umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brook, Barry
    et al.
    Faculty of Science, Engineering & Technology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
    Edney, Kingsley
    School of Politics & International Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Hillerbrand, Rafaela
    Ethics & Philosophy of Technology, TU Delft, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Symons, Jonathan
    Department of Modern History, Politics & International Relations, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Energy research within the UNFCCC: a proposal to guard against ongoing climate-deadlock2016In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 803-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that an international ‘Low-Emissions Technology Commitment’ should be incorporated into the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiation process in order to promote innovation that will enable deepdecarbonization. The goal is to accelerate research, development, and demonstration of safe, scalable, and affordable lowemissions energy technologies. Such a commitment should be based on three elements. First, it should operate within existing UNFCCC negotiations so as to encourage developed states to offer directed funding for energy research as part of their national contributions. Second, pledges should be binding, verifiable, and coordinated within an international energy-research plan.Third, expert scientific networks and participating governments should collaborate to design a coordinated global research and technology-demonstration strategy and oversee national research efforts. To this end an Intergovernmental Panel on Low-Emissions Technology Research might be established. This proposal offers some insurance against the risk that the political impasse in international negotiations cannot be overcome. The higher costs associated with low-emissions alternatives to fossil fuels currently creates significant economic and political resistance to their widespread adoption. To breach this impasse, amechanism supporting accelerated energy research is needed that seeks to reduce future abatement costs, share experienceand ‘learning-by-doing’ in first-of-a-kind demonstrations, and thus facilitate future widespread deployments. These actions will also assist in addressing inequalities in energy access.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Après Paris: Breakthrough innovation as the primary moral obligation of rich countries2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 63, p. 170-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the notion of differentiated responsibility has always included an element of technological transfer, the growing disparity between the deployment of non-scalable renewable energy sources in the rich countries and the massive expansion of fossil infrastructure elsewhere has brought new urgency to issues of climate leadership. Breakthrough innovation into technologies capable of providing an abundance of clean energy now appears necessary not only to broaden energy access but also to ensure that fossil fuels are quickly displaced globally (including in those countries that have failed to take climate change seriously). Moreover, it is reasonable to expect that a climatechanged world in itself will demand abundant energy to facilitate everything from carbon dioxide removal to mass desalination for agriculture and other adaptation measures. Considering the moral and political impossibility of treating sustained poverty as the “solution” to the climate crisis, this paper suggests that rich countries have a moral obligation to invest in breakthrough innovation into technologies that are compatible with a future global economic convergence around OECD-levels.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Book review – Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of Our Planetary Future2018In: Global Policy, ISSN 1758-5880, E-ISSN 1758-5899Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Doubling down on progress: A Response to Enlightenment Environmentalism2018In: Breakthrough Journal, no 9, p. 103-105Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Expanding Opportunity in the Anthropocene2017In: Ethics, Policy & Environment, ISSN 2155-0085, E-ISSN 2155-0093, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 240-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecomodernists have argued that rather than imposing an “ethic of sustainability”, publicly funded breakthrough innovation can make possible both liberal freedom and expanding opportunity in the Anthropocene. Yet, just like the perfectionist social vision formulated by Randall Curren and Ellen Metzger, an ecomodern future would require far-reaching political commitment and coordination to an extent that may be at odds with real world political experiences. This commentary suggests that important insights into sustainability debates can be obtained by taking a longer look at human history.

  • 6.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Gallery Walk Seminar: Visualizing the Future of Political Ideologies2020In: Journal of Political Science Education, ISSN 1551-2169, E-ISSN 1551-2177, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows how a gallery walk exercise can be used to encourage broad participation and higher-level thinking among undergraduate students of political science. Asked to visualize the future of different political ideologies, the students work together in groups to create posters that they then present for each other during a vernissage-like event that includes a Q&A session. This seminar format enables an iterative, adaptive, and reflective approach to learning that stimulates higher-level skills such as synthesis and evaluation. As such, the gallery walk exercise can be seen as a useful complement to more traditional didactic learning activities aimed at the lower levels of Bloom’s taxonomy (e.g., knowledge and comprehension). Based on written course evaluations, the students seem to appreciate not only the novelty of the gallery walk seminar format but also how it prompted them to see the different ideologies in a new light and that it significantly deepened their understanding of the subject matter.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nature (TM) Inc.: Environmental Conservation in the Neoliberal Age2015In: Environmental Values, ISSN 0963-2719, E-ISSN 1752-7015, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 559-560Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The environmental risks of incomplete globalization2017In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 550-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the liberal optimism of the long 1990s has faded into a world of growing inequality and resurging nationalism, there is less certainty about the prospects of economic convergence and global integration. Beyond the formidable human cost of maintaining a divided world, the possibility of incomplete globalisation also gives rise to a number of environmental risks. While environmental political theory generally sees strength in localism, history rather shows that a robust world trade system is crucial to offset local resource scarcities and that cosmopolitan norms of solidarity are essential for helping communities to rebuild after environmental catastrophe. In relation to climate change, statist thinking has led to a focus on non-scalable technologies and a silent acceptance of chronic poverty abroad as a way of avoiding a climate emergency. Contrary to such views, this paper argues that accelerating the transition to a fully integrated high-energy planet may more effectively mitigate Anthropocene risks.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The high-energy planet2018In: Global Change, Peace & Security, ISSN 1478-1158, E-ISSN 1478-1166, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key part of the ecomodern discourse of a 'Good Anthropocene' is the vision of a 'high-energy planet' characterized by universal access to modern energy. Recognizing the crucial historical role that rising energy consumption has played in driving social transformations, ecomodernists imagine a future with substantial global equality of opportunity powered by clean and abundant energy. Whereas traditional environmental thinking has advocated land-intensive distributed forms of renewable energy, ecomodernists have argued that such technologies are fundamentally incompatible with a world in which 7-10 billion people can live modern lives. Instead, ecomodernists believe that only breakthrough innovation can overcome the current political and cultural polarization surrounding climate change and provide a unifying pathway towards climate stability. Yet, resurging populism and nationalism, but also the statist frame of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change process, make such a future unlikely as rich countries remain focused on meeting their own domestic emissions targets rather than decarbonizing the global economy as a whole. As a consequence, overall political polarization is bound to increase as radical environmental voices will call for ever harsher demand-side reductions while technocratic elites may come to see solar radiation management as the only feasible way of preventing an irreversible destabilization of the climate system.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Three metaphors for sustainability in the Anthropocene2016In: The Anthropocene Review, ISSN 2053-0196, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents three different metaphors for sustainability in the Anthropocene. The first metaphor is the widely used notion of an ‘ecological footprint’, which offers a snapshot of what sustainability would require today using existing technologies. The second metaphor is one of a rocket taking off. Unlike the static footprint metaphor, this metaphor allows for the possibility that achieving a long-term sustainable trajectory might require entering a temporary state of even higher levels of unsustainability. Finally a third metaphor is presented, in which human civilisation is likened to an airplane and modernity to a runway. This metaphor suggests that sustainability can be achieved either by (1) a take-off into a post-scarcity space-faring civilisation or (2) a deceleration into a small-scale economy based on norms of frugality and simplicity. The third metaphor highlights the risk that insufficient political commitment to either trajectory might lead to (3) a catastrophic ecological overshoot.

