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  • 1.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Öhrn, Elisabet
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rurality and education relations: metro-centricity and local values in rural communities and rural schools2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 19-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork in six different types of rural area and their schools in different parts of Sweden, this article identifies how rural schools relate to the local place and discusses some of the educational implications from this. Recurrent references to the local community were present in some schools and people there explicitly positioned themselves in the local rural context and valorised rurality positively in education exchanges, content and interactions, with positive effects on young people's experiences of participation and inclusion. These factors tended to occur in sparsely populated areas. An emphasis on nature and its value as materially vital in people's lives was present as was a critique of middle-class metrocentricity. Such values and critique seemed to be absent in other areas, where rurality was instead often represented along the metrocentric lines of a residual space in modernizing societies.

  • 2.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Öhrn, Elisabet
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Education and participation in local context: Rural diversity and gender2016In: ECER 2016, Dublin, 22-26 august, 2016: Leading Education: The Distinct Contributions of Educational Research and Researchers, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often assumed that rural youth experience less severe problems with various kinds of social exclusion than do urban youth. However, recent Nordic research shows that they more often express a lack of involvement in society and a lack of conficence in governments than others (Ungdomsstyrelsen, 2010). This project analyses young people’s social inclusion and participation in rural (and urban) schools. We chose to include both sparsely populated areas, tourist municipalities and small industrial villages. Previous research points to some potentially significant differences between such rural areas. Connell’s (1996; Connell & Messerschmidt, 2005) concepts of masculinities and femininities and Massey’s (1994) understanding of place as continously in process through socio-spatial and material practices have been important. Five weeks of compressed mode ethnographic fieldwork (Jeffrey & Troman, 2004) has been conducted in one class in each of five rural schools. Observations of classroom interactions and teaching content, field conversations and formal student interviews (with about 140 students), have been used supplemented by observations in the neighbourhood and interviews with school staff. Presentations of place, participation, influence, conflicts and views of inclusion and fellowship were attended to. The fieldwork started in 2014 and ends in early 2016. The analyses have been both case-specific and collective. The research group have engaged in continuous joint discussions to identify tentative themes and further questions. The analyses tentatively point to considerable differences between the researched schools’ relations to the surrounding communities. Some explicitly connect to local characteristics, whereas others don't and instead have almost no visible signs of the local neighbourhood. The schools that more explicitly linked to the local neighbourhood were from more sparsely populated areas. The stronger local contextualization and connection in the sparsely populated areas coincides with students in these areas also tending to refer to some of the locally important adult activities when explaining their leisure time preferences. One such example is hunting, which is put forward especially by boys, but also by girls. Hunting, like some of the other activities mentioned, is typically historically connected to men and might appear valuable for boys’ positioning and gendered identity work, but it also appears as generally important for students’ understandings of their positions and relations to the neighbourhood.

  • 3.
    Berggren, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Talvia, S.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Waling, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    The lived experiences of school lunch: an empathy-based study with children in Sweden2019In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    School lunch is in general regulated through policies and agendas constituted by the perspectives of adults. In this article, we focus on children’s lived experiences of school lunch with a special emphasis on emotions and how they relate to social and physical dimensions. This study draws on empathy-based stories written by 10–11 year olds (n = 171) from schools in Sweden. We identified three themes: Interaction and exposure, Routines and restrictions and Food and eating. The children’s lived experiences of school lunch and the emotions attached to them are closely associated and intertwined with the socio-spatial dimension of school lunch. A pleasant meal experience seems to require harmonization between the physical and social space whilst negative experiences contain tensions between them, something that actors working with school lunch and school lunch environments should take in consideration when resourcing, planning and scheduling school lunch, and also when designing new school restaurants.

  • 4.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Isberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Idrottsföreningens isolerade öar2016In: Föreningen, laget och jaget: 7 perspektiv på idrottens demokratiska effekter / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg, Johan Pihlblad, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2016, 1, p. 91-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Gatorna och torgens demokratiska dimension2015In: Västerbottens-kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246, no 30 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Where to go and what to do?: Young people's arguments about career choices in Swedish rural contexts2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Junghyon, Yoon
    et al.
    University of Turku.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Control and agency in comprehensive schools: A cross-cultural perspective of democratic schooling in Finland and Korea2019In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, 2019, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on a cross-cultural qualitative study in Finnish and Korean comprehensive schools, we explore how student agency is controlled or manifested in ordinary school scenes and how students reflect their experiences on control and agency. Focusing on teaching-learning practices, student-teacher interactions in daily routines and students’ movements in physical and virtual spaces, we aim to understand how power relations and control indwelling everyday school practices are connected to the issue of the school life of students as democratic citizens.

    We utilised an analytical differentiation of the ‘official’, ‘informal’ and ‘physical’ schools (Gordon, Holland and Lahelma, 2000) to analyse the inherent complexity in everyday school life. We also employed Bernstein’s (1996) concepts of classification and framing as the theoretical lens with which to examine relationships between students and teachers and the school system as an institution which has boundaries and hierarchies within it.

    The analysis draws on qualitative data produced through fieldwork in two comprehensive schools in southern Finland, and in two primary schools and two middle schools in Seoul, Korea. The data consist of field notes generated through observations and interviews with students and their class teachers. The process of analysis was inspired by a cross-cultural qualitative approach (Lahelma and Gordon, 2010) that combines and relates data from both countries to enhance a theoretical understanding of analogical incidents through the analysis of various cultural contexts and to challenge taken-for-granted familiarity indwelling in the schooling of each national context.

    The findings indicate that student agency was controlled and encouraged by varying pedagogic practices that embedded differing understandings on the roles of teachers and students. Students sought to increase their agency and hoped to find the balance between their agency and control, also revealing paradoxical preferences on the limitation of their agency. However, to sum up, student agency was extensively limited, and strong classification appeared throughout school life. Student agency was restricted the most in teaching-learning practices; teacher control in daily routines appeared differently in relation with the roles of teachers in each sociocultural context; and student agency was limited both in real and virtual space.

    Lastly, our analyses of control, agency and classification of and among school members and systems lead this article to the discussion of democratic schooling from a cross-cultural perspective. Learning from Nordic school ethnographies and cross-cultural research, we expect that our discussions between Finnish and Korean contexts could provide interesting implications to the research field by connecting individualistic/collectivistic culture and educational welfare systems with student agency

  • 8.
    Larsson, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Norlin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Den svenska skolgårdens historia: skolans utemiljö som pedagogiskt och socialt rum2017Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De flesta av oss har minnen kopplade till vår gamla skolgård – raster med avsides ro eller vild lek, gymnastik lektioner med idrott och tävlingar eller undervisning, kanske i naturkunskap eller bild. Idag har skolgården blivit en naturlig del av skolan, men hur har denna plats blivit så självklar? I sin intresseväckande bok redogör författarna Anna Larsson, Björn Norlin och Maria Rönnlund för den svenska skolgårdens historia utifrån historiskt källmaterial och människors minnesberättelser. De beskriver hur skolgården har tagit form och förändrats som koncept, hur den fysiskt har formgetts och utvecklats, och hur den har använts för social samvaro. Boken ger en ny och samlad kunskap om skolans utemiljö som ett pedagogiskt och socialt rum, både i en historisk och nutida kontext.

  • 9.
    Ledman, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    How femininities are performed and valued in three domains of vocational education2018In: ECER 2018, Bolzano, 3–7 September, 2018, Free University Bolzano: Inclusion and Exclusion, Resources for Educational Research?, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gendered identity and norms interplay with other social categories, as ethnicity, age and class. What is valued and recognised as ways of being a girl and women in one social group differs from another. In this study, we focus on how girls in three different tracks of vocational education act/perform gender as a part of their vocational, civic and private identity - in relation to peers and teachers. The research was carried out in Swedish upper secondary education, where the pupils, after comprehensive K-9, chose between twelve Vocational education and training programmes (VETP) alongside six Higher education preparatory programmes (HEPP). On a general level, the pupils applying for the VET programmes have working class background (parents with low educational level, level of income and living standard compared to students applying for HEPP) (Broady and Börjesson 2006). The VET programmes are strongly gendered, some programmes being either boy- or girl-dominated by tradition, peer-pressure and/or other fractors (Fehring and Herring 2013; Lundahl 2011), and gendered-marked vocational programmes have gendered practices (Connell 2006; Smyth and Steinmetz 2015). We argue that exploring gender in VET is of particular importance because of the strong gender divide. This is not only the case in Sweden, but rather a general phenomenon throughout Europe. The division, and ‘keeping apart’, of women and men is an important principle of upholding gendered categories, which is a prerequisite for the logic of men as norm (compare Hirdman 1988). The problem investigated is expected to generate results that can further the understanding of gender and vocational education more generally.

    In her anthropological study of groups in the Children and recreation programme and Social science programme, Ambjörnsson (2004) shows how norms and ideals of femininity is performed differently by VETP girls and HEPP girls. As Ambjörnsson, we are influenced by the works by Skeggs (2004; 2000) on how working class girls and women perform gendered subjectivities that differs from valued feminitities within middle class. We consider gender to be reified through social performances (compare Butler 2006 [1999]) and thus as socially constructed identities. Also, in line with Butler (2006 [1999] we acknowledge that the constant practices of performing gender opens for possibilities to change and challenge norms: subversive performativity. Our ambition is to explore how ‘girls’ - norms and ideals of femininity - are constructed in different contexts, i.e. different VET programmes. This means that we are comparing the performance of gender within the larger group of pupils enrolled in VET, i.e. a group of pupils that on an aggregated level have a working-class background, not, as Ambjörnsson (2004), pupils in VETP with HEPP, which have a larger share of pupils with middle class background. The three VET-programmes selected are gendered in terms of ratio of girls/boys enrolled and reflects a gendered divided labour market: Health and Care (HC) programme (81% girls), Restaurant management (RM) programme (58% girls) and Vehicle and transport (VT) programme (14% girls). The question of how girls act/perform gender as a part of their vocational, civic and private identity - in relation to peers and teachers in different VET contexts - are largely unexplored. The aim of this study is thus to contribute with knowledge of the processes of being and becoming a girl and a young women in the specific context of vocational education and training. RQ: How do the pupils perform feminitity? What ways of performing femininity is recognised, encouraged and valued by others?, and the other way around, what ways of performing femininity is not recognised, but opposed and disqualified?

