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  • 1. Anderson, Ian
    et al.
    Robson, Bridget
    Connolly, Michele
    Al-Yaman, Fadwa
    Bjertness, Espen
    King, Alexandra
    Tynan, Michael
    Madden, Richard
    Bang, Abhay
    Coimbra, Carlos E. A., Jr.
    Pesantes, Maria Amalia
    Amigo, Hugo
    Andronov, Sergei
    Armien, Blas
    Obando, Daniel Ayala
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Bhatti, Zaid Shakoor
    Bhutta, Zulfi Qar Ahmed
    Bjerregaard, Peter
    Bjertness, Marius B.
    Briceno-Leon, Roberto
    Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild
    Bustos, Patricia
    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi
    Chu, Jiayou
    Deji, .
    Gouda, Jitendra
    Harikumar, Rachakulla
    Htay, Thein Thein
    Htet, Aung Soe
    Izugbara, Chimaraoke
    Kamaka, Martina
    King, Malcolm
    Kodavanti, Mallikharjuna Rao
    Lara, Macarena
    Laxmaiah, Avula
    Lema, Claudia
    Taborda, Ana Maria Leon
    Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan
    Lobanov, Andrey
    Melhus, Marita
    Meshram, Indrapal
    Miranda, J. Jaime
    Mu, Thet Thet
    Nagalla, Balkrishna
    Nimmathota, Arlappa
    Popov, Andrey Ivanovich
    Poveda, Ana Maria Penuela
    Ram, Faujdar
    Reich, Hannah
    Santos, Ricardo V.
    Sein, Aye Aye
    Shekhar, Chander
    Sherpa, Lhamo Y.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tanywe, Asahngwa
    Ugwu, Chidi
    Ugwu, Fabian
    Vapattanawong, Patama
    Wan, Xia
    Welch, James R.
    Yang, Gonghuan
    Yang, Zhaoqing
    Yap, Leslie
    Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration): a population study2016In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 388, no 10040, p. 131-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries.

    Methods: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous health data systems were identified for each country. Data were obtained for population, life expectancy at birth, infant mortality, low and high birthweight, maternal mortality, nutritional status, educational attainment, and economic status. Data sources consisted of governmental data, data from non-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated.

    Findings: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case, and the size of the rate difference varies. We document poorer outcomes for Indigenous populations for: life expectancy at birth for 16 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1 year in 15 populations; infant mortality rate for 18 of 19 populations with a rate difference greater than one per 1000 livebirths in 16 populations; maternal mortality in ten populations; low birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in three populations; high birthweight with the rate difference greater than 2% in one population; child malnutrition for ten of 16 populations with a difference greater than 10% in five populations; child obesity for eight of 12 populations with a difference greater than 5% in four populations; adult obesity for seven of 13 populations with a difference greater than 10% in four populations; educational attainment for 26 of 27 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 24 populations; and economic status for 15 of 18 populations with a difference greater than 1% in 14 populations.

    Interpretation: We systematically collated data across a broader sample of countries and indicators than done in previous studies. Taking into account the UN Sustainable Development Goals, we recommend that national governments develop targeted policy responses to Indigenous health, improving access to health services, and Indigenous data within national surveillance systems.

  • 2.
    Axelsson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Sköld, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Sweden: the Sami2016In: A global snapshot of indigenous and tribal peoples' health: the Lancet–Lowitja Institute collaboration / [ed] Kate Silburn, Hannah Reich & Ian Anderson, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia: The Lowitja Institute , 2016, , p. 2p. 46-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berck, Peter
    et al.
    University of California, Berkeley.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Regional sorting of human capital: the choice of location among young adults in Sweden2016In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 757-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration rates are highest among young adults, especially students, and their location choices affect the regional distribution of human capital, growth and local public sector budgets. Using Swedish register data on young adults, the choice of whether to enroll in education and the choice of location are estimated jointly. The results indicate a systematic selection into investment in further education based on school grades and associated preferences for locations with higher per capita tax bases. For students, the estimates indicate lower preferences for locations with higher shares of older people.  The importance of family networks for the choice of location is confirmed.    

  • 4.
    Berck, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy, University of California, Berkeley, USA.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Regional sorting of human capital: the choice of location among young adults in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration rates are highest among young adults, especially students, and their location choices affect the regional distribution of human capital, growth and local public sector budgets. Using Swedish register data on young adults, the choice of whether to enroll in education and the choice of location are estimated jointly. The results indicate a systematic selection into investment in further education based on school grades and associated preferences for locations with higher per capita tax bases. For students, the estimates indicate lower preferences for locations with higher shares of older people.  The importance of family networks for the choice of location is confirmed. 

  • 5.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Internal Migration of Young Adults: Heterogeneity in Effects on Labour Income by School Grades2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper estimates the relationship between migration across labour-market regions and the subsequent changes in earnings in Sweden by using the individual’s grade point average (GPA) from the final year of comprehensive school as a proxy for ability. This measure aims to capture heterogeneity in the effects of mobility on earnings for individuals conditional on educational attainment and other observed traits. Register data from Sweden, including two whole cohorts of individuals, is used. A difference-in-difference propensity score matching estimator is applied to estimate the relationship between income and migration up to seven years after migrating. The results show variation between different ability groups with respect to the return to regional migration. There are indications of larger gains for individuals holding top grades, while the bottom half seems to benefit less, or have slightly negative returns. The difference in return to migration across GPA quartiles is larger for women than for men.

  • 6.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Migration and Regional Sorting of Skills2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis consists of an introductory part and four papers.

    Paper [I] estimates jointly the choice of whether to enroll in education and the choice of location among young people. Being a particularly mobile group, the location choices of young individuals shape much of the regional distribution of human capital, growth, and local public sector budgets. Applying Swedish register data on nest leavers, we seek to determine factors deciding the education and location choice of young people. The results indicate a systematic selection higher education based on school grades and preferences for locations with higher per capita tax bases and with lower shares of elderly people. The importance of family networks for the choice of location is confirmed.             

    Paper [II] examines how individual ability, reflected by the grade point average (GPA) from comprehensive school affects the probability of migration among university graduates. The econometric analysis applies detailed micro-data of two entire cohorts of young individuals retrieved from the Swedish population registers. The results indicate that individual abilities are strongly influential both concerning completion of a university degree and for the migration decision. In addition, we find a positive relationship between the GPA and migrating from regions with lower per capita tax bases and/or a relatively small share of highly educated individuals. Analogously, individuals with a high GPA tend to stay in more densely populated regions, suggesting a clustering of human capital vis-à-vis school grades. 

    Paper [III] estimates the relationship between migration across labour market regions and the subsequent changes in earnings by using the GPA from the final year of comprehensive school as a proxy for ability. This measure aims to capture heterogeneity in the returns to migration for individuals conditional on education attainment. Using Swedish register data on young adults, a difference-in-difference propensity score matching estimator is applied to estimate income differences measured up to seven years after migration. The results show variation between different ability groups regarding the returns to regional migration. There are indications of larger gains for individuals holding top grades, while the bottom half seems to benefit less, or face slightly negative effects.

    Paper [IV] examines whether power couple formation and the location choice of such couples are driven by factors already inherent in young people during their formative school years. The paper also extends the analysis by modeling location choice among different sizes of labor market areas, given different power statuses of the couples. Based on analysis of Swedish register data, we produce evidence that power spouses evolve from the population of high achieving school age individuals; the latter is identified by high academic performance during their years of compulsory school. Regarding location choice, the results indicate that power couples display a relatively high tendency to migrate from their regions of origin to large cities.

  • 7.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Regional clustering of human capital: school grades and migration of university graduates2014In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 561-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial distribution of human capital plays a fundamental role for regional differences in economic growth and welfare. This paper examines how individual ability indicated by the grade point average (GPA) from comprehensive school affects the probability of migration among young university graduates in Sweden. Using detailed microdata available from the Swedish population register, the study examines two cohorts of individuals who enrol in tertiary education. The results indicate that individual abilities reflected by the GPA are strongly influential when it comes to completing a university degree and for the migration decision after graduation. Moreover, there is a positive relationship between the GPA and the choice of migrating from regions with a relatively low tax base and a relatively small share of highly educated people in the population, while individuals with higher GPA tend to stay at a higher rate in more flourishing regions.

  • 8.
    Tano, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Regional Clustering of Human Capital: School Grades and Migration of University Graduates2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial distribution of human capital plays a fundamental role for regional differences in economic growth and welfare. This paper examines how individual ability indicated by the grade point average (GPA), from comprehensive school, affects the probability of migration among young university graduates in Sweden. Using detailed micro data available from the Swedish population registers, the study examines two cohorts of individuals who enrol in tertiary education. The results indicate that individual abilities reflected by the GPA are strongly influential when it comes to completing a university degree and for the migration decision after graduation. Moreover, there is a positive relationship between the GPA and the choice of migrating from regions with a relatively low tax base and a relatively small share of highly educated people in the population. Analogously, individuals with a high GPA tend to stay at a higher rate in more flourishing regions.

  • 9.
    Tano, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Berck, Peter
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    The determinants of the choice of location among young adults: evidence from Sweden2011Other (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Tano, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Nakosteen, Robert A.
    Isenberg School of Management, Universiity of Massachussets at Amherst, MA, USA.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Zimmer, Michael
    Schroeder School of Business , University of Evansville, IN, USA.
    Youth-age characteristics as precursors of power couple formation and location choice2018In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 52, p. 98-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper extends the literature on highly educated “power” couples. Its objectives are twofold. First, it examines the extent to which precursors of power couple formation are evident in young people during their years of compulsory schooling. Second, we examine location choices at adult ages by accounting for youth-age characteristics in addition to adult-age power status. Using Swedish register data, we produce evidence that power couples evolve from matching of spouses who were high academic achievers during the schooling years. Regarding location choice, our results indicate that power couples are characterized by a disproportionate tendency to migrate from their regions of origin to large labour markets. The evidence also points to latent self selection in both spouse matching and location choice.

  • 11.
    Tano, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Pettersson, Örjan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Stjernström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Labour income effects of the recent "mining boom" in northern Sweden2016In: Resources policy, ISSN 0301-4207, E-ISSN 1873-7641, Vol. 49, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the early 21st century, the world market prices for minerals increased dramatically. As a consequence of this development, large investments were made in mining all around the world. Increased exploration activities, the opening of new mines and large investment schemes in already operating mines and related physical infrastructure also gave rise to a “mining boom” in the remote and sparsely populated areas of northern Sweden. New jobs were generated in the mining sector, but the question of whether the “mining boom” also has stimulated economic development in a broader sense in these areas has been more open. The present article investigated whether labour incomes have increased not only in sectors clearly connected to mining, but also in other parts of the local and regional economy. This was done by following the income changes of residents in the mining areas of northern Sweden over the time period 2004–2010 and by using a propensity score matching estimator method (PSM). The results show rapid income growth for employees in the mining industry and construction sectors, but also some growth in several other sectors, indicating spread effects to the rest of the local and regional economies. The impact, however, is much stronger in the largest mining towns than in communities where mining is of less significance.

  • 12.
    Tano, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Jyväskylä University, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Nakosteen, Robert
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA.
    Zimmer, Michael
    University of Evansville, USA.
    Back to the Future: Migration, Matching and the Power Couple Phenomenon in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to a recent and growing literature addressing the phenomenon of high-credentialed power couples. It seeks to determine the extent to which precursors of power couple formation and location choice of couples at midlife are evident in young people during their formative school years. Its second objective is to extend the analysis of location choice by modeling location choice among different sizes of labor market areas, given different power status of the couples.

         Based on analysis of Swedish register data, we produce evidence that power spouses evolve from the population of high achieving school age individuals, the latter identified by high academic performance during the years of compulsory schooling. Other factors such as parental education and family income also play a role. In addition, there appear to be regional disparities in the evolution of power couples. The evidence also points to the presence self-selection arising from unmeasured heterogeneity, both in spouse matching and to a lesser extent in location choice. Regarding location choice, the results indicate that power couples display a disproportionate tendency to migrate from their regions of origin to large cities.

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