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  • 1.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Aasa, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Norrlandskliniken, Umeå, Sweden.
    Westerståhl, Maria
    Institutionen för laboratoriemedicin, Karolinska institutet.
    Physical Activity Might Be of Greater Importance for Good Spinal Control Than If You Have Had Pain or Not: A Longitudinal Study2015In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 40, no 24, p. 1926-1933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal design. A cohort followed in 3 waves of data collection.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe the relationships between the performance of 2 tests of spinal control at the age of 52 years and low back pain, physical activity level, and fitness earlier in life, as well as to describe the cross-sectional relationships between these measures.

    SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Altered spinal control has been linked to pain; however, other stimuli may also lead to inability to control the movements of the spine.

    METHODS: Participants answered questions about physical activity and low back pain, and performed physical fitness tests at the age of 16, 34, and 52 years. The fitness test battery included tests of endurance in the back and abdominal muscles, a submaximal bicycle ergometer test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake, and measurements of hip flexion, thoracic spine flexibility, and anthropometrics. Two tests were aggregated to a physical fitness index. At the age of 52, also 2 tests of spinal control, the standing Waiter's bow (WB) and the supine double leg lower (LL) were performed.

    RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses showed that higher back muscle endurance at the age of 34 years could positively predict WB performance at 52 years and higher physical fitness at the age of 34 could positively predict LL performance at 52 years. Regarding cross-sectional relationships, an inability to perform the WB correctly was associated with lower physical fitness, flexibility and physical activity, and larger waist circumference. An inability to correctly perform the LL was associated with lower physical fitness. One-year prevalence of pain was not significantly associated with WB or LL test performance.

    CONCLUSION: An active life resulting in higher physical fitness is related to better spinal control in middle-aged men and women. This further strengthens the importance of physical activity throughout the life span.

    LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.

  • 2.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Jansson, Eva
    Westerståhl, Maria
    The Swedish physical activity and fitness cohort born in 1958 - dropout analysis and overview at 36-year follow-up2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 418-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the Swedish physical activity and fitness cohort study (SPAF-1958) was to describe physical fitness, physical activity, health, and lifestyle across part of the lifespan, and to assess the influences on these factors from the environment, personal factors, and genetics. There is inevitable dropout from longitudinal studies, and it may be systematic. The aim of this first paper of the second follow-up of SPAF-1958 was to provide a dropout analysis to consider to what extent the participants, at 52 years of age, remain a representative sample of the original adolescent study population. Additional aims were to provide an overview of the study protocol and the ongoing study population. Ongoing study participants in SPAF born in 1958 were, at the second follow-up at the age of 52, still representative of the study cohort in terms of sex, adolescent geographical area, upper secondary school program, adolescent body composition, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. However, a higher physical activity and, among women, a higher aerobic capacity in adolescence decreased the risk for dropout. It is important when interpreting results from longitudinal studies to adjust for the systematic dropout that could bias the conclusions drawn from the results.

  • 3.
    Hesselman Borg, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Westerståhl, Maria
    Institutionen för laboratoriemedicin, Karolinska institutet.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Longitudinal study exploring factors associated with neck/shoulder pain at 52 years of age2016In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 9, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the ability of work-related measurements, body composition, physical activity, and fitness levels to predict neck/shoulder pain (upper body pain, UBP) at the age of 52 years. Another aim was to investigate the cross-sectional relationships between UBP, work-related factors, and individual factors at the age of 52 years.

    METHODS: We followed a randomly selected cohort of 429 adolescents that was recruited in 1974 (baseline), when they were 16 years old. The participants completed physical fitness tests, questions about sociodemographic and lifestyle factors at 16, 34, and 52 years of age, and questions about work-related factors and pain in the follow-ups. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between UBP and the other variables.

    RESULTS: Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that high body mass index and the work-related factors, low control, and low social support at the age of 34 years were related to UBP at the age of 52 years. For social support, there was an interaction between men and women where the relationship between low social support and the experience of pain was more evident for women. Among women, body mass index and social support remained significantly related in the multivariate analyses. For men, social support remained significantly related. Cross-sectional relationships at the age of 52 differed from the longitudinal in the sense that measures of joint flexibility and work posture were also significantly associated with UBP.

    CONCLUSION: The fact that the cross-sectional differed from the longitudinal relationships strengthens the importance of performing longitudinal studies when studying factors that might influence the initiation of pain. UBP preventative measures might need to include both lifestyle (such as dietary habits and physical activity to ensure that the individuals are not becoming overweight) and work-related factors such as social support.

  • 4. Kahn, Nicolas
    et al.
    Tomos, Ioannis
    Andrianopoulos, Vasileios
    Arikan, Husevin
    van der Does, Anne
    Almendros, Isaac
    Bonvivi, Sara
    Morgan, Ann
    Nenna, Raffaella
    Magouliotis, Dimitrios
    Rutter, Matthew
    De Soomer, Kevin
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Physiotherapy.
    Leceuvre, Katleen
    Singanayagam, Aran
    Bostantzoglou, Clementine
    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry
    De Brandt, Jana
    Early Career Members at the ERS International Congress 2017: highlights from the Assemblies.2017In: Breathe, ISSN 1810-6838, E-ISSN 2073-4735, Vol. 13, no 4, p. e121-e129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2017 ERS International Congress was, as always, well organised, providing participants with a good mixture of translational and clinical science. Early career members were very well represented in thematic poster, poster discussion and oral presentation sessions and were also actively involved in chairing sessions. The efforts of the Early Career Members Committee (ECMC) to increase the number of early career members included in the competence list (the list of early career members with an interest in being more actively involved in the society) paid off immensely, because the number of early career members registered improved hugely across all assemblies after the Congress. Several newly registered early career members have collated some highlights of the Congress for their assemblies, which should be of interest to all members. As assemblies 12 and 13 are new, there is no report from assembly 12 as there is not yet, at the time of writing, an early career member representative for this newly created assembly.

  • 5.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    COPD in primary care: exploring conditions for implementation of evidence-based interventions and eHealth2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. Symptoms and comorbidities associated with COPD affect the whole body. Clinical guidelines for COPD recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) including exercise training and education promoting self-management strategies. Despite the positive effects on health status, few people with COPD have access to PR. Electronic health (eHealth) has been seen as promising for increased access to evidence-based interventions. To increase the likelihood of a successful implementation, it is important to identity enablers and barriers that might affect implementation outcomes. The aim of this thesis is to explore the experiences, interactions and contexts of the management of COPD in primary care, as well as the design, experienced relevance, effect and expected usefulness of eHealth solutions.

    The thesis is based on four papers that have used qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. Qualitative interviews (papers I, II, IV) and focus group discussions (paper IV) were analysed using qualitative content analysis (papers I, IV) and grounded theory (paper II). Quantitative data, collected using questionnaires (paper I) and in a systematic review (paper III) was analysed with descriptive statistics (paper I) and meta-analysis (paper III). The qualitative and quantitative findings in paper I and II were merged in a mixed methods design. Participants in the studies included healthcare professionals (papers I, IV), people with COPD (papers II, III, IV), their relatives (paper IV), senior managers representing primary care centres (paper I), and external researchers (paper IV).

    The findings in this thesis gave insight in the complex interactions within COPD management between the healthcare organisation (e.g. resources and priority), healthcare professionals (e.g. attitudes, collaboration and competence) and people with COPD (e.g. emotions, attitudes and coping). The healthcare organisation is fragmented with few resources and COPD care takes low priority. The healthcare professionals are Building COPD care on shaky ground (paper I), where the shaky ground is a presentation of the non-compliant organisation and other challenging circumstances. Driven, responsible and ambitious healthcare professionals wish to provide empowering COPD interventions through interprofessional collaboration, but are inhibited by their limited knowledge of and experience with COPD. People with COPD are (Re)acting in an ambiguous interaction with primary care providers (paper II), have limited knowledge and struggle with stigma, while they try to accept and manage their disease. The attitudes and support of healthcare professionals’ are essential for necessary interaction and self-management strategies. For people with COPD, this can take different paths: either enhancing confidence with empowering support or coping with disempowering stigma and threat.

    eHealth solutions such as telehealth, have been used to provide interventions to people with COPD through phone calls, websites or mobile phones, in combination with exercise training and/or education. They show a significant effect on physical activity level, but not on physical capacity and dyspnoea (paper III). Healthcare professionals, people with COPD and their relatives, and external researchers report that, to be useful and relevant in clinical practice, an eHealth tool should be reinforcing existing support structures (paper IV). Furthermore, it needs to fit in the current routines and contexts and create a sense of commitment in its users. According to the participants, information about selfmanagement strategies, such as how-to videos are valuable, and need to help them identify themselves with the people in the videos. The participants regard eHealth as providing knowledge and support for self-management.

    In conclusion, there is a need for implementation of clinical guidelines for COPD in primary care in order to improve both the management of COPD, as well as the interaction between healthcare professionals and people with COPD. Several actions are needed to facilitate this implementation. The priority and status of COPD management in primary care need to be raised. In addition, more resources (e.g. healthcare professionals) for COPD interventions is required to enhance the conditions for interprofessional collaboration and patient participation. Furthermore, it is important to include physiotherapists in COPD management, considering the focus on exercise training and physical activity. Healthcare professionals in primary care need further training and more time to educate and empower people who have COPD. The use of eHealth may lead to improvements in patient outcomes, although more research on web-based interventions is required. User involvement in the development process of an eHealth tool increases its usefulness and relevance in clinical practice and everyday life. The findings from this thesis may guide implementation processes in primary care, as well as the development of eHealth tools for people with COPD or other long-term conditions.

  • 6.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Stort glapp mellan riktlinjer för KOL och den vård som faktiskt gavs2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 115, article id E3X3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Telehälsa kan öka fysisk aktivitetsnivå hos personer med KOL: en systematisk litteraturöversikt2015In: BestPractice Lungmedicin, no 9, p. 7-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Lundell, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Holmner, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Telehealthcare in COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis on physical outcomes and dyspnea2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 1, p. 11-26Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Only a minority of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have access to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Home-based solutions such as telehealthcare, have been used in efforts to make PR more available. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of telehealthcare on physical activity level, physical capacity and dyspnea in patients with COPD, and to describe the interventions used. 

    Methods: Randomized controlled trials were identified through database searches, reference lists and included authors. Articles were reviewed based on eligibility criteria by three authors. Risk of bias was assessed by two authors. Standardized mean differences (SMD) or mean differences (MD) with 95% CI were calculated. Forest plots were used to present data visually.

    Results: Nine studies (982 patients) were included. For physical activity level, there was a significant effect favoring telehealthcare (MD, 64.7 min; 95% CI, 54.4-74.9). No difference between groups was found for physical capacity (MD, -1.3 m; 95% CI, -8.1-5.5) and dyspnea (SMD, 0.088; 95% CI, -0.056-0.233). Telehealthcare was promoted through phone calls, websites or mobile phones, often combined with education and/or exercise training. Comparators were ordinary care, exercise training and/or education. 

    Conclusions: The use of telehealthcare may lead to improvements in physical activity level, although the results should be interpreted with caution given the heterogeneity in studies. This is an important area of research and further studies of the effect of telehealthcare for patients with COPD would be beneficial.

  • 9.
    Lundell, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Tistad, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Holmner, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Building COPD care on shaky ground: a mixed methods study from Swedish primary care professional perspective2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, article id 467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a public health problem. Interprofessional collaboration and health promotion interventions such as exercise training, education, and behaviour change are cost effective, have a good effect on health status, and are recommended in COPD treatment guidelines. There is a gap between the guidelines and the healthcare available to people with COPD. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of what shapes the provision of primary care services to people with COPD and what healthcare is offered to them from the perspective of healthcare professionals and managers.

    Methods: The study was conducted in primary care in a Swedish county council during January to June 2015. A qualitatively driven mixed methods design was applied. Qualitative and quantitative findings were merged into a joint analysis. Interviews for the qualitative component were performed with healthcare professionals (n = 14) from two primary care centres and analysed with qualitative content analysis. Two questionnaires were used for the quantitative component; one was answered by senior managers or COPD nurses at primary care centres (n = 26) in the county council and the other was answered by healthcare professionals (n = 18) at two primary care centres. The questionnaire data were analysed with descriptive statistics.

    Results: The analysis gave rise to the overarching theme building COPD care on shaky ground. This represents professionals driven to build a supportive COPD care on 'shaky' organisational ground in a fragmented and non-compliant healthcare organisation. The shaky ground is further represented by uninformed patients with a complex disease, which is surrounded with shame. The professionals are autonomous and pragmatic, used to taking responsibility for their work, and with limited involvement of the management. They wish to provide high quality COPD care with interprofessional collaboration, but they lack competence and are hindered by inadequate routines and lack of resources.

    Conclusions: There is a gap between COPD treatment guidelines and the healthcare that is provided in primary care. To facilitate implementation of the guidelines several actions are needed, such as further training for professionals, additional resources, and improved organisational structure for interprofessional collaboration and patient education.

  • 10.
    Lundell, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Tistad, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University.
    Enhancing confidence or coping with stigma in an ambiguous interaction with primary care: a qualitative study of people with COPDManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lundell, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Tistad, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Interacting with primary care - experiences of patients with COPD. A qualitative study2018In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation aims to support self-management strategies and behaviour change in patients with COPD, which requires an interaction between the patients and healthcare professionals.

    Aim: The aim was to explore how patients with COPD interact with primary care, and how they experience this interaction.

    Methods: The study was conducted in primary care in northern Sweden. Interviews were performed with patients with COPD (n=13) with varied disease severity, symptoms, sex and age, from four primary care centres. The interviews were analysed with grounded theory.

    Results: The analysis ended up in a process of becoming a more active patient with COPD, moving back and forth between different stages of interaction with primary care. The category building self-esteem with empowering support comprises factors that facilitated this process, such as having a positive spirit, experiences of availability, continuity and regular contacts in primary care, along with a good support where the patients felt respected.

    The simultaneous and conflicting category struggling with the stigma and threat of COPD captures factors inhibiting the process such as the patients’ fear of dyspnea and death, along with feelings of shame and guilt, the low status of COPD and disempowering support from primary care.

    Conclusions: The interaction with primary care could be seen as an ongoing, flexible empowering process for patients with COPD, affected by both inhibiting and facilitating factors. These results could help primary care to empower patients with COPD and facilitate their social process of becoming more active and in control of their disease by using the facilitating factors and decreasing the inhibiting factors.

  • 12.
    Tistad, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun.
    Lundell, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Nyberg, Andre
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Holmner, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Wadell, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Usefulness and relevance of an eHealth Tool in supporting the self-management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: explorative qualitative study of a cocreative process2018In: JMIR Human Factors, E-ISSN 2292-9495, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e10801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: New strategies are urgently needed to support self-management for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care. The use of electronic health (eHealth) solutions is promising. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how such eHealth tools should be designed in order to be perceived as relevant and useful and meet the needs and expectations of the health professionals as well as people with COPD and their relatives.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the aspects of an eHealth tool design and content that make it relevant and useful for supporting COPD-related self-management strategies from the perspective of health care professionals, people with COPD and their relatives, and external researchers.

    Methods: Data were collected during the development of an eHealth tool. A cocreation process was carried out with participants from two primary care units in northern Sweden and external researchers. Individual interviews were performed with health care professionals (n=13) as well as people with COPD (n=6) and their relatives (n=2), and focus group discussions (n=9) were held with all groups of participants. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The overarching theme, reinforcing existing support structures, reflects participant views that the eHealth tool needs to be directly applicable and create a sense of commitment in users. Moreover, participants felt that the tool needs to fit with existing routines and contexts and preferably should not challenge existing hierarchies between health care professionals and people with COPD. Important content for health care professionals and people with COPD included knowledge about self-management strategies. Videos were regarded as the most effective method for communicating such knowledge.

    Conclusions: The cocreation in the development process enables participant perspectives and priorities to be built into the eHealth tool. This is assumed to contribute to a tool that is useful and relevant and, therefore, adopted into clinical practice and everyday life. Findings from this study can inform the development of eHealth tools for people with COPD in other contexts, as well as the development of eHealth tools for self-management support of other chronic diseases.

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