  • 10.
    Ledman, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Democratic implications of school based activities before and after workplace learning2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Young people's career choices in Swedish rural contexts: Schools' social codes, migration and resources2018In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 60, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful social and economic integration into Swedish society increasingly demands a post-compulsory education, but such education is increasingly centralised, posing problems for rural young people. To help efforts to address such problems, this article considers social codes and resources that may influence rural young peoples' trajectories to post-secondary and higher education. This is done by analysing how codes and resources (social, cultural and material) influenced thoughts of students preparing to leave compulsory education regarding their educational/career choices. The empirical data were gathered using ethnographic approaches (classroom observations, and interviews with students, teachers, heads and study/work counsellors) in six classes in six rural Swedish towns, differing in terms of size, access to post-compulsory education, unemployment and young peoples' trajectories. The theoretical framework is based on Massey's understandings of place and power geometry, i.e. the distinct ways different social groups and individuals are placed in relation to the flows and interconnections of socio-economic and cultural interactions. The results indicate that social resources such as siblings and cousins ‘paving the way’, or relatives in towns offering possible options, may influence choices of upper secondary school. Cultural resources such as institutional recognition, in the form of academic credentials or qualifications, were also important. So too were financial resources, partly because economically privileged students tended to pick the programme of their choice, without reflecting much about where they would live, while less privileged students had to consider potential accommodation problems. In conclusion, differences in resources seem even more important to rural young people than they reportedly are for their urban peers.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-01 01:00
  • 12.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Democratic challenges: students' active participation in everyday school life2014In: Fair and competitive?: critical perspectives on contemporary Nordic schooling / [ed] Anne-Lise Arnesen, Elina Lahelma, Lisbeth Lundahl och Elisabet Öhrn, Tufnell Press, 2014, 1, p. 23-40Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Demokrati och deltagande: Elevinflytande i grundskolans årskurs 7-9 ur ett könsperspektiv.2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to examine the fostering of democracy in the form of pupils’ influence and participation in decision processes.  The main focus is on pupils’ formal influence in lower secondary education, forms 7-9, in particular class councils and pupil councils, although informal influence is also studied. The study is ethnographic and based on observations, informal conversations and formal interviews with pupils and school staff in three Swedish schools during one school year (2007/2008). The analysis draws on theories focusing on democracy and gender (Pateman, 1970; Young, 1990, 1997, 2000a,b, 2005), and institutional aspects of education (Bernstein, 2000).

    The results show that the activity among the participating pupils is low, and that the councils deal with what the pupils mostly judge as unimportant and uninteresting issues. Issues related to teaching are generally seldom dealt with in the councils. A clear majority of the pupils also state that they cannot exert influence to the extent they would like, and that they find the representative systems both coercive and excluding. Still, pupils’ formal influence shows to be important as a means for democracy fostering. In particular positive participation effects are expressed in councils/groups characterised by pupil autonomy and collective community, a result that emphasises the importance of supporting pupil-governed councils and providing collective influence forms. But, the fact that a great deal of the pupils’ criticism against pupils’ influence in practice and the organization of pupils’ influence is connected to representation,  indicates that alternative collective forms to a greater extent than the representative systems can promote interest and active participation among the pupils.

    The results also show that only a minor proportion of the pupils take active part in influence processes, both formally and informally, and that a predominant majority of the participating pupils are girls. In sum, the results lend support to the idea that active participation in some contexts and in some conditions yields certain positive participation effects. But the fact that a large group of pupils, a majority of them boys, do not participate, proves lacking achievement and inequality when it comes to democracy fostering in the form of pupils’ influence. In view of the results more groups of pupils need to be strengthened as regards influence and participation in decision processes. 

  • 14.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Den professionella föreningen: en fallstudie av en idrottsförening med rötter i svensk föreningstradition2018In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 7, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här artikeln problematiseras och diskuteras de professionaliseringsprocesser som många svenska idrottsföreningar genomgår och hur dessa tenderar att påverka det interna föreningsdemokratiska arbetet. Genom intervjuer med föreningsmedlemmar i en nutida “modern” idrottsförening med rötter i svensk föreningstradition belyser jag vad som sker i mötet mellan en folkrörelserotad föreningskultur uppbyggd kring demokratiska beslutsprocesser, och den marknadskultur som alltmer präglar idrotten. Studien ger exempel på frågor, diskussioner och föreningsdemokratiska processer som professionaliseringen ger upphov till och hur de hanteras av styrelseledamöter, verksamhetsledare, föräldrar och aktiva. Här diskuteras också hur yttre och inre professionalisering kan påverka relationen mellan den enskilde föreningsmedlemmen och föreningen, samt eventuellt försvaga förväntade deltagareffekter.

  • 15.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    "Det handlar om att kunna lämna ifrån sig ansvar": elevers inflytande och demokratiska fostran2007In: Rum för forskning - rymd för lärande: forskning och pedagogisk praktik / [ed] Gun-Marie Frånberg, Umeå: Fakulteten för lärarutbildning, Umeå universitet , 2007, p. 111-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Elevinflytande i en skola i förändring2013In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 65-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Students’ influence’ is in curricula and policy documents presented as a legal right for students but also a means to foster students for future democratic citizenship in individual/collective and informal/formal influence processes in school. In this article, students’ influence in everyday practice is analyzed and discussed in relation to the various elements that constitute the concept, and to the structural changes that the Swedish school has undergone the last decades.  Drawing on results from an ethnographic study carried out in three Swedish lower secondary schools during one school year, the analysis shows that students and school staff to some extent represent different views on and different approaches to students’ influence, a condition that gives rise to tensions in everyday life and discontent among the students. Yet, the results suggest that active student participation in influence processes in certain forms and contexts, have fostering effects and provide students with participatory skills.

  • 17.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Umeå University.
    'I Love this Place, but I Won’t Stay': Identification with Place and Imagined Spatial Futures Among Youth Living in Rural Areas in Sweden2019In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to a body of literature that addresses relationships betweenspace, place and identity, and their effects on young people’s ‘spatial horizons’.Drawing on ethnographic data from Sweden, it analyses youths’ identification withhome place and how it relates to their imagined spatial futures in terms of staying‘local’ or migrating. The findings indicate that locality strongly influenced the identity-processing of youths, but there was no straightforward relationship betweenidentification with home place and willingness to stay in that place. Rather thehome place’s perceived and narrated relation to other places, as well as its materialconditions, social relationships and practices, contributed to the youths’ articulatedviews of their spatial futures.

  • 18.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Justice in and through education?: students’ participation in decision‐making2014In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 104-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on one year of ethnographic work in three Swedish lower secondary schools, this article problematizes students’ participation in decision-making in everyday school life in the perspective of social justice. In order to extend the traditional liberal understanding of justice and include also relational, procedurial, social and cultural aspects of justice, the analysis focuses on the range, depth and breadth of the participation. The analysis highlights how students’ participation in decision-making was curtailed and restricted in ways that referred to both the range and the depth of the participation. There were also deficiencies as regards the breadth.  The analysis indicates inconveniences as regards students’ participation in decision-making in the perspective of social justice. At the same time it raises questions about social justice in educational contexts – to what extent is it possible to reach a social just school and classroom culture? Based on this analysis, it is argued that school actors need to be more explicit about the institutional frameworks and boundaries that regulate and frame students’ participation in decision-making in school. Such an approach might facilitate for students and staff to negotiate within these frameworks to a greater extent than was the case in these three schools. It is also argued that more students need to be involved in decision-making.

  • 19.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Place and identity: Young people in the rural North talk about the present, the future and ‘the self'2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rural youth. Education, place and participation.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Schoolyard stories: processes of gender identity in a 'children's place'2015In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 85-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from a Swedish primary school, this article explores how the schoolyard and places within the schoolyard are discursively used in processing gender identity. The analysis of children’s narratives in relation to four identified key places indicated diverse and parallel ways of processing gender identity, and that spatial characteristics formed different conditions for processing gender identity. The analysis stresses the importance of understanding gender identity as spatial and diverse and children as active agents in processing this identity. Following the analysis outlined in the article, it is argued that a spatially diverse and multi-characteristic schoolyard is likely to meet various and parallel ways of processing gender identity to a greater extent than a schoolyard with low spatial variety. In general, representations of an ‘active’, ‘playing with everybody’, ‘rule-abiding’, and ‘gendered’ school child were not challenged to any great extent. This result indicates the power of institutional and societal forming and framing in contemporary outdoor school environments.

  • 22.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Skolgården som socialt rum2015In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, E-ISSN 1891-5949, Vol. 35, no 3-4, p. 200-216Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on interview data with primary school students, this article explores how the schoolyard is produced as social space. Drawing on French philosopher and sociologist Henri Lefebvre, the schoolyard is analyzed as perceived, conceived and lived space. The analysis shows how spatial dimensions interact and form a spatial practice which produces and reproduces the schoolyard as social space. There are tensions between the three dimensions. However, the overall pattern is that the three dimensions harmonize, and that social relations related to the lived dimension largely effect perceived and conceived space. In the discussion, some theoretical and methodological issues are highlighted.

  • 23.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Student participation in activities with influential outcomes: Issues of gender, individuality and collective thinking in Swedish secondary schools.2010In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 208-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on a study in three Swedish lower secondary schools, this article examines how students engaged in the democratic processes involved in the formation of an action group intended to influence their school by making it more environmentally friendly. The aim is to acquire greater understanding of influential processes in relation to gender and both individualistically and collectively oriented ideas, including understanding of which students participate in such groups, the role gender plays in the likelihood of a student participating, how they act, and their experiences of participation. From observations of, and interviews with, four participants girls were found both to be more active participants and to have more positive experiences than boys. It is concluded that the group represents an arena for both individual and collective performance in which both individual and collective ideas are reflected. However, differences in the expectations of boys and girls concerning where and how they feel they should act and perform in school, seems to make the arena more suitable and more effective for girls than boys.  While the girls’ participation provided them with political confidence, the two participating boys did not gain this from the experience.

  • 24.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The ideal schoolyard child: subjectivity in teachers representations of educational outdoor space2016In: Nera 2016: 9-11 March, Helsinki, Finland, Nera 44th congress : Social justice, equality and solidarity in education, The Nordic Educational Research Association (NERA) , 2016, p. 318-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The ideal schoolyard child: subjectivity in teachers' representations of educational outdoor space2017In: Troubling educational cultures in the Nordic countries / [ed] Touko Vaahtera, Anna-Maija Niemi, Sirpa Lappalainen, Dennis Beach, London: Tufnell Press, 2017, p. 34-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Umeå University.
    Bergström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Tieva, Åse
    Umeå University.
    Space for active learning: Envisioned and practiced school design.2019In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study of trends and transitions in the context of Nordic school design. The aim is to explore how local stakeholders in Sweden (principals, school leaders and architects) involved in school building projects envision a ‘good’ learning environment and what perceptions of teaching and learning that underlie their visions. By including various groups of stakeholders, we also aim at exploring how their views relate to each other. Drawn on the results, we discuss their ideas in relation to wider discourses on teaching and learning in late modern society with focus on local – global transitions.

    The study draws on a relational understanding of space (Massey 2005; McGregor 2004), and the idea that physical, social and pedagogical dimensions of learning space are generated together and continuously in process. Furthermore, we understand learning spaces as areas where power relations, control and agency are performed. In line with this understanding the analysis draws on Bernstein’s concepts ‘classification’ and ‘framing’ (Bernstein 2000).

    We conducted semi-structured interviews with stakeholders at different levels (municipality level, school level) involved in projects concerning construction and reconstruction of school buildings. At the level of municipalities, interviews where held with 8 officials/school leaders and 3 architects. At the school level, interviews where held with 9 principals (n 20). Interview data was analysed inspired by Critical Discourse Analysis as advocated by Wodac and Fairclough (1997).

    We identified two main discourses about how learning space shall be constituted, that differed in terms of classification. One which celebrated clear boundaries and separations between different places/localities, i.e. strong classification in physical space, and one which celebrated more blurred boundaries and separations in physical space, i.e. weak classification between localities. Furthermore, the framing came in different forms in the two discourses - more strong framing of student-teacher relations and communication in the first discourse and more weak framing in the second discourse. Thus, strongly classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) strong framing of communication and behaviour (clear and explicit rules and principles for classroom practices), and weak classified physical space seemed to entail (or operate with) more weak framing of practices (the rules and principles for learning being merely implicit). No matter of what discourse or profession they represented, the stakeholders advocated a pedagogical approach directed towards ‘active’ learning and saw the student as an ‘active learner‘.

  • 27.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Hjelm, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Isberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Idrott och demokrati: Berggården IK 1974-20042015In: Idrott, historia & samhälle, ISSN 0280-2775, p. 89-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse a Swedish sport club’s journey from being a small local club run by a handful of locals, to become a ‘big club’ with several employees and various resources. By following the club’s organizational work over time, from its formation in 1974 to the year 2004, the purpose of this study is to gain knowledge about democratic processes of more general significance; how the growth in activities, membership and economic responsibilities affected the democratic structures and the internal work. Based on a democratic theoretical framework we scrutinize the decision-making processes of some core issues during the club’s history with focus on the breath and the depth of the processes. The empirical material consists of minutes of meetings, reports/documents, and interviews with club leaders. The analysis points out fluctuations in both the breadth and the depth. As the club extended its activities, the organizational democratic structures were strengthened, which facilitated the breadth and depth aspects. But the growth also meant more complex issues where expert knowledge was needed, a fact that came to aggravate the democratic breadth and depth.

  • 28.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Larsson, Anna
    The Conceived Schoolyard: A Comparison between Sweden and France2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Ledman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nylund, Mattias
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Life skills for 'real life': How critical thinking is contextualised across vocational programmes2019In: Educational research (Windsor. Print), ISSN 0013-1881, E-ISSN 1469-5847, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 302-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This article presents an analysis of how critical thinking is contextualised in everyday teaching in three vocational education and training (VET) programmes: Vehicle and transport, Restaurant and management, and Health and social care.

    Purpose: The main question addressed is: What knowledge discourses permeate different VET-contexts, and hence what kinds of opportunities for critical thinking do they offer students?

    Method: The qualitative analysis draws on data from a four-year ethnographic project exploring learning processes that can be characterised as civic education in Swedish vocational education. The analysis presented here used data collected during 85 days of observations of teaching in six VET classes, interviews with 81 students and 10 teachers, and collected teaching material. To explore why some contextualisations provided more opportunities and encouragement for critical thinking than others, we applied Bernsteinian concepts of 'horizontal and vertical knowledge discourses' and 'discursive gaps'.

    Findings and conclusions: Overall, teaching that was observed focused primarily on 'doing'. However, in all three programmes, the analysis identified that there were also situations that touched upon critical thinking. Three major themes were identified: critical thinking related to 'Personal experiences', 'The other(s)' and 'Wider perspectives'. It appeared that the frequency and nature of such situations varied with the knowledge discourses permeating the programme. Furthermore, we discuss the manifestations of critical thinking in relation to the wider context of what Bernstein refers to as pedagogic rights; individual enhancement, social inclusion and development of the competence and confidence to participate in political processes.

  • 30.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science. Umeå University.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The organisation around workplace learning in VET and its implications for teaching and learning critical thinking2019In: NERA 2019, 6-8 March, Uppsala, Sweden: Education in a globalized world, Umeå, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Child and Youth education, Special Education and Counselling.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Johansson, Monica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Vocational or academic track?: Study and career plans among Swedish students living in rural areas2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 360-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study explores how rural lower secondary school students reflect on study and career choices, focusing on the choice between vocational and academic upper secondary programs. Applying a spatial perspective, we analyze individual students’ reflections about study and career choices within a variety of rural regions, and compare patterns in the regions. The results indicate complex interactions between structural factors and individual dispositions. In places where education levels were low and the local labor market predominantly offered unskilled manual and service work, there was a stronger tendency to choose vocational programs than in places with higher education levels and access to a more varied labor market. Likewise, there was an association between strongly gendered labor markets and gender-typical choices. However, individual students positioned themselves actively in relation to the local place, its local labor market and social relations; their choices were place-bound to varying degrees, and chose upper secondary programs and presented ideas about prospective careers that were harmonious with the local labor market in some cases, but discordant in other cases. The results are discussed in the framework of individuals' horizon for actions. 

  • 32.
    Rönnlund, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Tollefsen, Aina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Rum: samhällsvetenskapliga perspektiv2016Book (Other academic)
1 - 32 of 32
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