  • 11.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kim, Hee-Yoon
    Hankuk University of Foreign Studies.
    Korea and Climate Change: Unpacking the Domestic Media Discourse2015In: Asian Politics & Policy, ISSN 1943-0779, E-ISSN 1943-0787, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 332-336Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Symons, Jonathan
    Macquarie Univ, Polit & Int Relat, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia.
    Making Climate Leadership Meaningful: Energy Research as a Key to Global Decarbonisation2015In: Global Policy, ISSN 1758-5880, E-ISSN 1758-5899, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article revisits a number of familiar debates about climate change mitigation yet draws some unorthodox conclusions.First, that progress towards a renewable small-scale energy future in environmentally conscious countries such asGermany and Sweden may take the world as a whole further away from climate stability by reducing the political pressureto finance breakthrough innovation. Second, that without such game-changing innovations, developing countrieswill continue to deploy whatever technologies are domestically available, scalable and affordable, including thermalcoal power in most instances. Third and finally, that as any realistic hope of achieving climate stability hinges on theinnovation of breakthrough technologies, the urgency of climate change calls not so much for the domestic deploymentof existing energy technologies but rather a concentrated effort to develop technologies that will be adoptedglobally. These arguments imply that national innovation policy, and an international treaty establishing a ‘Low-EmissionsTechnology Commitment’ should be the central focus of climate policy.

  • 13. Symons, Jonathan
    et al.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ecomodernist citizenship: rethinking political obligations in a climate-changed world2018In: Citizenship Studies, ISSN 1362-1025, E-ISSN 1469-3593, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 685-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green accounts of environmental citizenship typically seek to promote environmental sustainability and justice. However, some green theorists have argued that liberal freedoms are incompatible with preserving a planetary environment capable of meeting basic human needs and must be wound back. More recently, ‘ecomodernists’ have proposed that liberalism might be reconciled with environmental challenges through state-directed innovation focused on the provision of global public goods. Yet, they have not articulated an account of ecomodernist citizenship. This article seeks to advance the normative theory of ecomodernism by specifying an account of ecomodernist citizenship and subjecting the theory’s core claims to sympathetic critique. We argue that state-directed innovation has the potential to reconcile ambitious mitigation with liberal freedoms. However, full implementation of ecomodernist ideals would require widespread embrace of ecophilic values, high-trust societies and acceptance of thick political obligations within both national and global communities. Ecomodernism’s wider commitments to cosmopolitan egalitarianism and separation from nature thus amount to a non-liberal comprehensive public conception of the good. Furthermore, ecomodernism currently lacks an adequate account of how a society that successfully ‘separates’ from nature can nurture green values, or how vulnerable people’s substantive freedoms will be protected during an era of worsening climate harms.

  • 14.
    Symons, Jonathan
    et al.
    Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Green political theory in a climate-changed world: between innovation and restraint2015In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 173-192, article id 230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implications for Green political theory of the international community’s failure to avert dangerous warming are evaluated. An emerging conflict is identified between the Green-romantic value of restraint and the Green-rationalistvalue of protection, between a desire to preserve biotic systemsand a distrust of scientific solutions to problems that are intrinsically social. In response, approaches are outlined that can help to navigate the current period of overshoot beyond safe planetary boundaries by informing choices among bundles of environmental harms. An ethic of restraint, encompassing non-domination and post-materialist values, can validly be justified without reference to ecological catastrophe. Meanwhile, in respect of preservationfrom climate-linked harms, the need for cooperation in support of scalable abatement measures suggests the necessity of accelerated research into ‘breakthrough’, low-emissions energy technologies. However, since technophilic preservationism is incompatible with existing environmental ‘logics ofpractice’, this strategy must mobilise political support outside the traditional environmental movement.

1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf