umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 51
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Blander, M
    et al.
    Milne, T A
    Dayton, D C
    Backman, R
    Blake, D
    Kühnel, V
    Linak, W
    Nordin, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Ljung, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry.
    Equilibrium Chemistry of Biomass Combustion: A Round-Robin Set of Calculations Using Available Computer Programs and Databases2001In: Energy Fuels, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 344-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equilibrium calculations of three problems regarding biomass combustion, at various levels of sophistication, were performed at six laboratories using seven combinations of computer programs and databases. The objective was to test the adequacy of the programs and databases for calculating both condensed and gas-phase behavior. The first problem was a simplified calculation for the combustion of a woodlike material with added sulfur to possibly form an ideal molten salt solution of potassium and calcium sulfate. The second and third problems were to simulate aspen wood and wheat straw combustion, respectively, and required a relatively sophisticated database on high-temperature solutions to describe condensed phases. All the participants performed calculations of the gas phases, which were reasonably accurate when their databases were adequate. For problem I, most of the participants were also able to calculate a reasonable set of condensed phases. However, for problems II and III, only four of the participants, using the two most sophisticated computer programs and databases, had the ability to produce rational results for the condensed phases. This round robin identified two computer programs and their associated databases that could prove useful for calculating the condensed-phase equilibrium chemistry of biomass combustion when coupled with experimental programs and the capability to expand databases as new experimental data become available. Such calculations can greatly enhance our understanding of the total equilibrium chemistry of biomass combustion.

  • 2.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Characterization of inorganic particulate matter from residential combustion of pelletized biomass fuels2004In: Energy and Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 338-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased focus on potential adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) motivates a careful characterization of particle emissions from different sources. Combustion is a major anthropogenic source of fine PM, and, in urban areas, traditional residential wood combustion can be a major contributor. New and upgraded biomass fuels have become more common, and fuel pellets are especially well-suited for the residential market. The objective of the present work was to determine the mass size distributions, elemental distributions, and inorganic-phase distributions of PM from different residential combustion appliances and pelletized biomass fuels. In addition, chemical equilibrium model calculations of the combustion process were used to interpret the experimental findings. Six different typical pellet fuels were combusted in three different commercial pellet burners (10−15 kW). The experiments were performed in a newly designed experimental setup that enables constant-volume sampling. Total-PM mass concentrations were measured using conventional filters, and the fractions of products of incomplete combustion and inorganic material were thermally determined. Particle mass size distributions were determined using a 13-step low-pressure cascade impactor with a precyclone. The PM was analyzed for morphology (using environmental scanning electron microscopy, ESEM), elemental composition (using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, EDS), and crystalline phases (using X-ray diffractometry, XRD). For complementary chemical structural characterization, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF−SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were also used. The emitted particles were mainly found in the fine (<1 μm) mode with mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.20−0.39 μm and an average PM1 of 89.5% ± 7.4% of total PM. Minor coarse-mode fractions (>1 μm) were present primarily in the experiments with bark and logging residues. Relatively large and varying amounts (28%−92%) were determined to be products of incomplete combustion. The inorganic elemental compositions of the fine particles were dominated by potassium, chlorine, and sulfur, with minor amounts of sodium and zinc. The dominating alkali phase was KCl, with minor but varying amounts of K3Na(SO4)2 and, in some cases, also K2SO4. The results showed that zinc is almost fully volatilized, subsequently and presumably forming a more complex solid phase than that previously suggested (ZnO). However, the formation mechanism and exact phase identification remain to be elucidated. With some constrains, the results also showed that the amounts and speciation of the inorganic PM seemed to be quite similar to that predicted by chemical equilibrium calculations.

  • 3.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Energy Technology Center, Piteå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Thanning, Lennart
    FOI.
    Effects of increased small-scale biomass pellet combustion on ambient air quality in residential areas: A parametric dispersion modeling study2003In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 465-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden's goals of contemporaneously reducing CO2 emissions and phasing out nuclear power will require a maximum utilization of biomass fuels. This would imply a significant shift from electricity and fuel oil to biomass generated heat, but must also be accomplished without a deterioration of the local air quality. The most suitable energy carrier seems to be pelletized biomass fuels with their associated low emissions and considerable residential conversion potential. Using an underlying statistical design, a parametric dispersion modeling study was performed to estimate and illustrate the combined effects of source-specific, meteorological and modeling variables on the ambient air quality in a typical residential area for different conversion scenarios. The work nicely illustrated the benefits of combining statistical designs with model calculations. It further showed that the concentration of combustion related ambient THC was strongly related to conditions affecting the source strength, but only weakly to the dispersion conditions and model variables. Time of year (summer or winter); specific emission performance; extent of conversion from electricity; conversion from wood log combustion; and specific efficiency of the pellet appliances showed significant effects in descending order. The effects of local settings and model variables were relatively small, making the results more generally applicable. To accomplish the desired conversion to renewable energy in an ecologically and sustainable way, the emissions would have to be reduced to a maximum advisable limit of (given as CH4). Further, the results showed the potential positive influence by conversion from wood log to low emission pellet combustion.

  • 4.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Evaluation of a constant volume sampling set-up for residential biomass fired appliances: influence of dilution conditions on particulate and PAH emissions2005In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 258-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased concerns about particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions from residentialbiomass combustion and their potential health effects, motivates detailed emission measurements under controlled conditions. Traditional sampling in raw flue gases can suffer from drawbacks mainly related to transient flows and the condensable nature of organic compounds. Whole flow dilution with constantvolumesampling (CVS) is an alternative method but different samplingconditions may, however, influence the emission characteristics. The objective was to design a CVS system for emission measurements in residentialbiomassfiredappliances and determine the influence of dilutionsamplingconditions on the characteristics and distributions of PM and PAH. Softwood pellets were combusted in a pellet stove with variations in; dilution ratio (3–7x), sampling temperature (45–75 °C), dilution tunnel residence time (2–4 s) and fuel load (2.3 and 4.8 kW) according to a statistical experimental design. The samplingconditions did not influence either the emission concentrations of PM, CO and NO or the particle size distribution. Variations in residence time had no significant effect on any studied emission parameter. However, increased concentrations of organic gaseous carbon (OGC) and PAH were observed with increased dilution ratio. The distribution between particulate and semivolatile phase was influenced for 12 of the 37 analyzed PAH compounds, mainly by increased fractions of semivolatile material at higher sampling temperature. No influence of sampling temperature was observed for the concentrations of PAHtot or the dominating PAH compounds, i.e. phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The results together with practical considerations also suggest sampling at 50±5 °C and 3–4 times dilution as robust and applicable conditions in the presently designed setup.

  • 5.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Stove performance and emission characteristics in residential wood log and pellet combustion: Part 1: Pellet stoves2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 307-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stove performance, characteristics, and quantities of gaseous and particulate emissions were determined for two different pellet stoves, varying fuel load, pellet diameter, and chimney draft. This approach aimed at covering variations in emissions from stoves in use today. The extensive measurement campaign included CO, NOx, organic gaseous carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PMtot) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and inorganic composition. At high load, most emissions were similar. For stove B, operating at high residual oxygen and solely with primary air, the emissions of PMtot and particle numbers were higher while the particles were smaller. Lowering the fuel load, the emissions of CO and hydrocarbons increased dramatically for stove A, which operated continuously also at lower fuel loads. On the other hand for stove B, which had intermittent operation at lower fuel loads, the emissions of hydrocarbons increased only slightly lowering the fuel load, while CO emissions increased sharply, due to high emissions at the end of the combustion cycle. Beside methane, dominating VOCs were ethene, acetylene, and benzene and the emissions of VOC varied in the range 1.1−42 mg/MJfuel. PAH emissions (2−340 μg/MJfuel) were generally dominated by phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The PMtot values (15−45 mg/MJfuel) were in all cases dominated by fine particles with mass median diameters in the range 100−200 nm, peak mobility diameters of 50−85 nm, and number concentrations in the range 4 × 1013 to 3 × 1014 particles/MJfuel. During high load conditions, the particulate matter was totally dominated by inorganic particles at 15−25 mg/MJfuel consisting of potassium, sodium, sulfur, and chlorine, in the form of K2SO4, K3Na(SO4)2, and KCl. The study shows that differences in operation and modulation principles for the tested pellet stoves, relevant for appliances in use today, will affect the performance and emissions significantly, although with lower scattering in the present study compared to compiled literature data.

  • 6.
    Boman, Christoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Trace element enrichment and behavior in wood pellet production and combustion processes.Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Borén, Eleonora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kajsa, Werner
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Defining the temperature regime of gaseous degradation products of Norway spruce2013In: 21nd European Biomass Conference and Exhibition, Copenhagen, June, 2013, ETA Florens Renewable Energies, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Borén, Eleonora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Rudolfsson, Magnus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Off-gassing from 16 pilot-scale produced pellets assortments of torrefied pine: impact of torrefaction severity, storage time, pelletization parameters, and pellet qualityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Off-gassing from wood pellets poses risks in large scale handling chains - yet little is known on off-gassing from pellets of torrefied wood. This study reports CO, CO2, and O2 concentrations in off-gases during storage of 16 torrefied and two untreated pellets assortments. According to an experimental design, pellets were produced in pilot scale from pine chips torrefied at five different set points. Off-gassing was assessed in relation to storage conditions, torrefaction and pelletization parameters, and pellet quality. Pellets from the most severely torrefied pine formed CO, CO2, and consumed O2 similarly to untreated pellets. Off-gassing was positively correlated to pellet moisture content; however, the most severely torrefied also retained the least moisture. Open air storage (20–270 days) of torrefied chips prior to pelletization did not affect off-gassing levels. Results are important for safe handling; torrefied pellets can cause comparable levels as untreated pellets of CO, CO2, and O2.

  • 9.
    Borén, Eleonora
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Rudolfsson, Magnus
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Larsson, Sylvia H.
    Off-gassing from pilot-scale torrefied pine wood chips: – impact of torrefaction severity, cooling technology, and storage timeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During handling and storage of conventional wood-based energy carriers, O2 depletion as well as CO and CO2 off-gassing can reach hazardous levels, and certain irritating VOCs trespass exposure levels. When new thermally pre-treated biomass commodities are entering consumer markets, knowledge on these assortments’ off-gassing behaviour is needed. In this study, relative concentrations of VOCs, CO, CO2, and O2 in off-gases of five different pilot-scale torrefied pine wood chip assortments was monitored over 12 days. VOC composition shifted with increased torrefaction treatment; terpene concentrations decreased while furan and lignin derivates increased. Generally, VOC amounts decreased with storage time, but for the least severely torrefied chips (291°C, 6 min), certain VOCs increased; e.g. hexanal, acetone, and 2-pentylfuran. Torrefied chips was subject to two different cooling technologies: i) heat exchanging and ii) additional water spraying. Water spraying resulted in higher VOC concentrations, stronger O2 depletion, and higher CO2 by a factor four. 

  • 10.
    Brostrom, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Branca, C.
    Di Blasi, C.
    Influence of torrefaction on the devolatilization and oxidation kinetics of wood2012In: Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis, ISSN 0165-2370, E-ISSN 1873-250X, Vol. 96, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Devolatilization and oxidation kinetics of torrefied wood have been studied by evaluating thermogravimetric curves measured in nitrogen and air at various heating rates. Samples consist of Norway spruce wood chips torrefied at several process temperatures and residence times. Data about untreated wood have also been obtained for comparison. Measured curves are well predicted by means of a five-reaction mechanism, consisting of three devolatilization reactions for the pseudo-components hemicellulose. cellulose and lignin and, in air, of two additional reactions for char devolatilization and combustion. The torrefaction pre-treatment only requires model modifications in the amounts of volatiles generated from the decomposition of pseudo-components, indicating that only their relative percentages and not their reactivities are modified. On the other hand, a slightly different thermal stability is found for the char generated from torrefied wood, which results in higher activation energy and lower reaction order for the oxidation step. Hence torrefaction conditions can affect the subsequent conversion characteristics of the char product. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Broström, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Kassman, Håkan
    Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Box 1046, SE-611 29 Nyköping, Sweden.
    Helgesson, Anna
    Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Berg, Magnus
    Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Andersson, Christer
    Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Älvkarleby, Sweden.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Sulfation of corrosive alkali chlorides by ammonium sulfate in a biomass fired CFB boiler2007In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 88, no 11-12, p. 1171-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomass and waste derived fuels contain relatively high amounts of alkali and chlorine, but contain very little sulfur. Combustion of such fuels can result in increased deposit formation and superheater corrosion. These problems can be reduced by using a sulfur containing additive, such as ammonium sulfate, which reacts with the alkali chlorides and forms less corrosive sulfates. Ammonium sulfate injection together with a so-called in situ alkali chloride monitor (IACM) is patented and known as "ChlorOut". IACM measures the concentrations of alkali chlorides (mainly KCl in biomass combustion) at superheater temperatures. Tests with and without spraying ammonium sulfate into the flue gases have been performed in a 96MW(th)/25MW(e) circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. The boiler was fired mainly with bark and a chlorine containing waste. KCl concentration was reduced from more than 15 ppm to approximately 2 ppm. during injection of ammonium sulfate. Corrosion probe measurements indicated that both deposit formation and material loss due to corrosion were decreased using the additive. Analysis of the deposits showed significantly higher concentration of sulfur and almost no chlorine in the case with ammonium sulfate. Results from impactor measurements supported that KCl was sulfated to potassium sulfate by the additive. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Brus, Elisabet
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hedman, Henry
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Bed agglomeration characteristics of biomass fuels using blast-furnace slag as bed material2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1187-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems during fluidized bed combustion. The attack or coating layers that are formed on the bed particles during combustion play an important role in the agglomeration process. To reduce bed agglomeration tendencies, alternative bed materials may be used. In this paper, bed agglomeration characteristics during the combustion of biomass fuels using a relatively new bed material (iron blast-furnace slag) as well as ordinary quartz sand were determined. Controlled agglomeration tests lasting 40 h, using five representative biomass fuels (bark, olive residue, peat, straw, and reed canary grass) were conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed. The bed materials and agglomerates were analyzed using SEM/EDS and X-ray diffraction. Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results showed that blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to agglomerate than quartz sand for most of the fuels. The quartz particles showed an inner attack layer more often than did the blast-furnace slag. The blast-furnace slag had a lower tendency to react with elements from the fuel. The outer coating layer had similar characteristics and thickness for both bed materials when the same fuel was combusted. However, the inner attack layer thickness was larger for quartz particles. SEM/EDS analyses of the agglomerates showed that the inner Ca-K-silicate-rich attack layer was responsible for the agglomeration of quartz sand. The composition of blast-furnace slag agglomerate was similar to the outer coating layer. Chemical equilibrium calculations showed that the original composition of the blast-furnace slag was close to the equilibrium composition, and hence there was no major driving force for reactions between that bed material and K and Ca from the fuel. The homogeneous silica-rich attack layer (with a low melting temperature) was not formed to the same extent for blast-furnace slag, thus explaining the lower bed agglomeration tendency.

  • 13.
    de Geyter, Sigrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Morgan
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Effects of non-quartz minerals in natural bed sand on agglomeration characteristics during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels2007In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 2663-2668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the previous literature on fluidized bed agglomeration during biomass combustion is based on quartz as a bed material. Full-scale installations however often use natural sand, which apart from quartz may contain a high fraction of non-quartz minerals such as potassium feldspar and plagioclase. The objective of the present study was therefore to elucidate the effects of non-quartz minerals occurring in natural sand on the agglomeration behavior during fluidized bed combustion of biomass fuels. Three fuels typical for previously determined agglomeration mechanisms were chosen as model fuels: calcium-rich bark, potassium-rich olive residues, and silica- and potassium-rich wheat straw. Two different feldspar minerals were used: a potassium feldspar and a plagioclase, labradorite, which both occur in many commercial bed materials. Furthermore, olivine was used as a bed material as this mineral represents another type of bed material used in some fullscale installations. Quartz was used as a reference bed material. The effects of non-quartz minerals in natural sand on initial defluidization temperature were assessed during carefully controlled, bench-scale fluidized bed agglomeration experiments. Bed material samples and agglomerates were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in order to explore the occurrence and chemical composition of coating and attack layers on the bed particles and necks between agglomerated particles. Significant differences in agglomeration characteristics were found for the different minerals when bark and olive residue were combusted. Potassium-feldspar was shown to lower the initial defluidization temperature for combustion of bark and olive residues. Plagioclase and olivine on the other hand were found to increase the initial defluidization temperature as compared to quartz for the combustion of olive residue, but for bark combustion, they did not differ significantly from quartz. During combustion of wheat straw, all bed materials agglomerated shortly after the startup of the experiment. For bark and olive residue samples, attack layers were found on all bed materials and the composition of the inner attack layer and agglomerate necks differed significantly with the fuel/bed material combination. For wheat straw however, no continuous attack layers were found, and the bed material composition was concluded not to influence the agglomeration characteristics for this biomass. The results were used to suggest possible mechanisms involved in layer formation for the different minerals.

  • 14.
    Håkansson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordwaeger, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Svanberg, Martin
    Logistics and Transportation, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Process and system integration aspects of biomass torrefaction2010In: 18th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition: Proceedings, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pre-treatment method torrefaction has been shown to significantly improve biomass fuel characteristics such as energy density, moisture content, milling energy, feeding and hydrophobic properties. These improvements establish torrefaction as a key process in facilitating an expanding market for biomass raw materials. Most of the previous work has focused on evaluating and optimizing the torrefaction process alone. However, to fully explore the maximum energy/exergy and cost efficiency of biomass torrefaction, the entire fuel supply chain and site specific systems must be considered; including logistics, scale and integration with other processes. The present work in progress aims to develop a model that incorporates optimization of the biomass supply chain and process integration systems together with the torrefaction process in order to avoid sub-optimization.

  • 15.
    Håkansson, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Persson, Kristoffer
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Torrefaction and Gasification of Hydrolysis Residue2008In: 16th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition: Proceedings, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When producing ethanol from lignocellulosic material using hydrolysis combined with fermentation, a large amount of residue consisting of mainly lignin is generated. A significant amount of energy is retained in this residue which may be utilised as a measure for the process to become economically viable. One possibility is as fuel in a gasification process for synthesis gas production, improving the fuel yield and the overall plant efficiency. Furthermore, the pre-treatment method torrefaction has been shown to significantly improve biomass fuel characteristics such as energy density, moisture content, feeding and hydrophobic properties, as well as significantly facilitate particle size reduction. Therefore, the process chain from hydrolysis residue to synthesis gas was investigated and demonstrated in the present work through bench-scale experiments in a batch torrefaction reactor and a bubbling fluidised bed gasifier. The results from the torrefaction work confirmed the improved fuel characteristics and the effects of process variables were evaluated by factorial designed experiments. The torrefaction residence time was identified as the most influential variable. The results from reactivity tests and gasification experiments indicate that hydrolysis residue and corresponding torrefied residue are suitable for synthesis gas production, with some improved feedstock handling characteristics for the latter.

  • 16.
    Khwaja, Salik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Weiland, Fredrik
    Pettersson, Esbjorn
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    Wingren, Anders
    Strandberg, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Padban, Nader
    Hinderson, Anna
    Khodayari, Raziyeh
    Carbo, Michiel
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Entrained Flow Gasification of Torrefied Lignocellulosic Biomass2016In: Papers of the 24TH European Biomass Conference: Setting the Course for a Biobased Economy / [ed] Faaij, APC Baxter, D Grassi, A Helm, P, Amsterdam: ETA Florence Renewable Energies , 2016, p. 1138-1142Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An extensive evaluation program was carried out within the European SECTOR project to evaluate the feasibility of torrefied and densified biomass in available entrained flow gasifiers. Different entrained flow reactors (both atmospheric and pressurized) in different scales, from lab scale to a 240 MW industrial gasifier were used for evaluation of torrefied materials as feedstock. Total behaviours of the new fuel throughout the whole supply chains and the EFG systems were evaluated and documented, including process behaviours in terms of operation, gas quality, products of incomplete gasification, etc. Results showed a significant improvement in fuel properties in terms of storage, logistics, milling and feeding behaviour by torrefaction and densification. Entrained flow gasification of the torrefied biomass was also shown to be feasible without any major showstoppers, even improving the gasification processes. Production of tars and other products of incomplete gasification were often found significantly reduced during gasification of torrefied material.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Warnqvist, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Gunnar
    Influence of black liquor variability, combustion, and gasification process variables and inaccuracies in thermochemical data on equilibrium modeling results2006In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 359-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work is a systematic sensitivity study of how inaccuracies in thermochemical data influence important parameters resulting from chemical equilibrium modeling of black liquor combustion and gasification processes. These effects have also been compared with those originating from normal variations in process variables and black liquor composition. Determination of the effects was achieved by performing a large number of equilibrium calculations structured according to statistical designs. Evaluation of the chemical equilibrium model calculations was facilitated by regression analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that uncertainties in thermochemical data of several key components have significant effects on important chemical and physical modeling responses in black liquor combustion and gasification. These effects are in many cases comparable to, or larger than, the effects from variation in fuel and process variables. Experimental redetermination of thermochemical data for Na2S, K2S, and gaseous NaOH is suggested.

  • 18.
    Lestander, Torbjörn A.
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology.
    Rudolfsson, Magnus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Biomaterials and Technology.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    NIR provides excellent predictions of properties of biocoal from torrefaction and pyrolysis of biomass2014In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 4906-4913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When biomass is exposed to high temperatures in torrefaction, pyrolysis or gasification treatments, the enrichment of carbon in the remaining 'green coal' is correlated with the temperature. Various other properties, currently measured using wet chemical methods, which affect the materials' quality as a fuel, also change. The presented study investigated the possibility of using NIR spectrometry to estimate diverse variables of biomass originating from two sources (above-ground parts of reed canary grass and Norway spruce wood) carbonised at temperatures ranging from 240 to 850 C-circle. The results show that the spectra can provide excellent predictions of its energy, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents. Hence NIR spectrometry combined with multivariate calibration modeling has potential utility as a standardized method for rapidly characterising thermo-treated biomass, thus reducing requirements for more costly, laborious wet chemical analyses and consumables.

  • 19.
    Lindberg, Gustav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Larsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Råberg, Mathias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Determination of thermodynamic properties of Na2S using solid-state EMF measurements2007In: Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics, ISSN 0021-9614, E-ISSN 1096-3626, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 44-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To obtain reliable thermodynamic data for Na2S(s), solid-state EMF measurements of the cell Pd(s)|O2(g)|Na2S(s), Na2SO4(s)|YSZ| Fe(s), FeO(s)|O2(g)ref| Pd(s) were carried out in the temperature range 870 < T/K < 1000 with yttria stabilized zirconia as the solid electrolyte. The measured EMF values were fitted according to the equation Efit/V (±0.00047) = 0.63650 − 0.00584732(T/K) + 0.00073190(T/K) ln (T/K). From the experimental results and the available literature data on Na2SO4(s), the equilibrium constant of formation for Na2S(s) was determined to be lg Kf(Na2S(s)) (±0.05) = 216.28 − 4750(T/K)−1 − 28.28878 ln (T/K). Gibbs energy of formation for Na2S(s) was obtained as ΔfG(Na2S(s))/(kJ · mol−1) (±1.0) = 90.9 − 4.1407(T/K) + 0.5415849(T/K) ln (T/K). By applying third law analysis of the experimental data, the standard enthalpy of formation of Na2S(s) was evaluated to be ΔfH(Na2S(s), 298.15 K)/(kJ · mol−1) (±1.0) = −369.0. Using the literature data for Cp and the calculated ΔfH, the standard entropy was evaluated to S(Na2S(s), 298.15 K)/(J · mol−1 · K−1) (±2.0) = 97.0.

  • 20.
    Lundholm, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Shchukarev, Andrei
    Fate of Cu, Cr and As during combustion of impregnated wood with and without peat additive2007In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 41, no 18, p. 6534-6540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU Directive on incineration of waste regulates the harmful emissions of particles and twelve toxic elements, including copper, chromium, and arsenic. More information is critically needed on the speciation and behavior of these trace elements during combustion, including the effects of different process variables, as well as of different fuels and fuel mixtures. Using a 15 kW pellets-fueled grate burner, experiments were performed to determine the fate of copper, chromium, and arsenic during combustion of chromate copper arsenate (CCA) preservative wood. The effects of co-combustion of CCA-wood with peat were also studied since peat fuels previously have proved to generally reduce ash related problems. The fate and speciation of copper, chromium, and arsenic were determined from analysis of the flue gas particles and the bottom ash using SEM-EDS, XRD, XPS, and ICP-AES. In addition, chemical equilibrium model calculations were performed to interpret the experimental findings. The results revealed that about 5% copper, 15% chromium, and 60% arsenic were volatilized during combustion of pure CCA-wood, which is lower than predicted volatilization from the individual arsenic, chromium, and copper oxides. This is explained by the formation of more stable refractory complex oxide phases for which the stability trends and patterns are presented. When co-combusted with peat, an additional stabilization of these phases was obtained and thus a small but noteworthy decrease in volatilization of all three elements was observed. The major identified phases for all fuels were CuCrO2(s), (Fe,Mg,Cu)(Cr,Fe,Al)O4(s), Cr2O3(s), and Ca3(AsO4)2(s). Arsenic was also identified in the fine particles as KH2AsO4(s) and As2O3(s). A strong indication of hexavalent chromium in the form of K2CrO4 or as a solid solution between K3Na(CrO4)2 and K3Na(SO4)2 was found in the fine particles. Good qualitative agreement was observed between experimental data and chemical equilibrium model calculations.

  • 21.
    Lundholm, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Trace element speciation in combustion processes: review and compilatons of thermodynamic data2007In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 88, no 11-12, p. 1061-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical equilibrium calculations are often used to determine the fate of trace metals in combustion processes and to study the effects of different process variables and varying fuel compositions. In the present report, thermodynamic data on compounds containing the trace elements As, Cd, Cr, Cu and Pb from different database sources are compared. The results showed significant differences between existing databases in both number of compounds included in the databases and thermodynamic data. The differences also significantly affected the outcome of the equilibrium calculations.

  • 22.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    On the chemistry of combustion and gasification of biomass fuels, peat and waste: environmental aspects1993Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nordin, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordwaeger, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Biomass conversion through torrefaction2012In: Technologies for converting biomass to useful energy: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, torrefaction and fermentation / [ed] Erik Dahlquist, CRC Press, 2012, p. 217-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24. Olofsson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Strandberg, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Oxygen enhanced torrefaction - An initial feasibility studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Upcoming world market prices on thermally treated and densified biomass to be feasible for coal replacement put a high demand on the process suppliers to deliver cost efficient and high energy yield conversion systems with a capacity to produce a high quality product. One of the more complex and vital parts in a torrefaction facility is the indirect or direct heat transfer system applied. This is a critical task that also may limit the scale-up potential and thus influence the economy of scale of a complete torrefaction system.

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the torrefaction reactions in a rotary drum pilot reactor (20 kgDS/h) potentially may be operated autothermally by a low level injection of air directly into the reactor for controlled in-situ partial combustion of the released torrefaction gases. Both concurrent and countercurrent gas flow patterns were evaluated for different process temperatures. At higher temperatures (338°C) in countercurrent gas flow mode, steady-state torrefaction was reached without external heat supply. The resulting torrefied biomass had higher heating value, higher carbon content and lower milling energy consumption, compared to non-oxidative torrefied biomass with same mass yield. Condensation of torrefaction gas compounds is a suggested reason.No significant decrease in the combustibility of the torrefaction gas was experienced.  The demonstrated Oxygen Enhanced Torrefaction (OET) mode thus has the potential to improve the torrefaction systems in terms of scale-up performance with reduced investment and operational costs but further validation work is needed to confirm the present findings and also to identify working conditions.

  • 25.
    Persson, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Broström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Umeå Energi AB, Box 224, 901 05 Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    High temperature corrosion in a 65 MW waste to energy plant2007In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 88, no 11-12, p. 1178-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incineration of municipal solid waste is often associated with high temperature corrosion problems. This paper presents results of full-scale corrosion tests in a 65 MW waste fired combined heat and power plant. A failure case indicated alarmingly high corrosion rate of the superheater tubes. Corrosion tests with five different alloys were carried out within this work in order to determine plant specific corrosion rates on different superheater materials. Additional tests were done to determine the effect on the corrosion rate from adding chlorine containing polyvinyl chloride to the ordinary fuel mix. A corrosion probe with metal temperatures ranging from 320 degrees C to 460 degrees C was used to estimate corrosion loss and to collect deposits. The sampling was performed at a flue gas temperature of 470 degrees C for 10 days. The probe rings were analysed using scanning electron microscope and micrometer measurements to determine the deposit chemistry and corrosion rates. The results showed significant differences in corrosion rates depending on tube material. Chlorine was shown to have a key role in the corrosion process, even at these relatively low temperatures. The results indicated a chlorine induced corrosion mechanism involving volatile iron chloride with a high corrosion rate on the superheater materials typically used. Addition of extra polyvinyl chloride to the fuel mix had an increasing effect on the corrosion. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    et al.
    Luleå tekniska universitet och ETC Piteå.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholms universitet, Analytisk kemi.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Stove performance and emission characteristics in residential wood log and pellet combustion: Part 2: Wood stove2011In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characteristics and quantities of a large number of gaseous and particulate emission components during combustion in a residential wood log stove with variations in fuel, appliance and operational conditions were determined experimentally. The measurement campaign included CO, NOx, organic gaseous carbon (OGC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total particulate matter (PMtot) as well as particle mass and number concentrations, size distributions, and inorganic composition. CO varied in the range of 1100 to 7200 mg/MJfuel, while OGC varied from 210 to 3300 mg/MJfuel. Dominating VOCs were methane, followed by ethene, acetylene, and benzene. Methane varied from 9 to 1600 mg/MJfuel. The nonmethane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions were in the range of 20−2300 mg/MJfuel. The PAHtot emissions varied from 1.3 to 220 mg/MJfuel, in most cases dominated by phenantrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. PMtot were in all cases dominated by fine particles and varied in the range 38−350 mg/MJfuel. The mass median particle diameters and the peak mobility diameters of the fine particles varied in the range 200−320 and 220−330 nm, respectively, and number concentrations in the range of 1−4 × 1013 particles/MJfuel. Air starved conditions, at high firing intensity, gave the highest emissions, especially for hydrocarbons. This type of condition is seldom considered, though it may occur occasionally. The emissions from Swedish wood stoves, comparing a Swedish field study, are covered fairly well with the applied methodology, but other field studies report considerably higher emissions especially for diluted particle sampling.

  • 27.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    et al.
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden; Division of Energy Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Lindmark, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Division of Energy Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Department of Analytical Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Design Changes in a Fixed-Bed Pellet Combustion Device: Effects of Temperature and Residence Time on Emission Performance2010In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 1333-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of wood fuel pellets has proven to be well-suited for the small-scale market, enabling controlled and efficient combustion with low emission of products of incomplete combustion (PIC). Still! a potential for further emission reduction exists, and it thorough understanding of the influence of combustion Conditions oil the emission characteristics of air pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM), is important. The Objective of the present work was to determine the effect of design changes, i.e., increasing the temperature and/or residence time, on the emission performance and characteristics for a pellet combustion device using a laboratory fixed-bed reactor (< 5 kW) The temperature and residence time after the bed Section were varied according to statistical experimental designs (650-950 degrees C and 0.5-3.0 s) with file emission responses: CO, organic gaseous carbon (OGC), NO, volatile organic compounds (VOCs, 20 compounds), PAHs (43 compounds), PM(tot) mass concentration, fine particle mass/count median diameter (MMD and CMD), and number concentration. The temperature was negatively correlated with the emissions of all studied PIC, with limited effects of the residence time. The PM(tot) emissions of 15-20 mg/MJ were in all cases dominated by fine (< 1 mu m) particles of K, Na, S, Cl, C, O, and Zn. An increased residence time resulted in increased fine particle sizes (i.e., MMD and CMD) and decreased number concentrations. The Importance of a high temperature (> 850 degrees C in the bed zone with intensive, air-rich, and well-mixed Conditions was illustrated for wood pellets combustion with almost a total depletion Of all Studied PIC. The importance of the residence time was shown to be limited, and file results emphasize the need for further verification studies and technology development work.

  • 28.
    Pommer, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Burvall, Jan
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Mechanisms behind the positive effects on bed agglomeration and deposit formation combusting forest residue with peat additives in fluidized beds2009In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 4245-4253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A compilation was made of the composition of peat from different areas in Sweden, or which a selected But was characterized anal co-combusted with forest residue ill controlled fludized-bed agglomeration tests with extensive particle sampling, The variation in ash-forming elements in the different peat samples was large; thus, eight peat samples were selected from the compilation to represent the variation in peat composition in Sweden. These samples were characterized in terms of botanical composition, analyzed for ash-forming elements, and oxidized using a low-temperature ashing procedure, followed by characterization using scanning electron microscopy/electron-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The selected peat samples had in common the presence of Et small fraction of crystalline phases, such as quartz, microcline, albite, and calcium sulfate. The controlled fluidized-bed agglomeration tests that co-combusted forest residue with peat resulted ill a significant increase it) agglomeration temperatures compared to combusting forest residue alone. Plausible explanations for this were in increase of calcium, iron, Or aluminum in the bed particle layers and/or the reaction of potassium with clay minerals, which prevented the formation of low molting bed particle layers, The effects oil particle and deposit formation during co-combustion were reduced amounts of rule particles and all increased number of coarse particles, The mechanisms for the positive effects were a transfer and/or removal of potassium ill the gas phase to it loss reactive particular form via sorption and/or it reaction with the reactive peat ash (SiO2 and CaO), which in most cases formed larger particles (> 1 mu m) containing calcium silicon and Potassium.

  • 29.
    Pommer, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Bed agglomeration characteristics and mechanisms during gasification and combustion of biomass fuels2005In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 1742-1748Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Rudolfsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Borén, Eleonora
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lestander, Torbjörn A.
    Combined effects of torrefaction and pelletization parameters on the quality of pellets produced from torrefied biomass2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 191, p. 414-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combined torrefaction and pelletization study was performed at industrially relevant settings using a factorial design. First, wood chips of Scots pine were torrefied at high temperatures (291-315 degrees C) and short residence times (6-12 min), facilitating high throughput in a continuous pilot-scale torrefaction process. Then the torrefied materials were pelletized, also in pilot-scale, using varying moisture contents (MCs) (10-14%), sieve sizes (4-6 mm), and press channel lengths (PCLs) (25 and 30 mm), in all 19 batches, each of 400 kg. The resulting so called black pellets exhibited bulk densities of 558-725 kg m(-3), durabilities of 46.3-86.5%, and fines contents of 3.8-85.8%. Through multiple linear regression modelling of all 11 responses, it was found that the parameter with the greatest influence on the responses was the torrefaction temperature, followed by torrefaction time, MC, and PCL. Longer PCL and higher MC resulted in higher pellet quality, with less fines and greater bulk density and durability. Furthermore, a low torrefaction degree decreased the amount of power required for pelletization. The energy required to grind pellets into a powder (<0.5 mm) decreased with increasing torrefaction degree as expected, but also with decreasing MC before pelletizing. Pyrolysis-GC/MS analysis of thermal degradation products from the pellets revealed correlations with the torrefaction temperature and time, but no correlations with the pelletization process. These results are useful for mapping chemical changes in torrefied materials and identifying complementary torrefaction and pelletization settings. Specifically of interest is adjustment of PCLs at low intervals to better match friction properties of torrefied materials.

  • 31.
    Råberg, Mathias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Rosén, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Warnqvist, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Improvement of the binary phase diagram Na2CO3 -Na2S2003In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 1591-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gasification of black liquor is an attractive alternative to the traditional recovery boiler. However, in process modeling of gasification, thermodynamic data for the key components are quite uncertain, which will reduce the reliability of the modeling of the chemical processes in a gasifier. The objective of this work was to experimentally re-determine and improve data on the binary phase diagram Na2CO3−Na2S, especially on the Na2CO3 side of the system, which is the region of interest concerning black liquor combustion and gasification, and also the region with the most significant uncertainties. Measurements were carried out in a dry inert atmosphere at temperatures from 25 to 1200 °C, using high-temperature microscopy (HTM) and high-temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HT-XRD). To examine the influence of pure CO2 atmosphere on the melting behavior, HTM experiments in the same temperature interval were made. This paper presents new data complementary to earlier published data on the binary phase diagram Na2CO3−Na2S. These include re-determination of liquidus curves, in the Na2CO3-rich area, melting points of the pure components, as well as determination of the extent of the solid solution, Na2CO3(ss), area.

  • 32.
    Strandberg, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kollberg, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Powder characteristics of torrefied and pelletized biomass2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-firing biomass with coal is an efficient way of mitigating severe climate change by reducing the total atmospheric greenhouse gas burden. Although biomass is considered close to CO2-neutral, present biomass based energy carriers all however suffer from several logistical challenges. The high moisture content, hydrophobic and fibrous nature, low energy density and bulky characteristics are all challenges impeding large-scale industrial use. The thermal pre-treatment method torrefaction enhances the above biomass fuel qualities and significantly facilitate large scale industrial use of biomass raw materials with respect to, handling, storage, feeding as well as for final conversion. In the present work we evaluate the influence of torrefaction on some fuel powder quality aspects. Five different types of torrefied pellets was compared to a reference (regular white wood pellets) with respect to milling energy and different powder characteristics such as aerated and tapped bulk density, particle size distribution, angle of repose and image analysis. Milling energy decreased by between 77 and 93 % for torrefied pellets compared to wood pellets, and the resulting black powders consisted of considerably smaller particle sizes. Particles from torrefied fuels were also less elongated and more circular/less rough, properties which positively influence flowability. Powder bulk density increased by 90 % at most. Angle of repose, previously documented to be negatively correlated to flowability, decreased from 66° for the reference powder to 57° for the torrefied sample with the lowest angle. Torrefaction temperature affected the results considerably more than moisture content prior to pelletization. The total evidences found therefore suggest a positive effect of torrefaction on both powder production and characteristics.

  • 33.
    Strandberg, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Evaluation of existing and new approaches to determine degree of torrefactionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Torrefaction is a promising thermal pretreatment method for biomass in which many material properties are enhanced. The biomass components (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) degrade in this thermal process to different extents depending on type of process, treatment temperature, residence time and biomass type. Torrefaction severity is usually defined by biomass weight loss or mass yield, but other approaches to determine degree of torrefaction have also been suggested. For continuous and large scale facilities, mass yield can be challenging to determine and another approach to determine torrefaction severity is therefore desired. In this study, one existing and two new approaches for determining degree of torrefaction are presented, compared and evaluated including uncertainty analysis. The three approaches were based on analysis of; volatile matter, thermochemical properties (enthalpy of formation), and higher heating value. 

    All three methods were highly correlated to mass yield and independent of torrefaction process. The degree of torrefaction based on higher heating value predicted mass yield most accurate, had lowest measurement uncertainty and the results were independent of biomass type. In the evaluation of the method based on formation enthalpy it was revealed that the increase in heating values for torrefied biomasses could be explained by the combination of increase in enthalpy of formation and decrease in oxygen content.

  • 34.
    Strandberg, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Wiklund-Lindström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Åberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Effects of temperature and residence time on continuous torrefaction of spruce wood2015In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 134, p. 387-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a solid energy carrier, biomass generally has a few disadvantages, which limits its use for coal replacement and as a feedstock for entrained flow gasification. The hydrophilic and fibrous nature, the low calorific value and low bulk energy content imply high accumulated costs in the whole supply chain and severe challenges in more advanced conversion systems. By thermally pretreating the biomass by torrefaction, these properties may be significantly improved. A continuous torrefaction rotary drum reactor was designed, constructed and evaluated to enable an accurate process control and allow a homogeneous well-defined high quality product to be produced. The combined effects of torrefaction temperature (260–310 °C) and residence time (8–25 min) on a large number of product properties (&gt; 25) were determined for Norway spruce. The resulting mass and energy yields were 46–97% and 62–99%, respectively. Exothermic reactions were evident both at low (260 °C) and high temperatures (310 °C) but with no thermal runaway observed. Increased torrefaction severity resulted in decreased milling energy consumption, angle of repose, mass and energy yield, content of volatile matter, hydrogen, cellulose and hemicellulose. Hydrophobicity, heating value, carbon and fixed carbon contents increased. For all responses, the effect of torrefaction temperature was larger than the effect of residence time. Substantial interaction effects were present for mass and energy yields, volatile matter and hydrogen content. Another correlation found was the relationship of hemicellulose degradation and the brittleness of the torrefied product. Data also suggest secondary char forming reactions during the torrefaction process, resulting in higher fixed carbon content in the torrefied material than expected. The results also suggest torrefaction temperature and residence time not to be totally interchangeable.

  • 35.
    Strandberg, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Wiklund-Lindström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI.
    Åberg, Katarina
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Effects of temperature and residence time on torrefaction of spruce woodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36. Svanberg, Martin
    et al.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Flodén, Jonas
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Analysing biomass torrefaction supply chain costs2013In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 142, p. 287-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the present work was to develop a techno-economic system model to evaluate how logistics and production parameters affect the torrefaction supply chain costs under Swedish conditions. The model consists of four sub-models: (1) supply system, (2) a complete energy and mass balance of drying, torrefaction and densification, (3) investment and operating costs of a green field, stand-alone torrefaction pellet plant, and (4) distribution system to the gate of an end user. The results show that the torrefaction supply chain reaps significant economies of scale up to a plant size of about 150-200 kiloton dry substance per year (kton(DS)/year), for which the total supply chain costs accounts to 31.8 euro per megawatt hour based on lower heating value ((sic)/MWLHV). Important parameters affecting total cost are amount of available biomass, biomass premium, logistics equipment, biomass moisture content, drying technology, torrefaction mass yield and torrefaction plant capital expenditures (CAPEX).

  • 37.
    Taube, Fabian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Larsson, Tom
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Shchukarev, Andrey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Soil Remediation – Mercury Speciation in Soil and Vapor Phase During Thermal Treatment2008In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 193, no 1-4, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spectroscopic (XRD, XPS, ICP-MS and AAS) and microscopic (ESEM) techniques have been used in order to study the chemical effects with emphasis on mercury speciation, during thermal treatment of a mercury contaminated soil. In the untreated soil, mercury was found concentrated in spherical particles, which were successively broken down upon thermal treatment. Hg0 and inorganic mercury compounds (presumably HgO(s) and HgSO4(s)) could be detected. No (CH3)2Hg and only traces of CH3Hg+ could be found. The dependence on temperature and heating time indicated that the evaporation of mercury from the soil was partly controlled by diffusion mechanisms. Mercury volatilized in two separate stages during heating; initial elemental vaporization, and subsequent volatilization of the oxide or sulfate phase at higher temperatures (>230°C). By thermal treatment at 470°C and 20 min, a removal of >99% of the mercury could be achieved.

  • 38. Weiland, Fredrik
    et al.
    Nordwaeger, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Entrained flow gasification of torrefied wood residues2014In: Fuel processing technology, ISSN 0378-3820, E-ISSN 1873-7188, Vol. 125, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, four different fuels were gasified in a pressurized entrained flow pilot plant gasifier at approximately 270 kW(th). The different fuels were; two torrefied wood residues, one raw wood residue and one torrefied stem wood. The system pressure and oxygen equivalence ratio (lambda) were held constant for all four gasification experiments. It was found that the torrefaction pretreatment significantly reduced the milling energy consumption for fuel size reduction, which in turn contributed to increased gasification plant efficiency. Furthermore, the results indicate that the carbon conversion efficiency may be enhanced by an intermediate torrefaction pretreatment, whereas both less severe torrefaction and more severe torrefaction resulted in reduced carbon conversions. The results also indicate that the CH4 yield was significantly reduced for the most severely torrefied fuel.

  • 39.
    Wiinikka, Henrik
    et al.
    Energy Technology Centre, Box 726, S-941 28 Piteå, Sweden.
    Gebart, Rikard
    Energy Technology Centre, Box 726, S-941 28 Piteå, Sweden.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    High-temperature aerosol formation in wood pellets flames: Spatially resolved measurements2006In: Combustion and Flame, ISSN 0010-2180, E-ISSN 1556-2921, Vol. 147, no 4, p. 278-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation and evolution of high-temperature aerosols during fixed bed combustion of wood pellets in a realistic combustion environment were investigated through spatially resolved experiments. The purpose of this work was to investigate the various stages of aerosol formation from the hot flame zone to the flue gas channel. The investigation is important both for elucidation of the formation mechanisms and as a basis for development and validation of particle formation models that can be used for design optimization. Experiments were conducted in an 8-kW-updraft fired-wood-pellets combustor. Particle samples were withdrawn from the centerline of the combustor through 10 sampling ports by a rapid dilution sampling probe. The corresponding temperatures at the sampling positions were in the range 200-1450 degrees C. The particle sample was size-segregated in a low-pressure impactor, allowing physical and chemical resolution of the fine particles. The chemical composition of the particles was investigated by SEM/EDS and XRD analysis. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared to theoretical models for aerosol formation processes. The experimental data show that the particle size distribution has two peaks, both of which are below an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mu m (PM2.5). The mode diameters of the fine and coarse modes in the PM2.5 region were similar to 0.1 and similar to 0.8 mu m, respectively. The shape of the particle size distribution function continuously changes with position in the reactor due to several mechanisms. Early, in the flame zone, both the fine mode and the coarse mode in the PM2.5 region were dominated by particles from incomplete combustion, indicated by a significant amount of carbon in the particles. The particle concentrations of both the fine and the coarse mode decrease rapidly in the hot oxygen-rich flame due to oxidation of the carbon-rich particles. After the hot flame, the fine mode concentration and particle diameter increase gradually when the temperature of the flue gas drops. The main contribution to this comes from condensation on preexisting particles in the gas of alkali sulfates, alkali chlorides, and Zn species formed from constituents vaporized in the fuel bed. The alkali sulfates were found to condense at a temperature of similar to 950 degrees C and alkali chlorides condensed later at similar to 600 degrees C. This agrees well with results of chemical equilibrium calculation of the gas-to-particle conversion temperature. After the hot flame the coarse mode concentration decreased very little when the flue gas was cooled. In addition to carbon, the coarse mode consists of refractory metals and also considerable amounts of alkali. (c) 2006 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Wiklund Lindström, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nilsson, David
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordwaeger, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Olofsson, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Geladi, Paul
    Quality assurance of torrefied biomass using RGB, visual and near infrared (hyper) spectral image data2014In: Journal of Near Infrared Spectroscopy, ISSN 0967-0335, E-ISSN 1751-6552, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 129-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visible and near infrared imaging techniques for analysing characteristics of torrefied biomass were evaluated for possible use in future online process control. The goal of such a control system is to identify products with the desired properties and reject products outside the specification. Two pushbroom hyperspectral cameras with different wavelength regions and a commercial digital colour camera were evaluated. The hyperspectrat cameras, short wave infrared (SWIR) and visible-near infrared (VNIR), covered the ranges of 1000-2500 nm and 400-1000 nm, respectively. The biomass was produced according to an experimental design in a torrefaction pilot plant at different temperatures, residence times, and nitrogen and steam flow rates to obtain a wide range of different characteristics and qualities of torrefied material. Chemical characteristics, heating values and milling energy of the different torrefied materials were analysed or calculated using standardized procedures and were used for calibration. For the hyperspectral images, a principal-component analysis was performed on the absorbance spectra. The score plots and score images were used interactively to separate background, outlier pixels and shading effects from sample signal. Averaged spectra of individual torrefied woodchips were used. Partial least-squares regression was used to relate average spectra to heating values and chemical characteristics of the torrefied biomass. Owing to the small size of the data sets, cross-validation using leave-one-out validation was used for testing the models. The ratio of standard error of prediction to sample standard deviation (RPD) values were used for comparing the imaging techniques. For ROB images, all RPD values were 4 or lower. The RPD values for the VNIR technique were all below 5, while the SWIR images produced RPD values above 5 for eight of the 13 properties. The promising results of the SWIR technique strongly suggested that the torrefied biomass undergoes changes to chemical structures, which are not necessarily manifested as changes to the colour of the material.

  • 41. Zevenhoven-Onderwater, Maria
    et al.
    Öhman, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Skrifvars, Bengt-Johan
    Backman, Rainer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry. Åbo Akademi University.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hupa, Mikko
    Bed agglomeration characteristics of wood-derived fuels in FBC2006In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 818-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The agglomeration tendency of five Scandinavian forest-derived biomass fuels was studied using an advanced fuel analysis, i.e., a combination of chemical fractionation analysis, controlled bed defluidization tests, and SEM/EDX analysis of bed samples. It is shown that all five fuels have a tendency to form bed agglomerates when fired in a fluidized bed with silica sand as the bed material. The agglomeration appeared to proceed by formation of a sticky layer on bed particles gluing them together. The layers on the bed particles contained Si, Ca, and K, and, in some cases, P. The combination of advanced fuel analysis by SEM/EDX showed that the soluble fraction of Ca and K (i.e., leachable from the fuel with water and acetate) may be responsible for the formation of the layer. Silicon may mainly come from the bed particles.

  • 42.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Borén, Eleonora
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Hydrogen and carbon separation by low-temperature slow pyrolysis of biomass: experimental validationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous work have indicated that slow pyrolysis may be used to separate hydrogen and carbon in a biomass feedstock into different product fractions. The hydrogen predominantly ends up in the pyrolysis gas fraction, whereas the carbon is mainly retained in the char. A system concept was suggested using low-temperature slow pyrolysis to achieve; a) transportation fuel/chemical production from the volatilized fraction, and b) potential carbon negativity by sequestering the carbon from the biochar fraction after use for electricity and/or heat production. The present work aimed to identify important process parameters, validate the hydrogen and carbon separation potential, and identify a potential process optimum for spruce wood slow pyrolysis. The process temperature was shown as the most important factor influencing the hydrogen and carbon pyrolysis gas yields, whereas the residence time factor only showed significant influence on the product yields for the shorter residence times. All experiments demonstrated significant hydrogen and carbon separation to gas and char respectively, particularly for lower process temperatures. An optimum process operation temperature was not found but from an industrial perspective, the suggested preferable temperature interval lies within the lowtemperature pyrolysis range (350-400°C), just above high temperature torrefaction (~300°C).

  • 43.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Khwaja, Salik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pilot scale experimental validation of the Bio2fuels low-temperature slow pyrolysis system conceptManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The “Bio2Fuels” concept previously suggested may potentially achieve a transport driven carbon negativity by use of a combination of; low-temperature slow pyrolysis/high-temperature torrefaction; gas reforming; fuel synthesis; coal replacement by the solid bio-coal stream; and CCS of the resulting flue gases. The initial pre-treatment process suggested may potentially exhibit several advantages and may well facilitate an appealing and cost-efficient conversion system. The present work was comprised of pilot-scale pyrolysis experiments on softwood pellets using a continuous auger screw torrefaction/pyrolysis reactor for validation of the process in the temperature range of 300-425°C. All products were analyzed for composition and the pyrolysis gas (permanent gases + bio-oil) was sampled for particulate matter, permanent gas and bio-oil composition. The volatilization propensity of ash-forming elements was analyzed based on alkali deposits on impactor plates with SEM analysis and ICP-AES analysis of the bio-oil. The volatilization of sulfur and chlorine was also evaluated via char retainment. In addition, an initial test run of thermal pyrolysis gas reforming was performed by operating the thermal oxidation burner in gasification/reforming mode. The results showed that the hydrogen and oxygen in the biomass feedstock were volatilized at lower temperatures than the feedstock carbon, with the desired resulting hydrogen/carbon separation into pyrolysis gas and biochar, but also enrichment of oxygen in the pyrolysis gas. The hydrogen pyrolysis gas yield was >75% for pyrolysis temperatures ≥375°C and the corresponding carbon gas yield ranged from 50% to 63%. Most of the hydrogen in the pyrolysis gas was bound in the bio-oil as water and various hydrocarbons. No significant volatilization of alkali elements was observed through either analysis method. The most abundant permanent gas formed was CO2 and with a CH4 concentration of about 9%vol. The thermal reforming experiments also demonstrated a high CH4 syngas concentration, strongly indicating the need for a catalytic reforming process.

  • 44.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindh, Ingemar
    Bioendev AB.
    Kollberg, Kristoffer
    Sigma Industry.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Torrefaction and gasification of lignocellulosic hydrolysis residue from bio-ethanol productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of lignocellulosic ethanol through hydrolysis (acid or enzymatic) combined with fermentation generate a large amount of residue consisting of mainly lignin and un-ydrolyzed cellulose. The significant amount of energy retained in this residue require further conversion as a measure to ensure economic viability for the total process. Thermal conversion of the hydrolysis residue through gasification for syngas production would improve the fuel yield in addition to the overall plant efficiency. Also, torrefaction of various biomass feedstocks has been shown to significantly improve biomass fuel characteristics in addition to having substantial positive effect on the energy consumption of the particle size reduction. The present work was an evaluation of hydrolysis residue and torrefied hydrolysis residue as gasification feedstocks in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier, based on syngas composition, particle formation, tar production and volatilization behavior. In addition, the effects of torrefaction on hydrolysis residue material characteristics were separately evaluated, including the influence of the process parameters on milling energy consumption and morphology. All torrefaction data was fitted to multiple linear regression models with good reproducibility and fit. The results confirm the previously reported improved feedstock characteristics resulting from torrefaction of biomass, however residence time was proved the most influential process parameter on the torrefaction severity, most likely derived from the lack of hemicellulose in the residue. The resulting syngas composition and quality indicated that both non-torrefied and torrefied hydrolysis residue were suitable gasification feedstocks. The hydrolysis residue product gas had elevated tar concentration but the torrefied residue demonstrated a significant reduction in the tar content (particularly the heavy tar components), compared to both raw hydrolyis residue and the wood reference feedstock. Hence, torrefaction may significantly reduce tar related problems in downstream equipment/processes.

  • 45.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Low-temperature slow pyrolysis of biomass for H2-enriched syngas production and carbon negativityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To optimally utilize biomass resources as feedstock for fuels and chemicals production as well as for a potential substantial carbon sink, a dedicated process and system concept is suggested. The desired outcome of the process is a hydrogen-enriched pyrolysis gas and a carbon-enriched char, also retaining the ash-forming elements. To obtain a transport-driven large-scale CO2 negative system, the char is suggested as co-firing fuel in a facility with carbon capture and storage technology. In the present work, the basis for this Bio2Fuels separation concept was evaluated by 1) analysis of previously published empirical data for pyrolysis, and 2) chemical equilibrium calculations. The former analysis indicated on the potential for a significant separation of H and C to the pyrolysis gas and char respectively, with ~80% of the hydrogen and 40-60% of the carbon from the raw feedstock present in the pyrolysis gas product. Based on analyzed thermochemical driving forces, most of the ash-forming elements can be expected to be retained in the char, and an ash and alkali-free gas may be achieved at temperatures below 500°C. In addition, chemical equilibrium modelling of the pyrolysis gas reforming demonstrated a significantly increased H2/CO ratio in the syngas compared to gasification of the raw biomass.

  • 46.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Syngas production by combined biomass gasification and in situ biogas reforming2015In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 3725-3731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For small- to medium-sized streams of biogas (methane) produced at a biorefinery site where cost-efficient reforming by traditional methods are unavailable, combined biomass gasification and methane reforming could facilitate co-conversion and increase the H-2/CO ratio in the syngas from the gasification plant. In the present work, co-gasification of biomass with CH4 was evaluated by means of a parametric chemical equilibrium study for both wood/CH4 and black liquor/CH4 feedstocks and bench-scale fluidized-bed gasification experiments for a wood/peat/CH4 fuel mixture. The parametric study indicated that high-temperature, and steam and oxygen addition all facilitate a high conversion rate, i.e., methane reforming. Evaluating the influence of the gasification temperature on CH4 reforming and increasing the H-2/CO ratio experimentally demonstrated that high temperatures are required for efficient co-conversion.

  • 47.
    Åberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pommer, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Syngas production by combined biomass gasification and in-situ methane reformingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Öhman, Marcus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hedman, Henry
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå, Sweden.
    Effect of kaolin and limestone addition on slag formation during combustion of wood fuels2004In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1370-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ash-related problems have more than occasionally been observed in wood-fuel-fired boilers and also recently in wood-pellet burners. These problems can lead to reduced accessibility of the combustion systems as well as bad publicity for the market. The objectives of the present work were, therefore, to determine the effects of kaolin and limestone addition on the slagging propensities of problematic and problem-free wood fuels during combustion in residential pellet appliances (burners), thus contributing to the understanding of the role of kaolin and limestone in preventing slagging on furnace grates. Pellets with additive-to-fuel ratios between 0 and 0.7 wt %d.s. were combusted in three different types of burner constructions (10 kW): over-, horizontal-, and under-feeding of the fuel. The collected slag deposits from the under-fed burner as well as the corresponding deposited fly ash in the boiler were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The initial sintering temperatures of the formed slags were also determined. By adding limestone with an additive-to-fuel ratio of 0.5 wt %d.s. to the problematic stemwood raw material (Si-enriched probably because of contamination of sand/soil), the severe slagging of the fuel could totally be eliminated. Adding kaolin to the problematic raw material gave a minor decrease in slagging tendency of the problematic raw material and a major increase in slagging tendency of the problem-free stemwood raw material. When adding limestone to the problematic raw material, the composition of the formed slag was changed from relatively low temperature melting silicates to high temperature melting silicates and oxides. On the other hand, kaolin addition to the problematic raw material changed the content of the slag from mainly Ca-Mg silicates to be dominated by K-Al silicates which have relatively low melting points. When introducing kaolin to the problem-free raw material, the high temperature melting Ca-Mg oxides react to form lower temperature melting Ca-Al-K silicates. Chemical equilibrium model calculations were used to interpret the experimental findings, and generally good qualitative agreements between modeling and experimental results were obtained.

  • 49.
    Öhman, Marcus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Hedman, H
    Jirjis, R
    Reasons for slagging during stemwood pellet combustion and some measures for prevention2004In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 597-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ash related problems have more than occasionally been observed in pellet burners during the last years. These problems lead to reduced accessibility of the appliances and also bad publicity for the pellet market. The objectives of the present work were therefore to: (i) determine the critical levels of the problematic ash components in stemwood pellets regarding slagging, (ii) document the variations of these problematic elements in the outgoing pellets from two pellet-mills during one operational season, (iii) determine how frequently these elements exceed the critical levels, (iv) determine how different sub-processes in the pelletising process (especially the dryer) effect the slagging properties of the pellet, and if possible (v) suggest some measures for prevention. A significant number of wood pellets reported to be problematic and problem-free, regarding slagging in ordinary residential pellet burners, were collected from the Swedish market. The ash compositions of these fuels were analysed and the results compiled in a database. Partial Least-Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) and F-tests were used to statistically identify both the critical ash components and the critical levels of these components that separated the two reported classes. In addition, chemical equilibrium model calculations were used to interpret the findings. The variations of these elements in the in-going raw material and in the produced pellets were determined during one season in two pellet mills equipped with exhaust gas dryers. The results showed that the problematic wood-pellets had a significantly higher amount of Si, but also Al and Fe, in the fuel ash. The critical level of Si (given as SiO2) was about 20-25 wt% of the fuel ash, i.e. pellets with levels in or over this range resulted in slagging problems in residential burners. This critical Si content was exceeded once and twice for the analysed samples in the two studied pellet mills. In one of the studied mills, this was because of contamination by sand of the raw material during storage and handling, and in the other mill the reason was found to be contamination of the raw material by elutriated particles from the dryer fuel. The major conclusion of the work is that both raw materials and drying fuels/processes should be carefully treated to avoid mineral contamination, and an additional cyclone separator could potentially also be used to improve the pellet quality.

  • 50.
    Öhman, Marcus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nordin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lundholm, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Boström, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Hedman, Hedman
    Energy Technology Centre, Piteå.
    Lundberg, Margareta
    Kvaerner Pulping AB, Power Division, Göteborg.
    Ash Transformations during Combustion of Meat-, Bonemeal, and RDF in a (bench-scale) Fluidized Bed Combustor2003In: Energy & Fuels, ISSN 0887-0624, E-ISSN 1520-5029, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 1153-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the recent Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) experiences, thermal treatment of meat- and bonemeal (MBM) in existing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plants for refuse-derived fuels (RDFs) has evolved as an interesting disposal and disintegration method. However, only a limited number of studies have previously been performed for combustion of MBM in fluidized beds. The objectives of the present work were, therefore, to determine the bed agglomeration tendencies of these materials during combustion in fluidized beds and to evaluate the effects of dolomite and kaolin addition to the fuel mix, as well as to elucidate the overall ash transformation mechanisms governing the potential bed agglomeration and fouling processes. By controlled agglomeration experiments in a 5 kW bench-scale fluidized bed reactor, the fuel-specific critical agglomeration temperatures in normal quartz bed material were determined for the different fuel/additive mixtures. All collected samples of bed materials, final bed agglomerates, and cyclone ashes were analyzed using SEM/EDS and XRD. The results indicated that the MBM fuels could be expected to be problematic concerning bed agglomeration in normal quartz beds, while kaolin and possibly dolomite addition could be used to reduce this risk to moderate levels. A significant elemental fractionation between the bed material and the cyclone ash was obtained. Apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH) or potentially some other calcium phosphates are elutriated from the bed and enriched in the fly ash, while sodium and potassium are enriched in the bed material. The characteristics and the corresponding melting behavior estimations of the necks formed between agglomerated bed particles suggest that silicate melts are responsible for the bed agglomeration. Results from XRD analysis of the fly ash formed from the fuels used in the present study indicated that the risk for melt-related fly ash problems seem relatively small.

12 1 - 50 of 51
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf