umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alqahtani, F. Y.
    et al.
    Aleanizy, F. S.
    Mohamed, R. Ali El Hadi
    Alanazi, M. S.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. College of Medicine, Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh 12484, Saudi Arabia.
    Alrasheed, M. M.
    Abanmy, N.
    Alhawassi, T.
    Prevalence of comorbidities in cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus: a retrospective study2019In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 147, article id UNSP e35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a life-threatening respiratory disease with a high case fatality rate; however, its risk factors remain unclear. We aimed to explore the influence of demographic factors, clinical manifestations and underlying comorbidities on mortality in MERS-CoV patients. Retrospective chart reviews were performed to identify all laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS-COV infection in Saudi Arabia that were reported to the Ministry of Health of Saudi Arabia between 23 April 2014 and 7 June 2016. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess the effect of sex, age, clinical presentation and comorbidities on mortality from MERS-CoV. A total of 281 confirmed MERS-CoV cases were identified: 167 (59.4%) patients were male and 55 (20%) died. Mortality predominantly occurred among Saudi nationals and older patients and was significantly associated with respiratory failure and shortness of breath. Of the 281 confirmed cases, 160 (56.9%) involved comorbidities, wherein diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease and chronic kidney disease were significantly associated with mortality from MERS-CoV and two or three comorbidities significantly affected the fatality rates from MERS-CoV. The findings of this study show that old age and the existence of underlying comorbidities significantly increase mortality from MERS-CoV.

  • 2.
    Baudin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Jumaa, Ammar M.
    Jomma, Huda J. E.
    Karsany, Mubarak S.
    Bucht, Göran
    Näslund, Jonas
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Association of Rift Valley fever virus infection with miscarriage in Sudanese women: a cross-sectional study2016In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 4, no 11, p. e864-e871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rift Valley fever virus is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that causes infections in animals and human beings in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever lead to mass abortions in livestock, but such abortions have not been identified in human bezings. Our aim was to investigate the cause of miscarriages in febrile pregnant women in an area endemic for Rift Valley fever.

    METHODS: Pregnant women with fever of unknown origin who attended the governmental hospital of Port Sudan, Sudan, between June 30, 2011, and Nov 17, 2012, were sampled at admission and included in this cross-sectional study. Medical records were retrieved and haematological tests were done on patient samples. Presence of viral RNA as well as antibodies against a variety of viruses were analysed. Any association of viral infections, symptoms, and laboratory parameters to pregnancy outcome was investigated using Pearson's χ(2) test.

    FINDINGS: Of 130 pregnant women with febrile disease, 28 were infected with Rift Valley fever virus and 31 with chikungunya virus, with typical clinical and laboratory findings for the infection in question. 15 (54%) of 28 women with an acute Rift Valley fever virus infection had miscarriages compared with 12 (12%) of 102 women negative for Rift Valley fever virus (p<0·0001). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, haemorrhagic disease, and chikungunya virus infection, an acute Rift Valley fever virus infection was an independent predictor of having a miscarriage (odds ratio 7·4, 95% CI 2·7-20·1; p<0·0001).

    INTERPRETATION: This study is the first to show an association between infection with Rift Valley fever virus and miscarriage in pregnant women. Further studies are warranted to investigate the possible mechanisms. Our findings have implications for implementation of preventive measures, and evidence-based information to the public in endemic countries should be strongly recommended during Rift Valley fever outbreaks.

    FUNDING: Schlumberger Faculty for the Future, CRDF Global (31141), the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, the County Council of Västerbotten, and the Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University.

  • 3. Hoffman, Tove
    et al.
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Barboutis, Christos
    Erciyas-Yavuz, Kiraz
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Fransson, Thord
    Figuerola, Jordi
    Jaenson, Thomas G. T.
    Kiat, Yosef
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Lundkvist, Åke
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Moutailler, Sara
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Olsen, Björn
    Salaneck, Erik
    Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Virus RNA in Hyalomma rufipes Ticks Infesting Migratory Birds, Europe and Asia Minor2018In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 879-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus RNA was detected in immature Hyalomma rufipes ticks infesting northward migratory birds caught in the North Mediterranean Basin. This finding suggests a role for birds in the ecology of the Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus and a potential mechanism for dissemination to novel regions. Increased surveillance is warranted.

  • 4. Lindgren, Therese
    et al.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Björkström, Niklas K
    Longitudinal analysis of the human T cell response during acute hantavirus infection2011In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 85, no 19, p. 10252-10260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal studies of T cell immune responses during viral infections in humans are essential for our understanding of how effector T cell responses develop, clear infection, and provide long-lasting immunity. Here, following an outbreak of a Puumala hantavirus infection in the human population, we longitudinally analyzed the primary CD8 T cell response in infected individuals from the first onset of clinical symptoms until viral clearance. A vigorous CD8 T cell response was observed early following the onset of clinical symptoms, determined by the presence of high numbers of Ki67(+)CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) effector CD8 T cells. This response encompassed up to 50% of total blood CD8 T cells, and it subsequently contracted in parallel with a decrease in viral load. Expression levels of perforin and granzyme B were high throughout the initial T cell response and likewise normalized following viral clearance. When monitoring regulatory components, no induction of regulatory CD4 or CD8 T cells was observed in the patients during the infection. However, CD8 as well as CD4 T cells exhibited a distinct expression profile of inhibitory PD-1 and CTLA-4 molecules. The present results provide insight into the development of the T cell response in humans, from the very onset of clinical symptoms following a viral infection to resolution of the disease.

  • 5.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Johansson, Patrik
    Klingström, Jonas
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Bucht, Göran
    Development and evaluation of a broad reacting SYBR-green based quantitative real-time PCR for the detection of different hantaviruses2013In: Journal of Clinical Virology, ISSN 1386-6532, E-ISSN 1873-5967, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 280-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hantaviruses are endemic in most parts of the world and cause hundreds of thousand human cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) annually throughout Eurasia and the Americas. They are zoonotic viruses, most commonly transmitted to humans by aerosolized rodent excreta. New hantaviruses are frequently discovered in previously unknown reservoir species and geographic areas. Consequently, there is a need to improve hantavirus diagnostics. OBJECTIVES: This paper describes the design and evaluation of a rapid and robust quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) assay able to detect a wide range of hantaviruses. STUDY DESIGN: Primers with the potential to detect different hantaviruses were designed from conserved regions of different hantavirus L segments, as identified from multiple sequence alignments. RESULTS: By using SYBR-green-based QRT-PCR 100-1000 target molecules of in vitro produced RNA and less than 100 copies of hantavirus RNA from different hantavirus clades and regions of the world were detected. When using the assay on clinical samples from patients with acute HFRS, Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) RNA was confirmed in all previously positive samples. Notably, the broad reacting L-segment QRT-PCR also detected viral RNA in HFRS patient samples, previously negative by a QRT-PCR targeting the S segment of PUUV. CONCLUSIONS: This novel assay provides a powerful tool for diagnosis of hantaviruses from different clades and regions and may also be useful in surveys with the purpose of finding new hantaviruses in rodent or insectivore species.

  • 6.
    Rasmuson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mohamed, Nahla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lejon, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Cytotoxic immune responses in the lungs correlate to disease severity in patients with hantavirus infection2016In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 713-721Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hantavirus infections may cause severe and sometime life-threatening lung failure. The pathogenesis is not fully known and there is an urgent need for effective treatment. We aimed to investigate the association between pulmonary viral load and immune responses, and their relation to disease severity. Bronchoscopy with sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was performed in 17 patients with acute Puumala hantavirus infection and 16 healthy volunteers acting as controls. Lymphocyte subsets, granzyme concentrations, and viral load were determined by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Analyses of BAL fluid revealed significantly higher numbers of activated CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, as well as higher concentrations of the cytotoxins granzymes A and B in hantavirus-infected patients, compared to controls. In patients, Puumala hantavirus RNA was detected in 88 % of BAL cell samples and correlated inversely to the T cell response. The magnitude of the pulmonary cytotoxic lymphocyte response correlated to the severity of disease and systemic organ dysfunction, in terms of need for supplemental oxygen treatment, hypotension, and laboratory data indicating renal failure, cardiac dysfunction, vascular leakage, and cell damage. Regulatory T cell numbers were significantly lower in patients compared to controls, and may reflect inadequate immune regulation during hantavirus infection. Hantavirus infection elicits a pronounced cytotoxic lymphocyte response in the lungs. The magnitude of the immune response was associated with disease severity. These results give insights into the pathogenesis and possibilities for new treatments.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf