umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Betti, Marco
    et al.
    Bauwe, Hermann
    Busch, Florian A.
    Fernie, Alisdair R.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Levey, Myles
    Ort, Donald R.
    Parry, Martin A. J.
    Sage, Rowan
    Timm, Stefan
    Walker, Berkley
    Weber, Andreas P. M.
    Manipulating photorespiration to increase plant productivity: recent advances and perspectives for crop improvement2016In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 2977-2988Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of the 2-phosphoglycolate generated by the oxygenase reaction of Rubisco requires a complex and energy-consuming set of reactions collectively known as the photorespiratory cycle. Several approaches aimed at reducing the rates of photorespiratory energy or carbon loss have been proposed, based either on screening for natural variation or by means of genetic engineering. Recent work indicates that plant yield can be substantially improved by the alteration of photorespiratory fluxes or by engineering artificial bypasses to photorespiration. However, there is also evidence indicating that, under certain environmental and/or nutritional conditions, reduced photorespiratory capacity may be detrimental to plant performance. Here we summarize recent advances obtained in photorespiratory engineering and discuss prospects for these advances to be transferred to major crops to help address the globally increasing demand for food and biomass production.

  • 2.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    In response to partial plant shading, the lack of phytochrome A does not directly induce leaf senescence but alters the fine-tuning of chlorophyll biosynthesis2014In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 65, no 14, p. 4037-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytochrome is thought to control the induction of leaf senescence directly, however, the signalling and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, an ecophysiological approach was used to establish a functional connection between phytochrome signalling and the physiological processes underlying the induction of leaf senescence in response to shade. With shade it is important to distinguish between complete and partial shading, during which either the whole or only a part of the plant is shaded, respectively. It is first shown here that, while PHYB is required to maintain chlorophyll content in a completely shaded plant, only PHYA is involved in maintaining the leaf chlorophyll content in response to partial plant shading. Second, it is shown that leaf yellowing associated with strong partial shading in phyA-mutant plants actually correlates to a decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll rather than to an increase of its degradation. Third, it is shown that the physiological impact of this decreased biosynthesis of chlorophyll in strongly shaded phyA-mutant leaves is accompanied by a decreased capacity to adjust the Light Compensation Point. However, the increased leaf yellowing in phyA-mutant plants is not accompanied by an increase of senescence-specific molecular markers, which argues against a direct role of PHYA in inducing leaf senescence in response to partial shade. In conclusion, it is proposed that PHYA, but not PHYB, is essential for fine-tuning the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway in response to partial shading. In turn, this mechanism allows the shaded leaf to adjust its photosynthetic machinery to very low irradiances, thus maintaining a positive carbon balance and repressing the induction of leaf senescence, which can occur under prolonged periods of shade.

  • 3.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bagard, Matthieu
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The impact of light intensity on shade-induced leaf senescence2012In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 1084-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants often have to cope with altered light conditions, which in leaves induce various physiological responses ranging from photosynthetic acclimation to leaf senescence. However, our knowledge of the regulatory pathways by which shade and darkness induce leaf senescence remains incomplete. To determine to what extent reduced light intensities regulate the induction of leaf senescence, we performed a functional comparison between Arabidopsis leaves subjected to a range of shading treatments. Individually covered leaves, which remained attached to the plant, were compared with respect to chlorophyll, protein, histology, expression of senescence-associated genes, capacity for photosynthesis and respiration, and light compensation point (LCP). Mild shading induced photosynthetic acclimation and resource partitioning, which, together with a decreased respiration, lowered the LCP. Leaf senescence was induced only under strong shade, coinciding with a negative carbon balance and independent of the red/far-red ratio. Interestingly, while senescence was significantly delayed at very low light compared with darkness, phytochrome A mutant plants showed enhanced chlorophyll degradation under all shading treatments except complete darkness. Taken together, our results suggest that the induction of leaf senescence during shading depends on the efficiency of carbon fixation, which in turn appears to be modulated via light receptors such as phytochrome A.

  • 4.
    Chrobok, Daria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Law, Simon R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Linden, Pernilla
    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Liebsch, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Narsai, Reena
    Szal, Bozena
    Moritz, Thomas
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    Whelan, James
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence2016In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 4, p. 2132-2153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is conserved until the latest stages of leaf senescence, while their number drops by 30%. Adenylate phosphorylation state assays and mitochondrial respiratory measurements indicated that the leaf energy status also is maintained during this time period. Furthermore, after establishing a curated list of genes coding for products targeted to mitochondria, we analyzed in isolation their transcript profiles, focusing on several key mitochondrial functions, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial electron transfer chain, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, transporters, as well as catabolic pathways. In tandem with a metabolomic approach, our data indicated that mitochondrial metabolism was reorganized to support the selective catabolism of both amino acids and fatty acids. Such adjustments would ensure the replenishment of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate, which provide the carbon backbones for nitrogen remobilization. Glutamate, being the substrate of the strongly up-regulated cytosolic glutamine synthase, is likely to become a metabolically limiting factor in the latest stages of developmental leaf senescence. Finally, an evolutionary age analysis revealed that, while branched-chain amino acid and proline catabolism are very old mitochondrial functions particularly enriched at the latest stages of leaf senescence, auxin metabolism appears to be rather newly acquired. In summation, our work shows that, during developmental leaf senescence, mitochondria orchestrate catabolic processes by becoming increasingly central energy and metabolic hubs.

  • 5. Dejonghe, Wim
    et al.
    Kuenen, Sabine
    Mylle, Evelien
    Vasileva, Mina
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Viotti, Corrado
    Swerts, Jef
    Fendrych, Matyas
    Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres
    Mishev, Kiril
    Delang, Simon
    Scholl, Stefan
    Zarza, Xavier
    Heilmann, Mareike
    Kourelis, Jiorgos
    Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw
    Nguyen, Le Son Long
    Drozdzecki, Andrzej
    Van Houtte, Isabelle
    Szatmari, Anna-Maria
    Majda, Mateusz
    Baisa, Gary
    Bednarek, Sebastian York
    Robert, Stephanie
    Audenaert, Dominique
    Testerink, Christa
    Munnik, Teun
    Van Damme, Daniel
    Heilmann, Ingo
    Schumacher, Karin
    Winne, Johan
    Friml, Jiri
    Verstreken, Patrik
    Russinova, Eugenia
    Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis largely through cytoplasmic acidification2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 11710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ATP production requires the establishment of an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial uncouplers dissipate this proton gradient and disrupt numerous cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, mainly through energy depletion. Here we show that Endosidin9 (ES9), a novel mitochondrial uncoupler, is a potent inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in different systems and that ES9 induces inhibition of CME not because of its effect on cellular ATP, but rather due to its protonophore activity that leads to cytoplasm acidification. We show that the known tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostinA23, which is routinely used to block CME, displays similar properties, thus questioning its use as a specific inhibitor of cargo recognition by the AP-2 adaptor complex via tyrosine motif-based endocytosis signals. Furthermore, we show that cytoplasm acidification dramatically affects the dynamics and recruitment of clathrin and associated adaptors, and leads to reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate from the plasma membrane.

  • 6. Fernie, A. R.
    et al.
    Bauwe, H.
    Eisenhut, M.
    Florian, A.
    Hanson, D. T.
    Hagemann, M.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mielewczik, M.
    Nikoloski, Z.
    Peterhaensel, C.
    Roje, S.
    Sage, R.
    Timm, S.
    von Cammerer, S.
    Weber, A. P. M.
    Westhoff, P.
    Perspectives on plant photorespiratory metabolism2013In: Plant Biology, ISSN 1435-8603, E-ISSN 1438-8677, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 748-753Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being intimately intertwined with (C3) photosynthesis, photorespiration is an incredibly high flux-bearing pathway. Traditionally, the photorespiratory cycle was viewed as closed pathway to refill the Calvin-Benson cycle with organic carbon. However, given the network nature of metabolism, it hence follows that photorespiration will interact with many other pathways. In this article, we review current understanding of these interactions and attempt to define key priorities for future research, which will allow us greater fundamental comprehension of general metabolic and developmental consequences of perturbation of this crucial metabolic process.

  • 7. Gama, Filipe
    et al.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Eymery, Francoise
    Finkemeier, Iris
    Gelhaye, Eric
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dietz, Karl Josef
    Rey, Pascal
    Jacquot, Jean-Pierre
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    The mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from poplar2007In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 196-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria are a major site of reactive oxygen species production and controlling the peroxide levels in this compartment is essential. Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are heme-free peroxidases, which use reactive cysteines for their catalysis and reducing systems for their regeneration. One of the two Prxs present in poplar mitochondria, Prx IIF, expressed as a recombinant protein, was found to reduce a broad range of peroxides with electrons provided preferentially by glutaredoxin and to a lesser extent by glutathione, all the thioredoxins tested being inefficient. This protein is constitutively expressed because it is found in all tissues analyzed. Its expression is modified during a biotic interaction between poplar and the rust fungus Melampsora laricii populina. On the other hand, Prx IIF expression does not substantially vary under abiotic stress conditions. Nevertheless, water deficit or chilling and probably induced senescence, but not photooxidative conditions or heavy metal treatment, also led to a small increase in PrxIIF abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

  • 8. Hodges, Michael
    et al.
    Dellero, Younes
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Betti, Marco
    Raghavendra, Agepati S.
    Sage, Rowan
    Zhu, Xin-Guang
    Allen, Doug K.
    Weber, Andreas P. M.
    Perspectives for a better understanding of the metabolic integration of photorespiration within a complex plant primary metabolism network2016In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 3015-3026Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in photorespiration research are described and future priorities to better understand the metabolic integration of the photorespiratory cycle within the complex network of plant primary metabolism are discussed.Photorespiration is an essential high flux metabolic pathway that is found in all oxygen-producing photosynthetic organisms. It is often viewed as a closed metabolic repair pathway that serves to detoxify 2-phosphoglycolic acid and to recycle carbon to fuel the Calvin-Benson cycle. However, this view is too simplistic since the photorespiratory cycle is known to interact with several primary metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, nitrate assimilation, amino acid metabolism, C-1 metabolism and the Krebs (TCA) cycle. Here we will review recent advances in photorespiration research and discuss future priorities to better understand (i) the metabolic integration of the photorespiratory cycle within the complex network of plant primary metabolism and (ii) the importance of photorespiration in response to abiotic and biotic stresses.

  • 9.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    From green to yellow: a leaf story2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When switching from green to yellow, a leaf undergoes both morphological and metabolic changes. This process is known as senescence and improved understanding of its mechanisms is important both from a fundamental scientific perspective but also for biotechnological applications. The present thesis reports on several important aspects regarding the cellular and metabolic mechanisms occurring during leaf senescence with an emphasis on the mitochondrial contribution to this process.

    As a first step, we developed methods to isolate either highly functional crude mitochondria or highly purified mitochondria from leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. These methods were further used to study mitochondrial contributions to cellular redox homeostasis and to estimate the mitochondrial capacities in leaves undergoing senescence. In particular, we compared the induction of senescence by different dark treatments in Arabidopsis. The comparison between individually darkened leaves and leaves from whole darkened plants revealed different metabolic strategies in response to darkness. Integrating data from measurements of photosynthesis, respiration and confocal laser microscopy with transcriptomics and metabolomics profiling, we suggested that metabolism in leaves of the whole darkened plants enter a “stand-by mode” with low mitochondrial activity in order to maintain the photosynthetic machinery for as long as possible. In contrast, mitochondria from individually darkened leaves are more active and may provide energy and carbon skeletons for the degradation of cell constituents, facilitating the retrieval of nutrients. We also investigated the dynamic of the microtubular cytoskeleton during dark-induced senescence. Mitochondrial mobility was affected by an early disruption of the microtubules in individually darkened leaves but not in whole darkened plants. In addition, several microtubules associated proteins (MAPs) seemed to be involved in the bundling of the microtubules around the chloroplasts.

    Altogether, the work presented in this thesis highlights several important steps regarding the metabolic adjustments and the cellular mechanisms in Arabidopsis leaves submitted to prolonged darkness. In particular, we suggest the mitochondria to fulfill specific and important functions during leaf senescence since the role of mitochondria in leaves experiencing prolonged darkness appears very dependant on the whole metabolic status of the plant.

  • 10.
    Keech, Olivier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Nilsson, Marie Charlotte
    Adsorption of allelopathic compounds by wood-derived charcoal: the role of wood porosity2005In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 272, no 1-2, p. 291-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish boreal forests, areas dominated by the dwarf shrub Empetrum hermaphroditum Hagerup are known for their poor regeneration of trees and one of the causes of this poor regeneration has been attributed to allelopathy (i.e. chemical interferences) by E. hermaphroditum. Fire-produced charcoal is suggested to play an important role in rejuvenating those ecosystems by adsorbing allelopathic compounds, such as phenols, released by E. hermaphroditum. In this study, we firstly investigated whether the adsorption capacity of charcoal of different plant species varies according to the wood anatomical structures of these, and secondly we tried to relate the adsorption capacity to wood anatomical structure. Charcoal was produced from eight boreal and one temperate woody plant species and the adsorption capacity of charcoal was tested by bioassays technique. Seed germination was used as a measurement of the ability of charcoal to adsorb allelochemicals. The charcoal porosity was estimated and the pore size distribution was then calculated in order to relate the wood anatomical features to the adsorption capacity. The results showed that the adsorption capacity of charcoal was significantly different between plant species and that deciduous trees had a significantly higher adsorption capacity than conifers and ericaceous species. The presence of macro-pores rather than a high porosity appears to be the most important for the adsorption capacity. These results suggest that fire-produced charcoal has different ability to adsorb phenols in boreal forest soil, and therefore may have differing effects on the germination of seeds of establishing tree seedlings.

  • 11.
    Keech, Olivier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dizengremel, Pierre
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Preparation of leaf mitochondria from Arabidopsis thaliana2005In: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 403-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arabidopsis thaliana is, perhaps, the most important model species in modern plant biology. However, the isolation of organelles from leaves of this plant has been difficult. Here, we present two different protocols for the isolation of mitochondria, yielding either highly functional crude mitochondria or highly purified mitochondria. The crude mitochondria were well coupled with the substrates tested (malate + glutamate, glycine and NADH), exhibiting respiratory control ratios of 2.1–3.9. Purified mitochondria with very low levels of chlorophyll contamination were obtained by Percoll gradient centrifugation, yielding 1.2 mg of mitochondrial protein from 50 g of leaves.

  • 12.
    Keech, Olivier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    The redox control of photorespiration: from biochemical and physiological aspects to biotechnological considerations2017In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 553-569Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photorespiration is a complex and tightly regulated process occurring in photosynthetic organisms. This process can alter the cellular redox balance, notably via the production and consumption of both reducing and oxidizing equivalents. Under certain circumstances, these equivalents, as well as reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, can become prominent in subcellular compartments involved in the photorespiratory process, eventually promoting oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins. Keeping these changes under tight control should therefore be of primary importance. In order to review the current state of knowledge about the redox control of photorespiration, we primarily performed a careful description of the known and potential redox-regulated or oxidation sensitive photorespiratory proteins, and examined in more details two interesting cases: the glycerate kinase and the glycine cleavage system. When possible, the potential impact and subsequent physiological regulations associated with these changes have been discussed. In a second part, we reviewed the extent to which photorespiration contributes to cellular redox homeostasis considering, in particular, the set of peripheral enzymes associated with the canonical photorespiratory pathway. Finally, some recent biotechnological strategies to circumvent photorespiration for future growth improvements are discussed in the light of these redox regulations.

  • 13.
    Keech, Olivier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gutierrez, Laurent
    Ahad, Abdul
    Bellini, Catherine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Smith, Steven M
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Leaf senescence is accompanied by an early disruption of the microtubule network in Arabidopsis.2010In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 154, no 4, p. 1710-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic assembly and disassembly of microtubules (MTs) is essential for cell function. Although leaf senescence is a well-documented process, the role of the MT cytoskeleton during senescence in plants remains unknown. Here, we show that both natural leaf senescence and senescence of individually darkened Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves are accompanied by early degradation of the MT network in epidermis and mesophyll cells, whereas guard cells, which do not senesce, retain their MT network. Similarly, entirely darkened plants, which do not senesce, retain their MT network. While genes encoding the tubulin subunits and the bundling/stabilizing MT-associated proteins (MAPs) MAP65 and MAP70-1 were repressed in both natural senescence and dark-induced senescence, we found strong induction of the gene encoding the MT-destabilizing protein MAP18. However, induction of MAP18 gene expression was also observed in leaves from entirely darkened plants, showing that its expression is not sufficient to induce MT disassembly and is more likely to be part of a Ca(2+)-dependent signaling mechanism. Similarly, genes encoding the MT-severing protein katanin p60 and two of the four putative regulatory katanin p80s were repressed in the dark, but their expression did not correlate with degradation of the MT network during leaf senescence. Taken together, these results highlight the earliness of the degradation of the cortical MT array during leaf senescence and lead us to propose a model in which suppression of tubulin and MAP genes together with induction of MAP18 play key roles in MT disassembly during senescence.

  • 14. Lallement, Pierre-Alexandre
    et al.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hecker, Arnaud
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    The still mysterious roles of cysteine-containing glutathione transferases in plants2014In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 5, p. 192-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) represent a widespread multigenic enzyme family able to modify a broad range of molecules. These notably include secondary metabolites and exogenous substrates often referred to as xenobiotics, usually for their detoxification, subsequent transport or export. To achieve this, these enzymes can bind non-substrate ligands (ligandin function) and/or catalyze the conjugation of glutathione onto the targeted molecules, the latter activity being exhibited by GSTs having a serine or a tyrosine as catalytic residues. Besides, other GST members possess a catalytic cysteine residue, a substitution that radically changes enzyme properties. Instead of promoting GSH-conjugation reactions, cysteine-containing GSTs (Cys-GSTs) are able to perform deglutathionylation reactions similarly to glutaredoxins but the targets are usually different since glutaredoxin substrates are mostly oxidized proteins and Cys-GST substrates are metabolites. The Cys-GSTs are found in most organisms and form several classes. While Beta and Omega GSTs and chloride intracellular channel proteins (CLICs) are not found in plants, these organisms possess microsomal ProstaGlandin E-Synthase type 2, glutathionyl hydroquinone reductases, Lambda, Iota and Hemerythrin GSTs and dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs); the four last classes being restricted to the green lineage. In plants, whereas the role of DHARs is clearly associated to the reduction of dehydroascorbate to ascorbate, the physiological roles of other Cys-GSTs remain largely unknown. In this context, a genomic and phylogenetic analysis of Cys-GSTs in photosynthetic organisms provides an updated classification that is discussed in the light of the recent literature about the functional and structural properties of Cys-GSTs. Considering the antioxidant potencies of phenolic compounds and more generally of secondary metabolites, the connection of GSTs with secondary metabolism may be interesting from a pharmacological perspective.

  • 15.
    Law, Simon R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Chrobok, Daria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Juvany, Marta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Lindén, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Forest Genetics and Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish Agriculture University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ahad, Abdul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish Agriculture University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Darkened leaves use different metabolic strategies for senescence and survival2018In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 177, no 1, p. 132-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In plants, an individually darkened leaf initiates senescence much more rapidly than a leaf from a whole darkened plant. Combining transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we present an overview of the metabolic strategies that are employed in response to different darkening treatments. Under darkened plant conditions, the perception of carbon starvation drove a profound metabolic readjustment in which branched-chain amino acids and potentially monosaccharides released from cell wall loosening became important substrates for maintaining minimal ATP production. Concomitantly, the increased accumulation of amino acids with a high nitrogen-carbon ratio may provide a safety mechanism for the storage of metabolically derived cytotoxic ammonium and a pool of nitrogen for use upon returning to typical growth conditions. Conversely, in individually darkened leaf, the metabolic profiling that followed our 13C-enrichment assays revealed a temporal and differential exchange of metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, between the darkened leaf and the rest of the plant. This active transport could be the basis for a progressive metabolic shift in the substrates fueling mitochondrial activities, which are central to the catabolic reactions facilitating the retrieval of nutrients from the senescing leaf. We propose a model illustrating the specific metabolic strategies employed by leaves in response to these two darkening treatments, which support either rapid senescence or a strong capacity for survival.

  • 16.
    Liebsch, Daniela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dark-induced leaf senescence: new insights into a complex light-dependent regulatory pathway2016In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 212, no 3, p. 563-570Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaf senescence - the coordinated, active process leading to the organized dismantling of cellular components to remobilize resources - is a fundamental aspect of plant life. Its tight regulation is essential for plant fitness and has crucial implications for the optimization of plant productivity and storage properties. Various investigations have shown light deprivation and light perception via phytochromes as key elements modulating senescence. However, the signalling pathways linking light deprivation and actual senescence processes have long remained obscure. Recent analyses have demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) are major transcription factors orchestrating dark-induced senescence (DIS) by targeting chloroplast maintenance, chlorophyll metabolism, hormone signalling and production, and the expression of senescence master regulators, uncovering potential molecular links to the energy deprivation signalling pathway. PIF-dependent feed-forward regulatory modules might be of critical importance for the highly complex and initially light-reversible DIS induction.

  • 17. Lindén, Pernilla
    et al.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling2016In: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 67, no 10, p. 3123-3135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions.

  • 18. Nystedt, Björn
    et al.
    Street, Nathaniel Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wetterbom, Anna
    Zuccolo, Andrea
    Lin, Yao-Cheng
    Scofield, Douglas G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Giacomello, Stefania
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    Vicedomini, Riccardo
    Sahlin, Kristoffer
    Sherwood, Ellen
    Elfstrand, Malin
    Gramzow, Lydia
    Holmberg, Kristina
    Hällman, Jimmie
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Klasson, Lisa
    Koriabine, Maxim
    Kucukoglu, Melis
    Käller, Max
    Luthman, Johannes
    Lysholm, Fredrik
    Niittylä, Totte
    Olson, Åke
    Rilakovic, Nemanja
    Ritland, Carol
    Rosselló, Josep A.
    Sena, Juliana
    Svensson, Thomas
    Talavera-López, Carlos
    Theißen, Günter
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Vanneste, Kevin
    Wu, Zhi-Qiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zhang, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zerbe, Philipp
    Arvestad, Lars
    Bhalerao, Rishikesh
    Bohlmann, Joerg
    Bousquet, Jean
    Gil, Rosario Garcia
    Hvidsten, Torgeir R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    de Jong, Pieter
    MacKay, John
    Morgante, Michele
    Ritland, Kermit
    Sundberg, Björn
    Thompson, Stacey Lee
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Andersson, Björn
    Nilsson, Ove
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The Norway spruce genome sequence and conifer genome evolution2013In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 497, no 7451, p. 579-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conifers have dominated forests for more than 200 million years and are of huge ecological and economic importance. Here we present the draft assembly of the 20-gigabase genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies), the first available for any gymnosperm. The number of well-supported genes (28,354) is similar to the >100 times smaller genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, and there is no evidence of a recent whole-genome duplication in the gymnosperm lineage. Instead, the large genome size seems to result from the slow and steady accumulation of a diverse set of long-terminal repeat transposable elements, possibly owing to the lack of an efficient elimination mechanism. Comparative sequencing of Pinus sylvestris, Abies sibirica, Juniperus communis, Taxus baccata and Gnetum gnemon reveals that the transposable element diversity is shared among extant conifers. Expression of 24-nucleotide small RNAs, previously implicated in transposable element silencing, is tissue-specific and much lower than in other plants. We further identify numerous long (>10,000 base pairs) introns, gene-like fragments, uncharacterized long non-coding RNAs and short RNAs. This opens up new genomic avenues for conifer forestry and breeding.

  • 19. Peterhansel, C.
    et al.
    Krause, K.
    Braun, H-P
    Espie, G. S.
    Fernie, A. R.
    Hanson, D. T.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Maurino, V. G.
    Mielewczik, M.
    Sage, R. F.
    Engineering photorespiration: current state and future possibilities2013In: Plant Biology, ISSN 1435-8603, E-ISSN 1438-8677, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 754-758Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduction of flux through photorespiration has been viewed as a major way to improve crop carbon fixation and yield since the energy-consuming reactions associated with this pathway were discovered. This view has been supported by the biomasses increases observed in model species that expressed artificial bypass reactions to photorespiration. Here, we present an overview about the major current attempts to reduce photorespiratory losses in crop species and provide suggestions for future research priorities.

  • 20. Rouhier, Nicolas
    et al.
    Gelhaye, Eric
    Dietz, Karl Josef
    Jacquot, Jean-Pierre
    Wingsle, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Villarejo, Arsenio
    Srivastava, Manoj
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Droux, Michel
    Finkemeier, Iris
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Identification of plant glutaredoxin targets2005In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 7, no 7-8, p. 919-929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) are small ubiquitous proteins of the thioredoxin (Trx) family, which catalyze dithiol–disulfide exchange reactions or reduce protein-mixed glutathione disulfides. In plants, several Trx-interacting proteins have been isolated from different compartments, whereas very few Grx-interacting proteins are known. We describe here the determination of Grx target proteins using a mutated poplar Grx, various tissular and subcellular plant extracts, and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry detection. We have identified 94 putative targets, involved in many processes, including oxidative stress response [peroxiredoxins (Prxs), ascorbate peroxidase, catalase], nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon metabolisms (methionine synthase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoglycerate kinase), translation (elongation factors E and Tu), or protein folding (heat shock protein 70). Some of these proteins were previously found to interact with Trx or to be glutathiolated in other organisms, but others could be more specific partners of Grx. To substantiate further these data, Grx was shown to support catalysis of the stroma β-type carbonic anhydrase and Prx IIF of Arabidopsis thaliana, but not of poplar 2-Cys Prx. Overall, these data suggest that the interaction could occur randomly either with exposed cysteinyl disulfide bonds formed within or between target proteins or with mixed disulfides between a protein thiol and glutathione.

  • 21.
    Sani, Marc-Antoine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dufourc, Erick J
    UMR 5248 Chimie et Biologie des Membranes et des Nanoobjets, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Bordeaux 1, Pessac, France.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Magic-angle phosphorus NMR of functional mitochondria: in situ monitoring of lipid response under apoptotic-like stress2009In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 2872-2878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a noninvasive, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclearmagnetic resonance (MAS NMR) approach, we track ex vivo thebehavior of individual membrane components in isolated, activemitochondria (model system: potato tubers) during physiologicalprocesses. The individual phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine(PE), and cardiolipin (CL) membrane constituents were identifiedas distinct lines by applying MAS 31P NMR on extracted lipidmembranes. However, the CL NMR signal appeared to be very broadin functional mitochondria, indicating a tight complex formationwith membrane protein. Calcium stress induced severe membranedegradation without recovery of a single CL NMR resonance. Thissuggests that calcium overload destroys the outer mitochondrialmembrane and does not modify strongly the CL protein complexesin the inner membrane; a conclusion confirmed by respiratorycontrols. Conversely, mitochondrial membrane disruption on timedegradation or mechanical stress generates clearly visible identicalCL NMR signals, similar to those observed in rehydrated lipidextracts. Similarly, noninvasive based NMR tracking of lipidsin response to diverse physiological stimuli can easily be usedfor other organelles and whole living cells. Sani, M.-A., Keech,O., Gardeström, P., Dufourc, E. J., Gröbner, G. Magic-anglephosphorus NMR of functional mitochondria: in situ monitoringof lipid response under apoptotic-like stress.

  • 22.
    Sani, Marc-Antoine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dufourc, Erick J.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Tracking lipid interactions in intact mitochondria under oxidative stress by ex vivo solid state 31P NMR spectroscopyIn: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23. Sylvestre-Gonon, Elodie
    et al.
    Law, Simon R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Schwartz, Mathieu
    Robe, Kevin
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Didierjean, Claude
    Dubos, Christian
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    Hecker, Arnaud
    Functional, Structural and Biochemical Features of Plant Serinyl-Glutathione Transferases2019In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 608Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) belong to a ubiquitous multigenic family of enzymes involved in diverse biological processes including xenobiotic detoxification and secondary metabolism. A canonical GST is formed by two domains, the N-terminal one adopting a thioredoxin (TRX) fold and the C-terminal one an all-helical structure. The most recent genomic and phylogenetic analysis based on this domain organization allowed the classification of the GST family into 14 classes in terrestrial plants. These GSTs are further distinguished based on the presence of the ancestral cysteine (Cys-GSTs) present in TRX family proteins or on its substitution by a serine (Ser-GSTs). Cys-GSTs catalyze the reduction of dehydroascorbate and deglutathionylation reactions whereas Ser-GSTs catalyze glutathione conjugation reactions and eventually have peroxidase activity, both activities being important for stress tolerance or herbicide detoxification. Through non-catalytic, so-called ligandin properties, numerous plant GSTs also participate in the binding and transport of small heterocyclic ligands such as flavonoids including anthocyanins, and polyphenols. So far, this function has likely been underestimated compared to the other documented roles of GSTs. In this review, we compiled data concerning the known enzymatic and structural properties as well as the biochemical and physiological functions associated to plant GSTs having a conserved serine in their active site.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf