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  • 1.
    Hedlund, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tourists’ vacation choice structure: Exploring the relationship between values, vacation choices, and green tourismManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order for charter tourists to be able to go on vacation, they have to make several different sub-choices, for example regarding what type of destination to visit and what travel mode and accommodation to choose. These sub-choices can be seen as part of an individual’s vacation choice structure. The outcome of one sub-choice can have an impact on other choices in this structure and also be more or less harmful to the environment. The present study used conjoint analysis to explore the trade-off between and within vacation choices as well as to see if and when green aspects are included in the choice of vacation packages. It also explored how value orientation influences tourists’ green vacation choices. The results indicated that charter tourists clearly make a distinction between vacation choices with regard to their importance in a trade-off situation and that travel mode is the most important choice. The findings also showed that green preferences only could be found in choice of accommodation and that individuals’ value orientation does not affect vacation choices to a large extent. Implications of the findings and recommendations for further research are also provided.

  • 2. Juslin, Peter
    et al.
    Olsson, Henrik
    Olsson, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Exemplar effects in categorization and multiple-cue judgment.2003In: Journal of experimental psychology. General, ISSN 0096-3445, E-ISSN 1939-2222, Vol. 1, no 132, p. 133-156Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Neumann, Patrick
    et al.
    Ryerson Univ, Dept Mech & Ind Engn, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada.
    Dixon, Shane
    Ryerson Univ, Dept Mech & Ind Engn, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Consumer demand as a driver of improved working conditions: the 'Ergo-Brand' proposition2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 1113-1126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops and explores the “Ergo-Brand” proposition; which posits that consumersmay prefer to buy goods that are made under good working conditions (GWC). This preferencewould enhance a differentiation strategy for companies, thereby fostering the application ofergonomics in production. This proposition is developed in the context of a narrative review ofthe literature on ‘ethical consumerism’. This is supplemented with a small pilot survey study,conducted in both Canada and Sweden (n=141) to explore this proposition. Results indicate thatconsumers would prefer goods made under GWC, but not unconditionally as quality and priceconcerns were ranked higher. Access to information on the working conditions in productionwas seen as a barrier. Nevertheless, the Ergo-Brand concept may be a viable avenue topromoting attention to ergonomics in companies – particularly if consumer habits are subject tointervention by advertising. Further research on this strategy is warranted.

  • 4.
    Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Gärling, Tommy
    Gothenburg Universtiy.
    Marell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Importance ratings of grocery store attributes2015In: International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, ISSN 0959-0552, E-ISSN 1758-6690, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 63-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive set of grocery store attributes that can be standardized and used in empirical research aiming at increasing retailers´ understanding of determinants of grocery store choice, and assessing how the relative importance of the attributes is affected by consumer socio-demographic characteristics and shopping behaviour.

    Design/methodology/approach: An Internet survey of 1,575 Swedish consumers was conducted. A large set of attributes was rated by the participants on seven-point scales with respect to their importance for choice of grocery store. Principal component analysis resulted in a reduced set of reliably measured aggregated attributes. This set included the attractiveness attributes price level, supply range, supply quality, service quality, storescape quality, facilities for childcare, and closeness to other stores, and the accessibility attributes easy access by car, easy access by other travel modes, and availability (closeness to store and opening hours).

    Findings: The results showed that accessibility by car is the most important grocery store attribute, storescape quality and availability the next most important and facilities for childcare the least important. It was also found that socio-demographic factors and shopping behaviour have an impact on the importance of the store attributes.

    Originality/value: A comprehensive set of attractiveness and accessibility attributes of grocery stores that can be standardized and used in empirical research is established. The results are valid for the Swedish-European conditions that differ from the conditions in North America where most previous research has been conducted. The results reveal the relative importance grocery-shopping consumers place on controllable attractiveness attributes compared to uncontrollable accessibility attributes as well as the relative importance of the attributes within each category.

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Gärling, Tommy
    Gothenburg Universtiy.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Marell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Who shops groceries where and how?: The relationship between choice of store format and type of grocery shopping2015In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between type of grocery shopping, consumers’ choice of store format and demographic characteristics. By simultaneously observing consumers’ choice of store format and whether they are major or fill-in shopping, we are able to investigate combinations of shopping types and store format than has been done previously. In an Internet survey, a sample of 1,575 Swedish consumers reported how they shop groceries. Statistical analyses were performed to determine what consumer characteristics explain frequency of major versus fill-in shopping and frequency of shopping in supermarkets versus convenience stores. Five different segments of consumers are distinguished on the basis of how they shop (major versus fill-in shopping) and where they shop (supermarkets versus convenience stores): “Planning Suburbans”, “Pedestrians”, “Social Shoppers”,City Dwellers”, and “Flexibles”. These segments differ on various characteristics. The results inform retailers of the characteristics of consumers patronizing their stores, enabling them to change the store attributes to fit consumer needs as well as the needs of new consumers.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    et al.
    School of Business, Economics, and Law, University of Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Jansson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Isberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Anna-Carin, Nordvall
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Customer satisfaction with socially responsible investing initiatives: the influence of perceived financial and non-financial quality2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 265-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, socially responsible investment (SRI) initiatives have grown to become a mainstream financial service in many countries. However, to date, only a few studies focus on understanding the final investor of such initiatives. This article focuses on one particularly overlooked aspect of SRI behavior; that of customer post-purchase satisfaction. A theoretical model of satisfaction with SRI-profiled mutual funds is developed and tested. The results indicate that perceived financial performance of the SRI-profiled mutual fund is the most important predictor of customer satisfaction. However, perceived environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance also had a positive impact on satisfaction for the SRI mutual fund. On the basis of these results, it is argued that although ESG quality is important to customers, marketers of SRI initiatives should primarily focus on the conventional quality attributes such as financial performance, as a good ESG record alone is unlikely to generate customer satisfaction.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Jansson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Isberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Determinants of customer satisfaction with socially responsible investments: The influence of ethical quality perceptions and perceived financial return2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability and marketing of products and services positioned as socially or environmentally responsible has grown significantly during the last few decades. Much of the previous research within this area has focused on what leads customers to purchase products and services that fill certain social, ethical and environmental (SEE) criteria. However, while research has focused on the initiation and the actual purchase of these products and services, literature on how satisfied customers are after the purchase has largely been neglected. To address this gap in the literature, this study examines how a set of technical and functional quality attributes contribute to customer satisfaction in a socially responsible investment (SRI) setting. The results indicate that perceived financial performance of the SRI profiled mutual fund is the most important predictor of customer satisfaction. However, perceived social, ethical, and environmental performance also had a positive impact on satisfaction for the SRI mutual fund. Based on these results, it is argued that, although SEE quality is important to customers, marketers of SEE profiled products are advised to focus on the conventional quality attributes such as financial performance, as a good SEE record alone is unlikely to generate customer satisfaction.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Isberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    The information search process of socially responsible investors2010In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Largely fuelled by an increasing social and ethical concern among private investors, socially responsible investment (SRI) has, in many ways, gone from having a marginal role to becoming a ‘mainstream’ financial service in recent years. SRI is an investment process that, in addition to the ‘traditional’ financial objective of investment, also uses social, ethical or environmental (SEE) criteria when making investment decisions. However, despite the growth of the market for SRI profiled mutual funds, very little research has been carried out with the objective of understanding the decision-making process of private SR-investors. In order to address this gap in the literature, this article addresses one stage in the SR-investor decision-making process: consumer pre-purchase information search. Using a sample of 369 SR-investors, the results of the study indicate that SR-investors search more for SEE information, such as the criteria used for exclusion of stocks than for ‘regular’ financial information such as past financial return and level of risk. Moreover, the study also indicates that involvement and perceived knowledge with regard to both financial and SEE issues impact the nature of the information search process of private SR mutual fund investors.

  • 9.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Consumer Cognitive Dissonance Behavior in Grocery Shopping2014In: International Journal of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 2163-1948, E-ISSN 2163-1956, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 128-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive dissonance occurs when people have to choose between two equally attractive goods. The unpleasant feeling, in turn, leads to a consequent pressure to reduce it. However, the strong interest in food in consumers’ life makes the line between high and low involvement purchases indistinct where also grocery shopping could trigger cognitive dissonance. In this research 100 males and females performed a virtual shopping spree using rate – choose – rate again. In accordance with previous studies, the results showed that participants did give a more favorable score for chosen items. Contradicting to previous research, the results showed that cognitive dissonance occur even for goods categorized as low involvement purchases.

  • 10.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Cue abstraction and Exemplars in Multiple Cue Judgment2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Examining consumer purchase judgment with multiple cue judgment: catching the slippery fish of cognitive process2015In: 2015 Anzmac Conference: innovation and growth strategies in marketing / [ed] Ashish Sinha, Jack Cadeaux and Tania Bucic, Sydney, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the author argue for multiple-cue judgment to measure the cognitive process and consumer attitude at the same time with real time assessment. Previous studies in consumer behavior have focused on the outcome of a purchase rather than emphasizing the cognitive process behind the purchase. Further, the research of consumer behavior have used post-hoc measure to examine consumer attitudes, which could lead to data and interpretation biases. Multiple-cue judgment task experiments allow a more detailed description of which cognitive process consumer base their purchase decisions on and on the same time could indicate which kind of attitude the consumer has towards the object. The present proposal suggest that methods commonly used in consumer behavior research area are biased and could produce incorrect results of consumer thinking. Therefore, there is a need for an opening of new unbiased methods. 

  • 12.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Recycling is good! – Sharing knowledge from one individual to another in a multiple-cue judgment task2014In: International journal of Behavioral Research and Psychology, ISSN 2332-3000, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 47-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive models exemplar memory and cue abstraction was examined in two experiments in a multiple-cue judgment task with verbalization to see how the models was affected by verbalization and how verbalization could improve individual learning. The results showed that verbalization increase individual learning and that the judgments in the analogue condition were significantly better than the proposition condition overall. Strong exemplar effects was shown for all groups regardless of stimulus presentation and learning mode, even for the learning individuals conditions that learned from written verbalized information in the absence of outcome feedback. The results suggest that exemplar memory works as a backup system similar to previous research and that exemplar-based knowledge could be the regular result of cooperation, even without social interaction.

  • 13.
    Olsson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    di Zazzo, Nicole
    Tjäderborn, Johanna
    Social Decision Making Strategies in Internet Poker Playing2007In: Cognitive Science Journal Archive, 2007, p. 1831-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Olsson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Psychology.
    Enkvist, T
    Juslin, Peter
    Go with the flow: How to master a nonlinear multiple-cue judgment task2006In: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-LEARNING MEMORY AND COGNITION, ISSN 0278-7393, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 1371-1384Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Olsson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Enqvist, Tommy
    Juslin, Peter
    Uppsala universitet.
    Cue abstraction and exemplar memory in non-linear multiple-cue judgment tasksArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Olsson, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Juslin, Peter
    Uppsala universitet.
    Olsson, Henrik
    Individuals and dyads in a multiple-cue judgment task: Cognitive processes and performance2006In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-1031, E-ISSN 1096-0465, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 40-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtually all studies of multiple-cue judgment focus on the learning by individuals. In a multiple-cue judgment task the authors examined if people acquire rule or exemplar knowledge as a function of learning the task alone or in dyads. Learning in dyads was expected to promote explicit rule-based thinking as a consequence of verbalization (social abstraction effect) and to improve performance due to the larger joint exemplar knowledge base (exemplar pooling effect). In two experiments the results suggest more accurate judgment by dyads, evidence for an exemplar pooling effect, but no evidence for the social abstraction effect. In contrast to most previous research, social interaction proved beneficial and allowed the dyads to surpass their combined individual performance.

  • 17. Shane, Dixon
    et al.
    Nordvall, Anna-Carin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Cukier, Wendy
    Neumann, Patrick
    Young consumers' considerations of healthy working conditions in purchasing decisions: a qualitative examination2017In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 601-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has suggested that products manufactured under healthy work conditions (HWC) may provide a marketing advantage to companies. This paper explores young consumers’ considerations of HWC in purchasing decisions using data from qualitative interviews with a sample of 21 university students. The results suggest that interviewees frequently considered the working conditions of those who produced the products they purchased. Participants reported a willingness to pay 17.5% more on a $100 product if it were produced under HWC compared to not. Their ability and willingness to act on this issue was, however, hampered a lack of credible information about working conditions in production, the limited availability of HWC goods and a presumed higher price of HWC goods. While caution should be applied when generalising from this targetable market segment to a general population, these results provide actionable direction for companies interested in using a HWC brand image to gain a strategic sales advantage.Practitioner Summary: This interview study shows that young consumers are interested in, and willing to pay a premium for, goods made under healthy working conditions (HWC). Reported barriers to acting on this impulse include a lack of credible information on working conditions. Ergonomics can help provide a strategic marketing advantage for companies.

1 - 17 of 17
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