umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Biagio, L.
    et al.
    Swanepoel, D. W.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Lundberg, Thorbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Paediatric otitis media at a primary healthcare clinic in South Africa2014In: SAMJ South African Medical Journal, ISSN 0256-9574, E-ISSN 2078-5135, Vol. 104, no 6, p. 431-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No published studies on the prevalence of paediatric otitis media at primary healthcare clinics (PHCs) in South Africa (SA) are available. OBJECTIVE: To examine the point prevalence of otitis media in a paediatric population in a PHC in Johannesburg, SA, using otomicroscopy. METHODS: A sample of 140 children aged 2 - 16 years (mean 6.4; 44.1% females) were recruited from patients attending the PHC. Otomicroscopy was completed for each of the participants' ears by a specialist otologist using a surgical microscope. RESULTS: Cerumen removal was necessary in 36.0% of participants (23.5% of ears). Otitis media with effusion was the most frequent diagnosis (16.5%). Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) was diagnosed in 6.6% of children and was the most common type of otitis media in participants aged 6 - 15 years. Acute otitis media was only diagnosed in the younger 2 - 5-year age group (1.7%). Otitis media was significantly more prevalent among younger (31.4%) than older children (16.7%). CONCLUSION: CSOM prevalence, as classified by the World Health Organization, was high. Consequently diagnosis, treatment and subsequent referral protocols may need to be reviewed to prevent CSOM complications.

  • 2. Biagio, Leigh
    et al.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Lundberg, Thorbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Video-otoscopy recordings for diagnosis of childhood ear disease using telehealth at primary health care level2014In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, E-ISSN 1758-1109, Journal of telemedicine and telecare, ISSN 1758-1109, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 300-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the diagnoses made by an otologist and general practitioner (GP) from video-otoscopy recordings on children made by a telehealth facilitator. The gold standard was otomicroscopy by an experienced otologist. A total of 140 children (mean age 6.4 years; 44% female) were recruited from a primary health care clinic. Otomicroscopic examination was performed by an otologist. Video-otoscopy recordings were assigned random numbers and stored on a server. Four and eight weeks later, an otologist and a GP independently graded and made a diagnosis from each video recording. The otologist rated the quality of the video-otoscopy recordings as acceptable or better in 87% of cases. A diagnosis could not be made from the video-otoscopy recordings in 18% of ears in which successful onsite otomicroscopy was conducted. There was substantial agreement between diagnoses made from video-otoscopy recordings and those from onsite otomicroscopy (first review: otologist κ = 0.70 and GP κ = 0.68; second review: otologist κ = 0.74 and GP κ = 0.75). There was also substantial inter-rater agreement (κ = 0.74 and 0.74 at the two reviews) and intra-rater agreement (κ = 0.77 and 0.74 for otologist and GP, respectively). A telehealth facilitator, with limited training, can acquire video-otoscopy recordings in children for asynchronous diagnosis. Remote diagnosis was similar to face-to-face diagnosis in inter- and intra-rater variability.

  • 3.
    Hertegård, Stellan
    et al.
    Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallén, Lars
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Central Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Lindström, Elisabeth
    Department of Logopedics and Phoniatrics, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Testad, Per
    Department of Speech Pathology, Central Hospital, Falun, Sweden.
    Dahlqvist, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Cross-linked hyaluronan used as augmentation substance for treatment of glottal insufficiency: safety aspects and vocal fold function2002In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 112, no 12, p. 2211-2219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine safety aspects and vocal fold function after vocal fold augmentation with a cross-linked hyaluronan derivative (hylan B gel) as compared with bovine collagen.

    STUDY DESIGN; A prospective, randomized trial.

    METHODS: Eighty-three patients with glottal insufficiency were treated with injection augmentation with hylan B gel and bovine collagen and were examined at 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Seventy patients with unilateral vocal fold paresis (n = 35) or atrophy (n = 35) were randomly assigned to receive either hylan B gel (n = 47) or collagen (n = 23) injections into one vocal fold. Thirteen patients with glottal insufficiency caused by scar defects or paresis resulting from malignant disease were included in a nonrandomized group and were treated only with hylan B gel. Evaluations were made from patients' subjective ratings (visual analogue scales), digitized videostroboscopic measurements, phonetograms, maximum phonation time, and phonation quotients.

    RESULTS: Twelve months after injections, the patients' self-ratings were significantly improved for both the hylan B gel and the collagen groups. In addition, the videostroboscopic measurements showed significantly improved glottal closure for both groups. However, for the hylan B gel group, vibration amplitude and glottal area variations were preserved, and this group showed significantly less resorption at the injected vocal fold edge. Furthermore, maximum phonation time had increased significantly for the hylan B gel patients (collagen, nonsignificant). No serious adverse events were observed; three patients injected with hylan B gel had temporary inflammation at the injection site, which resolved without sequelae.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that both hylan B gel and collagen can be safely used for injection treatment of glottal insufficiency. Both treatments resulted in significantly improved voice as rated by the patients. However, the patients treated with hylan B gel showed better vocal fold status and longer maximum phonation time at 12 months after treatment as compared with patients treated with collagen.

  • 4.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech and Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Laurell, Göran
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Olofsson, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Hyaluronan in vocal folds and false vocal folds in patients with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis2018In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 138, no 11, p. 1020-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hyaluronan (HA) is a glycosaminoglycan with viscoelastic properties necessary for vocal fold (VF) vibration and voice production. Changes in HAs molecular mass, possibly related to human papilloma virus, could affect formation/persistence of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP).

    Aims/Objective: Describing mass and localization of HA and localization of HA receptor CD44 in VF and false vocal folds (FVF) in RRP.

    Materials and Methods: Biopsies from VF and FVF from 24 RRP patients. Twelve were studied with histo-/immunohistochemistry for HA and CD44 in epithelium, stroma and RRP lesions. Twelve samples were analyzed for HA molecular mass distribution with gas-phase-electrophoretic-molecular-mobility-analyzer (GEMMA).

    Results: Three of 23 stains (VF and FVF combined) showed faint HA staining in the epithelium; there was more extensive staining in the stroma. CD44 was present throughout all areas in FVF and VF, it did not concur with HA. GEMMA analysis revealed very high mass HA (vHMHA) with more varying amounts in VF.

    Conclusions/Significance: HA was mainly distributed in the stroma. CD44 not binding to HA might explain the non-inflammatory response described in RRP. Possibly crosslinked vHMHA was seen in VF and FVF, with more variable amounts in VF samples. Counteracting HA crosslinking could become a treatment option in RRP.

  • 5.
    Laurent, Claude
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Hörnsten, Jan
    Hörselskadlig examination: [Examination harmful for the hearing]2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lundberg, Thorbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Biagio, Leigh
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Speech Language Pathol & Audiol, ZA-0002 Pretoria, South Africa.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Univ Pretoria, Dept Speech Language Pathol & Audiol, ZA-0002 Pretoria, South Africa.
    Sandström, Herbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Speech Language Pathol & Audiol, ZA-0002 Pretoria, South Africa.
    Remote evaluation of video-otoscopy recordings in an unselected pediatric population with an otitis media scale2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 9, p. 1489-1495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A recently validated image-based grading scale for acute otitis media (OMGRADE) can be used to assess tympanic membrane (TM) status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of this scale for remote assessments of TM status using video-otoscopy recordings in an unselected pediatric population.

    Method: Children 2-16 years attending a South African primary health clinic were offered an ear examination by an otologist using otomicroscopy. An ear and hearing telehealth facilitator then made video-otoscopy recordings (9 – 33 seconds) of the ears and uptakes were uploaded to a secure server for remote assessments in Sweden by an otologist and general practitioner at four- and eight-weeks post onsite assessment. TM appearance was judged according to the OMGRADE scale. Concordance between onsite otomicroscopy and asynchronous assessments of video-otoscopy recordings was calculated together with intra- and inter-rater agreements.

    Results: One hundred and eighty ears were included. Concordance of TM classifications using the OMGRADE scale was found to be substantial (weighted kappa range 0,66-0,79). Intra- and inter-rater agreement (test-retest) was found to be substantial to almost perfect (weighted kappa range 0,85-0,88 and 0,69-0,72, respectively).

    Conclusion: The OMGRADE scale can be used to accurately assess the normal TM and secretory otitis media (SOM) remotely using video-otoscopy recordings in an unselected pediatric population.

  • 7.
    Lundberg, Thorbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    de Jager, Leigh Biagio
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Diagnostic accuracy of a general practitioner with video-otoscopy collected by a health care facilitator compared to traditional otoscopy2017In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 99, p. 49-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Video-otoscopy is rapidly developing as a new method to diagnose common ear disease and can be performed by trained health care facilitators as well as by clinicians. This study aimed to compare remote asynchronous assessments of video-otoscopy with otoscopy performed by a general practitioner. Method: Children, aged 2-16 years, attending a health center in Johannesburg, South Africa, were examined. An otologist performed otomicroscopy and a general practitioner performed otoscopy. Video-otoscopy was performed by a health care facilitator and video sequences were stored on a server for assessment by the same general practitioner 4 and 8 weeks later. At all examinations, a diagnosis was set and the tympanic membrane appearance was graded using the OMgrade-scale. The otologist's otomicroscopic diagnosis was set as reference standard to compare the accuracy of the two otoscopic methods. Results: Diagnostic agreement between otologist's otomicroscopic examination and the general practitioner's otoscopic examination was substantial (kappa 0.66). Agreement between onsite otomicroscopy and the general practitioners asynchronous video assessments were also substantial (kappa 0.70 and 0.80). Conclusion: Video-otoscopy performed by a health care facilitator and assessed asynchronously by a general practitioner had similar or better accuracy compared to face-to-face otoscopy performed by a general practitioner.

  • 8.
    Lundberg, Thorbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Sandström, Herbert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hellström, Sten
    Department of Audiology and Neurotology Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What does otalgia in children represent?: A study of acute otitis media in general practice related to symptoms and tympanic membrane status over time.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Otalgia is an important symptom leading children to seek health care in general practice and it can be a symptom of acute otitis media (AOM). The course of AOM can be of importance when grading severity of AOM.

    The aim of this study was to assess tympanic membrane TM appearance in children aged 2–16 years with otalgia in general practice and to follow their signs and symptoms over time.

    Method

    The children were examined at four rural health care centers in Lapland, Sweden. Symptoms such as otalgia, fever and the general condition were recorded together with endoscopic TM images and tympanometry results and stored in a central database. The same procedures were applied at follow-up visits after 3 days, 7 days and 3 months. The symptoms were given scores 0–2, the tympanograms were labeled as type A, type C and type B (scores 0–4–8) whereas TM images were graded according to the OMGRADE scale for TM´s (score 0–8). An assessment group set a diagnosis asynchronously after a consensus discussion. Diagnoses: normal, otitis media with effusion, AOM, bullous myringitis without AOM (BM), bullous myringitis with AOM (bAOM) and AOM with perforation or a wet and chagrinated appearance of the TM (pAOM). The diagnoses were scrutinized for any difference in presentation of symptoms. The course of signs and symptoms was followed up at return visits.

    Results

    The children showed a normal TM and tympanogram in 19%, otitis media with effusion in 32% and AOM in 49% at first visit. The majority of children reported no symptoms after 3 days. The children with bilateral AOM reported slightly more symptoms and the BM/bAOM groups reported fewer symptoms than children with AOM. A pAOM with a chagrinated TM was found in 19% and showed a prolonged return to normal tympanograms. Forty percent of the children who presented with a chagrinated TM (pAOM) at first visit still had type-B tympanograms after 3 months.

    Conclusions Half of the children with otalgia were diagnosed with AOM. Symptoms resolved faster than signs. The chagrinated TM appeared to be associated with prolonged middle ear effusion. 

  • 9. Meinert, M
    et al.
    Malmström, A
    Tufvesson, E
    Westergren-Thorsson, G
    Petersen, AC
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Uldbjerg, N
    Eriksen, GV
    Labour induces increased concentrations of biglycan and hyaluronan in human fetal membranes2007In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 482-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The proteoglycan decorin stabilizes collagen whereas biglycan and hyaluronan disrupt well-organized collagen. The aim was to compare hyaluronan and proteoglycans in human fetal membranes obtained before and after spontaneous labour at term.

    Study design: Prelabour samples of fetal membranes (N = 9) were obtained from elective caesarean sections and regionally sampled from over the cervix (cervical membranes) and mid-zone samples between this area and the placental edge. Postlabour samples (N = 11) were obtained from spontaneous vaginal delivery and also regionally sampled. Amnion and chorio-decidua were analysed separately. The proteoglycans decorin and biglycan were analysed using alcian blue precipitation, SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunostaining. Hyaluronan was analysed using a radioimmunoassay and by histochemistry. Collagen was measured by estimating hydroxyproline content.

    Results: In prelabour membranes the biglycan concentration (mu g/mg wtw) in the cervical amnion was 40% lower than in the mid-zone amnion (P < 0.05). After delivery the cervical amnion showed a twofold increase in biglycan (P < 0.05), a 30% decrease in collagen (P < 0.05), and a 50% decrease in decorin concentration (P < 0.05). In mid-zone samples after delivery the concentrations of hyaluronan showed an increase form 1.0 to 4.9 mu g/mg wtw (P < 0.05). Histology demonstrated a gelatinous substance, which separated amnion and chorio-decidua, in particular at the cervical site. This gelatinous substance contained hyaluronan at a concentration of 3.0 mu g/mg wtw.

    Conclusion: It is well established that prelabour fetal membranes are considerably stronger than postlabour fetal membranes. Two features may explain this; a weakening of the amnion combined with a separation of amnion and chorio-decidua. The biomechanical changes are consistent with the decrease in collagen and decorin, and the increase in hyaluronan and biglycan demonstrated in this study. The separation of the membranes is caused by the formation of a gelatinous substance, rich in hyaluronan. The results indicate that the biomechanical changes are not merely secondary to the stress of labour but that an active maturation process is involved.

  • 10. Myburgh, Hermanus C.
    et al.
    Jose, Stacy
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Towards low cost automated smartphone- and cloud-based otitis media diagnosis2018In: Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, ISSN 1746-8094, E-ISSN 1746-8108, Vol. 39, p. 34-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Odds media is one of the most common childhood illnesses. Access to ear specialists and specialist equipment is rudimentary in many third world countries, and general practitioners do not always have enough experience in diagnosing the different otitis medias. In this paper a system recently proposed by three of the authors for automated diagnosis of middle ear pathology, or otitis media, is extended to enable the use of the system on a smartphone with an Internet connection. In addition, a neural network is also proposed in the current system as a classifier, and compared to a decision tree similar to what was proposed before. The system is able to diagnose with high accuracy (1) a normal tympanic membrane, (2) obstructing wax or foreign bodies in the external ear canal (W/O), (3) acute otitis media (AOM), (4) otitis media with effusion (OME) and (5) chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). The average classification accuracy of the proposed system is 81.58% (decision tree) and 86.84% (neural network) for images captured with commercial video-otoscopes, using 80% of the 389 images for training, and 20% for testing and validation. 

  • 11. Myburgh, Hermanus C.
    et al.
    van Zijl, Willemien H.
    Swanepoel, DeWet
    Hellstrom, Sten
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Otitis Media Diagnosis for Developing Countries Using Tympanic Membrane Image-Analysis2016In: EBioMedicine, ISSN 0360-0637, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 5, p. 156-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Otitis media is one of the most common childhood diseases worldwide, but because of lack of doctors and health personnel in developing countries it is often misdiagnosed or not diagnosed at all. This may lead to serious, and life-threatening complications. There is, thus a need for an automated computer based image-analyzing system that could assist in making accurate otitis media diagnoses anywhere. Methods: A method for automated diagnosis of otitis media is proposed. The method uses image-processing techniques to classify otitis media. The system is trained using high quality pre-assessed images of tympanic membranes, captured by digital video-otoscopes, and classifies undiagnosed images into five otitis media categories based on predefined signs. Several verification tests analyzed the classification capability of the method. Findings: An accuracy of 80.6% was achieved for images taken with commercial video-otoscopes, while an accuracy of 78.7% was achieved for images captured on-site with a low cost custom-made video-otoscope. Interpretation: The high accuracy of the proposed otitis media classification system compares well with the classification accuracy of general practitioners and pediatricians (similar to 64% to 80%) using traditional otoscopes, and therefore holds promise for the future in making automated diagnosis of otitis media in medically underserved populations. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  • 12. Opheim, Leif Runar
    et al.
    Hellman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Engström-Laurent, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech/Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Hyaluronan in Human Vocal Folds in Smokers and Nonsmokers: A Histochemical Study2016In: Journal of Voice, ISSN 0892-1997, E-ISSN 1873-4588, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the hyaluronan occurrence in human vocal folds, with special regards to gender and smoking and to discuss the implications of findings.

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a descriptive/morphologic study.

    METHODS: Sixteen cadaveric vocal folds from eight individuals between 58 and 90 years old (six women and two men) were removed and studied morphologically. Three of the individuals had been cigarette smokers. A direct method for hyaluronan histochemistry using a hyaluronan-binding protein probe (HABP) was used to visualize the polysaccharide. Five examiners performed an analysis of the intensities of hyaluronan staining, independently.

    RESULTS: We observed intense hyaluronan staining of the vocal folds of which those from women stained considerably stronger than those from men. Stratified squamous epithelium stained for hyaluronan in all sections, whereas respiratory epithelium only stained weakly or not at all. The highest accumulation of hyaluronan occurred subepithelially in the lamina propria, corresponding to Reinke's space. It was observed that vocal folds from smokers were more intensively stained than those from nonsmokers.

    CONCLUSIONS: Hyaluronan is found in all layers of the human vocal fold. Contradictory to earlier studies, hyaluronan was visualized in squamous epithelium, where it may function as an impact protector. The occurrence of hyaluronan in smokers may have implications in the development of vocal fold inflammation and tumor initiation as hyaluronan is an important molecule in these processes.

  • 13.
    Sandström, Josefin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Carel Myburgh, Hermanus
    Laurent, Claude
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
    Smartphone threshold audiometry in underserved primary health-care contexts2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 232-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To validate a calibrated smartphone-based hearing test in a sound booth environment and in primary health-care clinics.

    DESIGN: A repeated-measure within-subject study design was employed whereby air-conduction hearing thresholds determined by smartphone-based audiometry was compared to conventional audiometry in a sound booth and a primary health-care clinic environment.

    STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 94 subjects (mean age 41 years ± 17.6 SD and range 18-88; 64% female) were assessed of whom 64 were tested in the sound booth and 30 within primary health-care clinics without a booth.

    RESULTS: In the sound booth 63.4% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dB HL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 80.6% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.6 dB ± 9.9 SD. In primary health-care clinics 13.7% of conventional and smartphone thresholds indicated normal hearing (≤15 dBHL). Conventional thresholds exceeding 15 dBHL corresponded to smartphone thresholds within ≤10 dB in 92.9% of cases with an average threshold difference of -1.0 dB ± 7.1 SD.

    CONCLUSIONS: Accurate air-conduction audiometry can be conducted in a sound booth and without a sound booth in an underserved community health-care clinic using a smartphone.

  • 14. Siem, Geir
    et al.
    Fagerheim, Toril
    Jonsrud, Christoffer
    Laurent, Claude
    Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty Division Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Otolaryngology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Teig, Erik
    Harris, Sten
    Leren, Trond P
    Früh, Andreas
    Heimdal, Ketil
    Causes of hearing impairment in the Norwegian paediatric cochlear implant program2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 596-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe to profound hearing impairment (HI) is estimated to affect around 1/2000 young children. Advances in genetics have made it possible to identify several genes related to HI. This information can cast light upon prognostic factors regarding the outcome in cochlear implantation, and provide information both for scientific and genetic counselling purposes. From 1992 to 2005, 273 children from 254 families (probands) were offered cochlear implants in Norway. An evaluation of the causes of HI, especially regarding the genes GJB2, GJB6, SLC26A4, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and the mutation A1555G in mitochondrial DNA was performed in 85% of the families. The number of probands with unknown cause of HI was thus reduced from 120 to 68 (43% reduction). Ninety-eight (46%) of the probands had an identified genetic etiology of their HI. A relatively high prevalence of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome was found. The main causes of severe and profound HI were similar to those found in other European countries. GJB2 mutations are a common cause of prelingual HI in Norwegian cochlear implanted children.

  • 15. Strøm-Roum, Henrik
    et al.
    Laurent, Claude
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Wie, Ona B
    Comparison of bilateral and unilateral cochlear implants in children with sequential surgery2012In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 95-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants and the importance of the inter-implant interval.

    METHODS: Seventy-three prelingually deaf children received sequential bilateral cochlear implants. Speech recognition in quiet with the first, second and with both implants simultaneously was evaluated at the time of the second implantation and after 12 and 24 months.

    RESULTS: Mean bilateral speech recognition 12 and 24 months after the second implantation was significantly higher than that obtained with either the first or the second implant. The addition of a second implant was demonstrated to have a beneficial effect after both 12 and 24 months. Speech recognition with the second implant increased significantly during the first year. A small, non-significant improvement was observed during the second year. The inter-implant interval significantly influenced speech recognition with the second cochlear implant both at 12 and 24 months, and bilateral speech recognition at 12 months, but not at 24 months.

    CONCLUSIONS: A small, but statistically significant improvement in speech recognition was found with bilateral cochlear implants compared with a unilateral implant. A major increase in speech recognition occurred with the second cochlear implant during the first year. A shorter time interval between the two implantations resulted in better speech recognition with the second implant. However, no definitive time-point was found for when the second implant could no longer add a positive effect.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf