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  • 1.
    Elbe, Pia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mellqvist, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brändström, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Predicting attention shifting abilities from self-reported media multitasking2019In: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, ISSN 1069-9384, E-ISSN 1531-5320, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 1257-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Media multitasking is an increasingly prominent behavior in affluent societies. However, it still needs to be established if simultaneous use of several modes of media content has an influence on higher cognitive functions, such as divided attention. In this study, attention shifting was the primary focus, since switching between tasks is assumed to be necessary for media multitasking. Two tasks, the number–letter and local–global task, were used as measures of switching ability. The cognitive reflections task was included to control for possible effects of intelligence. Results from linear regression analyses showed that higher levels of media multitasking was related to lower switching costs in the two attention-shifting tasks. These findings replicate previous findings suggesting that heavy media multitaskers perform better on select measures of task switching. We suggest two possible explanations for our results: media multitasking may practice skills needed for switching between tasks, or high media multitaskers are choosing this style of technology use due to a dominating personality trait in this group.

  • 2.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Different Features of Bilingualism in Relation to Executive Functioning2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, no 269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion that the long-term practice of managing two languages is beneficial for the executive control system is an ongoing debate. Criticism have been raised that studies demonstrating a bilingual advantage often suffer from small sample sizes, and do not control for fluid intelligence as a possible confound. Taking those suggested factors into account, focusing on older bilingual age groups and investigating the potential effects of linguistic distances, this study aimed to improve the interpretations of the bilinguals’ advantages. Measures of inhibition (Flanker, Stroop, Simon task) and switching (Number-letter, Color-Shape, Local-global task) were collected in participants in the ages 50-75 years (n = 193). Despite a large study sample, results did not support any beneficial effects related to improve processing costs in executive functioning. Sub-analyses of the two different language groups (Swedish – Finnish / Swedish – English) intended to investigate the effect of linguistic distances did not change this outcome. Future studies exploring the potential long-term term effects of bilingualism would benefit from identifying tests of cognitive control with greater ecological validity and include other measures of cognitive functioning. Language learning interventions may also be a promising tool for future research.

  • 3.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pritschke, Ilona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Complexity of Primary Lifetime Occupation and Cognitive Processing2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, p. 1-12, article id 1861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, there are a lack of studies focusing on the relationship between occupational complexity and executive functioning. This is noteworthy since executive functions are core aspects of cognitive processing. The present study was aimed to investigate if three occupational complexity factors (with data, people, and things) of main lifetime occupation were related to performance in executive tasks (inhibition, switching, updating). We analyzed cross-sectional data that were available for 225 participants aged 50–75 years. Results from structural equation models showed that higher complexity levels of working with data were related to lower error rates in the updating component of cognitive control. In addition, higher rates of complexity working with people was associated with lower error rates in task-switching, which also persisted after adjustment of fluid intelligence. Complexity with things, however, was not related to performance in the executive tasks. Future studies would benefit from a longitudinal design to investigate if the results from this study also hold in the long term and to further investigate the directionality between factors.

  • 4.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Marsh, John Everett
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0189299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An ongoing debate surrounds whether bilinguals outperform monolinguals in tests of executive processing. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are long-term (10 year) bilingual advantages in executive processing, as indexed by dual-task performance, in a sample that were 40-65 years at baseline. The bilingual (n = 24) and monolingual (n = 24) participants were matched on age, sex, education, fluid intelligence, and study sample. Participants performed free-recall for a 12-item list in three dual-task settings wherein they sorted cards either during encoding, retrieval, or during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list. Free recall without card sorting was used as a reference to compute dual-task costs. The results showed that bilinguals significantly outperformed monolinguals when they performed card-sorting during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list, the condition that presumably placed the highest demands on executive functioning. However, dual-task costs increased over time for bilinguals relative to monolinguals, a finding that is possibly influenced by retirement age and limited use of second language in the bilingual group.

  • 5.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Reading Habits Among Older Adults in Relation to Level and 15-Year Changes in Verbal Fluency and Episodic Recall2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this study was to investigate reading habits in older adults in relation to level and 15-year changes in verbal fluency and episodic recall. We examined a sample of 1157 participants (55 years at baseline) up to 15 years after the baseline assessment using latent growth curve modeling of cognitive measures with baseline reading frequency (books, weekly magazines) as a predictor of cognitive level (intercept) and rate of change (slope). Subgroup analyses were performed to investigate the role of an early adult g factor in the association between reading habits and cognitive ability in midlife. Frequent reading of books, but not of magazines, was associated with higher levels of verbal fluency and recall but unrelated to rate of longitudinal decline. Subgroup analyses indicated that the g factor in early adulthood predicted reading and cognitive level in midlife and this factor removed the current association between reading habits and level of cognitive ability (both cognitive factors). The results indicate an enduring relationship between book reading and level of cognitive ability across the adult life span and provide little support of the hypothesis that frequent reading protects against latelife cognitive decline. The extent to which book reading promotes cognitive functioning in childhood/youth remains to be demonstrated. Intervention studies may be useful in this regard.

  • 6.
    Hjärtström, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Distraction and facilitation: The impact of emotional sounds in an emoji oddball task2019In: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0252, E-ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 180-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotional stimuli are argued to capture attention and consume attentional resources differently depending on their emotionalcontent. The present study investigates the impact of the automatic detection of unexpected and to-be-ignored emotional stimuli onhuman behavioral responses, and aims to unravel the differences in distraction between two negative emotional stimuli: sadness and anger.Forty participants (Mage= 25.5 years) performed a visual categorization task where angry and sad emoji faces were presented after eithera standard neutral tone (in 80% of trials) or a deviant emotional sound (tone changing in pitch; sad or angry sound in 10% of trials each)that was to be ignored. Deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., sad sound—sad face) or incongruent (e.g., angry sound—sad face).Although the stimuli presented to the participants were brief and to-be-ignored, results indicate that participants were significantly moredistracted by sad compared to angry stimuli (seen as prolonged response times). Findings are discussed with reference to the nature ofthe two negative emotions.

  • 7.
    K. Ljungberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.
    Institutionen för psykologi vid universitetet i Palma, Spanien.
    Attention capture by tactile deviance2012In: THULE: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundets Årsbok 2012, Kungliga skytteanska samfundet , 2012, p. 119-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    K Ljungberg, Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Permentier, Fabrice BR
    Department of Psychology, Edificio Cientifico-Tecnico, University of Balearic Islands, Palma, Spain.
    Hughes, Robert W
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Macken, William J
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Jones, Dylan M
    School of Psychology Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Listen out!: Behavioural and subjective responses to verbal warnings2012In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 451-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both the behavioural and subjective impacts of single-word spoken warnings were examined. Behaviourally, the effect of infrequently occurring warnings was studied through their disruptive impact on a visually presented serial recall task. In separate experiments, ratings of the same words were elicited. Experiment 1 showed a localized effect of the warnings (on the item immediately following the warning), with the urgently intoned warning having a greater disruptive effect than its valence (emotional content). Valence and intonation (urgency) did not interact. The performance changes were mirrored in the ratings of the words. Experiment 2 showed no systematic effect on performance of either the action-relatedness of the word or its lexicality. There was, however, a systematic effect of lexicality but not action-relatedness on ratings. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using objective performance methods to establish the likely effects of verbal warnings and the utility of using such methods for the design of alarm systems.

  • 9.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Cognitive degradation after exposure to combined noise and whole-body vibration in a simulated vehicle ride2007In: International Journal of Vehicle Noise and Vibration (IJVNV), ISSN 1479-148X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 130-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated if vehicle noise and whole-body vibrations produce negative after-effects on performance in an attention task and on ratings of alertness, difficulty, and annoyance. The task was applied before and after exposure, and after a rest. Participants had degraded performance immediately after exposure in all conditions, but no effect was found after the rest. No main effect was found between exposure conditions on performance, it was concluded that the degraded performance dependent on time was caused by fatigue. The results also suggested lower ratings of alertness and higher ratings of annoyance in the vibration condition compared to the control condition.

  • 10.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Editorial: Distraction of attention by sound2014In: PsyCh Journal, ISSN 2046-0260, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andrés, Pilar
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma, Spain.
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Longitudinal Study of Memory Advantages in Bilinguals2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, p. e73029-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Typically, studies of cognitive advantages in bilinguals have been conducted previously by using executive and inhibitory tasks (e.g. Simon task) and applying cross-sectional designs. This study longitudinally investigated bilingual advantages on episodic memory recall, verbal letter and categorical fluency during the trajectory of life. Monolingual and bilingual participants (n=178) between 35–70 years at baseline were drawn from the Betula Prospective Cohort Study of aging, memory, and health. Results showed that bilinguals outperformed monolinguals at the first testing session and across time both in episodic memory recall and in letter fluency. No interaction with age was found indicating that the rate of change across ages was similar for bilinguals and monolinguals. As predicted and in line with studies applying cross-sectional designs, no advantages associated with bilingualism were found in the categorical fluency task. The results are discussed in the light of successful aging.

  • 12.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Cross-modal distraction by deviance: functional similarities between the auditory and tactile modalities2012In: Experimental psychology (Göttingen), ISSN 1618-3169, E-ISSN 2190-5142, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 355-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unexpected task-irrelevant changes in the auditory or visual sensory channels have been shown to capture attention in an ineluctable manner and distract participants away from ongoing auditory or visual categorization tasks. We extend the study of this phenomenon by reporting the first within-participant comparison of deviance distraction in the tactile and auditory modalities. Using vibro-tactile-visual and auditory-visual cross-modal oddball tasks, we found that unexpected changes in the tactile and auditory modalities produced a number of functional similarities: A negative impact of distracter deviance on performance in the ongoing visual task, distraction on the subsequent trial (post-deviance distraction), and a similar decrease – but not the disappearance – of these effects across blocks. Despite these functional similarities, deviance distraction only correlated between the auditory and tactile modalities for the accuracy-based measure of deviance distraction and not for response latencies. Post-deviance distraction showed no correlation between modalities. Overall, the results suggest that behavioral deviance distraction may be underpinned by both modality-specific and multimodal mechanisms, while post-deviance distraction may predominantly relate to modality-specific processes.

  • 13.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    University of the Balearic Islands, Palma, Spain.
    The Impact of Intonation and Valence on Objective and Subjective Attention Capture by Auditory Alarms2012In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208, E-ISSN 1547-8181, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 826-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The objective was to study the involuntary capture of attention by spoken words varying in intonation and valence.

    Background:

    In studies of verbal alarms, the propensity of alarms to capture attention has been primarily assessed with the use of subjective ratings of their perceived urgency. Past studies suggest that such ratings vary with the alarms’ spoken urgency and content.

    Method:

    We measured attention capture by spoken words varying in valence (negative vs. neutral) and intonation (urgently vs. nonurgently spoken) through subjective ratings and behavioral measures. The key behavioral measure was the response latency to visual stimuli in the presence of spoken words breaking away from the periodical repetition of a tone.

    Results:

    The results showed that all words captured attention relative to a baseline standard tone but that this effect was partly counteracted by a relative speeding of responses for urgently compared with nonurgently spoken words. Word valence did not affect behavioral performance. Rating data showed that both intonation and valence increased significantly perceived urgency and attention grabbing without any interaction.

    Conclusion:

    The data suggest a congruency between subjective ratings and behavioral performance with respect to spoken intonation but not valence.

    Application:

    This study demonstrates the usefulness and feasibility of objective measures of attention capture to help design efficient alarm systems.

  • 14.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK.
    Parmentier, Fabrice BR
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Jones, Dylan M
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘What’s in a name?’ ‘No more than when it's mine own’. Evidence from auditory oddball distraction.2014In: Acta Psychologica, ISSN 0001-6918, E-ISSN 1873-6297, Vol. 150, p. 161-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research of the distractor value of hearing the own name has shown that this self-referring stimulus captures attention in an involuntary fashion and create distraction. The behavioral studies are few and the outcomes are not always clear cut. In this study the distraction by own name compared to a control name was investigated by using a cross-modal oddball task in two experiments. In the first experiment, thirty-nine participants were conducting a computerized categorization task while exposed to, to-be ignored own and matched control names (controlling for familiarity, gender and number of syllables) as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (12.5% trials for each name category) and a sine wave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials). In the second experiment, another group of thirty-nine participants completed the same task but with the additional deviant stimulus of an irrelevant word added (10% trials for each deviant type and 70% trials with the standard stimulus). Results showed deviant distracton by exposure to both the irrelevant word, own and the control name compared to the standard tone but no differences were found showing that the own name captured attention and distracted the participants more than an irrelevant word or a control name. The results elucidate the role of the own name as a potent auditory distractor and possible limitations with its theoretical significance for general theories of attention are discussed.

  • 15.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    University of Balearic Islands and University of Western Australia.
    Leiva, Alicia
    University of Balearic Islands.
    Vega, Nuria
    University of the Balearic Islands.
    The Informational Constraints of Behavioral Distraction by Unexpected Sounds: The Role of Event Information2012In: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory and Cognition, ISSN 0278-7393, E-ISSN 1939-1285, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 1461-1468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sounds deviating from an otherwise repeated stream of task-irrelevant auditory stimuli (deviant sounds among standard sounds) are known to capture attention and impact negatively on ongoing behavioral performance (behavioral oddball distraction). Traditional views consider such distraction as the ineluctable consequence of the deviant sounds’ low probability of occurrence relative to that of the standard.

    Contrary to this contention, recent evidence demonstrates that distraction by deviant sounds is not obligatory and occurs only when sounds (standards and deviants), though to be ignored, act as useful warning cues by providing information as to whether and when a target stimulus is to be presented (Parmentier, Elsley, & Ljungberg, 2010). The present study aimed to extend this finding by disentangling the roles of event information (target’s probability of occurrence) and temporal information (target’s time of occurrence). Comparing performance in a cross-modal oddball task where standard and deviant sounds provided temporal information, event information, both, or none, we found that distraction by deviant sounds emerged when sounds conveyed event information. These results suggest that unexpected changes in a stream of sounds yield behavioral distraction to the extent that standards and deviants carry relevant goal-directed information, specifically, the likelihood of occurrence of an upcoming target.

  • 16.
    Ljungberg, Jessika K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Cardiff University.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    The effect of language skills on dementia in a Swedish longitudinal cohort2016In: Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism, ISSN 1879-9264, E-ISSN 1879-9272, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 190-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings indicate that bilingualism delay the onset of dementia. Using data from the Betula longitudinal cohort study on memory, health and aging (www.betula.su.se) the issue of a possible protective effect of bilingualism was addressed.

    Monolingual (n = 736) and bilingual (n = 82) participants (≥ 60 years) without dementia at inclusion were followed for incident dementia over a time-period up to 10 years. In total, 112 participants developed dementia. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age, sex, and presence/absence of the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele, with dementia outcome as the dependent variable.

    Results showed no delayed onset of dementia in bilinguals compared to monolinguals. However, because of the findings from a study using participants from the same population showing beneficial longitudinal effects of bilingualism on episodic memory; we argue that our results may depend on the frequency of use of the second language after retirement.

  • 17.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hjärtström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Impact of Emotional Deviant Sounds on Emoji Faces in a Sustained Attention Task2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The involuntary shift of attention to emotional sounds were investigated in a cross-modal oddball task in which participants categorized angry and disappointed emoji faces. Prior to each face, a standard tone was presented (80% of trials) or a deviant “disappointed” or a buzzing “angry” sound (20% of trials). The deviant trials were either congruent (e.g., disappointed sound/disappointed emoji) or incongruent trials (e.g., a disappointed sound/angry emoji). Results showed that the emotional content of the deviant sounds interacted with the processing of the faces, but that the effect was only present in the congruent trials. Participants showed deviance distraction (prolonged response times compared to standard) in the disappointed trials and facilitation (no deviance distraction) in the angry deviant trials. The facilitation (or lack of distraction) caused by the angry deviant sound in the congruent trial may have been a result of an arousal effect due to the processing of threat.

  • 18.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Distraction and Facilitation: Emotional sounds Affect Performance in a Smiley Oddball Task2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jones, Dylan M.
    School of Psychology, Cardiff University, UK and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Neely, Gregory
    Any Tom, Dick, or Harry will do: Hearing one's own name distracts no more than any other in a cross-modal oddball task2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Marsja, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    When your name is just another word: Self-referential auditory stimulus no more distracting than other names and words in a cross-modal oddball task2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. Marsh, John E.
    et al.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Division of Human Work Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Executive Processes Underpin the Bilingual Advantage on Phonemic Fluency: Evidence from Analyses of Switching and Clustering2019In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, article id 1355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bilinguals often show a disadvantage in lexical access on verbal fluency tasks wherein the criteria require the production of words from semantic categories. However, the pattern is more heterogeneous for letter (phonemic) fluency wherein the task is to produce words beginning with a given letter. Here, bilinguals often outperform monolinguals. One explanation for this is that phonemic fluency, as compared with semantic fluency, is more greatly underpinned by executive processes and that bilinguals exhibit better performance on phonemic fluency due to better executive functions. In this study, we re-analyzed phonemic fluency data from the Betula study, scoring outputs according to two measures that purportedly reflect executive processes: clustering and switching. Consistent with the notion that bilinguals have superior executive processes and that these can be used to offset a bilingual disadvantage in verbal fluency, bilinguals (35-65 years at baseline) demonstrated greater switching and clustering throughout the 15-year study period.

  • 22.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marsh Everett, John
    Patrik, Hansson
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Domain-generality or domain-specificity of the short-term memory: insights from a multisensory distraction paradigm2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marsh, John Everett
    Neely, Gregory
    Hansson, Patrik
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Spatial Change In Multisensory Distractors Impact On Spatial and Verbal Short-Term Memory Performance2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unexpected changes (known as deviant sounds) in a repetitive stream ofstandardsounds are known to prolong responses in visual categorization tasks (Parmentier, 2014) and disrupt short-term memory (Hughes, Vachon, & Jones, 2005; 2007). While this deviation effect,has been studied extensively, unexpected changes in multisensory irrelevant stimuli have yet to be explored. A further issue is whether a spatial change in either tactile, auditory, or in both modalities simultaneously, affects verbal and spatial short-term memorysimilarly. We explored how spatial and verbal memory performance were affected by a spatial change unexpectedly presented in a multisensory stream consisting of task-irrelevant vibrations and sounds.The sounds were presented from headphones and the vibrations from coin-like vibrating motors strapped to the upper arms of the participants. In the majority of trials (approximately 80%) the multisensory stream was presented on one side of the body whereas on deviant trials the irrelevant stimuli changed to the other side of the body. Preliminarily results suggest that a spatial change in a multisensory stream of irrelevant stimuli affects short-term memory performance both the spatial and verbal domains similarly. We conclude by discussing the results in the framework of multisensory views of short-term memory and attention (e.g., Cowan's, 1988; 1995) and the predictive coding framework (e.g., Talsma, 2015)

  • 24.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of psychology, Cardiff University, UK.
    Investigating deviance distraction and the impact of the modality of the to-be-ignored stimuli2018In: Experimental psychology (Göttingen), ISSN 1618-3169, E-ISSN 2190-5142, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 61-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that deviance distraction is caused by unexpected sensory events in the to-be-ignored stimuli violating the cognitive system's predictions of incoming stimuli. The majority of research has used methods where the to-be-ignored expected (standards) and the unexpected (deviants) stimuli are presented within the same modality. Less is known about the behavioral impact of deviance distraction when the to-be-ignored stimuli are presented in different modalities (e.g., standard and deviants presented in different modalities). In three experiments using cross-modal oddball tasks with mixed-modality to-be-ignored stimuli, we examined the distractive role of unexpected auditory deviants presented in a continuous stream of expected standard vibrations. The results showed that deviance distraction seems to be dependent upon the to-be-ignored stimuli being presented within the same modality, and that the simplest omission of something expected; in this case, a standard vibration may be enough to capture attention and distract performance.

  • 25.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Effects of Unexpected and Sudden Vibrations and Sounds Does Not Disrupt Performance Similarly Over TimeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the effects of sudden and unexpected vibrations (i.e., deviants) have on visual tasks is scarce. Previous research has shown that vibrating deviants disrupt performance (i.e., deviance distraction) in visual digit categorization tasks in a similar manner as auditory deviants; however, this research has not used methods feasible for examining the temporal aspects of the effects. In our experiment, auditory and tactile stimuli were presented in different parts to examine the temporal aspects of deviance distraction of sounds and vibrations. Deviance distraction was found in both modalities. The effects of auditory deviants remained throughout the auditory part of the experiment whereas the effects of tactile deviants did not. Our results indicate that although deviance distraction may share similar mechanisms, the temporal aspects of deviance distraction might be dissimilar in the two modalities.

  • 26.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ma, Lichen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cross-modality matches of intensity and attention capture dimensions of auditory and vibrotactile stimuli2015In: Fechner Day 2015. The 31st Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics, Québec, Canada, August 17-21, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Körning-Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Deviance Distraction Is Contingent on Stimuli Being Presented Within the Same Modality2014In: Abstracts of the Psychomic Society, The Psychonomic Society , 2014, p. 101-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden and unexpected changes in the auditory and visual channel are known to capture attention. This attention capture has been shown to negatively impact performance in an ongoing task (i.e., deviance distraction). In three experiments we examined if deviant stimuli presented in a different modality than astandard stimuli caused distraction in a visual categorization task, using a multi-sensory oddball task. In two experiments a deviant sound was presented (20 % of trials) against 80 % vibrotactile standard trials. In one the standard was omitted on deviating sound trials, while in the other the standard and deviants were presented simultaneously. In the third experiment the standard vibration was omitted in 20 % of the trials without any presentation of a deviant sound. Results showed distraction by deviating sounds (p < .05), but not when standard vibrations were presented simultaneously (p >.05). Interestingly, the omission of a standard vibration showed distraction (p < .05). In conclusion, deviance distraction might be bound to within rather than between modalities.

  • 28.
    Marsja, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Parmentier, Fabrice
    Department of Psychology, University of the Balearic Islands, Spain and School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Deviant sounds does not capture attention when presented among, and simultaneously as standard vibrations2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Neely, Gregory
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Psychology, Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
    The impact of spoken action words on performance in a cross-modal oddball task2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0207852Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a cross-modal oddball task was employed to study the effect that words spoken either non-urgently or urgently would have on a digit categorization task and if women would exhibit greater behavioral inhibitory control. The words were unrelated to the task itself, but related to the action required to complete the task. Forty participants (21 women) conducted a computerized categorization task while exposed to a sinewave tone as a standard stimulus (75% of the trials) or a to-be ignored word (press, stop) spoken either non-urgently or urgently as unexpected auditory deviant stimulus (6.25% trials for each category). Urgent words had sharp intonation and an average fundamental frequency (F0) ranging from 191.9 (stop) to 204.6 (press) Hz. Non-urgent words had low intonation with average F0 ranging from 103.9.9 (stop) to 120.3 (press) Hz. As expected, deviant distraction and longer response times were found by exposure to the word stop, but deviant distraction was not found to be significant with the word press or due to intonation. While the results showed that women had in general longer reaction times, there were no gender differences found related to the deviant distraction caused by word or intonation. The present results do not support the hypothesis that women have greater behavioral inhibitory control, but there was evidence that the meaning of the word could influence response times.

  • 30.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Körning Ljungberg, Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stress and odor sensitivity in persons with noise sensitivity2013In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 15, no 64, p. 173-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has indicated that sensory sensitivity/intolerance to a specific modality may be part of a more general environmental hypersensitivity, and possibly mediated by stress. This study investigated the relationship between noise sensitivity, perceived stress, and odor sensitivity in a group of men. A quasi-experimental design was used. One-hundred and thirty-four male undergraduate students completed Weinsteins noise sensitivity scale from which a low-sensitivity group (n = 16) and a high-sensitivity (n = 16) group were formed. These two groups were screened for loss in auditory and olfactory detection sensitivity, and completed the perceived stress questionnaire (PSQ) and the chemical sensitivity scale (CSS). One-way analysis of variance and Spearman correlational analyses were performed. Significantly higher scores on the PSQ (P < 0.05) and the CSS (P < 0.05) were found in the high noise-sensitivity group compared to the low noise-sensitivity group. These findings raise the question of whether the relation between noise and odor sensitivity reflects a general environmental sensitivity.

  • 31.
    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.
    et al.
    University of the Balearic Islands and University of Western.
    Ljungberg, Jessica K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Elsley, Jane V.
    Bournemouth University.
    Lindkvist, Markus
    Medicinsk teknik, FOU, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, s-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
    A behavioral study of distraction by vibrotactile novelty2011In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, ISSN 0096-1523, E-ISSN 1939-1277, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 1134-1139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has demonstrated that the occurrence of unexpected task-irrelevant changes in the auditory or visual sensory channels captured attention in an obligatory fashion, hindering behavioral performance in ongoing auditory or visual categorization tasks and generating orientation and re-orientation electrophysiological responses. We report the first experiment extending the behavioral study of cross-modal distraction to tactile novelty. Using a vibrotactile-visual cross-modal oddball task and a bespoke hand-arm vibration device, we found that participants were significantly slower at categorizing the parity of visually presented digits following a rare and unexpected change in vibrotactile stimulation (novelty distraction), and that this effect extended to the subsequent trial (postnovelty distraction). These results are in line with past research on auditory and visual novelty and fit the proposition of common and amodal cognitive mechanisms for the involuntary detection of change.

  • 32.
    Sörman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ljungberg K., Jessica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hansson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Language skills and risk of dementia: a population-based study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 32 of 32
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