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  • 1.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Kratzer, S.
    Legrand, C.
    Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on pelagic basal production in a northerly estuary2018In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 204, p. 225-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria are key groups at the base of aquatic food webs. In estuaries receiving riverine water with a high content of coloured allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM), phytoplankton primary production may be reduced, while bacterial production is favoured. We tested this hypothesis by performing a field study in a northerly estuary receiving nutrient-poor, ADOM-rich riverine water, and analyzing results using multivariate statistics. Throughout the productive season, and especially during the spring river flush, the production and growth rate of heterotrophic bacteria were stimulated by the riverine inflow of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In contrast, primary production and photosynthetic efficiency (i.e. phytoplankton growth rate) were negatively affected by DOC. Primary production related positively to phosphorus, which is the limiting nutrient in the area. In the upper estuary where DOC concentrations were the highest, the heterotrophic bacterial production constituted almost 100% of the basal production (sum of primary and bacterial production) during spring, while during summer the primary and bacterial production were approximately equal. Our study shows that riverine DOC had a strong negative influence on coastal phytoplankton production, likely due to light attenuation. On the other hand DOC showed a positive influence on bacterial production since it represents a supplementary food source. Thus, in boreal regions where climate change will cause increased river inflow to coastal waters, the balance between phytoplankton and bacterial production is likely to be changed, favouring bacteria. The pelagic food web structure and overall productivity will in turn be altered.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Joanna, Paczkowska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kratzer, Susanne
    Stockholm University Institutionen för ekologi miljö och botanik 106 91 Stockholm.
    Marked impact of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on estuarine primary and bacterial productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Jurgensone, Iveta
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Simonelli, Paolo
    Bignert, Anders
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Can Humic Water Discharge Counteract Eutrophication in Coastal Waters?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, p. e61293-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common and established view is that increased inputs of nutrients to the sea, for example via river flooding, will cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms in coastal areas. We here show that this concept may be questioned in certain scenarios. Climate change has been predicted to cause increased inflow of freshwater to coastal areas in northern Europe. River waters in these areas are often brown from the presence of high concentrations of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon ( humic carbon), in addition to nitrogen and phosphorus. In this study we investigated whether increased inputs of humic carbon can change the structure and production of the pelagic food web in the recipient seawater. In a mesocosm experiment unfiltered seawater from the northern Baltic Sea was fertilized with inorganic nutrients and humic carbon (CNP), and only with inorganic nutrients (NP). The system responded differently to the humic carbon addition. In NP treatments bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton production increased and the systems turned net autotrophic, whereas the CNP-treatment only bacterial and zooplankton production increased driving the system to net heterotrophy. The size-structure of the food web showed large variations in the different treatments. In the enriched NP treatments the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous >20 mu m algae, while in the CNP treatments the phytoplankton was dominated by picocyanobacteria <5 mu m. Our results suggest that climate change scenarios, resulting in increased humic-rich river inflow, may counteract eutrophication in coastal waters, leading to a promotion of the microbial food web and other heterotrophic organisms, driving the recipient coastal waters to net-heterotrophy.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Meier, H.E. Markus
    Ripszam, Matyas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Eilola, Kari
    Legrand, Catherine
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lindehoff, Elin
    Tysklind, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Projected future climate change and Baltic Sea ecosystem management2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no Suppl 3, p. S345-S356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is likely to have large effectson the Baltic Sea ecosystem. Simulations indicate 2–4 Cwarming and 50–80 % decrease in ice cover by 2100.Precipitation may increase *30 % in the north, causingincreased land runoff of allochthonous organic matter(AOM) and organic pollutants and decreased salinity.Coupled physical–biogeochemical models indicate that, inthe south, bottom-water anoxia may spread, reducing codrecruitment and increasing sediment phosphorus release,thus promoting cyanobacterial blooms. In the north,heterotrophic bacteria will be favored by AOM, whilephytoplankton production may be reduced. Extra trophiclevels in the food web may increase energy losses andconsequently reduce fish production. Future managementof the Baltic Sea must consider the effects of climatechange on the ecosystem dynamics and functions, as wellas the effects of anthropogenic nutrient and pollutant load.Monitoring should have a holistic approach, encompassingboth autotrophic (phytoplankton) and heterotrophic (e.g.,bacterial) processes.

  • 5.
    Ask, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Strömgren, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Importance of coastal primary production in the northern Baltic Sea2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 635-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we measured depth-dependent benthic microalgal primary production in a Bothnian Bay estuary to estimate the benthic contribution to total primary production. In addition, we compiled data on benthic microalgal primary production in the entire Baltic Sea. In the estuary, the benthic habitat contributed 17 % to the total annual primary production, and when upscaling our data to the entire Bothnian Bay, the corresponding value was 31 %. This estimated benthic share (31 %) is three times higher compared to past estimates of 10 %. The main reason for this discrepancy is the lack of data regarding benthic primary production in the northern Baltic Sea, but also that past studies overestimated the importance of pelagic primary production by not correcting for system-specific bathymetric variation. Our study thus highlights the importance of benthic communities for the northern Baltic Sea ecosystem in general and for future management strategies and ecosystem studies in particular.

  • 6.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Capo, Eric
    Lindh, Markus
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Coupling between bacterial community composition and allochthonous organic matter in a sub-arctic estuaryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to cause increased precipitation in boreal and subarctic zones, leading to increased runoff of allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) from land to the sea. ADOM has been shown to be a major driver of bacterioplankton production in a sub-arctic estuary in the northern Baltic Sea, the Råne estuary. By using a network approach we here analyzed how the bacterial community is affected by ADOM and other environmental factors in the same estuary. β-proteobacteria were observed to be dominant in spring when the river runoff and the ADOM concentrations were high. Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia become more abundant later during the summer when the ADOM discharge was low. The diversity and evenness in the bacterioplankton community increased as the runoff decreased during the summer. During this period Verrucomicrobia, β-proteobacteria, Bacteriodetes, γ-proteobacteria and Planctomycetes became more abundant. Overall more complex population interactions were established in summer than in spring. β-proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes formed clusters, showing similar responses to different environmental factors, which suggest a functional connection between these groups. The bacterial community consisted of as much as ~60% of generalists, which reflected the large variation of the environmental conditions in the estuary.

  • 7.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Allochthonous Carbon - a major driver of bacterioplankton production in the subarctic Northern Baltic Sea2016In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 789-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterotrophic bacteria are, in many aquatic systems, reliant on autochthonous organic carbon as their energy source. One exception is low-productive humic lakes, where allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) is the major driver. We hypothesized that bacterial production (BP) is similarly regulated in subarctic estuaries that receive large amounts of riverine material. BP and potential explanatory factors were measured during May–August 2011 in the subarctic Råne Estuary, northern Sweden. The highest BP was observed in spring, concomitant with the spring river-flush and the lowest rates occurred during summer when primary production (PP) peaked. PLS correlations showed that ∼60 % of the BP variation was explained by different ADOM components, measured as humic substances, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). On average, BP was threefold higher than PP. The bioavailability of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (ADOC) exhibited large spatial and temporal variation; however, the average value was low, ∼2 %. Bioassay analysis showed that BP in the near-shore area was potentially carbon limited early in the season, while BP at seaward stations was more commonly limited by nitrogen-phosphorus. Nevertheless, the bioassay indicated that ADOC could contribute significantly to the in situ BP, ∼60 %. We conclude that ADOM is a regulator of BP in the studied estuary. Thus, projected climate-induced increases in river discharge suggest that BP will increase in subarctic coastal areas during the coming century.

  • 8. Kay, Catherine M
    et al.
    Rowe, Owen F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rocchetti, Laura
    Coupland, Kris
    Hallberg, Kevin B
    Johnson, Barrie D
    Evolution of Microbial “Streamer” Growths in an Acidic, Metal-Contaminated Stream Draining an Abandoned Underground Copper Mine2013In: Life, ISSN EISSN 2075-1729, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 189-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nine year study was carried out on the evolution of macroscopic “acid streamer” growths in acidic, metal-rich mine water from the point of construction of a new channel to drain an abandoned underground copper mine. The new channel became rapidly colonized by acidophilic bacteria: two species of autotrophic iron-oxidizers (Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and “Ferrovum myxofaciens”) and a heterotrophic iron-oxidizer (a novel genus/species with the proposed name “Acidithrix ferrooxidans”). The same bacteria dominated the acid streamer communities for the entire nine year period, with the autotrophic species accounting for ~80% of the micro-organisms in the streamer growths (as determined by terminal restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis). Biodiversity of the acid streamers became somewhat greater in time, and included species of heterotrophic acidophiles that reduce ferric iron (Acidiphilium, Acidobacterium, Acidocella and gammaproteobacterium WJ2) and other autotrophic iron-oxidizers (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans). The diversity of archaea in the acid streamers was far more limited; relatively few clones were obtained, all of which were very distantly related to known species of euryarchaeotes. Some differences were apparent between the acid streamer community and planktonic-phase bacteria. This study has provided unique insights into the evolution of an extremophilic microbial community, and identified several novel species of acidophilic prokaryotes.

  • 9.
    Liess, Antonia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Faithfull, Carolyn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Reichstein, Birte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Guo, Junwen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pete, R.
    Thomsson, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Uszko, Wojciech
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Francoeur, S. N.
    Terrestrial runoff may reduce microbenthic net community productivity by increasing turbidity: a Mediterranean coastal lagoon mesocosm experiment2015In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 753, no 1, p. 205-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terrestrial runoff into aquatic ecosystems may have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects, due to nutrient subsidies and increased light attenuation. To disentangle the effects of runoff on microbenthos, we added soil to coastal mesocosms and manipulated substrate depth. To test if fish interacted with runoff effects, we manipulated fish presence. Soil decreased microphytobenthic chlorophyll-a per area and per carbon (C) unit, increased microbenthic phosphorous (P), and reduced microbenthic nitrogen (N) content. Depth had a strong effect on the microbenthos, with shallow substrates exhibiting greater microbenthic net ecosystem production, gross primary production, and community respiration than deep substrates. Over time, micobenthic algae compensated for deeper substrate depth through increased chlorophyll-a synthesis, but despite algal shade compensation, the soil treatment still appeared to reduce the depth where microbenthos switched from net autotrophy to net heterotrophy. Fish interacted with soil in affecting microbenthic nutrient composition. Fish presence reduced microbenthic C/P ratios only in the no soil treatment, probably since soil nutrients masked the positive effects of fish excreta on microbenthos. Soil reduced microbenthic N/P ratios only in the absence of fish. Our study demonstrates the importance of light for the composition and productivity of microbenthos but finds little evidence for positive runoff subsidy effects.

  • 10.
    Liess, Antonia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Guo, Junwen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lind, Martin I.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Cool tadpoles from Arctic environments waste fewer nutrients - high gross growth efficiencies lead to low consumer-mediated nutrient recycling in the North2015In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 84, no 6, p. 1744-1756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endothermic organisms can adapt to short growing seasons, low temperatures and nutrient limitation by developing high growth rates and high gross growth efficiencies (GGEs). Animals with high GGEs are better at assimilating limiting nutrients and thus should recycle (or lose) fewer nutrients. Longer guts in relation to body mass may facilitate higher GGE under resource limitation. Within the context of ecological stoichiometry theory, this study combines ecology with evolution by relating latitudinal life-history adaptations in GGE, mediated by gut length, to its ecosystem consequences, such as consumer-mediated nutrient recycling. In common garden experiments, we raised Rana temporaria tadpoles from two regions (Arctic/Boreal) under two temperature regimes (18/23 degrees C) crossed with two food quality treatments (high/low-nitrogen content). We measured tadpole GGEs, total nutrient loss (excretion+egestion) rates and gut length during ontogeny. In order to maintain their elemental balance, tadpoles fed low-nitrogen (N) food had lower N excretion rates and higher total phosphorous (P) loss rates than tadpoles fed high-quality food. In accordance with expectations, Arctic tadpoles had higher GGEs and lower N loss rates than their low-latitude conspecifics, especially when fed low-N food, but only in ambient temperature treatments. Arctic tadpoles also had relatively longer guts than Boreal tadpoles during early development. That temperature and food quality interacted with tadpole region of origin in affecting tadpole GGEs, nutrient loss rates and relative gut length, suggests evolved adaptation to temperature and resource differences. With future climate change, mean annual temperatures will increase. Additionally, species and genotypes will migrate north. This will change the functioning of Boreal and Arctic ecosystems by affecting consumer-mediated nutrient recycling and thus affect nutrient dynamics in general. Our study shows that evolved latitudinal adaption can change key ecosystem functions.

  • 11.
    Liess, Antonia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Laboratoire Ecosystémes Marins Côtiers, UMR5119 CNRS, Université Montpellier2, IRD, IFREMER, Paris, France.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Francoeur, S. N.
    Guo, Junwen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lange, K.
    Schroeder, A.
    Reichstein, Birte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lefèbure, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Deininger, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Faithfull, Carolyn L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Terrestrial runoff boosts phytoplankton in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon, but these effects do not propagate to higher trophic levels2016In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 766, no 1, p. 275-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy rainfall events causing significant terrestrial runoff into coastal marine ecosystems are predicted to become more frequent with climate change in the Mediterranean. To simulate the effects of soil runoff on the pelagic food web of an oligotrophic Mediterranean coastal lagoon, we crossed soil extract addition (increasing nutrient availability and turbidity) and fish presence in a full factorial design to coastal mesocosms containing a natural pelagic community. Soil extract addition increased both bacteria and phytoplankton biomass. Diatoms however profited most from soil extract addition, especially in the absence of fish. In contrast zooplankton and fish did not profit from soil extract addition. Furthermore, our data indicate that nutrients (instead of light or carbon) limited basal production. Presumed changes in carbon availability are relatively unimportant to primary and secondary production in strongly nutrient limited systems like the Thau Lagoon. We conclude that in shallow Mediterranean coastal ecosystems, heavy rainfall events causing soil runoff will (1) increase the relative abundance of phytoplankton in relation to bacteria and zooplankton, especially in the absence of fish (2) not lead to higher biomass of zooplankton and fish, possibly due to the brevity of the phytoplankton bloom and the slow biomass response of higher trophic levels.

  • 12.
    Liess, Antonia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Guo, Junwen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Thomsson, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lind, Martin I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. University of Sheffield, UK and Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hot tadpoles from cold environments need more nutrients - life history and stoichiometry reflects latitudinal adaptation2013In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 1316-1325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. High-latitude species (and populations within species) are adapted to short and cold summers. They often have high growth and development rates to fully use the short growing season and mature before the onset of winter. Within the context of ecological stoichiometry theory, this study combines ecology with evolution by relating latitudinal life-history adaptations to their molecular consequences in body nutrient composition in Rana temporaria tadpoles. Temperature and food quality were manipulated during the development of tadpoles from Arctic and Boreal origins. We determined tadpole growth rate, development rate, body size and nutrient content, to test whether (i) Arctic tadpoles could realize higher growth rates and development rates with the help of higher-quality food even when food quantity was unchanged, (ii) Arctic and Boreal tadpoles differed in their stoichiometric (and life history) response to temperature changes, (iii) higher growth rates lead to higher tadpole P content (growth rate hypothesis) and (iv) allometric scaling affects tadpole nutrient allocation. We found that especially Arctic tadpoles grew and developed faster with the help of higher-quality food and that tadpoles differed in their stoichiometric (and life history) response to temperature changes depending on region of origin (probably due to different temperature optima). There was no evidence that higher growth rates mediated the positive effect of temperature on tadpole P content. On the contrary, the covariate growth rate was negatively connected with tadpole P content (refuting the growth rate hypothesis). Lastly, tadpole P content was not related to body size, but tadpole C content was higher in larger tadpoles, probably due to increased fat storage. We conclude that temperature had a strong effect on tadpole life history, nutrient demand and stoichiometry and that this effect depended on the evolved life history.

  • 13. Lindsay, Matthew B. J.
    et al.
    Wakeman, Kathryn D.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Grail, Barry M.
    Ptacek, Carol J.
    Blowes, David W.
    Johnson, D. Barrie
    Microbiology and geochemistry of mine tailings amended with organic carbon for passive treatment of pore water2011In: Geomicrobiology Journal, ISSN 0149-0451, E-ISSN 1521-0529, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 229-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A field-scale experiment was conducted to evaluate organic carbon amendment of mine tailings as a technique for pore water and drainage treatment. Six test cells were constructed by amending sulfide- and carbonate- rich tailings with varied mixtures of peat, spent-brewing grain and municipal biosolids. Samples were collected for microbial, geochemical and mineralogical analysis approximately three years after commencing this experiment. Test cells amended with spent-brewing grain promoted sulfate reduction and effective removal of sulfate and metal(loid)s. The addition of municipal biosolids did not sustain enhanced sulfidogenesis after three years, and peat was an ineffective source of organic carbon. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism revealed that test cells which supported sulfidogenesis exhibited the greatest microbial diversity. Indigenous bacteria identified using molecular and cultivation analyses were found to be related to Cellulomonas, Thiobacillus, Bacteroides, Paludibacter and Desulfovibrio, which was the only sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) isolated. The results demonstrate that mixtures of solid organic materials which supported complex anaerobic microbial communities, including sulfate- reducing bacteria, were most effective in promoting pore-water treatment.

  • 14. Lindström, Stafva
    et al.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Department of Microbiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Timonen, Sari
    Sundström, Liselotte
    Johansson, Helena
    Trends in bacterial and fungal communities in ant nests observed with Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques-validity and compatibility in ecological studies2018In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e5289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbes are ubiquitous and often occur in functionally and taxonomically complex communities. Unveiling these community dynamics is one of the main challenges of microbial research. Combining a robust, cost effective and widely used method such as Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) with a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) method (Illumina MiSeq), offers a solid alternative for comprehensive assessment of microbial communities. Here, these two methods were combined in a study of complex bacterial and fungal communities in the nest mounds of the ant Formica exsecta, with the aim to assess the degree to which these methods can be used to complement each other. The results show that these methodologies capture similar spatiotemporal variations, as well as corresponding functional and taxonomical detail, of the microbial communities in a challenging medium consisting of soil, decomposing plant litter and an insect inhabitant. Both methods are suitable for the analysis of complex environmental microbial communities, but when combined, they complement each other well and can provide even more robust results. T-RFLP can be trusted to show similar general community patterns as Illumina MiSeq and remains a good option if resources for NGS methods are lacking.

  • 15.
    Meunier, Cédric L.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Liess, Antonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Rydberg Laboratory of Applied Science, School of Business, Science and Engineering, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Rahman, Habib
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Skoglund, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Allochthonous carbon is a major driver of the microbial food web: a mesocosm study simulating elevated terrestrial matter runoff2017In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 129, p. 236-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change predictions indicate that coastal and estuarine environments will receive increased terrestrial runoff via increased river discharge. This discharge transports allochthonous material, containing bioavailable nutrients and light attenuating matter. Since light and nutrients are important drivers of basal production, their relative and absolute availability have important consequences for the base of the aquatic food web, with potential ramifications for higher trophic levels. Here, we investigated the effects of shifts in terrestrial organic matter and light availability on basal producers and their grazers. In twelve Baltic Sea mesocosms, we simulated the effects of increased river runoff alone and in combination. We manipulated light (clear/shade) and carbon (added/not added) in a fully factorial design, with three replicates. We assessed microzooplankton grazing preferences in each treatment to assess whether increased terrestrial organic matter input would: (1) decrease the phytoplankton to bacterial biomass ratio, (2) shift microzooplanlcton diet from phytoplankton to bacteria, and (3) affect microzooplankton biomass. We found that carbon addition, but not reduced light levels per se resulted in lower phytoplanlcton to bacteria biomass ratios. Microzooplankton generally showed a strong feeding preference for phytoplanlcton over bacteria, but, in carbon-amended mesocosms which favored bacteria, microzooplankton shifted their diet towards bacteria. Furthermore, low total prey availability corresponded with low microzooplankton biomass and the highest bacteria/phytoplankton ratio. Overall our results suggest that in shallow coastal waters, modified with allochthonous matter from river discharge, light attenuation may be inconsequential for the basal producer balance, whereas increased allochthonous carbon, especially if readily bioavailable, favors bacteria over phytoplankton. We conclude that climate change induced shifts at the base of the food web may alter energy mobilization to and the biomass of microzooplankton grazers.

  • 16. Nancucheo, Ivan
    et al.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Viikki Biocenter 1, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hedrich, Sabrina
    Johnson, D. Barrie
    Solid and liquid media for isolating and cultivating acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria2016In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 363, no 10, article id fnw083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth media have been developed to facilitate the enrichment and isolation of acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria (aSRB) from environmental and industrial samples, and to allow their cultivation in vitro. The main features of the 'standard' solid and liquid devised media are as follows: (i) use of glycerol rather than an aliphatic acid as electron donor; (ii) inclusion of stoichiometric concentrations of zinc ions to both buffer pH and to convert potentially harmful hydrogen sulphide produced by the aSRB to insoluble zinc sulphide; (iii) inclusion of Acidocella aromatica (an heterotrophic acidophile that does not metabolize glycerol or yeast extract) in the gel underlayer of double layered (overlay) solid media, to remove acetic acid produced by aSRB that incompletely oxidize glycerol and also aliphatic acids (mostly pyruvic) released by acid hydrolysis of the gelling agent used (agarose). Colonies of aSRB are readily distinguished from those of other anaerobes due to their deposition and accumulation of metal sulphide precipitates. Data presented illustrate the effectiveness of the overlay solid media described for isolating aSRB from acidic anaerobic sediments and low pH sulfidogenic bioreactors.

  • 17.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lefébure, Robert
    Brutemark, Andreas
    ARONIA Research and Development Institute, Novia University of Applied Sciences and Åbo Akademi University, Raseborgsvägen 9, FI-10600 Ekenäs, Finland.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Influence of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on a coastal phytoplankton communityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Drivers of phytoplankton production and community structure in a sub-arctic estuary influenced by seasonal river dischargeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. UMEÅ MARINE SCIENCE CENTRE, SE-905 71 HÖRNEFORS, SWEDEN.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. UMEÅ MARINE SCIENCE CENTRE, SE-905 71 HÖRNEFORS, SWEDEN; DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, DIVISION OF MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, VIIKKI BIOCENTER I, UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI, HELSINKI, FINLAND.
    Schlüter, Louise
    DHI, Environment and Toxicology, Agern Allé 5, 2970 Hørsholm, Denmark.
    Legrand, Catherine
    Center of Ecology and Evolution in Microbial Model Systems, EEMiS, Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Karlson, Bengt
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Oceanography SE-426 71 Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. UMEÅ MARINE SCIENCE CENTRE, SE-905 71 HÖRNEFORS, SWEDEN.
    Allochthonous matter: an important factor shaping the phytoplankton community in the Baltic Sea2017In: Journal of Plankton Research, ISSN 0142-7873, E-ISSN 1464-3774, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-known that nutrients shape phytoplankton communities in marine systems, but in coastal waters allochthonous dissolved organic matter (ADOM) may also be of central importance. We studied how humic substances (proxy of ADOM) and other variables influenced the nutritional strategies, size structure and pigment content of the phytoplankton community along a south-north gradient in the Baltic Sea. During the summer, the proportion of mixotrophs increased gradually from the phosphorus-rich south to the ADOM-rich north, probably due to ADOM-fueled microbes. The opposite trend was observed for autotrophs. The chlorophyll a (Chl a): carbon (C) ratio increased while the levels of photoprotective pigments decreased from south to north, indicating adaptation to the darker humic-rich water in the north. Picocyanobacteria dominated in phosphorusrich areas while nanoplankton increased in ADOM- rich areas. During the winter-spring the phytoplankton biomass and concentrations of photoprotective pigments were low, and no trends with respect to autotrophs and mixotrophs were observed. Microplankton was the dominant size group in the entire study area. We conclude that changes in the size structure of the phytoplankton community, the Chl a: C ratio and the concentrations of photoprotective pigments are indicative of changes in ADOM, a factor of particular importance in a changing climate.

  • 20.
    Rowe, Owen F
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Födobrist verkar stoppa rovvattenloppa2016In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Commission, HELCOM Secretariat, Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission, Helsinki, Finland.
    Dinasquet, Julie
    Paczkowska, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Riemann, Lasse
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Major differences in dissolved organic matter characteristics and bacterial processing over an extensive brackish water gradient, the Baltic Sea2018In: Marine Chemistry, ISSN 0304-4203, E-ISSN 1872-7581, Vol. 202, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine waters is a complex mixture of compounds and elements that contribute substantially to the global carbon cycle. The large reservoir of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represents a vital resource for heterotrophic bacteria. Bacteria can utilise, produce, recycle and transform components of the DOM pool, and the physicochemical characteristics of this pool can directly influence bacterial activity; with consequences for nutrient cycling and primary productivity. In the present study we explored bacterial transformation of naturally occurring DOM across an extensive brackish water gradient in the Baltic Sea. Highest DOC utilisation (indicated by decreased DOC concentration) was recorded in the more saline southerly region where waters are characterised by more autochthonous DOM. These sites expressed the lowest bacterial growth efficiency (BGE), whereas in northerly regions, characterised by higher terrestrial and allochthonous DOM, the DOC utilisation was low and BGE was highest. Bacterial processing of the DOM pool in the south resulted in larger molecular weight compounds and compounds associated with secondary terrestrial humic matter being degraded, and a processed DOM pool that was more aromatic in nature and contributed more strongly to water colour; while the opposite was true in the north. Nutrient concentration and stoichiometry and DOM characteristics affected bacterial activity, including metabolic status (BGE), which influenced DOM transformations. Our study highlights dramatic differences in DOM characteristics and microbial carbon cycling in sub-basins of the Baltic Sea. These findings are critical for our understanding of carbon and nutrient biogeochemistry, particularly in light of climate change scenarios.

  • 22.
    Rowe, Owen F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, Division of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Viikki Biocenter 1, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Guleikova, Liudmyla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Institute of Hydrobiology National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, UA-04210, Kyiv, Ukraine.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    A potential barrier to the spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi (Ostroumov 1891) in the Northern Baltic Sea2016In: Regional Studies in Marine Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, p. 8-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spread of the invasive cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi has been well documented in southern areas of the Baltic Sea, however, little research on this invasive species (nor the zooplankton community) has focused on the Gulf of Bothnia (Bothnian Sea and Bay). We analysed data collected over a 12–13 year period at two main stations, one coastal and one offshore, to examine the occurrence of C. pengoi, invasion dynamics, effects on natural zooplankton communities and associated environmental factors. Nine other stations in the Gulf of Bothnia were also examined and the contribution to three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) diet was quantified. The zooplankton community response apparently differed between coastal and offshore stations with Bosmina, Eurytemora, and Acartia populations being influenced during peak abundances of C. pengoi. It appears that the native zooplankton community has some resilience, returning to its prior structure outside of peak invasion periods. C. pengoi, where present, contributed significantly to stickleback diet. We explored possible barriers for C. pengoi in the Bothnian Bay, suggesting that the low productive Bothnian Bay ecosystem may be incapable of supporting such a predator. This highlights the need for further studies, especially in the light of global climate change.

  • 23. Traving, Sachia J.
    et al.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Jakobsen, Nina M.
    Sorensen, Helle
    Dinasquet, Julie
    Stedmon, Colin A.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Riemann, Lasse
    The Effect of Increased Loads of Dissolved Organic Matter on Estuarine Microbial Community Composition and Function2017In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, article id 351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased river loads are projected as one of the major consequences of climate change in the northern hemisphere, leading to elevated inputs of riverine dissolved organic matter (DOM) and inorganic nutrients to coastal ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of elevated DOM on a coastal pelagic food web from the coastal northern Baltic Sea, in a 32-day mesocosm experiment. In particular, the study addresses the response of bacterioplankton to differences in character and composition of supplied DOM. The supplied DOM differed in stoichiometry and quality and had pronounced effects on the recipient bacterioplankton, driving compositional changes in response to DOM type. The shifts in bacterioplankton community composition were especially driven by the proliferation of Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Alpha-and Betaproteobacteria populations. The DOM additions stimulated protease activity and a release of inorganic nutrients, suggesting that DOM was actively processed. However, no difference between DOM types was detected in these functions despite different community compositions. Extensive release of re-mineralized carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus was associated with the bacterial processing, corresponding to 25-85% of the supplied DOM. The DOM additions had a negative effect on phytoplankton with decreased Chl a and biomass, particularly during the first half of the experiment. However, the accumulating nutrients likely stimulated phytoplankton biomass which was observed to increase towards the end of the experiment. This suggests that the nutrient access partially outweighed the negative effect of increased light attenuation by accumulating DOM. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that parts of the future elevated riverine DOM supply to the Baltic Sea will be efficiently mineralized by microbes. This will have consequences for bacterioplankton and phytoplankton community composition and function, and significantly affect nutrient biogeochemistry.

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