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  • 1.
    Abraha, Atakelti
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Tigray Health Bureau, Tigray and Ethiopian Health Insurance Agency, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Institutes of Applied Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom; MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit, School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
    Kahsay, Asmelash
    Tigray Health Bureau, Tigray and Ethiopian Health Insurance Agency, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Public Health Sciences, Global Health (IHCAR), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social determinants of under-5 child health: A qualitative study in Wolkayit Woreda, Tigray Region, Ethiopia2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 6, article id e0218101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the significant reductions seen in under-5 child mortality in Ethiopia over the last two decades, more than 10,000 children still die each year in Tigray Region alone, of whom 75% die from preventable diseases. Using an equity lens, this study aimed to investigate the social determinants of child health in one particularly vulnerable district as a means of informing the health policy decision-making process. An exploratory qualitative study design was adopted, combining focus group discussions and qualitative interviews. Seven Focus Group Discussions with mothers of young children, and 21 qualitative interviews with health workers were conducted in Wolkayit district in May-June 2015. Data were subjected to thematic analysis. Mothers’ knowledge regarding the major causes of child mortality appeared to be good, and they also knew about and trusted the available child health interventions. However, utilization and practice of these interventions was limited by a range of issues, including cultural factors, financial shortages, limited female autonomy on financial resources, seasonal mobility, and inaccessible or unaffordable health services. Our findings pointed to the importance of a multi-sectoral strategy to improve child health equity and reduce under-5 mortality in Wolkayit. Recommendations include further decentralizing child health services to local-level Health Posts, and increasing the number of Health Facilities based on local topography and living conditions.

  • 2.
    Ahangari, Alebtekin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stewart Williams, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Generational, Health and Ageing, School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Pain and alcohol consumption among older adults: findings from the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health, Wave 12016In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1282-1292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate cross-sectional associations between self-reported recent pain and alcohol use/abstinence, and previous-day pain and previous-week alcohol consumption in adults aged 50 + in six low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). METHODS: The WHO Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 (2007-2010) in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa is the data source. Prevalence of alcohol use/abstinence is reported by previous-day and previous-month pain. Multinomial logistic regressions (crude and adjusted for sex and country) tested associations between recent pain and alcohol use in the pooled multicountry sample. RESULTS: Across the six SAGE countries, about one-third of respondents reported alcohol use, being highest in Russia (74%) and lowest in India (16%). Holding the effects of sex and country constant, compared with abstainers, people with previous-day pain were more likely to be previous-day or other users. With regard to the quantity and frequency of alcohol use, people with previous-day pain were more likely to be non-heavy drinkers. CONCLUSION: Overall, we found that, in this population of older adults in six LMICs, recent pain was associated with moderate use of alcohol, although there were differences between countries. The findings provide a platform for country-specific research to better understand bi-directional associations between pain and alcohol in older adults.

  • 3.
    Godefay, Hagos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Abrha, A
    Yang, HS
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Mulugeta, A
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Assessing the performance of the Ethiopian family folder system for collecting community-based health informationArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Godefay, Hagos
    et al.
    Tigray Regional Health Bureau, Mekelle, Ethiopia.
    Abrha, Atakelti
    Tigray Regional Health Bureau, Mekelle, Ethiopia.
    Kinsman, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Byass, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Medical Research Council/Wits University Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Institute of Applied Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom.
    Undertaking cause-specific mortality measurement in an unregistered population: an example from Tigray Region, Ethiopia2014In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, p. 25264-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The lack of adequate documentation of deaths, and particularly their cause, is often noted in African and Asian settings, but practical solutions for addressing the problem are not always clear. Verbal autopsy methods (interviewing witnesses after a death) have developed rapidly, but there remains a lack of clarity as to how these methods can be effectively applied to large unregistered populations. This paper sets out practical details for undertaking a representative survey of cause-specific mortality in a population of several million, taking Tigray Region in Ethiopia as a prototype.

    SAMPLING: Sampling was designed around an expected level of maternal mortality ratio of 400 per 100,000 live births, which needed measuring within a 95% confidence interval of approximately ±100. Taking a stratified cluster sample within the region at the district level for logistic reasons, and allowing for a design effect of 2, this required a population of around 900,000 people, equating to six typical districts. Since the region is administered in six geographic zones, one district per zone was randomly selected.

    IMPLEMENTATION: The survey was implemented as a two-stage process: first, to trace deaths that occurred in the sampled districts within the preceding year, and second to follow them up with verbal autopsy interviews. The field work for both stages was undertaken by health extension workers, working in their normally assigned areas. Most of the work was associated with tracing the deaths, rather than undertaking the verbal autopsy interviews.

    DISCUSSION: This approach to measuring cause-specific mortality in an unregistered Ethiopian population proved to be feasible and effective. Although it falls short of the ideal situation of continuous civil registration and vital statistics, a survey-based strategy of this kind may prove to be a useful intermediate step on the road towards full civil registration and vital statistics implementation.

  • 5.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    van der Pals, Maria
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Skånes University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Pediatric Clinic, Norrköping Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Danielsson, Lars
    Pediatric Clinic, Norrtälje Hospital, Norrtälje, Sweden.
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Pathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby, Sweden.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Pediatric Clinic, Norrtälje Hospital, Norrtälje, Sweden.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsson, Eva
    Pediatric Clinic, Växjö Hospital, Växjö, Sweden..
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Pediatric Clinic, Norrköping Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Pediatrics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Charlotta, Webb
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Skånes University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Skånes University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Reduced prevalence of childhood celiac disease: an effect of changes in infant feeding?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    van der Pals, Maria
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Danielsson, Lars
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Karlsson, Eva
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Webb, Charlotta
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Prevalence of childhood celiac disease and changes in infant feeding2013In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 131, no 3, p. e687-e694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Between 1984 and 1996, Sweden experienced an "epidemic" of clinical celiac disease in children <2 years of age, attributed partly to changes in infant feeding. Whether infant feeding affects disease occurrence and/or the clinical presentation remains unknown. We investigated and compared the total prevalence of celiac disease in 2 birth cohorts of 12-year-olds and related the findings to each cohort's ascertained infant feeding.

    METHODS: A 2-phase cross-sectional screening study was performed in which 13 279 children from 2 birth cohorts participated: children born during the epidemic (1993) and children born after the epidemic (1997). Previously diagnosed cases were reported and confirmed. Blood samples were analyzed for serological markers and children with positive values were referred for small intestinal biopsy. Infant feeding practices in the cohorts were ascertained via questionnaires. Prevalence comparisons were expressed as prevalence ratios.

    RESULTS: The total prevalence of celiac disease was 29 in 1000 and 22 in 1000 for the 1993 and 1997 cohorts, respectively. Children born in 1997 had a significantly lower risk of having celiac disease compared with those born in 1993 (prevalence ratio: 0.75; 95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.93; P = .01). The cohorts differed in infant feeding (specifically, in the proportion of infants introduced to dietary gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding).

    CONCLUSIONS: A significantly reduced prevalence of celiac disease in 12-year-olds indicates an option for disease prevention. Our findings suggest that the present infant feeding recommendation to gradually introduce gluten-containing foods from 4 months of age, preferably during ongoing breastfeeding, is favorable.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Nordyke, Katrina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Celiac Dietary Adherence Test simplifies Determining Adherence to a Gluten-Free Diet in Swedish Adolescents2019In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to ascertain whether the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test (CDAT) could contribute in determining adherence to a gluten-free diet in celiac disease patients and to evaluate the diet adherence and well-being of a study population five years after a celiac disease screening known as “Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden”.

    Methods: Through the screening, 90 adolescents (born 1997) were diagnosed with biopsy-proven celiac disease at twelve-years of age. Of them, 70 (78%) came to a five-year follow-up where anti–tissue transglutaminase antibodies 2 (TG2-IgA) was tested and a questionnaire was filled in, including CDAT, which consists of seven questions related to adherence. Non-parametrical tests were utilized to determine associations between adherence measures.

    Results: Among the adolescents, 86% were adherent to a gluten-free diet five years after screening, 38% reported their general well-being as excellent, 50% very well, and 12% well. Statistically significant associations were seen between TG2-IgA and the CDAT score (p=0.033), and the self-reported adherence question and the CDAT score (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: The screening-detected adolescents reported a high level of well-being and adherence to a gluten-free diet five years after screening. We conclude that the CDAT can be used in clinical practice as an estimation of adherence to a gluten-free diet. It would be most suitable to use in conjunction with currently used adherence measures, but can also be used as a stand-alone method when others are not accessible.

  • 8.
    Myleus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Gothefors, Leif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Persson, Lars-åke
    Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Early vaccinations are not risk factors for Celiac Disease2012In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 130, no 1, p. E63-E70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate if changes in the national Swedish vaccination program coincided with changes in the celiac disease (CD) incidence rate in infants (ie, the Swedish CD Epidemic), and to assess the potential association between these vaccinations and CD risk.

    METHODS: All studies were based on the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register. Using an ecological approach, we plotted changes over time in the national vaccination program in the graph displaying CD incidence rate. A population-based incident case-referent study of invited infants was performed. Exposure information was received through a questionnaire and child health clinic records. Vaccines explored were diphtheria/tetanus, pertussis (acellular), polio (inactivated), Haemophilus influenzae type b (conjugated), measles/mumps/rubella, and live attenuated bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in children with increased tuberculosis risk. Findings were subjected to a birth cohort analysis.

    RESULTS: Introduction of pertussis vaccine coincided in time with decreasing CD incidence rates. In the infant case-referent study, however, neither vaccination against pertussis (odds ratio 0.91; 95% confidence interval 0.60-1.4), nor against Haemophilus influenzae type b or measles/mumps/rubella was associated with CD. Coverage for the diphtheria/tetanus and polio vaccines was 99%. BCG was associated with reduced risk for CD (adjusted odds ratio 0.54; 95% confidence interval 0.31-0.94). Discontinuation of general BCG vaccination did not affect the cumulative incidence of CD at age 15 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Early vaccinations within the national Swedish program were not associated with CD risk, nor could changes in the program explain the Swedish epidemic. A protective effect by BCG was suggested, which could be subject to further studies. Pediatrics 2012;130:e63-e70

  • 9.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Towards explaining the Swedish epidemic of celiac disease: an epidemiological approach2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Celiac disease occurs worldwide in approximately 1% of the population, whereof the majority of cases are undiagnosed. Sweden experienced an epidemic (1984-1996) of clinically detected celiac disease in children below 2 years of age, partly attributed to changes in infant feeding. Whether the epidemic constituted a change in disease occurrence and/or a shift in the proportion of diagnosed cases remains unknown. Moreover, the cause of the epidemic is not fully understood.

    Objective: To increase the knowledge regarding the occurrence of celiac disease in Sweden, with focus on the epidemic period and thereafter, as well as the etiology of celiac disease in general, by investigating the Swedish epidemic and its potential causes.

    Methods: We performed a two-phased cross-sectional multicenter screening study investigating the total prevalence, including both clinically- and screening-detected cases, of celiac disease in 2 birth cohorts of 12-year-olds (n=13 279): 1 of the epidemic period (1993) and 1 of the post-epidemic period (1997). The screening strategy entailed serological markers analyses, with subsequent small intestinal biopsy when values were positive. Diagnosis was ascertained in clinical cases detected prior to screening. Infant feeding practices in the cohorts were ascertained via questionnaires. An ecological approach combined with an incident case-referent study (475 cases, 950 referents) performed during the epidemic were used for investigating environmental- and lifestyle factors other than infant feeding. Exposure information was obtained via register data, a questionnaire, and child health clinic records. All studies utilized the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register.

    Results: The total prevalences of celiac disease were 2.9% and 2.2% for the 1993 and 1997 cohorts, respectively, with 2/3 cases unrecognized prior to screening. Children born in 1997 had a significantly lower celiac disease prevalence compared to those born in 1993 (prevalence ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.93). The cohorts differed in infant feeding; more specifically in the proportion of infants introduced to dietary gluten in small amounts during ongoing breastfeeding. Of the environmental and lifestyle factors investigated, no additional changes over time coincided with the epidemic. Early vaccinations within the Swedish program were not risk factors for celiac disease. Early infections (≥3 parental-reported episodes) were associated with increased risk for celiac disease (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0), a risk that increased synergistically if, in addition to having ≥3 infectious episodes, the child was introduced to gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued (OR 5.6; 95% CI, 3.1-10). Early infections probably made a minor contribution to the Swedish epidemic through the synergistic effect with gluten, which changed concurrently. In total, approximately 48% of the epidemic could be explained by infant feeding and early infections.

    Conclusion: Celiac disease is both unexpectedly prevalent and mainly undiagnosed in Swedish children. Although the cause of the epidemic is still not fully understood, the significant difference in prevalence between the 2 cohorts indicates that the epidemic constituted a change in disease occurrence, and importantly, corroborates that celiac disease can be avoided in some children, at least up to 12 years of age. Our findings suggest that infant feeding and early infections, but not early vaccinations, have a causal role in the celiac disease etiology and that the infant feeding practice – gradually introducing gluten-containing foods from 4 months of age, preferably during ongoing breastfeeding – is favorable.

  • 10.
    Myléus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Gothefors, Leif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    International Maternal and Child Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Early infections are associated with increased risk for celiac disease: an incident case-referent study2012In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 194-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is defined as a 'chronic small intestinal immune-mediated enteropathy precipitated by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals'. Sweden has experienced an "epidemic" of celiac disease in children below two years of age. Celiac disease etiology is considered multifactorial; however, little is known regarding potential risk- or protecting factors. We present data on the possible association between early infectious episodes and celiac disease, including their possible contribution to the Swedish celiac disease epidemic.

    METHODS: A population-based incident case-referent study (475 cases, 950 referents) with exposure information obtained via a questionnaire (including family characteristics, infant feeding, and the child's general health) was performed. Celiac disease cases were diagnosed before two years of age, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. Referents were randomly selected from the national population register after fulfilling matching criteria. The final analyses included 954 children, 373 (79%) cases and 581 (61%) referents, with complete information on main variables of interest in a matched set of one case with one or two referents.

    RESULTS: Having three or more parental-reported infectious episodes, regardless of type of infection, during the first six months of life was associated with a significantly increased risk for later celiac disease, and this remained after adjusting for infant feeding and socioeconomic status (odds ratio [OR] 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.0; P=0.014). The celiac disease risk increased synergistically if, in addition to having several infectious episodes, infants were introduced to dietary gluten in large amounts, compared to small or medium amounts, after breastfeeding was discontinued (OR 5.6; 95% CI, 3.1-10; P<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: This study suggests that having repeated infectious episodes early in life increases the risk for later celiac disease. In addition, we found a synergistic effect between early infections and daily amount of gluten intake, more pronounced among infants for whom breastfeeding had been discontinued prior to gluten introduction. Regarding contribution to the Swedish celiac disease epidemic, which partly was attributed to concurrent changes in infant feeding, early infections probably made a minor contribution via the synergistic effect with gluten amount.

  • 11.
    Myléus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Webb, Charlotta
    Danielsson, Lars
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Karlsson, Eva
    Lagerqvist, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Wall, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Celiac disease revealed in 3% of Swedish 12-year-olds born during an epidemic2009In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 170-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objetive: Sweden experienced a marked epidemic of celiac disease between 1984 and 1996 in children younger than 2 years of age, partly explained by changes in infant feeding. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in 12-year-olds born during the epidemic (1993), including both symptomatic and screening detected cases.

    Patients and methods: All sixth-grade children in participating schools were invited (n = 10,041). Symptomatic and, therefore, previously diagnosed celiac disease cases were ascertained through the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register and/or medical records. All serum samples were analyzed for antihuman tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-IgA (Celikey), and serum-IgA, and some for tTG-IgG and endomysial antibodies. A small intestinal biopsy was recommended for all children with suspected undiagnosed celiac disease.

    Results: Participation was accepted by 7567 families (75%). Previously diagnosed celiac disease was found in 67 children; 8.9/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7-11). In another 192 children, a small intestinal biopsy was recommended and was performed in 180. Celiac disease was verified in 145 children, 20/1000 (95% CI 17-23). The total prevalence was 29/1000 (95% CI 25-33).

    Conclusions: The celiac disease prevalence of 29/1000 (3%)-with two thirds of cases undiagnosed before screening-is 3-fold higher than the usually suggested prevalence of 1%. When these 12-year-olds were infants, the prevailing feeding practice was to introduce gluten abruptly, often without ongoing breast-feeding, which might have contributed to this unexpectedly high prevalence.

  • 12.
    Myléus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Högberg, Lotta
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Health-related quality of life is not impaired in children with undetected as well as diagnosed celiac disease: a large population based cross-sectional study2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, p. 425-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with celiac disease remains limited and inconclusive. We investigated the HRQoL of three groups of 12-year-olds with: i) undetected celiac disease ii) clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and iii) without celiac disease.

    METHODS: A school-based cross-sectional multicenter screening study invited 18 325 children, whereof 68% consented to participate. Participants provided a blood sample, which was later analyzed for anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies, and alongside filled in a questionnaire. When anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies were elevated, a small intestinal biopsy verified the screening-detected celiac disease diagnosis. Self-reported HRQoL was measured using Kidscreen, a generic 52 items instrument with proven reliability and validity. Scores were linearly transformed into a 0-100 scale with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Mean values with standard deviations (mean +/- SD) were compared, and uni- and multivariate logistic regression models tested the odds of a low HRQoL among children with undetected or diagnosed celiac disease, respectively.

    RESULTS: Children with undetected celiac disease (n = 238) reported similar HRQoL as children without celiac disease (n = 12 037) (83.0 +/- 11.0 vs. 82.5 +/- 11.3, P = 0.51), and also similar HRQoL (82.2 +/- 12.2, P = 0.28) to that of children with diagnosed celiac disease (n = 90), of whom 92% were adherent to treatment. Having undetected celiac disease did not increase the odds of low overall HRQoL, independent of sex, area of residence, study year and occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.54-1.10). Comparable results were seen for diagnosed celiac disease cases (adjusted odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.85) CONCLUSION: Children with undetected celiac disease reported comparable HRQoL as their peers with diagnosed celiac disease, and those without celiac disease, when reporting prior to receiving the diagnosis through screening. Thus, children with celiac disease, both untreated and diagnosed, perceive their HRQoL as unimpaired by their disease.

  • 13.
    Myléus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Reilly, Norelle R.
    Green, Peter H.R.
    Rate, Risk Factors and Outcomes of Non-adherence in Pediatric Patients with Celiac Disease: a Systematic Review2019In: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, ISSN 1542-3565, E-ISSN 1542-7714, article id 31173891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The only treatment for celiac disease is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD). We performed a systematic review to investigate the rate of adherence to a GFD in children with celiac disease, risk factors that affect adherence, and outcomes of non-adherence.

    METHODS: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, EBSCO, and Scopus for studies through January 2019. We included observational studies of ≥50 children diagnosed with celiac disease and recommended for placement on a GFD. We collected data on adherence assessment (self-report, serology tests, structured dietary interview, biopsies, or assays for gluten immunogenic peptides), risk factors, and outcomes related to adherence. Findings were presented with medians, range, and a narrative synthesis.

    RESULTS: We identified 703 studies; of these, 167 were eligible for full-text assessment and 49 were included in the final analysis, comprising 7850 children. Rates of adherence to a GFD ranged from 23% to 98%. Comparable rates (median rates of adherence, 75%-87%) were found irrespective of how assessments were performed. Adolescents were at risk of non-adherence and children whose parents had good knowledge about celiac disease adhered more strictly. Non-adherence associated with patient growth, symptoms, and quality of life.

    CONCLUSION: In a systematic review of 49 studies of children with celiac disease, we found substantial variation in adherence to a GFD among patients. Rate of adherence was not associated with method of adherence measurement, so all methods appear to be useful, with lack of consensus on the ideal metric. Studies are needed to determine the best method to ensure adherence and effects on long-term health.

  • 14.
    Myléus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Högberg, Lotta
    Browaldh, Lars
    Daniels, Ing-Marie
    Fagerberg, Ulrika L.
    Gudjónsdóttir, Audur H.
    Malmquist, Marianne
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Questionnaire showed that Swedish paediatric clinics complied well with the revised European guidelines for diagnosing coeliac disease2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1140-1143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: In 2012, revised criteria for diagnosing childhood coeliac disease were published by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and incorporated into the revised Swedish guidelines the same year. These made it possible, in certain cases, to diagnose coeliac disease without taking small bowel biopsies. This survey assessed the extent to which the new guidelines were implemented by Swedish paediatric clinics two years after their introduction.

    Methods: In October 2014, we distributed a paper questionnaire including five questions on diagnostic routines to the 40 paediatric clinics in university or regional hospitals in Sweden that perform small bowel biopsies.

    Results: All 36 (90%) clinics that responded used anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies as the initial diagnostic test and some also used serological markers. Most clinics (81%) used endoscopy and took multiple duodenal biopsies, whereas only a few (19%) occasionally employed a suction capsule. Almost all clinics (86%) omitted taking small bowel biopsies in symptomatic children with repeatedly high coeliac serology and positive genotyping, thereby avoiding the need for invasive endoscopy under anaesthesia.

    Conclusion: The 2012 Swedish Paediatric Coeliac Disease Diagnostic Guidelines had been widely accepted and implemented in routine health care two years after their introduction.

  • 15.
    Namatovu, Fredinah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lindkvist, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Maternal and perinatal conditions and the risk of developing celiac disease during childhood.2016In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 16, article id 77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD) is increasing worldwide, which might be due to the changing environmental and lifestyle exposures. We aimed to explore how conditions related to maternity, delivery and the neonatal period influence CD onset during childhood.

    METHODS: Using Sweden's national registers we had access to information on 1 912 204 children born between 1991 and 2009, 6 596 of whom developed CD before 15 years of age. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine how CD is associated with maternity, delivery and the neonatal period.

    RESULTS: Regardless of sex, a reduction in CD risk was observed in children born to mothers aged ≥35 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.8; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.7-0.9) and with high maternal income (OR 0.9; 95 % CI 0.8-0.9). Being a second-born child, however, was positively associated with CD. Among boys, elective caesarean delivery increased the risk of CD (OR 1.2; 95 % CI 1.0-1.4), while maternal overweight (OR 0.9; 95 % CI 0.8-0.9), premature rupture of the membrane (OR 0.4; 95 % CI 0.2-0.8) and low birth weight showed a negative association. Girls had an increased CD risk compared to boys and in girls the risk was increased by repeated maternal urinary tract infections (OR 1.1; 95 % CI 1.0-1.2).

    CONCLUSIONS: Elective caesarean delivery and repeated maternal urinary tract infections during pregnancy are associated with increased risk of CD onset during childhood, suggesting the role of dysbiosis during early life. High maternal age and high income reduced the risk of CD, which might be due to infant-feeding practices and life style.

  • 16.
    Nordyke, Katrina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Danielsson, Lars
    Högberg, Lotta
    Karlsson, Eva
    Emmelin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    How do children experience participating in a coeliac disease screening?: a qualitative study based on children's written narratives2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 351-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore how 12-year-old Swedish children experienced being involved in a coeliac disease (CD) screening. METHODS: A qualitative approach was used to analyse short narratives written by children who had taken part in a school-based CD screening. Narratives were written after blood sampling, but prior to learning of the test results. Through an oscillation between the texts, codes, subcategories and four categories, a theme was generated describing the children's experience. RESULTS: The theme ''A Journey towards Confidence'' captures the overall experience of the screening. It illustrates that, although some children faced fear or anxiety, overall they had or were provided tools allowing them to cope well and experience a journey towards confidence. The categories describe conditions that contributed to the experience. The first, being involved, reflects the importance of involvement in receiving information and deciding to participate. Being a ''good citizen'' refers to feeling a duty to help and a trust to be treated fairly. Being able to cope with the screening was influenced by the children's ability to manage sensations and support received. The last category, being able to balance risk, illustrates that the children were able to balance the risks of screening when they had a realistic understanding of the disease and their vulnerability and had tamed their anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This study increases the understanding of how 12-year-old Swedish children experienced participating in a CD screening and describes conditions important for a positive experience. We show that, although some children faced anxiety, they had, or were provided with, tools allowing them to cope well and gain confidence.

  • 17.
    Norström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    van der Pals, Maria
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Högberg, Lotta
    Isaksson, Anders
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Impact of Thyroid Autoimmunity on Thyroid Function in 12-year-old Children With Celiac Disease2018In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 64-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Celiac disease (CD) is associated with thyroid autoimmunity and other autoimmune diseases. However, data are lacking regarding the relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and thyroid function, especially in regard to CD. Our aim was to investigate the impact of thyroid autoimmunity on thyroid function in 12-year-old children with CD compared to their healthy peers.

    METHODS: A case-referent study was conducted as part of a CD screening of 12-year-olds. Our study included 335 children with CD and 1,695 randomly selected referents. Thyroid autoimmunity was assessed with antibodies against thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb). Thyroid function was assessed with thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine.

    RESULTS: TPOAb positivity significantly increased the risk of developing hypothyroidism in all children. The odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) were: 5.3 (2.7-11) in healthy 12-year-olds, 10 (3.2-32) in screening-detected CD cases, 19 (2.6-135) in previously diagnosed CD cases, and 12 (4.4-32) in all CD cases together. Among children with TPOAb positivity, hypothyroidism was significantly more common (odds ratio 3.1; 95% CI 1.03-9.6) in children with CD (10/19) than in children without CD (12/46).

    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of thyroid dysfunction due to thyroid autoimmunity is larger for those with CD than their healthy peers. Our study indicate that a gluten-free diet does not reduce the risk of thyroid dysfunction. Further studies are required for improved understanding of the role of the gluten-free diet for the risk of autoimmune diseases in children with CD.

  • 18.
    Ragnarsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Recurrent Pain and Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children: A Systematic Review2019In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recurrent pain and school failures are common problems in children visiting the school nurses office. The overall aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between recurrent pain and academic achievement in school-aged children. Literature was searched in seven electronic databases and in relevant bibliographies. Study selection, data extraction, and study and evidence quality assessments were performed systematically with standardized tools. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria and 13 verified an association between recurrent pain (headache, stomachache, and musculoskeletal pain) and negative academic achievement. Two longitudinal studies indicated a likely causal effect of pain on academic achievement. All studies had substantial methodological drawbacks and the overall quality of the evidence for the identified associations was low. Thus, children’s lack of success in school may be partly attributed to recurrent pain problems. However, more highquality studies are needed, including on the direction of the association and its moderators and mediators.

  • 19. Stenhammar, Lars
    et al.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Laurin, Pia
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Coeliac disease and socio-economic status2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 8, article id e328Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In their interesting article on coeliac disease (CD) and socio-economic status, Whyte et al (1) report that CD is more common in children living in areas of the UK with higher socio-economic status than areas with low status. In 1996, we reported that a group of 72 Swedish children with CD were breastfed for a significantly shorter time than the 288 age-matched reference children included in the study (2). In addition, infants with CD were less likely to be breastfed when gluten was introduced into their diet. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 20. van der Pals, Maria
    et al.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Högberg, Lotta
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Body mass index is not a reliable tool in predicting celiac disease in children2014In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 14, p. 165-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Untreated celiac disease is traditionally believed to be associated with malabsorption and underweight. However, studies describing body mass index (BMI) in individuals at the time of diagnosis have shown contradictory results. We investigated the differences in weight, height, and BMI in 12- year-old children with screening-detected celiac disease compared to their healthy peers.

    Methods: In a population-based screening study of 12,632 12-year-old children, blood samples were analyzed for markers of celiac disease. Children with elevated markers were referred for a small bowel biopsy. Weight and height were measured in 239 out of 242 children with screening-detected celiac disease (57.3% girls) and in 12,227 children without celiac disease (48.5% girls). BMI was categorized according to the International Obesity Task Force. Age- and sex-specific cut-off points for underweight, normal weight, and overweight were used.

    Results: Children with celiac disease weighed less and were shorter than their peers (median weight 45.2 kg, interquartile range (IQR) 40.2-52.2 kg vs. 47.0 kg, IQR 41.1-54.4 kg, respectively, p = 0.01; median height 156.5 cm, IQR 151.0-162.0 cm vs. 157.5 cm, IQR 152.0-163.0 cm, respectively, p = 0.04). In comparing those with celiac disease to their healthy peers, 4.2% vs. 5.2% were underweight, 82.0% vs. 72.8% were normal weight, and 13.8% vs. 21.9% were overweight, respectively. There was no association between being underweight and the risk of having undiagnosed celiac disease (Odds ratio (OR) 1.3, 95% CI 0.7-2.4), but the risk was significantly lower among overweight children (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.4-0.8). Median BMI was slightly lower among the children with screening-detected celiac disease compared to their healthy peers (18.6 kg/m(2), IQR 17.1-19.8 kg/m(2) vs. 18.8 kg/m(2), IQR 17.2-21.1 kg/m(2), respectively, p = 0.05), but most of the celiac disease cases had a normal BMI.

    Conclusions: At a population level, children with celiac disease weigh less, are shorter, and have a lower BMI compared to their peers without celiac disease, and this emphasizes the importance of early recognition and treatment of the condition. However, at an individual level, growth parameters are not reliable in establishing the diagnosis.

  • 21. Webb, Charlotta
    et al.
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Danielsson, Lars
    Högberg, Lotta
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Karlsson, Eva
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Accuracy in Celiac Disease Diagnostics by Controlling the Small-bowel Biopsy Process.2011In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 549-553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:: In a Swedish celiac disease screening study (Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), we systematically reviewed the clinical diagnostic procedures with the aim to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and to take advantage of lessons learned for improving diagnostic routines. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: A school-based celiac disease screening study involving 5 Swedish centers, with 10,041 invited 12-year-olds with 7567 consenting participation. All 192 children with elevated serological markers were recommended to undergo small-bowel biopsy, performed and evaluated according to local clinical routines. All of the mucosal specimens were reevaluated by 1 and, when needed, 2 expert pathologists to reach diagnostic consensus. RESULTS:: Small-bowel biopsies were performed in 184 children: 130 by endoscopy and 54 by suction capsule. Endoscopic biopsies were inconclusive in 0.6%, compared with 7.4% of biopsies by suction capsule. A patchy enteropathy was found in 9.1%. Reevaluation by the expert pathologist resulted in 6 additional cases with celiac disease and 1 cleared. Sixteen children with normal or inconclusive biopsies, 4 after endoscopy, and 12 after suction capsule were endoscopically rebiopsied, resulting in another 8 cases. The celiac disease prevalence of 30 of 1000 (95% confidence interval 26-34) was not statistically different from that previously reported. CONCLUSIONS:: The present review revealed the importance of controlling each step of the diagnostic procedure. Several cases would have been missed by relying only on local routines. To improve the quality of childhood celiac disease diagnostics, we recommend multiple endoscopic biopsies from both proximal and distal duodenum and standardized evaluation by a pathologist with good knowledge of celiac disease.

  • 22. Webb, Charlotta
    et al.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Högberg, Lotta
    Lagerqvist, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    High adherence to a gluten-free diet in adolescents with screening-detected celiac disease2015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the gluten-free diet (GFD) adherenceafter one year of follow-up in children with screening-detected celiac disease (CD) in a general population. METHODS: A total of 18,325 12 year olds were invited to participate in apopulation-based CD screening (ETICS- Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), of whom 13,279 participated. In 240 children, CD was detected through elevated anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies 2 (TG2-IgA) and verified by a small-intestinal biopsy. This sub-study included the 210 children with TG2-IgAevaluated both at the initialbiopsy occasion and at the one-year follow-up. GFD adherence was evaluated by a combination of TG2-IgA measurements and self-reported adherence (n = 193). RESULTS: After one year, 83% (179/210) had normalizedTG2-IgA levels (<5U/mL). Among those who had >50 U/mL at diagnosis,25% (16/63) still had elevated TG2-IgA but for the majority their initial values were more than halved. Most reported a high level ofGFD adherence ('always' 75%(158/193) and 'often' 14%(30/193)), and 75% (145/193) reported always adhereingcombined with normalized TG2-IgA. Although reporting that they were always adherent, 13 (6.7%) had not yet normalized their TG2-IgA levels completely, however, a majority of these initially had the highestTG2-IgA levels. CONCLUSIONS: GFD adherence is high in adolescents with CD detected by screening of the general population of Swedish 12yearolds. Almost all had normalized serology and reported GFD adherenceat the one-year follow-up. However, a few adolescents whoreported GFD adherence still had elevated TG2-IgA levelssuggesting more severe disease and/or non-adherence.

  • 23. Webb, Charlotta
    et al.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Myléus, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Halvarsson, Britta
    Högberg, Lotta
    Lagerqvist, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Rosén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Celiac disease can be predicted by high levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in population-based screening2015In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 787-791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate any potential correlation between anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies of type immunoglobulin A (tTG-IgA) and the degree of gluten induced enteropathy in children participating in a screening study for celiac disease (CD) and to assess to what extent the revised ESPGHAN (European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition) guidelines cover this group of patients.

    METHODS: This is a sub-study of a cross-sectional CD screening study, ETICS (Exploring the Iceberg of Celiacs in Sweden), a two-phased study performed during 2005-2006 and 2009-2010. The 13,279 participating children had a blood test obtained and those with positive tTG-IgA were recommended a small intestinal biopsy. The tTG-IgA levels at the time of biopsy were compared with the assessment of the biopsy.

    RESULTS: There were 267 children included, of whom 230 were diagnosed with CD. Out of all children, 67 children had low tTG-IgA levels (<5 U/mL), whereof 55% had Marsh 3 lesions. All children with tTG-IgA levels exceeding 10 times the upper limit of normal values of 5 U/mL, i.e. 50 U/mL, were diagnosed with CD. Lowering the cut-off to 3 U/mL, all but one child with 30 U/mL got CD diagnosis.

    CONCLUSION: By adapting the revised ESPGHAN criteria, biopsies could have been omitted in a fourth of all cases. Our results indicate, that the criteria might be useful even on screened children. Further studies are needed to confirm whether the 2012 ESPGHAN guidelines should be revised to also apply to the populations being screened.

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