conducting a computerized categorization task while exposed to, to-be ignored own and matched control names (controlling for familiarity, gender and number of syllables) as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (12.5% trials for each name category) and a sine wave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials). In the second experiment, another group of thirty-nine participants completed the same task but with the additional deviant stimulus of an irrelevant word added (10% trials for each deviant type and 70% trials with the standard stimulus). Results showed deviant distracton by exposure to both the irrelevant word, own and the control name compared to the standard tone but no differences were found showing that the own name captured attention and distracted the participants more than an irrelevant word or a control name. The results elucidate the role of the own name as a potent auditory distractor and possible limitations with its theoretical significance for general theories of attention are discussed.

  • 8.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jones, Dylan M.
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Neely, Gregory
    Any Tom, Dick, or Harry will do: Hearing one's own name distracts no more than any other in a cross-modal oddball task2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    When your name is just another word: Self-referential auditory stimulus no more distracting than other names and words in a cross-modal oddball task2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marsh Everett, John
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Examining the Role of Spatial Changes in Bimodal and Uni-Modal To-Be-Ignored Stimuli and How They Affect Short-Term Memory Processes2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, p. 1-8, article id 299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the potential vulnerability of short-term memory processes to distraction by spatial changes within to-be-ignored bimodal, vibratory, and auditory stimuli. Participants were asked to recall sequences of serially presented dots or digits while being exposed to to-be-ignored stimuli. On unexpected occasions, the bimodal (Experiment 1), vibratory (Experiment 2), or auditory (Experiment 3) stimuli changed their spatial origin from one side of the body (e.g., ear and arm, arm only, ear only) to the other. It was expected that the bimodal stimuli would make the spatial change more salient compared to that of the uni-modal stimuli and that this, in turn, would yield an increase in distraction of serial short-term memory in both the verbal and spatial domains. Performance across three experiments support this assumption as a disruptive effect of the spatial deviant was only observed when presented within the bimodal to-be-ignored sequence (Experiment 1): Uni-modal to-be-ignored sequences, whether vibratory (Experiment 2) or auditory (Experiment 3), had no impact on either verbal or spatial short-term memory. Implications for models of attention capture, short-term memory, and the potential special role attention capturing role of bimodal stimuli is discussed.

  • 11.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marsh Everett, John
    Patrik, Hansson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Domain-generality or domain-specificity of the short-term memory: insights from a multisensory distraction paradigm2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Neely, Gregory
    Hansson, Patrik
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Spatial Change In Multisensory Distractors Impact On Spatial and Verbal Short-Term Memory Performance2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unexpected changes (known as deviant sounds) in a repetitive stream ofstandardsounds are known to prolong responses in visual categorization tasks (Parmentier, 2014) and disrupt short-term memory (Hughes, Vachon, & Jones, 2005; 2007). While this deviation effect,has been studied extensively, unexpected changes in multisensory irrelevant stimuli have yet to be explored. A further issue is whether a spatial change in either tactile, auditory, or in both modalities simultaneously, affects verbal and spatial short-term memorysimilarly. We explored how spatial and verbal memory performance were affected by a spatial change unexpectedly presented in a multisensory stream consisting of task-irrelevant vibrations and sounds.The sounds were presented from headphones and the vibrations from coin-like vibrating motors strapped to the upper arms of the participants. In the majority of trials (approximately 80%) the multisensory stream was presented on one side of the body whereas on deviant trials the irrelevant stimuli changed to the other side of the body. Preliminarily results suggest that a spatial change in a multisensory stream of irrelevant stimuli affects short-term memory performance both the spatial and verbal domains similarly. We conclude by discussing the results in the framework of multisensory views of short-term memory and attention (e.g., Cowan's, 1988; 1995) and the predictive coding framework (e.g., Talsma, 2015)

  • 13.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of psychology, Cardiff University, UK.
    Investigating deviance distraction and the impact of the modality of the to-be-ignored stimuli2018In: Experimental psychology (Göttingen), ISSN 1618-3169, E-ISSN 2190-5142, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 61-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that deviance distraction is caused by unexpected sensory events in the to-be-ignored stimuli violating the cognitive system's predictions of incoming stimuli. The majority of research has used methods where the to-be-ignored expected (standards) and the unexpected (deviants) stimuli are presented within the same modality. Less is known about the behavioral impact of deviance distraction when the to-be-ignored stimuli are presented in different modalities (e.g., standard and deviants presented in different modalities). In three experiments using cross-modal oddball tasks with mixed-modality to-be-ignored stimuli, we examined the distractive role of unexpected auditory deviants presented in a continuous stream of expected standard vibrations. The results showed that deviance distraction seems to be dependent upon the to-be-ignored stimuli being presented within the same modality, and that the simplest omission of something expected; in this case, a standard vibration may be enough to capture attention and distract performance.

  • 14.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Effects of Unexpected and Sudden Vibrations and Sounds Does Not Disrupt Performance Similarly Over TimeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the effects of sudden and unexpected vibrations (i.e., deviants) have on visual tasks is scarce. Previous research has shown that vibrating deviants disrupt performance (i.e., deviance distraction) in visual digit categorization tasks in a similar manner as auditory deviants; however, this research has not used methods feasible for examining the temporal aspects of the effects. In our experiment, auditory and tactile stimuli were presented in different parts to examine the temporal aspects of deviance distraction of sounds and vibrations. Deviance distraction was found in both modalities. The effects of auditory deviants remained throughout the auditory part of the experiment whereas the effects of tactile deviants did not. Our results indicate that although deviance distraction may share similar mechanisms, the temporal aspects of deviance distraction might be dissimilar in the two modalities.

  • 15.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ma, Lichen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cross-modality matches of intensity and attention capture dimensions of auditory and vibrotactile stimuli2015In: Fechner Day 2015. The 31st Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics, Québec, Canada, August 17-21, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Deviance Distraction Is Contingent on Stimuli Being Presented Within the Same Modality2014In: Abstracts of the Psychomic Society, The Psychonomic Society , 2014, p. 101-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden and unexpected changes in the auditory and visual channel are known to capture attention. This attention capture has been shown to negatively impact performance in an ongoing task (i.e., deviance distraction). In three experiments we examined if deviant stimuli presented in a different modality than astandard stimuli caused distraction in a visual categorization task, using a multi-sensory oddball task. In two experiments a deviant sound was presented (20 % of trials) against 80 % vibrotactile standard trials. In one the standard was omitted on deviating sound trials, while in the other the standard and deviants were presented simultaneously. In the third experiment the standard vibration was omitted in 20 % of the trials without any presentation of a deviant sound. Results showed distraction by deviating sounds (p < .05), but not when standard vibrations were presented simultaneously (p >.05). Interestingly, the omission of a standard vibration showed distraction (p < .05). In conclusion, deviance distraction might be bound to within rather than between modalities.

  • 17.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Deviant sounds does not capture attention when presented among, and simultaneously as standard vibrations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University.
    Ett internationellt förhållningssätt: hur kan det utvecklas vid Umeå universitet?2015In: Universitetspedagogiska konferensen 2015: Gränslös kunskap, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 63-63Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Neely, Gregory
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
    The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

  • 20.
    Neely, Gregory
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nilsson, Oskar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lind, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Quantifying environmental intolerance with a smartphone app2018In: Fechner Day 2018: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics / [ed] Müller, F., Ludwigs, L, & Kupper, M., Lüneburg, Germany: International Society for Psychophysics , 2018, p. 271-276Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is a condition characterized by low tolerance to environmental stimuli at levels that would not affect most people. EI is an ill-defined condition from which sufferers experience highly individual multisystem symptoms following exposure from specific environmental sources. Most research on EI is conducted using cross sectional approaches, however, longitudinal approaches that capture daily exposure are needed to fully understand how EI develops and change over time. This paper describes an app that was developed that can be used with most smartphones and, in conjunction with a website, can be used to collect symptoms and ratings of discomfort in the field as well as qualitative reports of the incident that triggered the discomfort.

  • 21.
    Neely, Gregory
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wilhelmson, E
    Self-reported incidents, accidents, and use of protective gear among small-scale forestry workers in Sweden2006In: SAFETY SCIENCE, ISSN 0925-7535, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 723-732Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stress and odor sensitivity in persons with noise sensitivity2013In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 15, no 64, p. 173-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has indicated that sensory sensitivity/intolerance to a specific modality may be part of a more general environmental hypersensitivity, and possibly mediated by stress. This study investigated the relationship between noise sensitivity, perceived stress, and odor sensitivity in a group of men. A quasi-experimental design was used. One-hundred and thirty-four male undergraduate students completed Weinsteins noise sensitivity scale from which a low-sensitivity group (n = 16) and a high-sensitivity (n = 16) group were formed. These two groups were screened for loss in auditory and olfactory detection sensitivity, and completed the perceived stress questionnaire (PSQ) and the chemical sensitivity scale (CSS). One-way analysis of variance and Spearman correlational analyses were performed. Significantly higher scores on the PSQ (P < 0.05) and the CSS (P < 0.05) were found in the high noise-sensitivity group compared to the low noise-sensitivity group. These findings raise the question of whether the relation between noise and odor sensitivity reflects a general environmental sensitivity.

  • 23.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sandström, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Odor and noise intolerance in persons with self-reported electromagnetic hypersensitivity2014In: International Journal of Evironmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 8794-8805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of confirmation of symptoms attributed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and triggered by EMF exposure has highlighted the role of individual factors. Prior observations indicate intolerance to other types of environmental exposures among persons with electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). This study assessed differences in odor and noise intolerance between persons with EHS and healthy controls by use of subscales and global measures of the Chemical Sensitivity Scale (CSS) and the Noise Sensitivity Scale (NSS). The EHS group scored significantly higher than the controls on all CSS and NSS scales. Correlation coefficients between CSS and NSS scores ranged from 0.60 to 0.65 across measures. The findings suggest an association between EHS and odor and noise intolerance, encouraging further investigation of individual factors for understanding EMF-related symptoms.

  • 24.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tsiakiris, G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lind, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis: Functional somatic syndromes and psychiatric conditions2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 85, p. 76-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
    Carlbring, Per
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Treating Major Depression with Physical Activity: a Systematic Overview with Recommendations2015In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this systematic overview was to determine the most effective mode and doseof physical activity (PA) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD), and to suggest guidelines and recommendations for clinicians. The selection process consisted of a comprehensive search that was conducted up until April 2014 in the following databases: sycINFO, Medline, PubMed and Scopus. The inclusion criteria were: (1) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, (2) complete description of intensity, duration and frequency of the PA, (3) the participants had to be diagnosed with MDD according to Diagnostic Statistical Manual 4 th edition (DSM-IV) or International Classification of Disease tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria (4) if the controls received any treatment, it had to be specified, (5) published after 1990, (6) consist of aerobic or anaerobic treatment PA, and (7) not be a pilotor preliminary study. A quality assessment of each study was conducted independently by two reviewers; this stringent selection process resulted in 12 reviewed studies. Conclusion: individually customized PA, for at least 30 minutes, preferably performed under supervision and with a frequency of at least three times per week is recommended when treating MDD. hese recommendations must be viewed in light of the relatively few studies matching the inclusion criteria.

  • 26.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sjöström, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Hassmén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Australia.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Martell, Christopher
    Carlbring, Per
    Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments.

    Method/results: Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges gav treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale.

    Limitations: The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed.

    Conclusions: The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes.

  • 27.
    Nyström, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå universitet.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Factors affecting relapse risk: a 24-months follow-up of an Internet administered treatment for depressionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Overlap in prevalence between various types of environmental intolerance2014In: International journal of hygiene and environmental health (Print), ISSN 1438-4639, E-ISSN 1618-131X, Vol. 217, no 4-5, p. 427-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is characterized by attribution of several, multisystem symptoms to specific environmental exposures, such as exposure to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and everyday sounds. The symptoms are medically unexplained, non-specific and the symptoms overlap between different types of EI. To approach the issue of underlying mechanisms the matter of overlap in prevalence between intolerances can provide valuable information. The aim of the study was to examine if the overlap between intolerance to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, EMFs and sounds is larger than the expected overlap if no association would exist between them. The study was using cross-sectional data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden; a large questionnaire-based survey. 8520 adults (18-79 years) were randomly selected after stratification for age and sex, of whom 3406 (40%) participated. Individuals with the four types of intolerance were identified either through self-report, or by having been physician-diagnosed with a specific EI. The overlaps between the four EIs were greater than predictions based on coincidence for both self-reported and diagnosed cases (except for the overlap between diagnosed intolerance to sounds and EMFs). The results raise the question whether different types of EI share similar underlying mechanisms, or at least that the sufferers of EI share some predisposition to acquire the conditions.

  • 29.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Who recovers from environmental intolerance?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Environmental intolerance (EI) is a condition characterized by the attribution of symptoms to, and experience of negative hedonics of certain aspects in the environment (such as odorous/pungent chemicals, everyday sounds, and electromagnetic fields – EMFs). To date few studies have reported the prognosis of EI (i.e. recovery or generalization of a certain EI to an additional EI, thus general EI). Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to assess the chances of recovery from a specific EI as well as the chances of a specific EI to spread into general EI during a six-year period. The study also aimed to investigate whether levels of stress, burnout, anxiety, depression and emotional/behavioral disturbance of environmental sources could predict recovery from a specific EI.

    Methods: Longitudinal data were used (three data-collection waves - T1: 2010, T2: 2013, T3: 2016) from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden. At T1, 539 participants reported a specific EI, constituting the sample. Two different probability calculations were used to estimate the chances of recovering from a specific EI or to develop general EI. The first calculation considered only those individuals who responded to the questionnaire at all three data-collection waves. The second calculation was based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation to calculate the 2-step transition probabilities, including all participants from T1. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test whether burnout (Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale-10) and emotional and behavioral disturbance by environmental sources (Chemical Sensitivity Scale for Sensory Hyperreactivity, Electromagnetic Field Sensitivity Scale-11, and Noise Sensitivity Scale-11) were predictors of recovering from EI or spreading into general EI.

    Results: The probability of recovering from EI was 44.3% according to the probability calculation based on the participants that remained in the study at T3. The probability of specific EI spreading into general EI was 12.8%. Based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation, 34.6% recovered and 10.0% reported general EI. The only significant predictor of recovery found in this study was CSS-SHR, in which one step increase of the scale reduced the odds of recovering by 0.94 times.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that the prognosis for EI is fairly good and that low emotional and behavioral disruption by environmental exposure increases the odds of recovering.

  • 30.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Coping and social support in environmental intoleranceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Environmental intolerance (EI) is a broad term encompassing several conditions characterized by unspecific symptom patterns attributed to certain environmental exposure, such as odorous/pungent chemicals, electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and sounds. Limited documentation of the role of coping strategies and social support in these EIs motivated the present study of (i) combinations of coping strategies and social support in high and low intolerance severity at baseline, and (ii) combinations of coping strategies and social support at baseline that are associated with recovery from EI at follow-up, three years later.

    Methods: The study used cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden, which is a large questionnaire-based survey. Individuals with EI attributed to chemicals, EMFs or sounds were identified through self-report (n=301 at baseline, n=213 at follow-up). The extent of use of four problem- and four emotion-focused strategies were assessed as well as perceived emotional, instrumental and informative support from seven sources.

    Results: The low and high intolerance severity groups differed as a function of relatively high problem-focused coping and instrumental support compared to lower reported levels of informational support, emotion-focused coping and emotional support. The groups not recovering and recovering from EI differed as a function of relatively high instrumental support and problem-focused coping compared to lower reported levels of informational support, emotional support and emotion-focused coping.

    Conclusions: The combination of coping strategies and perceived social support seem to be important in recovering from EI, for which emotion-focused coping, emotional and informational support seem to enhance recovery.

  • 31.
    Palmquist, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Environmental intolerance and mental ill-health: which comes first?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Environmental intolerance (EI) is a broad term encompassing several conditions characterized by unspecific symptom patterns attributed to certain environmental exposure. EI has previously been associated with mental ill-health, but prospective studies (enabling the direction of causality) within the field are sparse. This motivated the present study of testing whether (i) burnout, anxiety, depression and perceived stress are predictors of EI attributed to chemicals, certain buildings or sounds, and (ii) EI attributed to chemicals, certain buildings or sounds are predictors of burnout, anxiety or depression.

    Methods: The study used longitudinal data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden, which is a large questionnaire-based survey. Individuals with EI attributed to chemicals, certain buildings or sounds were identified through self-report. Logistic regression was used to test whether burnout (Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale-10) were predictors of EI, and, vice versa, whether EI attributed to chemicals, certain buildings or sounds were predictors of burnout, anxiety and depression. 

    Results: Burnout, anxiety, depression and perceived stress predicted EI attributed to chemicals and sounds, but not EI attributed to certain buildings (after controlling for age, sex, other EIs and asthma). EI attributed to chemicals, certain buildings or sounds were not predictors of burnout, anxiety or depression, except for EI attributed to certain buildings which was a significant predictor of burnout.

    Conclusion: The results provide important information about the cause-effect relations between EIs and mental ill-health, of value for both treatment and preventive healthcare for EI. 

  • 32.
    Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Liljelind, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Neely, Greg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Workers' interpretation of self-assessment of exposure2008In: The Annals of occupational hygiene, ISSN 1475-3162, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 663-671Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to investigate how workers interpret and act upon results from self-assessment of exposure (SAE). METHODS: Workers in four sawmills in Sweden were supplied with diffusive samplers for measurement of terpenes. Workers received both oral and written instructions about terpenes, their medical effects and how to handle the samplers. Responsibility for sampling was left to the individual worker; written feedback about terpene levels was provided after each measurement. The number of measurements was registered. The workers and supervisors were interviewed about their attitudes, perceived control of their work environment, need for preventive actions and future surveillance of the workplace. RESULTS: In total, 28 workers performed 100 terpene measurements. At one sawmill, there was a significant association between exposure levels and the number of measurements performed by each worker (rho = 0.79, P = 0.03). Contrary to instructions, supervisors played an important role in spontaneous organization of the measurements at each mill. Four measurements revealed terpene concentrations that exceeded the occupational exposure limits, and one preventive action was taken as a consequence of high levels. Seventy percent of the workers could not identify any reason for more measurements. Only 15% considered the measurements as their 'own' project, and the rest stated that they participated in order to satisfy the researchers. CONCLUSIONS: Previous studies have shown that workers can perform valid measurements, both select a day and technically perform measurements. This study indicates that this ability is not sufficient to ensure that measurements will be done or that implementing measurements will result in preventive actions. Workers need additional support to take preventive actions and use SAE for ongoing surveillance.

  • 33.
    Sjödin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Child group constitution and its relation to noise in preschools2015In: INTER-NOISE-2015 / [ed] Courtney Burroughs and George Maling, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years in Sweden the number of complaints regarding hearing related disorders from employees working in the preschool (kindergarten) has increased. It is often assumed that the size of the child group is the crucial factor associated with the high noise levels. However, the association between the noise levels and the size of the child group is not fully understood. Further, it is likely that the gender balance and the age of the children have an effect on the noise levels in the preschools.

     

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between noise in the preschool and the constitution of the child group in terms of number of children, gender balance and the children’s age.

     

    Noise levels were recorded at 34 preschool sites in Sweden using stationary sound level meters with an external microphone mounted in the ceiling in the dining room and the play halls at each site. Sound level measurements were carried out during 2-3 days in each room during the entire workday. Data regarding the constitution of the child group for every day was collected at the end of the week from the enrollment list. 

  • 34.
    Sjödin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Communication patterns and stress in the preschool: an observational study2017In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 181-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study included 12 preschool departments, with two teachers in six departments characterised by high levels of stress and burnout and two teachers in six departments characterised by low levels of stress and burnout. A total of 24 females with a mean age of 43.5 years participated in the study. The teachers rated stress, fatigue, work demands and work burnout using different questionnaires. Cortisol samples were collected at wake up, one hour after wake up, at 11:00 am and at 09:00 pm. An observation study was conducted to create an overview of the communication patterns between the children and the personnel during different time periods. Significant differences between the two groups of teachers were observed regarding the organisation of the work and family situation. The high-stress teachers had more communications from colleagues than low-stress teachers, spent more time on pedagogical planning and had young children at home. These results support the view that the organisation is a central factor regarding stress experienced by preschool teachers.

  • 35.
    Stenlund, Tobias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Burström, Lage
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Seated postural neck and trunk reactions to sideways perturbations with or without a cognitive task2015In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 548-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving on irregular terrain will expose the driver to sideways mechanical shocks or perturbations that may cause musculoskeletal problems. How a cognitive task, imposed on the driver, affects seated postural reactions during perturbations is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate seated postural reactions in the neck and trunk among healthy adults exposed to sideways perturbations with or without a cognitive task. Twenty-three healthy male subjects aged 19-36 years, were seated on a chair mounted on a motion system and randomly exposed to 20 sideways perturbations (at two peak accelerations 5.1 or 13.2 m/s2) in two conditions: counting backwards or not. Kinematics were recorded for upper body segments using inertial measurement units attached to the body and electromyography (EMG) was recorded for four muscles bilaterally in the neck and trunk. Angular displacements (head, neck, trunk and pelvis) in the frontal plane, and EMG amplitude (normalised to maximum voluntary contractions, MVC) were analysed. The cognitive task provoked significantly larger angular displacements of the head, neck and trunk and significantly increased EMG mean amplitudes in the upper neck during deceleration, although 10% of MVC was never exceeded. A cognitive task seems to affect musculoskeletal reactions when exposed to sideways perturbations in a seated position.

  • 36.
    Stenlund, Tobias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Lindroos, Ola
    Institutionen för skogens biomaterial och teknologi (SBT), Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Adaptation of postural reactions in seated positions and influence of head posture when exposed to a single sideway perturbation: relevance for driving on irregular terrain2016In: Journal of Novel Physiotherapy and Physical Rehabilitation, ISSN 2455-5487, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 022-029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background and objectives: Mechanical perturbations in seated positions caused by driving on irregular terrain destabilize the driver which, combined with the drivers’ posture, may cause musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate adaptation and the effect of different head postures on seated postural reactions caused by perturbations. 

    Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy male participants, aged 18-43 years, were tested on a movable platform delivering 15 sideways perturbations (peak acceleration 13.3 m/s2) while the participants held their head in a neutral or a laterally flexed posture. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded bilaterally in upper neck, trapezius, erector spinae and external oblique, while kinematics were recorded with inertial sensors for the head, trunk and pelvis. EMG amplitudes, muscle onset latencies and angular displacements in the frontal plane were analyzed. 

    Results: In the neutral position, the EMG amplitudes and neck angular displacements significantly decreased by 0.2% and more than 1.6° respectively after repeated perturbations. Muscle onset latencies remained unchanged. During lateral flexion of the head, the EMG amplitudes decreased by 0.5% but the muscular onset latencies increased by more than 9 ms. 

    Conclusion: The developed neuromuscular strategy seem to prefer a reduced EMG amplitude. The modest size of the postural reactions during the conditions presented here do not by themselves explain the musculoskeletal disorders found in drivers.

  • 37.
    Stenlund, Tobias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lundström, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Lindroos, Ola
    Häger, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Double-sided Mechanical Shocks Provoke Larger Seated Postural Reactions Compared to Single-Sided Mechanical Shocks2018In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 43, no 8, p. E482-E487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Human volunteers were exposed experimentally to single-sided mechanical shocks (SSMS) and double-sided mechanical shocks (DSMS) while seated.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and contrast seated postural reactions due to SSMS or DSMS in healthy male adults.

    SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Mechanical shocks to the body, caused when driving on irregular terrain, are suggested to be hazardous to the spine and may be associated with the reported musculoskeletal pain of the back and neck among professional drivers. However, very little is known about the characteristics of seated postural reactions and the biomechanical effects caused by mechanical shocks.

    METHODS: Twenty healthy male subjects (18-43 years old) were exposed while seated to 5 SSMS and 15 DSMS in lateral directions. The second acceleration in the DSMS was in the opposite direction to the first acceleration and was either fast, medium or slow depending on the speed of direction change. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded in muscles of the upper neck, trapezius, erector spinae and external oblique while kinematics were recorded with inertial sensors placed at the neck, trunk and pelvis. Muscle activity was normalized to maximum voluntary contractions (MVC).

    RESULTS: The EMG amplitudes were significantly higher (0.6-1%; p < 0.001) for the fast DSMS compared to all other shocks. Range of motion (ROM) of the neck and trunk was greater during the DSMS compared to the SSMS. Evoked muscle activity was less than 2% MVC in the trapezius, less than 10% MVC in the erector spinae and upper neck while the activity exceeded 10% MVC in the external oblique muscles.

    CONCLUSION: Fast DSMS in lateral directions appear more demanding compared to SSMS, demonstrating augmented seated postural reactions. However, the present mechanical shocks employed did not seem to induce postural reactions with regard to ROM or muscle activity of a magnitude likely to cause musculoskeletal overload.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4.

  • 38.
    Söderström, Tor
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lindgren, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    On the relationship between computer simulation training and the development of practical knowing in police education: 2019In: The international journal of information and learning technology, ISSN 2056-4880, E-ISSN 2056-4899, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g. Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966; Argyris and Schön, 1974) as well as empirical examples, this paper discusses the design of and what can be expected from computer simulation training for the development of police students’ professional knowing.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The discussion is based on lessons learned from working with two different computer simulation training situations designed to prepare the students for an upcoming practical training by facilitating the understanding of complex situations as they should be handled in the physical training situation.

    Findings

    The experiences from the training sessions showed that the different characteristics of the simulations mediate how the training session was performed, e.g., unplanned trial and error vs focused and attentive, but also group discussions about how to act and appropriate actions in relation to the situation to be solved in the simulation.

    Originality/value

    Based on the lessons learned from working with the two different computer simulations, it is posited that the use of computer simulations for practical scenario training is a complex endeavor that needs, in various degrees, to be supported by pedagogical steering. The design of computer simulation training (both the simulation and how the training is designed and performed) need to consider the specific aspects that surround tacit knowledge and embodied learning in the “real sense” (anchored to the practical training) to be of relevance for police students development of professional knowing.

  • 39.
    Söderström, Tor
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Lindgren, Carina
    Umeå University.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University.
    Tacit knowing: Implications for the design of computer simulation training in police education2018In: ICICTE 2018 - The!International!Conference!on!Information! Communication!Technologies in!Education!2018: Proceedings / [ed] L. Morris & C. Tsolakidis, ICTE , 2018, p. 235-244Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the practical knowing that is central in police education.Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g.,Argyris & Schön, 1974; Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966) as well asempirical examples, this paper will discuss the design of and what can beexpected from computer simulation training for the development of policestudents' professional knowing. Based on the the lessons learned fromworking with computer simulations in police education we argue thatcomputer simulations can be a useful aid for practical training, but they cannotreplace exercises in scenario training or drill exercises.

  • 40.
    Tsiakiris, Georgios
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lind, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis: functional somatic syndromes2017In: Psychology, Health & Medicine, ISSN 1354-8506, E-ISSN 1465-3966, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1163-1168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the concept of central sensitisation, the present study tested the hypothesis of comorbidity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis with diagnoses of functional somatic syndromes (FSSs), including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and migraine. Data were used from the population-based Västerbotten Environmental Health Study (n = 3406). The participants consisted of 164 individuals with allergic asthma and 298 individuals with allergic rhinitis as well as 2876 individuals without allergic or non-allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. Diagnoses were based on self-reports of having been diagnosed by a physician. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from binary logistic regression analysis, both crude and adjusted for age and education. The adjusted ORs (1.87–4.00) for all FSSs differed significantly from unity for both allergic asthma and rhinitis. The results provide support for the hypothesis of comorbidity in allergic asthma and rhinitis with FSSs. Since central sensitisation is likely to underlie FSSs, the present findings raises the question as to whether central sensitisation may also be involved in allergic asthma and rhinitis.

  • 41. Åteg, M
    et al.
    Andersson, I-M
    Neely, Gregory
    Rosén, G
    Laring, J
    Nygren, Olle
    Arbetslivsinstitutet.
    Arbetsmiljöarbete och motivation: Teoretisk översikt och konstruktion av ett frågeformulär2007Report (Other academic)
  • 42. Åteg, M
    et al.
    Nygren, Olle
    Arbetslivsinstitutet.
    Andersson, I-M
    Laring, J
    Neely, Gregory
    Rosén, G
    Metoder och verktyg för motivation och integration av arbetsmiljöarbete2006Report (Other academic)
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