umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Aarseth, Espen
    et al.
    Bean, Anthony M.
    Boonen, Huub
    Carras, Michelle Colder
    Coulson, Mark
    Das, Dimitri
    Deleuze, Jory
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Edman, Johan
    Ferguson, Christopher J.
    Haagsma, Maria C.
    Bergmark, Karin Helmersson
    Hussain, Zaheer
    Jansz, Jeroen
    Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel
    Kutner, Lawrence
    Markey, Patrick
    Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal
    Prause, Nicole
    Przybylski, Andrew
    Quandt, Thorsten
    Schimmenti, Adriano
    Starcevic, Vladan
    Stutman, Gabrielle
    Van Looy, Jan
    Van Rooij, Antonius J.
    Scholars' open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal2017In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 267-270Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns about problematic gaming behaviors deserve our full attention. However, we claim that it is far from clear that these problems can or should be attributed to a new disorder. The empirical basis for a Gaming Disorder proposal, such as in the new ICD-11, suffers from fundamental issues. Our main concerns are the low quality of the research base, the fact that the current operationalization leans too heavily on substance use and gambling criteria, and the lack of consensus on symptomatology and assessment of problematic gaming. The act of formalizing this disorder, even as a proposal, has negative medical, scientific, public-health, societal, and human rights fallout that should be considered. Of particular concern are moral panics around the harm of video gaming. They might result in premature application of diagnosis in the medical community and the treatment of abundant false-positive cases, especially for children and adolescents. Second, research will be locked into a confirmatory approach, rather than an exploration of the boundaries of normal versus pathological. Third, the healthy majority of gamers will be affected negatively. We expect that the premature inclusion of Gaming Disorder as a diagnosis in ICD-11 will cause significant stigma to the millions of children who play video games as a part of a normal, healthy life. At this point, suggesting formal diagnoses and categories is premature: the ICD-11 proposal for Gaming Disorder should be removed to avoid a waste of public health resources as well as to avoid causing harm to healthy video gamers around the world.

  • 2.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    A critical perspective on online safety measures2010In: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 1891-943X, E-ISSN 1891-943X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 72-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic countries have enjoyed mass use of the Internet at home and in schools since the mid-1990’s. Children have been noted to have rapidly taken the Internet into possession and to have made use of the affordances (Greeno, 1994) of Internet communication. However, media coverage of how children take on, and learn what the Internet has to offer has often been of a negative kind. Blazing headlines portray a generation in bottomless danger where children are defined both as possible victims and perpetrators. Another common attribute of this media coverage is the exoticising of young people’s net cultures – describing the young and their cultures as profoundly different from earlier generations and elevating the “colourful and the bizarre” (Coffey et al., 1999, p. 169) to a level where it appears normal for this particular generation. In this setting safe use guides – tips for parents and children on how to keep safe on the Internet – began to appear. They were often composed by teachers, concerned parents, non-governmental organisations and in some cases governments. The safe use guides were disseminated online in different forums aimed at concerned adults. In this article I will give a brief description of current online safety issues and examine them critically. My earlier research – 104 interviews with 12-year old Swedes conducted in 2004-2005 (Dunkels, 2007) and a study of European safe use guides conducted in 2008 (Lüders et al., 2009) left me with a number of questions. I could see that safe use guides were strikingly similar, despite their origin, and I could see that they rested upon norms and values that were actually neither accounted for nor even declared. This article is a literature review of the area with the aim of critically discussing some of these questions.

  • 3.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Children's strategies on the internet2008In: Critical studies in education, ISSN 1750-8487, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 171-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an interview study of 104 12‐year old children. The aim was to learn more about how children use the Internet, what they find negative on the Internet and what coping strategies they use. The media debate seems to display consensus regarding what threats the Internet poses to young people. However, this study shows a discrepancy between children's and adults' views on this subject. The children in the study handle the drawbacks of the Internet well, but they do not discuss this with adults. The study does not paint a picture of naïve children, unable to see actual threats, but of responsible people aware of the threats that exist in their digital environment and with developed methods to avoid such threats.

  • 4.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Net cultures2002In: @-Learning in Higher Education / [ed] Buchberger, Friedrich, Linz: Universitätsverlag , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Nätkulturer: vad gör barn och unga på Internet?2005In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, ISSN 1404-7659, Vol. 12, no 1/2, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med artikeln är att belysa några frågor som rör barns och ungas nätkulturer. Det finns undersökningar som tyder på ett glapp mellan vuxnas och barns syn på de risker som är förknippade med Internet och mycket talar för att många barn är hänvisade till jämnåriga vid utvecklandet av motstrategier. Med utgångspunkt i fyra berättelser om unga medborgare diskuteras ungas nätanvändning och tänkbara förklaringar till att nätets infödda, de som vuxit upp med Internet som en väsentlig del av sin barndom, tycks tänka på ett sätt om datormedierad kommunikation och vuxna på ett annat.

  • 6.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Reaktioner på ungas nätanvändning2010In: Barn och unga i den digitala mediekulturen / [ed] Carlsson, Ulla, Göteborg: Nordicom, Göteborgs universitet , 2010, p. 37-49Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel tar sin utgångspunkt i ett glapp i retoriken kring unga och nätet; att många vuxna säger att de inte hänger med i utvecklingen samtidigt som de tvärsäkert uttalar sig om farorna på nätet och till och med vad man ska göra för att undvika dem. Det är intressant att fundera över de här olika sätten att se på ungas aktiviteter på nätet. Hur kan man uttala sig om ett område där man anser att man saknar kunskap? Jag tror till stor del att de har med vår syn på barn och unga att göra och jag kommer att resonera lite kring det i detta kapitel.

  • 7.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    The digital native as a student: implications for teacher education2006In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, ISSN 1404-7659, Vol. 13, no 1, p. s. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article points out some features of contemporary learning models, claiming that computers and the Internet have changed the conditions of learning and communicating for young citizens - the digital natives. Firstly, it draws attention to the fact that the Internet with its hypertext seems to promote natural learning. Secondly, it describes a tremendous amount of informal learning - learning that takes place outside the educational system - which computers and the Internet seem to encourage. It acknowledges the growth of collective learning - learning that is collaborative and draws on other people's work, constantly adding to our collection of knowledge. The article also calls attention to the surfacing of human behaviour that the Internet seems to promote, making it possible to act against negative behaviour such as bullying. Finally, it portrays the openness that makes users of net communities exhibit sides of their personalities that traditionally have been hidden from strangers. In respect of changes in society and the speed of technological changes it is vital that we find a way of listening to young people's views of knowledge and learning. The article concludes that we should discuss how we may integrate contemporary learning models in our educational systems, learn from what takes place anyway and exploit it.

  • 8.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The Kids Are Alright – perspectives on children’s online safety.2010In: Children and Youth in the Digital Media Culture: From a Nordic Horizon / [ed] Carlsson, Ulla, Göteborg: The International Clearinghouse on Children, Youth and Media, Nordicom, University of Gothenburg , 2010, p. 189-199Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    There is a contradiction in the rhetoric about young people and the Internet, namely, that while many adults admit they haven't "kept up with the times", they have no trouble at all expounding all the dangers lurking on the internet and what needs to be done to combat them.  It is an interesting phenomenon.  How can people express such firm opinions about a subject they say they don't know very much about? I think it may have a lot to do with our ideas about children and young people, and it is that notion that I would like to develop in this chapter.

  • 9.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Unga och nätet2009In: Ungdomskulturer / [ed] Simon Lindgren, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2009, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Vad gör unga på nätet?2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns många åsikter om vad unga gör på nätet. Massmedierna fylls av larmrapporter och varningar kring nätmobbning och sexuella övergrepp. Hur ska man förhålla sig till ungas nätanvändning? Vilka krav är rimliga att ställa? Vilka regler ska gälla?

    I VAD GÖR UNGA PÅ NÄTET? visar Elza Dunkels hur viktigt det är att kunskaperna om unga och nätet sätts in i ett sammanhang. Om vi vill förstå räcker det inte med att iaktta på avstånd. Vi måste våga ställa frågor; i klassrummet såväl som vid middagsbordet. Den bästa informationen om ungas nätanvändning får vi inte från kvällstidningarnas löpsedlar. Den får vi från ungdomarna själva.

    Författaren utgår ifrån ett stort antal intervjuer med barn och ungdomar. Hon beskriver vad unga gör på nätet, resonerar kring möjliga risker och hur vi bäst hanterar dem. Hon ger också tips och råd kring hur vi kan överbrygga kunskapsavståndet mellan generationerna.

    I boken ifrågasätts våra föreställningar om nätet och de vanligaste fördomarna pekas ut. Samtidigt ger författaren redskap till ett rimligare förhållningssätt till ungas nätanvändning.

  • 11.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Young people's net cultures2005In: Encyclopaedia of distance learning / [ed] Howard, Caroline, Hershey: Idea Group Reference , 2005, Vol. 4, p. 2067-2074Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has a large number of Internet users, and on a global scale only Iceland had more Internet users in 2002 (ITU, 2003). The European Union-funded project SAFT (2003a) found that 87% of Swedish children have access to the Internet at home. Today Scandinavian media focus on alleged serious problems caused by children being online. Despite these media reports, however, it appears that Scandinavian parents and children talk little about the Internet and its effects on life

  • 12.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Enochsson, AnnBritt
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Interviews with young people using online chat2007In: Encyclopedia of information ethics and security / [ed] Quigley, Marian, Hershey: Idea Group Reference , 2007, p. 403-410Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When we first started using online interviews as amethod for qualitative research, we had no thoughtsabout it being any different from face-to-face interviews.Being naturalized digital immigrants (Prensky,2001), having not used computers and the Internet fromchildhood but having become accustomed to them overtime, we did not give the methodological issues muchthought. However, when we started getting questionsabout our research, we understood that we took toomuch for granted. The questions that were raised madeus question our approaches.

  • 13.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-MarieUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).Hällgren, CamillaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Interactive media use and youth: Learning, knowledge exchange and behavior2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern advancements in technology have changed the way that young people use interactive media. Learning from such methods was not even considered until recently. It is now slowly defining the landscape of contemporary pedagogical practices.

    Interactive Media Use and Youth: Learning, Knowledge Exchange and Behavior provides a comprehensive collection of knowledge based on different perspectives on quantitative and descriptive studies, what goes on in the contemporary media landscape, and pedagogical research on formal and non-formal learning strategies. This book outlines interactive media as an emerging research area, growing around young people and contemporary digital arenas. The field is growing in size, shape and complexity and the need for study is urgent.

  • 14.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Young people and contemporary digital arenas: Identity, learning and abusive practices2008In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning, ISSN 1104-523X, no 3-4, p. 35-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to outline an emerging research area, evolving around young people and contemporary digital arenas. The field is growing in size, shape and complexity and the need for study is urgent. The research area is also somewhat elusive and its outline is changing very quickly over time. In previous works the authors have focused on different parts of this area, and in this article bring ideas together to form a joint research base.

    The first theme is identity; what factors influence young people's identity development and how do we interpret identity in a changing media landscape as well as in a changing society?

    The second theme is learning; have contemporary media influenced the processes and outcomes of  learning and if so, how can the educational system benefit from and exploit this?

    The third theme is what we in this context call abusive practices; how can we understand abusive behavior on the internet, among and towards young people?

    The issues problematized in this article are to be seen as a probing for and a framing of a research base for further development.

    The overall aim of the proposed area of study is to identify, analyze and problematise contemporary digital channels of communication and learning in particular, expressions of abusive behavior, and their influence on digital culture and digital native identity construction, with a specific emphasis on issues related to age, class, gender and ethnicity.

  • 15.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Young people and online risk2011In: Youth culture and net culture: online social practices / [ed] Elza Dunkels, Gun-Marie Frånberg and Camilla Hällgren, Hershey, Pennsylvania (USA): IGI Global , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors suspect that the young perspective has been left out when online risk and safety are discussedin contemporary research. The aim of this chapter is to give a critical approach to this matter and questionfear as a driving force for protecting young people online. Interviews with children about their views ofinternet use (Dunkels, 2007) and a study of safe use guides from European countries conducted in 2008(Lüders et al, 2009) form the empirical base. The discussion in the chapter is underpinned by ideas ofchildhood as a social construction, emerging ideas of power relations pertaining to age and theories oftechnology reception. The authors also introduce a metaphor, the layer cake, to better understand howthe same action can be viewed from different vantage points.

  • 16.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-MarieUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).Hällgren, CamillaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Youth culture and net culture: Online social practices2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The globalization of our society has changed the social culture of young people forever. In this day and age, this online social culture is growing in size, shape, and complexity and the need for further study is imperative.

    Youth Culture and Net Culture: Online Social Practices aims to engage the complex relationship between technology and youth culture, while outlining the details of various online social activities. This book focuses on generational aspects of online social practices, as well as other facets, such as gender and social class. Presenting the views of young people regarding social practices is paramount in a time when the educational system, policymakers and non-governmental organizations are calling for this knowledge.

  • 17.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    The invisible girl: Ceci n'est pas une fille2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation describes The Invisible Girl, a Swedish multi-disciplinary research project in which power relations, gender, online youth culture and learning are the primary objects of study.

    Many studies on young girls' and boys' internet use have been conducted during the last fifteen years of rapidly developing mass use of the internet. However, the vast bulk of this research has had a top-down, adult perspective, with very little or no intention at all to give voice to the young informants themselves. There have also been tendencies to over-emphasize the generation gap and exoticisize young people's actions. Taking a closer look at this body of research, we find the presence of discomforting gender blindness. This is evident in, for instance, the use of boys' knowledge as a norm in the sense that girls should develop the same interests and competences as boys (ITU, 2008). Furthermore, in the gender blind school, girls' digital competence has been invisible and girls' knowledge is often hidden by their own terminology (Enochsson, 2005). Simmons (2004) also claims that we do not have words to describe girls' aggressions and that the lack of words leads to difficulties in discussing the question.

    As researchers we are concerned about the unequal nature of this research field. When trying to find out what these inequalities consist of we have identified an important blind spot, both from a societal and a research point of view, which has led us to call our project The Invisible Girl. The name is inspired by Ralph Ellison's novel Invisible Man (1952). Just like Ellison portrays black Americans as being invisible, it is possible to view girls as invisible on the internet in the sense that their actions cannot be described with the existing male oriented terminology.

  • 18.
    Dunkels, Elza
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lüders, Marika
    Bae Brandtzæg, Petter
    Risky contacts2009In: Kids online: opportunities and risks for children / [ed] Livingstone, Sonia & Haddon, Leslie, London: Policy Press , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Youth and contemporary learning2011In: Interactive media use and youth: Learning, knowledge exchange and behavior / [ed] Elza Dunkels, Gun-Marie Frånberg and Camilla Hällgren, Hershey, Pennsylvania (USA): IGI Global , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the chapter is to problematize the concept of learning and common views on transformed conditions for learning; have contemporary digital media reformed the processes of learning and if so, how can the educational system benefit from and exploit this?  The chapter highlights changes and reflects on contemporary and future aspects of learning. What is seen as meaningful learning? Is learning more demanding today or does the open and abundant access to information simplify it?

  • 20.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Hällgren, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Introductory chapter2012In: Invisible Girl: "Ceci n'est pas une fille" / [ed] Gun-Marie Frånberg, Camilla Hällgren, Elza Dunkels, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2012, p. 9-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Hällgren, CamillaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).Dunkels, ElzaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Invisible Girl: "Ceci n'est pas une fille"2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Dunkels, ElzaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).Frånberg, Gun-MarieUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Invisible Boy: the making of contemporary masculinities2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What does it mean to become a boy today? How does boyhood manifest itself in different contexts? How can we describe fathers and sons in contemporary society? And can we make the invisible boy visible in ways alternative to those of media?

    This publication is the outcome of an international, multidisciplinary exploration of how boys become boys and how boys form identities today. The project was global in its scope and included 24 artists and academics from Sweden, USA, Turkey, UK, Finland, New Zealand, Croatia, Nigeria, Switzerland, India, Canada and Italy have contributed to the Invisible Boy. The publication with its 20 chapters includes academic papers, video, drawings, digital images, photography and music. Combining a variety of intellectual expressions the chapters forms a joint example of multimodal explorations to further understandings of complex matters such as gendered identity making.

    The contributions are organised in four themes: Negotiating Identity, Bodily Existence, Boyhood Interrupted, and Gender and Contemporary Media.

  • 23.
    Hällgren, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Young people and contemporary digital arenas: identity, learning and abusive practice2009In: SITE Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education: Charleston March 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to outline an emerging research area around young people and contemporary digital arenas.The field is growing in size, shape and complexity. The need for investigations is demanding. The research area is also elusive and its outline is changing very quickly. In previous works the authors have focused on different parts of this area, and in this paper we bring our ideas together to form a joint research base. 1st theme is identity; what factors influence young people's identity development and how do we interpret identity in a changing media landscape as well as in a changing society? 2nd theme is learning; have contemporary media influenced the processes of learning and if so, how can the educational system benefit from this? The 3rd theme is what we in this context call abusive practices; how can we understand abusive behavior on the internet,among and towards young people? The issues problematized are to be seen as a probing for and a framing of a research base for further development.

  • 24.
    Hällgren, Camillla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Exploring the making of boys2015In: Invisible Boy: the making of contemporary masculinities / [ed] Camilla Hällgren, Elza Dunkels, Gun-Marie Frånberg, Umeå: Umeå University , 2015, p. 7-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Marklund, Leif
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Digital play as a means to develop children’s literacy and power in the Swedish preschool2016In: Early years, ISSN 0957-5146, E-ISSN 1472-4421, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 289-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents different angles on the subject of digital play as a means to develop children’s literacy and power, using an online ethnographical study of Swedish preschool teachers’ discussions in informal online forums. Question posts (n = 239) were analysed using the Technological Pedagogical Knowledge framework and the Caring, Nurturing and Teaching framework, with the aim of understanding how teachers intended to support children’s literacy development with tablets. Literacy development can be understood as a social practice that needs to develop along with changes in society’s demands on citizens. The results presented indicate that school subject oriented skills are predominantly present in the mind-set of these preschool teachers. When digital play is increasingly used for pedagogical purposes in preschools, that also means that preschools have expanded their opportunities to work with children’s literacy development. For preschool teachers, it is important to discuss how literacy development can be supported in a contemporary media landscape.

  • 26.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Netthets: strategier og tilnaerminger2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [no]

    Hvordan kan vi forstå og håndtere hets,trusler og maktutøvelse på nettet?

    Skal det være opp til hver enkelt å håndterenetthets, eller kan vi sammen og med felles krefter gå spørsmålene i møte?

    Dette er blant de sentrale problemstillingene som tas opp i denne boken.

    I tillegg til strategier og tilnærminger, presenteres også spørsmål somkan bidra til økt kunnskap og refleksjon rundt egen forståelse og erfaringangående maktutøvelse og netthets.

  • 27.
    Nyberg, Annakarin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Näthat: strategier och förhållningssätt2018 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan vi förstå och hantera hat, hot och maktutövande på nätet?

    Är svaren på frågorna upp till den enskilda individen att hantera, eller kan vi agera tillsammans och med gemensamma krafter?

    Det är några av de centrala frågeställningarna för den här boken.

    Tillsammans med förslag på strategier och förhållningssätt presenteras också frågor som syftar till att synliggöra den egna förståelsen, erfaren- heten och kunskapen om maktutövande och näthat.

  • 28. Van Rooij, Antonius J.
    et al.
    Ferguson, Christopher J.
    Carras, Michelle Colder
    Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel
    Shi, Jing
    Aarseth, Espen
    Bean, Anthony M.
    Bergmark, Karin Helmersson
    Brus, Anne
    Coulson, Mark
    Deleuze, Jory
    Dullur, Pravin
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Edman, Johan
    Elson, Malte
    Etchells, Peter J.
    Fiskaali, Anne
    Granic, Isabela
    Jansz, Jeroen
    Karlsen, Faltin
    Kaye, Linda K.
    Kirsh, Bonnie
    Lieberoth, Andreas
    Markey, Patrick
    Mills, Kathryn L.
    Nielsen, Rune Kristian Lundedal
    Orben, Amy
    Poulsen, Arne
    Prause, Nicole
    Prax, Patrick
    Quandt, Thorsten
    Schimmenti, Adriano
    Starcevic, Vladan
    Stutman, Gabrielle
    Turner, Nigel E.
    Van Looy, Jan
    Przybylski, Andrew K.
    A weak scientific basis for gaming disorder: Let us err on the side of caution2018In: Journal of Behavioral Addictions, ISSN 2062-5871, E-ISSN 2063-5303, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We greatly appreciate the care and thought that is evident in the 10 commentaries that discuss our debate paper, the majority of which argued in favor of a formalized ICD-11 gaming disorder. We agree that there are some people whose play of video games is related to life problems. We believe that understanding this population and the nature and severity of the problems they experience should be a focus area for future research. However, moving from research construct to formal disorder requires a much stronger evidence base than we currently have. The burden of evidence and the clinical utility should be extremely high, because there is a genuine risk of abuse of diagnoses. We provide suggestions about the level of evidence that might be required: transparent and preregistered studies, a better demarcation of the subject area that includes a rationale for focusing on gaming particularly versus a more general behavioral addictions concept, the exploration of non-addiction approaches, and the unbiased exploration of clinical approaches that treat potentially underlying issues, such as depressive mood or social anxiety first. We acknowledge there could be benefits to formalizing gaming disorder, many of which were highlighted by colleagues in their commentaries, but we think they do not yet outweigh the wider societal and public health risks involved. Given the gravity of diagnostic classification and its wider societal impact, we urge our colleagues at the WHO to err on the side of caution for now and postpone the formalization.

  • 29. von Feilitzen, Cecilia
    et al.
    Findahl, Olle
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Hur farligt är internet? Resultat från den svenska delen av den europeiska undersökningen EU Kids Online.2011Report (Refereed)
  • 30. von Feilitzen, Cecilia
    et al.
    Findahl, Olle
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Vad nytt om barn och internet i Sverige?: Resultat från den europeiska undersökningen EU Kids Online2011In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Wold, Thomas
    et al.
    Aristodemou, Elena
    Dunkels, Elza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Laouris, Yiannis
    Inappropriate content2009In: Kids online: opportunities and risks for children / [ed] Livingstone, Sonia & Haddon, Leslie, London: Policy Press, 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf