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  • 1.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Öström, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Alcohol and drugs in fatally and non-fatally injured motor vehicle drivers in northern Sweden2009In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 129-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol and drugs are important risk factors for traffic injuries, a major health problem worldwide. This prospective study investigated the epidemiology and the presence of alcohol and drugs in fatally and hospitalized non-fatally injured drivers of motor vehicles in northern Sweden. During a 2-year study period, blood from fatally and hospitalized non-fatally injured drivers was tested for alcohol and drugs. The study subjects were recruited from well-defined geographical areas with known demographics. Autopsy reports, medical journals, police reports, and toxicological analyses were evaluated. Of the fatally injured, 38% tested positive for alcohol and of the non-fatally 21% tested positive; 7% and 13%, respectively, tested positive for pharmaceuticals with a warning for impaired driving; 9% and 4%, respectively, tested positive for illicit drugs. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were benzodiazepines, opiates, and antidepressants. Tetrahydrocannabinol was the most frequently detected illicit substance. No fatally injured women had illegal blood alcohol concentration. The relative proportion of positively tested drivers has increased and was higher than in a similar study 14 years earlier. This finding indicates that alcohol and drugs merit more attention in future traffic safety work.

  • 2.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Saveman, Britt-inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Suicidal drowning deaths in Northern Sweden 1992-2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Division of Social and Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Saveman, Britt-inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Suicidal drowning deaths in northern Sweden 1992-2009: the role of mental disorder and intoxication2015In: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, ISSN 1752-928X, E-ISSN 1878-7487, Vol. 34, p. 168-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicides by drowning have received limited attention by researchers. A recent finding that almost onethird of all drowning deaths in Sweden were classified as suicide instigated this study. We identified 129 cases of suicide by drowning in Northern Sweden and analyzed the circumstances and the psychiatric history prior to the suicide. Information was obtained from autopsy, police and medical records, as well as from the National Inpatient Register. One-third of the suicide victims had previously attempted suicide and half of the victims had been hospitalized due to mental health problems. One-third of these had left the hospital less than one week before the suicide. Alcohol and psychoactive drugs were present in 16% and 62% of the cases, respectively. A history of mental disorder and previous suicide attempt (s), especially by drowning, is an ominous combination necessitating efficient clinical identification, treatment and follow-up if a complete suicide is to be prevented.

  • 4.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Drowning deaths in Sweden with emphasis on the presence of alcohol and drugs: a retrospective study, 1992-20092013In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, p. 216-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Drowning deaths constitute a significant proportion of unnatural deaths globally. In Sweden and other high-income countries, drowning deaths have decreased. This study investigates the epidemiology and current trends of unintentional, intentional, and undetermined drowning deaths with emphasis on the presence of alcohol and other drugs.

    Methods: During an 18-years period, 5,125 drowning deaths were autopsied in Sweden. Data on cases including toxicological analysis on alcohol, pharmaceutical drugs, and illicit drugs were obtained from the National Board of Forensic Medicine.

    Results: During the study period, the annual incidence of drowning deaths in Sweden was 3.1/100,000 inhabitants and decreased on average by about 2% each year (p<0.001). The highest incidence was found among males and in middle/older age groups. The incidence increased 3% for each year of age. Children/adolescents (<= 18 years) constituted 5% of all drowning deaths. Of all drowned females in the study, 55% (847/1,547) committed suicide, which was a significantly higher proportion compared with males (21%, 763/3,578) (p<0.001). In total, 38% (1,656/4,377) of tested drowned persons had alcohol in their blood and the mean concentration was 1.8 g/l. In the unintentional drowning group, intentional drowning group, and the undetermined group, the proportion of alcohol positive was 44%, 24%, and 45%, respectively. One or several psychoactive drugs were present in the blood in 40% (1,688/4,181) of all tested persons and in 69% (965/1,394) of tested persons who died from suicidal drowning. The most common drug was benzodiazepines (21%, 891/4,181). Illicit drugs were detected in 10% (82/854) of tested persons.

    Conclusion: Presence of alcohol and drugs were frequent and may have contributed to the drowning deaths. The incidence of drowning deaths significantly decreased during the study period. Males and the middle/older age groups had a higher incidence compared to females and children. Suicidal drowning was common especially among women. Alcohol and drugs are significant contributors in drowning deaths in Sweden and should be considered as part of a comprehensive prevention program.

  • 5.
    Albertsson, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    The Haddon matrix, a tool for investigating severe bus and coach crashes2003In: International Journal of Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1503-1438, E-ISSN 1755-4713, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to use the Haddon matrix to analyse crash and injury mechanisms in a severe coach crash, to investigate if a safety belt would have reduced injuries, and highlight the triage problem in a mass casualty situation during severe circumstances. Methods: A specific coach crash was chosen as the subject for the case study. All 34 occupants on board were interviewed about the crash, their injuries, and how they sustained their injuries. Medical records concerning ambulance and hospital treatment have been examined. Police reports and other documents concerning the vehicle, weather conditions and the road have been examined. The materials were structured in different cells according to Haddon's matrix. Results: The coach went off a road via a guard-rail and landed on the right side, in a 90° position right across a small river. The main reason for the coach to deviate from the road was strong and gusty side winds imposing lateral forces on the coach, making steering impossible. The impact from the crash was greatest in the front part of the coach, as this part fell 3 metres from the bridge guard-rail down to the river bank. The most frequent injury mechanism was that occupants were hit by other falling occupants. Most occupants would have benefited from having worn seat belts. Ten ambulances and one helicopter from different locations were called upon and the first ambulance arrived 30 minutes after the alarm (a 67-km drive). The helicopter, with an anaesthetist on board, arrived after 1 hour and 20 minutes (a 120-km flight). Nine occupants with moderate injuries and 10 seriously or severely injured occupants were transported by ambulance or helicopter to the hospital. Fifteen occupants, triaged as priority 3, were transported by a chartered coach to hospital where they arrived after about 3 hours. Conclusion: If 100% of the occupants had used a two-point belt, about two-thirds of the injured occupants with MAIS 2+ injuries would have sustained an injury reduction. A further injury reduction by roughly 20% could have been achieved by shifting from two-point belts to three-point belts. Triage of injured occupants could be different from normal practice because of the limited space inside a coach, and the use of ordinary equipment is not always possible inside a crashed vehicle. The fact that most of the side windows remained in position after the crash probably prevented many occupants from serious and fatal injuries caused by ejection or partial ejection.

  • 6.
    Albertsson, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Petzäll, J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Falkmer, T
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Näsman, Y
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Utrymningsförsök av passagerare ur buss vid brand och brandtillbud samt antalet bränder och brandtillbud i bussar i Sverige.2006In: Scand J Trauma Rescue Emerg Med, Vol. 14, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Albertsson, Pontus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Kirk, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Mayrhofer, E
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Case study: 128 injured in rollover coach crashes in Sweden - injury outcome, mechanisms and possible effects of seat belts.2006In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 87-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk for injuries in rollover coach crashes are dependent on whether the occupants are belted or not. However, the influence of the different belt systems for reducing injuries has remained unclear. Since many injuries sustained are caused by impacts with the interior, passenger interactions or ejection through a window, the advantages by proper seat belt systems are evident. In this study, representing the most common serious crash scenario for serious injury, 128 injured in rollover cases were analysed with regard to the injury outcome, mechanisms and the possible injury reduction for occupants when using a safety belt. Furthermore, the different belt systems were compared to explain their contribution to increased safety. Based on medical reports and questioning of the passengers, the injuries sustained are recorded according to the AIS classification. The next step was the identification of the injury mechanisms, using the passenger statements as well as results from numerical occupant simulations. It is important to mention that this study was purely focused on detection of the injury mechanism to avoid the reported injuries. The possibility of additional injuries due to the wearing of a belt were not taken into account. However, the analysis of the 128 injured showed a considerable increase in safety for belted occupants through limiting interior contacts, minimising passenger interaction and reducing the possibility of ejection.

  • 8.
    Aléx, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Center for Disaster Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in prehospital emergency care - an intervention study2015In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 74, article id 28878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients' exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients' temperatures in the prehospital emergency care.

    METHODS: A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30) was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30) no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS), subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures.

    RESULTS: Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001) but decreased in the control group (p=0.014). A significant higher proportion (57%) of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001). At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients' thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress.

  • 9.
    Backman, Kaj
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Albertsson, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Pettersson, S
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Protocol from the coach crash in Ängelsberg, Sweden, January 20032004In: International Journal of Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1503-1438, E-ISSN 1755-4713, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 93-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The crash took place on Friday, 24 January 2003. Due to technical problems, a train was cancelled in Ludvika, a village in central Sweden. A replacement coach was to transport the passengers 115 km to Vsters, via the same route. In darkness, at 4.23 pm, i.e. during working hours, the coach went off the road on a left-hand curve. The driver reduced the speed to 49 km/h before the curve, but lost control of the coach, which skidded off the road, down a high road bank and landed on its right side. The coach's structural damage was mainly located on the right side. Of the 49 occupants, 11 were partially or totally ejected, and 6 were fatally injured. Forty occupants had injuries classified as ISS 1-15, three as ISS 16-30 and six as ISS 41-75. All those in the last group sustained fatal injuries.

  • 10.
    Bergström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Fracture mechanisms and fracture pattern in men and women aged 50 years and older: a study of a 12-year population-based injury register, Umeå, Sweden2008In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 1267-1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: In a study of a 12-year population-based injury register, Umeå, Sweden, we analyzed the fracture mechanisms and fracture pattern in men and women 50 years and older. Low-energy trauma was responsible for the major and costliest part of the fracture panorama, but the pattern differs between age groups.

    Introduction: Osteoporosis-related fracture is a major health problem: the number of hip fractures is expected to double to 2030. While osteoporosis is one of many risk factors, trauma is almost always involved. Therefore, we analyzed injury mechanisms in patients aged over 50.

    Methods: We registered injury mechanism, cause, diagnosis in all trauma patients at Umeå University hospital, Sweden. This population-based register (1993–2004) comprises a total of 113,668 injuries (29,189 fractures). Patients ≥50 years contributed to 13,279 fractures.

    Results: Low-energy trauma (fall <1 m) caused 53% of all fractures ≥50 years and older. In those over 75 low-energy trauma caused >80%. The seasonal variation of fractures was maximally 25%. With increasing age, proximal fractures became more common, in both upper and lower extremities. Proximal locations predominate in older age groups.

    Conclusions: Low-energy trauma was responsible for the largest and costliest part of the fracture panorama. In fact, almost all fractures in middle-aged and old people were caused by low-energy mechanisms; thus, most fractures in these patients have a fragility component, and the contribution of osteoporosis-related fractures is more important than previously thought. A better understanding of injury mechanisms also in low-energy trauma is a prerequisite for preventive interventions.

  • 11. Bergström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Svensson, Olle
    Fracture panorama in Umeå2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 103, no 40, p. 2967-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    [Children up to the age of 12 at risk in the traffic. Analysis of traffic accidents at the Norrland University Hospital in Umea]2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 26-28, p. 1361-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Strongly increased incidence of trampoline-induced injuries2007In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 421-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Dödsolyckor i arbetslivet: Delrapport 12016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Nio av tio arbetsrelaterade dödsolyckor drabbar män. Utifrån vår analys verkar det som att kvinnor och män har liknande risk att drabbas av en dödsolycka om förhållandena i arbetsmiljön är likartade.

    Dödsolyckor drabbar också i högre grad äldre personer än yngre, och mer än hälften av männen som omkom var över 50 år. En viktig delförklaring är att äldre får svårare skador och har högre risk för dödlig utgång än yngre om de utsätts för samma skadevåld.

    Fordonsrelaterade olyckor utgör ca hälften av alla dödsolyckor, och hälften av dem sker i vägtrafikområden. Det finns dock redan många aktörer som arbetar för att förebygga olyckor i trafiken, så aktörer inom arbetsmiljöområdet bör prioritera förebyggande åtgärder i andra miljöer. Olyckor i sådana andra miljöer utgör ca en fjärdedel av alla dödsolyckor.

    Fallolyckor är en viktig orsak till dödsolyckor och då främst fall från höjd. Många sådana olyckor inträffar inom byggverksamhet, och vår analys tyder på att tekniska brister i byggställningar kan vara ett område för förbättringar. Dessutom bör åtgärder riktas mot gruppen äldre elinstallatörer eftersom de förhållandevis ofta drabbas av dödliga elolyckor.

    Trädfällning är en annan betydande orsak till dödsolyckor, framför allt inom jord- och skogsbruk.

    En jämförelse mellan data ur registren för dödliga och svåra men icke-dödliga arbetsolyckor visar på stora skillnader ibland annat vem som drabbas och var skadan inträffar. Det innebär att register om svåra men icke-dödliga skador ger begränsad information om vilka förebyggande åtgärder som är lämpliga mot dödsolyckor och var de ska sättas in.

    Sammantaget visar vår analys att statistik över allvarliga arbetsrelaterade olyckor, baserat på sjukskrivningstid, har begränsat värde när det gäller att prioritera åtgärder för att förebygga arbetsrelaterade dödsolyckor. I registren finns fritextsvar som beskriver händelseförloppet för varje anmäld olycka. En textanalys av dessa beskrivningar kan ge värdefull kunskap, men det är något som behöver studeras ytterligare.

  • 15.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Järvholm, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Dödsolyckor i arbetslivet: Delrapport 22017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatal and serious occupational accidents have decreased in Sweden since the 1950s. Today, there is on average, about 1 fatal outcome of occupational accidents per 100 000 persons, and 1 serious accident per 500 persons.2 Nine of ten occupational accidents with fatal outcome 2010-2014 happened to men. Fatal accidents are more common among elderly people and more than half of the male victims were over the age of 50. Older people often suffer more severe injuries than younger people for the same trauma, which may have contributed to the observed higher death rate among mature and elderly persons.

    Accidents related to vehicles represented about half of all fatalities. Half of these happened on public roads in ordinary road traffic, and the other half happened in other places and under other circumstances than vehicle crashes. Falls, especially from higher level, were another significant cause of fatal accidents. Many such accidents occurred in the construction industry, and our analysis indicates that e.g. improvement of scaffolding could decrease the risk. Half of fatally injured electricians were older than 58 years with long occupational experience. This indicates that persons with long experience may also need repeated training and education. Cutting down trees was another important cause of fatalities, especially among older persons working within forestry and agriculture.

    Comparative data from registers of fatal and serious occupational accidents indicates differences in who had the accident and where the accident occurred. This means that a register of non-fatal accidents gives limited information about possible strategies for the prevention of accidents with fatal outcome.

    2 A serious accident is an accident with at least 14 days sick absenteeism.12

    Important conclusions are

    • Fatal and serious occupational accidents are rare events with different causes. It is therefore difficult for organizations and working groups to learn from incidents in their own organization. Personal experience and general information about risks have thus limited potential to prevent fatal and serious accidents within a single organization if not compiled or aggregated in e.g. a wider national perspective. We think that injury mitigation work should focus on technical measures and support strict organizational procedures, e.g. for the use of protective equipment especially where there is risk for fatal accidents. Today that is routine procedure in organizations with high awareness of risks, such as the aviation industry.
    • The strategy for prevention of fatal and serious occupational injuries may partly have different focus as their epidemiology is different.
    • Two of three fatal accidents are related to vehicles, or to falls from higher level, which are the two most important areas to address in the injury reducing work of fatalities.
    • Many of the most risky activities above happened at temporary workplaces, which often require that the worker themselves prevent risks. This requires special training and education.
    • Fatal accidents due to electricity or cutting of trees often happened to mature and elderly persons. It may indicate that continuous training and education could be of value also in experienced persons as well as in small enterprises and among the self-employed.
    • Investigation of fatal and serious occupational accidents could be developed to have an even stronger focus on injury mitigation and prevention.
  • 16.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Vehicle-related injuries in and around a medium sized Swedish City - bicyclist injuries caused the heaviest burden on the medical sector2017In: Injury Epidemiology, ISSN 0176-3733, E-ISSN 2197-1714, Vol. 4, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A data acquisition from the medical sector may give one important view of the burden on the society caused by vehicle related injuries. The official police-reported statistics may only reflect a part of all vehicle-related injured seeking medical attention. The aim is to provide a comprehensive picture of the burden of vehicle related injuries on the medical sector (2013), and to compare with official police-reported statistics and the development year 2000-2013.

    METHODS: The data set includes 1085 injured from the Injury Data Base at Umeå University Hospital's catchment area with 148,500 inhabitants in 2013.

    RESULTS: Bicyclists were the most frequently injured (54%). One-third had non-minor (MAIS2+) injuries, and bicyclists accounted for 58% of the 1071 hospital bed days for all vehicle-related injuries. Car occupants represented 23% of all injured, and only 9% had MAIS2+ injuries. They accounted for 17% of the hospital bed days. Motorized two wheel vehicle riders represented 11% of the injured and 39% had MAIS2+ injuries and they occupied 11% of the hospital bed days. Of the 1085 medically treated persons, 767 were injured in public traffic areas, and, therefore, should be included in the official police statistics; however, only a third (232) of them were reported by the police. The annual injury rate had not changed during 2000-2013 for bicyclists, motor-cycle riders, pedestrians or snowmobile riders. However, for passenger car occupants a decrease was observed after 2008, and for mopedists the injury rate was halved after 2009 when a licensing regulation was introduced.

    CONCLUSION: The Swedish traffic injury reducing strategy Vision Zero, may have contributed to the reduction of injured car occupants and moped riders. The official police-reported statistics was a biased data source for vehicle related injuries and the total number medically treated was in total five times higher. Bicyclists caused the heaviest burden on the medical sector; consequently, they need to be prioritized in future safety work, as recently declared in the Government plan Vision Zero 2.0.

  • 17.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Better scientific basis is necessary for traffic safety2004In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 101, no 24, p. 2117-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Pre-hospital emergency care in Sweden - with special emphasis on care of traffic victims2004In: International Association of Traffic and Safety Sciences Research, Vol. 28, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Snowmobile, motorcycle and moose-car accidents: aspects on injury control1985Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Injuries related to snowmobiles, motorcycles and moose-car collisions have increased. The aim of the present thesis was to analyse mechanisms and consequences in fatal and non-fatal accidents of these types, and to penetrate possible preventive measures.

    Snowmobiles

    The median age of the injured was 30 and of the killed 32, males pre­dominating. A majority of the accidents occurred during weekends, and especially the fatal accidents occurred after dark. The extremities were the most commonly injured parts of the body, however, drowning, crushed chest and cranial injuries caused most of the fatalities. Among the fatalities, four out of five were under the influence of alcohol. The present Swedish laws regarding snowmobiles seem well motivated. "Built-in" safety measures in the construction of the snowmobiles, pro­perly designed snowmobile tracks and functional search and rescue sys­tems could reduce the injuries.

    Motorcycles

    The median age was 19 years for both the traffic injured and the kil­led. Half of the traffic accidents were collisions with other motor ve­hicles. In the fatally injured group, also collisions with fixed road­side objects were common. Of the fatally injured, more than every fifth person died in an accident where alcohol was an influential factor. In the injured group, lower extremity injuries (especially in off-road riding) were common and among the fatalities most riders died from injuries to the head or chest. Out of one thousand motorcycle riders interviewed, 45% reported wobbling experiences (8% reported severe wobbling). Possible injury reducing measures include increasing the licensing age, more discriminating driving test, "built-in" restriction of the motorcycle's top speed, elimination of motorcycles prone to wobbling, and a more intensive traffic supervision (speeding, alco­hol).

    Moose-car collisitions

    The median age of the drivers was 38 years. Most collisions happened at dusk or when dark (3/4). The median collision speed was 70 km/h. The damage to the car was typical, the roof and the windshield pillars were deformed downwards and backwards. The broken windshield was often pressed into the passenger compartment. Most of the injured car occu­pants suffered cuts predominantly to the head and upper extremities. Nearly all the fatally injured died of head and neck injuries. The injuries may be reduced by strengthening the roof and the windshield pillars, and by introducing anti 1 acerati ve windshields.

  • 20.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Albertsson, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Petzäll, Jan
    Injury events among bus and coach occupants - Non-crash injuries as important as crash injuries2005In: International Association of Traffic and Safety Sciences: Research, ISSN 0386-1112, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 79-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ten year complete data set from the health sector, comprising 284 injured bus and coach occupants from a well defined area, was analyzed. The annual injury incidence was 2 per 10,000 inhabitants, 3/4 were women. In non-crash incidents, 54% were injured; 2/3 while alighting from a bus or coach. In crashes, 46% were injured; 2/3 in collisions with other vehicles and 1/3 in single vehicle crashes. During October-March, 3/4 were injured. In two single vehicle mass casualty crashes in slippery road conditions, high built coaches were hit by so high cross wind forces that they were blown off the road. This crash mechanism has received little attention earlier. Of those injured in collisions with other vehicles, 78% were injured in collisions with other heavy vehicles. Slippery conditions contributed to half of the alighting injuries. The proportion of moderate or more serious injuries (MAIS 2+) was highest in single vehicle crashes (48%) and in alighting and boarding (43%) incidents, and was lowest (5%) in collisions. Every seventh injured was treated as an in-patient on average in five days. Non-crash victims consumed 57% of all in-patient days. Conclusions: The aerodynamic cross-wind factor merits more studies. Injury reducing measures against alighting injuries, addressing especially step height and slippery conditions, may have a great potential to reduce these injuries. Rear-end collisions by other heavy vehicles in urban areas, causing a high number of “whip-lash" injuries, also need to be further addressed. The newly introduced law on compulsory seat belt use in long distance coaches may have a potential to reduce single vehicle crash and some collision injuries.

  • 21.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Ahlm, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Sjögren, Harmeet
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Violent deaths in small children in northern Sweden.2006In: International journal of circumpolar health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 28-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To identify causes and trends of violent deaths among children younger than 4 years in a northern region. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of medico-legal autopsy and police data. METHODS: Data from all 72 deaths from "external causes" 1977-2004, in children < 4 years from the northern half of Sweden were analysed. RESULTS: The death rate was 7.1 per 100,000 children and year during the first half of the study period, and 5.2 during the second half. Vehicle- and drowning-related deaths were halved. Fifteen were struck by motor vehicles (in 8 cases by heavy vehicles), 14 car occupants were killed in car crashes, 12 were killed by intentional violence inflicted by an adult, and 9 each were killed by (i) carbon monoxide/smoke inhalation, (ii) asphyxiation, or (iii) drowning. The boy:girl ratio was 1:1 in all groups, except in the groups "drowning" and "run over by motor vehicle", where boys dominated. CONCLUSIONS: Medical professionals have a difficult but important task in identifying and taking action against child abuse and in promoting child safety especially in the traffic and home environments.

  • 22.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine. Rättsmedicin.
    Passenger car collision fatalities - with special emphasis on collisions with heavy vehicles2008In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 158-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1995 and 2004, 293 passenger car occupants died in collisions with other vehicles in northern Sweden (annual incidence: 3.3 per 100,000 inhabitants, 6.9 per 100,000 cars, or 4.8 per 109 km driven); half of these deaths involved heavy vehicles. The annual number of passenger car occupant death per 100,000 cars in var-truck/bus collisions has remained unchanged since the 1980s, , but in car-car collisions it has decreased to one third of its former level. As crash objects, trucks and buses killed five times as many car occupants per truck/bus kilometer driven as did cars.

    The collisions were characterized by crashes in the oncoming vehicle´s lane, under icy, snowy, or wet conditions; crashes into heavy vehicles generally occurred in daylight, on workdays, in winter, and on 90 and 70 km/h two-lane roads. Head and chest injuries accouted for most of the fatal injuries. multiple fatal injuries and critical and deadly head injuries characterized the deaths in collisions with heavy vehicles.

    An indication of suicide was present in 4% of the deaths; for thos who crashed into trucks, this percentage was doubled. Among the driver victims, 4% had blood alcohol levels above the legal limit of 0.2 g/L.

    Frontal collision risks might be reduced by a mid-barrier, by building less injurious fronts on trucks and buses, by efficient skid prevention, and by use of flexible speed limits varying with road and light conditions.

  • 23. Blomquist, E
    et al.
    Danielsson, Å
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Kartläggning av skador på grund av misshandel i Umeå- fler polisanmäler våldsbrotten och "gängvåldet" ökar2005In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 102, no 945-948Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Boman, Helena
    et al.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Små barn lever farligt i traktorers närhet. Håll barn borta från traktorer; gör traktorer säkrare!1999In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 96, no 18, p. 2222-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under åren 1992-1997 inträffade i Sverige 14 traktorrelaterade dödsfall bland barn. Elva var pojkar och medelåldern 5 år. I nära hälften av fallen var barnets far förare av traktorn. För att förebygga dessa händelser bör barn inte tillåtas vara i närheten av traktorer i arbete eller färdas som passagerare. Med hänsyn till hur svåråtkomlig "den mänsliga faktorn" är, torde också utvecklande av skadeförebyggande åtgärder i traktorn vara av betydelse.

  • 25.
    Boman, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Hedelin, Annika
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    "Avoidable" deaths in two areas of sweden - Analysis of deaths in hospital after injury1999In: The European journal of surgery = Acta chirurgica, ISSN 1102-4151, Vol. 165, no 9, p. 828-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe causes of death and other characteristics of "avoidable" deaths in patients admitted to hospital after trauma, and estimate and analyse changes in the avoidable death rate during the years studied. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of medico legal autopsy material. SETTING: One northern and one western area in Sweden 1988-1996. SUBJECTS: 335 cases who died in hospital after trauma. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Avoidable death, defined as an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 35 or less and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) head of 4 or less and cause of death. RESULTS: We found 70 avoidable deaths (21%). Among these, 15 (21%) died of head injuries, 17 (24%) of thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic injuries, and 38 (54%) of medical complications. The number of deaths after trauma decreased considerably from 1988-90 to 1994-96, but the proportion who died in hospital remained almost constant. The proportion of avoidable deaths decreased from 22% to 17%, mainly because the proportion of deaths from medical complications was halved. CONCLUSION: The standard of Swedish in-hospital trauma care has improved, particularly with a reduction in post-traumatic complications. However, there is still room for improvement in the treatment of complications among elderly people.

  • 26. Danielsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Blomqvist, Elin
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    More violent assaults reported to the police and increasing gang violence. A survey of violence-related personal injuries in Umea2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 102, no 12-13, p. 945-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Doohan, Isabelle
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Östtlund, Ulrika
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study2017In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 165-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore physical and mental consequences and injury mechanisms among bus crash survivors to identify aspects that influence recovery. Methods The study participants were the total population of survivors (N=56) from a bus crash in Sweden. The study had a mixed-methods design that provided quantitative and qualitative data on injuries, mental well-being, and experiences. Results from descriptive statistics and qualitative thematic analysis were interpreted and integrated in a mixed-methods analysis. Results Among the survivors, 11 passengers (20%) sustained moderate to severe injuries, and the remaining 45 (80%) had minor or no physical injuries. Two-thirds of the survivors screened for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) risk were assessed, during the period of one to three months after the bus crash, as not being at-risk, and the remaining one-third were at-risk. The thematic analysis resulted in themes covering the consequences and varying aspects that affected the survivors' recoveries. The integrated findings are in the form of four core cases of survivors who represent a combination of characteristics: injury severity, mental well-being, social context, and other aspects hindering and facilitating recovery. Core case Avery represents a survivor who had minor or no injuries and who demonstrated a successful mental recovery. Core case Blair represents a survivor with moderate to severe injuries who experienced a successful mental recovery. Core case Casey represents a survivor who sustained minor injuries or no injuries in the crash but who was at-risk of developing PTSD. Core case Daryl represents a survivor who was at-risk of developing PTSD and who also sustained moderate to severe injuries in the crash. Conclusion The present study provides a multi-faceted understanding of mass-casualty incident (MCI) survivors (ie, having minor injuries does not always correspond to minimal risk for PTSD and moderate to severe injuries do not always correspond to increased risk for PTSD). Injury mitigation measures (eg, safer roadside material and anti-lacerative windows) would reduce the consequences of bus crashes. A well-educated rescue team and a compassionate and competent social environment will facilitate recovery.

  • 28.
    Eklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bone mass, size and previous fractures as predictors of prospective fractures in an osteoporotic referral population.2009In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 808-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of bone mass, bone size and previous low energy fractures upon prospective fractures has not been investigated in a referral osteoporotic population. We investigated the association between bone mass, bone size, previous fractures, body constitution, and prospective validated fractures in 5701 women and 1376 men, aged 30 years and older. Bone mass measurements of the femoral neck were collected at a single study center in Sweden. Most of the subjects were measured on suspicion of osteoporosis. Data on validated low energy retrospective and prospective fractures in the cohort were collected from the corresponding health care district. Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and estimated volumetric BMD (vBMD, g/cm(3)) were shown to be good independent predictors for fracture in both women and men (Hazard ratio per standard deviation decrease (HR)=1.27-1.52, p<0.05). Bone size did not predict prospective fractures in either sex (HR=0.91-0.99, p>0.05), and bone size completely explained the higher BMD in men than in women. In women, retrospective low energy fractures (HR=1.78, p<0.001) and height (HR=1.02, p=0.006) were additional independent predictors of osteoporotic fractures after adjusting for age and BMD. In conclusion, we show that in a large osteoporotic referral population, age, BMD and previous fractures are independent predictors of prospective low energy fractures. These results add additional strength to the recent change in focus towards a multivariate analysis when assessing the future risk of fracture.

  • 29.
    Englund, Undis
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nilsson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bucht, Gustaf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Pettersson Kymmer, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Physical activity in middle-aged women and hip fracture risk: the UFO study2011In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 499-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: In a population-based case-control study, we demonstrate that middle-aged women who were active with walking or in different physical spare time activities were at lower risk of later sustaining a hip fracture compared to more sedentary women.

    Introduction: In middle-aged women participating in the Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study, we investigated whether physical activity is associated with a subsequent decreased risk of sustaining a hip fracture.

    Methods: The UFO study is a nested case-control study investigating associations between bone markers, lifestyle, and osteoporotic fractures. We identified 81 female hip fracture cases that had reported lifestyle data before they sustained their fracture. Each case was compared with two female controls who were identified from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total cohort of 237 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 57.2 ± 5.0 years, and mean age at fracture was 65.4 ± 6.4 years.

    Results: Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, weight, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects who were regularly active with walking or had a moderate or high frequency of physical spare time activities (i.e. berry/mushroom picking and snow shovelling) were at reduced risk of sustaining a hip fracture (OR 0.14; 95% CI; 0.05–0.53 for walking and OR 0.19; 95% CI; 0.08–0.46, OR 0.17, 95% CI; 0.05–0.64 for moderate and high frequency of spare time activities, respectively) compared to more sedentary women.

    Conclusion: An active lifestyle in middle age seems to reduce the risk of future hip fracture. Possible mechanisms may include improved muscle strength, coordination, and balance resulting in a decreased risk of falling and perhaps also direct skeletal benefits.

  • 30.
    Engström, Karl Gunnar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Angrén, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Mass casualty incidents in the underground mining industry: applying the Haddon Matrix on an integrative literature review2018In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, E-ISSN 1938-744X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Underground mining is associated with obvious risks that can lead to mass casualty incidents. Information about such incidents was analyzed in an integrated literature review.

    METHODS: A literature search (1980-2015) identified 564 modern-era underground mining reports from countries sharing similar occupational health legislation. These reports were condensed to 31 reports after consideration of quality grading and appropriateness to the aim. The Haddon matrix was used for structure, separating human factors from technical and environmental details, and timing.

    RESULTS: Most of the reports were descriptive regarding injury-creating technical and environmental factors. The influence of rock characteristics was an important pre-event environmental factor. The organic nature of coal adds risks not shared in hard-rock mines. A sequence of mechanisms is commonly described, often initiated by a human factor in interaction with technology and step-wise escalation to involve environmental circumstances. Socioeconomic factors introduce heterogeneity. In the Haddon matrix, emergency medical services are mainly a post-event environmental issue, which were not well described in the available literature. The US Quecreek Coal Mine incident of 2002 stands out as a well-planned rescue mission.

    CONCLUSION: Evaluation of the preparedness to handle underground mining incidents deserves further scientific attention. Preparedness must include the medical aspects of rescue operations.

  • 31.
    Fahlström, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Acute Achilles tendon rupture in badminton players1998In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 467-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All patients with badminton-related acute Achilles tendon ruptures registered during 1990 to 1994 at the University Hospital of Umeå were retrospectively followed up using a questionnaire. Thirty-one patients (mean age, 36.0 years), 27 men and 4 women, were included. Thirty patients (97%) described themselves as recreational players or beginners. The majority of the injuries (29 of 31, 94%) happened at the middle or end of the planned game. Previous local symptoms had been noticed by five patients (16%). Long-term results showed that patients treated with surgery had a significantly shorter sick leave absence than patients treated without surgery (50 versus 75 days). There was no obvious selection favoring any treatment modality. None of the surgically treated patients had reruptures, but two reruptures occurred in the nonsurgically treated group. There seemed to be fewer remaining symptoms and a higher sports activity level after the injury in the surgically treated group. Our results indicate that local muscle fatigue may interfere with strength and coordination. Preventive measures such as specific treatment of minor injuries and adequate training of strength, endurance, and coordination are important. Our findings also indicate that surgical treatment and careful postoperative rehabilitation is of great importance among badminton players of any age or sports level with Achilles tendon rupture.

  • 32.
    Fahlström, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Acute badminton injuries1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 145-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 1990-1994, 1.2% of all sports injuries that required emergency care at the University Hospital of Umeå were caused by badminton. In 90.7% of the cases the patients described themselves as recreational players or beginners. There were 51.3% minor injuries (AIS 1) and 48.7% moderate injuries (AIS 2). The lower extremities were affected in 92.3% of the cases. Achilles tendon ruptures (34.6%) and ankle sprains and fractures (29.5%) were the most frequent. By the time of the follow-up (10-69 months), 52.6% of the players still had symptoms from the injuries and 39.5% had not been able to return to playing badminton. Our data indicate the importance of adequate treatment and rehabilitation after acute badminton injuries.

  • 33.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    One hundred years of railway disasters and recent trends2011In: Prehospital and disaster medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 367-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Globally, railway transport is increasing steadily. Despite the adoption of diverse safety systems, major railway incidents continue to occur. Higher speeds and increased passenger traffic are factors that influence the risk of mass-casualty incidents and make railway crashes a reality that merits extensive planning and training.

    METHODS: Data on railway disasters were obtained from the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), which maintains the Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT). This descriptive study consists of 529 railway disasters (≥10 killed and/or ≥100 non- fatally injured) from 1910 through 2009.

    RESULTS: The number of railway disasters, people killed, and non-fatally injured, has increased throughout the last hundred years-particularly during the last four decades (1970-2009), when 88% of all disasters occurred. In the mid-20th century, a shift occurred, resulting in more people being non-fatally injured than fatally injured. During 1970-2009, 74% of all railway disasters occurred in Asia, Africa, and South and Central America, combined. The remaining 26% occurred in Europe, North America, and Oceania, combined. Since 1980, railway disasters have increased, especially in Asia and Africa, while Europe has had a decrease in railway disasters. The number killed per disaster (1970-2009) was highest in Africa (n = 55), followed by South and Central America (n = 47), and Asia (n = 44). The rate was lowest in North America (n = 10) and Europe (n = 29). On average, the number of non-fatal injuries per disaster was two to three times the number of fatalities, however, in the African countries (except South Africa) the relation was closer to 1:1, which correlates to the relation found in more developed countries during the mid-20th century. The total losses (non-fatally and fatally injured) per disaster has shown a slight decreasing trend.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite extensive crash avoidance and injury reduction safety systems, railway crashes occur on all continents, indicating that this type of incident must be accounted for in disaster planning and training. Better developed safety, crashworthiness, and rescue resources in North America and Europe may be factors explaining why the number of crashes and losses has stabilized and why the average number of people killed per disaster is lowest on these continents.

  • 34.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Holgersson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Bodén, Ida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    A study of a mass casualty train crash, focusing on the cause of injuries2014In: Journal of Transportation Safety & Security, ISSN 1943-9962, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 152-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study includes 73 fatally and nonfatally injured passengers from a level-crossing train crash in Nosaby, Sweden, in 2004. The aim was to identify the injury panorama and the injury objects and to determine the injury-inducing variables. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, quantitative content analysis, and multivariate data analysis. The first carriage overturned, and its occupants were the ones who suffered the most severe and lethal injuries. Injury type and injury location for these passengers also differed significantly from the passengers on the other two carriages. Tables significantly influenced injury type and injury location in all carriages, whereas the injured persons’ seating position had significant effect only in the second and third carriage. Those who had travelled facing forward with a table in front of them in Carriages 2 and 3 were more likely to have sustained injuries to their abdomen or pelvis. Other injury-inducing objects were seats, interior structures, wood pellets from the truck, and other passengers. Neck sprains were significantly more prevalent among those who had travelled facing backward. Improved train crashworthiness also needs to include interior safety, which would have a potential to reduce crash injuries.

  • 35.
    Forsberg, Rebecca
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Strandberg, Veronica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Goede, Patrick
    Liuski, Petra
    Sahovic, Dzenan
    [New threats raise new disaster planning requirements]2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 9, p. 603-604Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En rad attentat mot den spårbundna trafiken har visat hur sårbar sektorn är för attacker. Ett väl utvecklat och anpassat katastrofmedicinskt omhändertagande behövs för att öka förmågan att hantera följderna av eventuella attentat.

  • 36.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    A cost-utility analysis of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up for injured road users2009In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 9, p. 98-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Traffic injuries can cause physical, psychological, and economical impairment, and affected individuals may also experience shortcomings in their post-accident care and treatment. In an earlier randomised controlled study of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up, self-ratings of health-related quality of life were generally higher in the intervention group than in the control group. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of nursing intervention via telephone follow-up by examining costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). METHODS: A randomised controlled study was conducted between April 2003 and April 2005. Car occupants, cyclists, and pedestrians aged between 18 and 70 years and attending the Emergency Department of Umeå University Hospital in Sweden after an injury event in the traffic environment were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288) or control group (n = 280). The intervention group received routine care supplemented by nursing via telephone follow-up during half a year, while the control group received routine care only. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, and a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed including the costs of the intervention and the QALYs gained. RESULTS: Overall, the intervention group gained 2.60 QALYs (260 individuals with an average gain of 0.01 QALYs). The car occupants gained 1.54 QALYs (76 individuals, average of 0.02). Thus, the cost per QALY gained was 16 000 Swedish Crown (SEK) overall and 8 500 SEK for car occupants. CONCLUSION: Nursing intervention by telephone follow-up after an injury event, is a cost effective method giving improved QALY to a very low cost, especially for those with minor injuries. 

  • 37.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Omvårdnad. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Omvårdnad.
    Injured in traffic: experiences of care and rehabilitation.2006In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Jansson, Lilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Injured road users' experience of care in the emergency department2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 726-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the patients' perceptions of quality of care (QoC) in an emergency department (ED) and to analyse associations between patients' background characteristics and estimated QoC.

    BACKGROUND: Each year 1.4 out of every 100 inhabitants are injured in the traffic environment and receive care at the ED. No study has yet analysed different injured road users' perceived QoC, or how important they rate different caring dimensions.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional study at the ED, in the University Hospital in Umeå, Sweden.

    METHOD: A stratified consecutive sample of 166 car occupants, 200 cyclists and 199 pedestrians, aged 18-70 years, all injured in the traffic environment. Data were collected from medical records and from a mail survey using a short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire, modified for ED use. The statistical methods used included Mann-Whitney's U-test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and multiple logistic regression.

    RESULTS: The perceived QoC and the subjective importance of the corresponding QoC dimensions were rated at the 'better' half of the rating scale, with no differences between the different road user categories. The most prominent factors associated with a positive perceived QoC rating were a short waiting time, moderate or serious injuries and high age as well as high educational level of the injury victim. For the subjective importance, a short waiting time was rated as the most important but slight differences were seen, related to education and sex.

    CONCLUSION: The association patterns between the areas of perceived reality and subjective importance indicated that expectations were higher than perceived QoC, suggesting that patients expected somewhat higher QoC than they received.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Information on factors causing long waiting times, adapted to patients' age, sex and educational level, may reduce dissatisfaction among long waiting patients, especially among those with minor injuries.

  • 39.
    Franzén, Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Brulin, Christine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Injured road users' health-related quality of life after telephone intervention: a randomised controlled trial.2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether nursing intervention via telephone follow-up can affect health-related quality of life among road users in the postinjury phase.

    Background: Injuries in the traffic environment often cause both physical impairment and psychological trauma. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether nursing via telephone follow-up after discharge could affect health-related quality of life among injured road users.

    Design: A randomised controlled study.

    Method: Between April 2003–April 2005, car occupants, cyclists and pedestrians, aged 18–70 years, all injured in the traffic environment, were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 288) or control group (n = 280). All patients were initially managed by one emergency department with the intervention group being followed up by nurse led telephone follow-up three weeks after discharge, while the control group did not receive any telephone follow-up. Data were collected from a mail survey using the non-disease-specific health-related quality of life instrument EQ5D, at baseline and after six months.

    Results: In general, the intervention group rated significantly higher health-related quality of life than the control group. This difference was most pronounced in the group of those provided with advice as part of telephone follow-up and significantly for the general health status. Car occupants gained most advantage from the nursing telephone follow-up, with significantly lower problems in the dimensions of pain/discomfort and usual activities.

    Conclusion: Nursing intervention via telephone follow-up was effective at increasing the health-related quality of life of injured road users. Early identification of the concerns of the injured and specific advice provided by the intervening nurse seems to be of greatest weight. Thus, more research is needed regarding the usefulness of early support and the advantage of this from a health economic perspective.

    Relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for changes in attitudes and working routines to identify individuals with low health-related quality of life and to give more extensive support from this point of view.

  • 40.
    Hanberger, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Bylund, Per-Olof
    Akut och katastrofmedicinskt centrum, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå.
    Metodologiska utgångspunkter för forskningsprogrammet ”Säkerhetsarbetets relevans och effekter”2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapporten har utvecklat och sammanfattat programmets metodologiska utgångspunkter. Centrala begrepp har definierats och motiverats. Principiella frågor kring utvärdering av relevans och effekter av säkerhetsarbeten och säkerhetsprogram har också diskuterats. De överväganden som diskuteras och de ställningstaganden som gjorts i rapporten kommer att vägleda arbetet och konkretiseras i forskningsprocessen. Utgångspunkterna kommer att vid behov anpassas till de utmaningar som forskarna ställs inför. I slutrapporten kommer programmets metodologiska lärdomar att redovisas och diskuteras.

  • 41.
    Henriksson, Otto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundgren, Peter J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Protection against cold: a survey of available equipment in Swedish pre-hospital services2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 1354-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to survey the current equipment used for prevention, treatment and monitoring of accidental hypothermia in Swedish pre-hospital services.

    Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all road ambulance services (AS), the helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS), the national helicopter search and rescue service (SAR) and the municipal rescue services (RS) in Sweden to determine the availability of insulation, active warming, fluid heating, and low-reading thermometers.

    Results: The response rate was 77% (n = 255). All units carried woollen or polyester blankets for basic insulation. Specific windproof insulation materials were common in the HEMS, SAR and RS units but only present in about half of the AS units. Active warming equipment was present in all the SAR units, but only in about two-thirds of the HEMS units and about one-third of the AS units. About half of the RS units had the ability to provide a heated tent or container. Low-reading thermometers were present in less than half of the AS and HEMS units and were non-existent in the SAR units. Pre-warmed intravenous fluids were carried by almost all of the AS units and half of the HEMS units but infusion heaters were absent in most units.

    Conclusion: Basic insulation capabilities are well established in the Swedish pre-hospital services. Specific wind and waterproof insulation materials, active warming devices, low-reading thermometers and IV fluid heating systems are less common. We suggest the development and implementation of national guidelines on accidental hypothermia that include basic recommendations on equipment requirements.

  • 42.
    Henriksson, Otto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundgren, Peter J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Kuklane, Kalev
    Holmér, Ingvar
    Giesbrecht, Gordon G
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Protection against cold in prehospital care: wet clothing removal or addition of a vapor barrier2015In: Wilderness & environmental medicine (Print), ISSN 1080-6032, E-ISSN 1545-1534, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier in shivering subjects exposed to a cold environment with only limited insulation available.

    METHODS: Volunteer subjects (n = 8) wearing wet clothing were positioned on a spineboard in a climatic chamber (-18.5°C) and subjected to an initial 20 minutes of cooling followed by 30 minutes of 4 different insulation interventions in a crossover design: 1) 1 woolen blanket; 2) vapor barrier plus 1 woolen blanket; 3) wet clothing removal plus 1 woolen blanket; or 4) 2 woolen blankets. Metabolic rate, core body temperature, skin temperature, and heart rate were continuously monitored, and cold discomfort was evaluated at 5-minute intervals.

    RESULTS: Wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier significantly reduced metabolic rate (mean difference ± SE; 14 ± 4.7 W/m(2)) and increased skin temperature rewarming (1.0° ± 0.2°C). Increasing the insulation rendered a similar effect. There were, however, no significant differences in core body temperature or heart rate among any of the conditions. Cold discomfort (median; interquartile range) was significantly lower with the addition of a vapor barrier (4; 2-4.75) and with 2 woolen blankets (3.5; 1.5-4) compared with 1 woolen blanket alone (5; 3.25-6).

    CONCLUSIONS: In protracted rescue scenarios in cold environments with only limited insulation available, wet clothing removal or the use of a vapor barrier is advocated to limit the need for shivering thermogenesis and improve the patient's condition on admission to the emergency department.

  • 43.
    Henriksson, Otto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundgren, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Kuklane, Kalev
    Lunds universitet, Insitutionen för designvetenskaper.
    Holmér, Ingvar
    Lunds universitet, Insitutionen för designvetenskaper.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Protection against cold in prehospital care: thermal insulation properties of blankets and rescue bags in different wind conditions2009In: Prehospital and disaster medicine : the official journal of the National Association of EMS Physicians and the World Association for Emergency and Disaster Medicine in association with the Acute Care Foundation, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: In a cold, wet, or windy environment, cold exposure can be considerable for an injured or ill person. The subsequent autonomous stress response initially will increase circulatory and respiratory demands, and as body core temperature declines, the patient's condition might deteriorate. Therefore, the application of adequate insulation to reduce cold exposure and prevent body core cooling is an important part of prehospital primary care, but recommendations for what should be used in the field mostly depend on tradition and experience, not on scientific evidence.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulation properties in different wind conditions of 12 different blankets and rescue bags commonly used by prehospital rescue and ambulance services.

    METHODS: The thermal manikin and the selected insulation ensembles were setup inside a climatic chamber in accordance to the modified European Standard for assessing requirements of sleeping bags. Fans were adjusted to provide low (< 0.5 m/s), moderate (2-3 m/s) and high (8-9 m/s) wind conditions. During steady state thermal transfer, the total resultant insulation value, Itr (m2 C/Wclo; where C = degrees Celcius, and W = watts), was calculated from ambient air temperature (C), manikin surface temperature (C), and heat flux (W/m2).

    RESULTS: In the low wind condition, thermal insulation of the evaluated ensembles correlated to thickness of the ensembles, ranging from 2.0 to 6.0 clo (1 clo = 0.155 m2 C/W), except for the reflective metallic foil blankets that had higher values than expected. In moderate and high wind conditions, thermal insulation was best preserved for ensembles that were windproof and resistant to the compressive effect of the wind, with insulation reductions down to about 60-80% of the original insulation capacity, whereas wind permeable and/or lighter materials were reduced down to about 30-50% of original insulation capacity.

    CONCLUSIONS: The evaluated insulation ensembles might all be used for prehospital protection against cold, either as single blankets or in multiple layer combinations, depending on ambient temperatures. However, with extended outdoor, on-scene durations, such as during prolonged extrications or in multiple casualty situations, the results of this study emphasize the importance of using a windproof and compression resistant outer ensemble to maintain adequate insulation capacity.

  • 44.
    Henriksson, Otto
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lundgren, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Kuklane, Kalev
    Lunds universitet, Insitutionen för designvetenskaper.
    Holmér, Ingvar
    Lunds universitet, Insitutionen för designvetenskaper.
    Naredi, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Protection against cold in prehospital care: evaporative heat loss reduction by wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapour barrier - a thermal manikin study2012In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In the prehospital care of a cold and wet person, early application of adequate insulation is of utmost importance to reduce cold stress, limit body core cooling, and prevent deterioration of the patient’s condition. Most prehospital guidelines on protection against cold recommend the removal of wet clothing prior to insulation, and some also recommend the use of a waterproof vapor barrier to reduce evaporative heat loss. However, there is little scientific evidence of the effectiveness of these measures.

    Objective: Using a thermal manikin with wet clothing, this study was conducted to determine the effect of wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier on thermal insulation and evaporative heat loss using different amounts of insulation in both warm and cold ambient conditions.

    Methods: A thermal manikin dressed in wet clothing was set up in accordance with the European Standard for assessing requirements of sleeping bags, modified for wet heat loss determination, and the climatic chamber was set to -15 degrees Celsius (°C) for cold conditions and +10°C for warm conditions. Three different insulation ensembles, one, two or seven woollen blankets, were chosen to provide different levels of insulation. Five different test conditions were evaluated for all three levels of insulation ensembles: (1) dry underwear; (2) dry underwear with a vapor barrier; (3) wet underwear; (4) wet underwear with a vapor barrier; and (5) no underwear. Dry and wet heat loss and thermal resistance were determined from continuous monitoring of ambient air temperature, manikin surface temperature, heat flux and evaporative mass loss rate.

    Results: Independent of insulation thickness or ambient temperature, the removal of wet clothing or the addition of a vapor barrier resulted in a reduction in total heat loss of 19-42%. The absolute heat loss reduction was greater, however, and thus clinically more important in cold environments when little insulation is available. A similar reduction in total heat loss was also achieved by increasing the insulation from one to two blankets or from two to seven blankets.

    Conclusion: Wet clothing removal or the addition of a vapor barrier effectively reduced evaporative heat loss and might thus be of great importance in prehospital rescue scenarios in cold environments with limited insulation available, such as in mass-casualty situations or during protracted evacuations in harsh conditions.

  • 45.
    Holgersson, Annelie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Mass-casualty attacks on public transportation2014In: Journal of Transportation Security, ISSN 1938-7741, E-ISSN 1938-775X, Vol. 7, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 21st century has provided many examples of the devastating effects attacks can have when public transportation has been targeted or used as weapons. Four hundred and seventy seven mass-casualty attacks (≥10 fatally injured and/or ≥100 non-fatally injured) against public transportation and terminal buildings during the years 1970–2009 were studied with data from the Global Terrorism Database in addition to open media sources, scientific journals, and books. Asia was the most frequently targeted region, followed by the Middle East & North African region and Sub Saharan Africa. Airplanes were the most frequently attacked mode of transport during the 1970s, but were surpassed by buses in the mid-80s. There was also an alarming increase in attacks against terminal buildings during 2000–2009. The two most common types of attacks were bombings and armed assault. Complex tactical approaches so as to achieve as much carnage as possible were apparent—e.g., maximizing the number of exposed people, enhancing weapon effects, approaching victims one-by-one, combining several attack types, and targeting rescue personnel. These approaches were more predominant during the last two decades and attacks against rescue personnel were exclusive to the 21st century. The average number of injured increased considerably, despite a quite stable incidence rate since the 1980s. High numbers of non-fatally injured people were connected to attacks on terminal buildings, multiple targets and complex tactical approaches. These incidents, with more and more non-fatally injured, challenge our societal response structures and thus require more research.

  • 46.
    Holgersson, Annelie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Sahovic, Dzenan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Saveman, Britt-Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Factors influencing responders' perceptions of preparedness for terrorism2016In: Disaster Prevention and Management, ISSN 0965-3562, E-ISSN 1758-6100, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 520-533Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse factors influencing perceptions of preparedness in the response to terrorist attacks of operational personnel in Swedish emergency organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using a questionnaire distributed to operational personnel from the police, rescue and ambulance services in eight Swedish counties; 864 responses were received and analysed. Findings: Three aspects of the perception of preparedness for terrorist attacks among Swedish emergency responders were studied: willingness to respond; level of confidence with tasks; and estimated management capability. Factors which positively influenced these perceptions were male sex, training in first aid and dealing with mass casualty incidents, terrorism-related management training (MT), table-top simulations, participation in functional exercises, and access to personal protective equipment (PPE); work experience was inversely related. Occupation in police or rescue services was positively associated with willingness to respond whereas occupation within the emergency medical services was positively associated with estimated management capability. Practical implications: These findings show that terrorism-related MT and access to PPE increase the perceptions of preparedness for terrorism among the emergency services, aiding judgements about investments in preparedness by crisis management planners. Originality/value: Limited research in disaster management and hazard preparedness has been conducted in a European context, especially regarding terrorism. Little is known about aspects of preparedness for terrorism in Sweden, particularly from the perspective of the emergency responders.

  • 47.
    Johansson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Forensic Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Teenager injury panorama in northern Sweden.2001In: International journal of circumpolar health, ISSN 1239-9736, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 380-90Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study non-fatal unintentional injuries among teenagers and to suggest preventive measures. SETTING: The emergency care unit of the University Hospital, Umea, Sweden. METHODS: All injured teenagers (N = 1044) attending the emergency care unit during 1991 were asked to answer a questionnaire focusing on when, where and how the injury occurred. All available medical records were examined. Data were coded according to the Nordic Medico-Statistical Committees Classification for Accident Monitoring, NOMESCO, and to the Abbreviated Injury Scale, AIS. RESULTS: 1,043 teenagers were treated with sports and transportation related injuries as the most common ones. Most injuries were minor (AIS 1), transportation related injuries had the highest proportion of non-minor injuries (AIS > or = 2), 139 teenagers were admitted for in-patient care. Most injuries occurred during leisure/school time. CONCLUSIONS: Sports and transportation related injuries were most frequent. Body weight and length differs among teenagers, we suggest that teenagers should exercise and play together, not only by age, but also to some extent, to height and weight. Curfew laws, a compulsory bicycle helmet law are other injury reducing measures suggested.

  • 48.
    Jonsson, Bertil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Backset-stationary and during car driving.2008In: Traffic injury prevention, ISSN 1538-957X, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 568-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to measure and analyze backset, defined as the horizontal distance between the back of the occupant's head and a point located on the ventral/top aspect of the sewn rim of the head restraint, with the car stationary and during driving, in the driver's position in a modern car. METHODS: A population of 65 subjects, 35 males and 30 females, was studied in a Volvo V70 car, model year 2007. The subjects were studied in the driver's position, in a self-selected posture. Stationary backset was measured with the technique described by Jonsson et al. (2007) and backset during driving with video analysis. Descriptive data were calculated, and variability and correlation analyses were performed. A t-test was used to test differences of means. Significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: In comparison to stationary backset, mean backset during driving was 43 mm greater in males and 41 mm greater in females. Driving backset was 44 mm larger in males than in females. Driving backset was moderately correlated (0.37-0.43) to stature, seated height, and seat back angle in males and moderately correlated (0.44-0.52) to hip width, waist circumference, and weight in females. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient for backset during driving was 0.81 (CI: 0.75-0.86). CONCLUSIONS: These results may be of use in designing future updates of test protocols/routines for geometric backset, such as RCAR and RCAR-IIWPG.

  • 49.
    Jonsson, Bertil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Kirurgi.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Mats Y
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Kirurgi.
    Backset and cervical retraction capacity among occupants in a modern car.2007In: Traffic Inj Prev, ISSN 1538-9588, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Jonsson, Bertil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Mats Y
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Seat adjustment: capacity and repeatability among occupants in a modern car2008In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 232-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Families in the Western world have a car and several family members share the same car. In this study, 154 participants have adjusted a driver's seat three times. The primary objective was to study intrapersonal repeatability and intraclass correlation (ICC) on seat; length adjustment, backrest angle, seat front edge and seat rear edge adjustment, related to participant age, sex, stature and weight. Length adjustment has the best intrapersonal repeatability within two repetitions, 49 mm and ICC-value 0.87. Females and younger participants (age < 40 years) adjust seats generally more accurately. Females adjust the seat 41 mm more forward, 120 mm compared to men 79 mm counted from 0-starting position. Females sit with more upright seat backrests, 46 degree compared to 43 degrees for males counted from 0-starting position. Females sit higher than males in both the frontal and rear part of the seat cushion.

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