umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    You Can’t Have It All: Assessing Small and Large Firms’ Willingness to Cooperate with Competitors for Innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze partner selection decisions in coopetition for innovation. We study how much risk (related to competition) small and large firms are willing to accept to realize the potential benefits of cooperating with a competitor. We use a choice-based conjoint analysis to examine the importance of and trade-off between seven attributes associated with competitors as partners. We show that the level of competition is the most important attribute for small and large firms. SMEs are willing to partner with a competitor if that partnership can reduce costs and the time-to-market, while large firms place more value on the learning opportunities.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Johansson, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Alliance portfolio management capability of SMEs: strategies for dealing with larger partners2015In: Strategic alliances for SME development / [ed] T. K. Das, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2015, p. 1-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Johansson, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Raza-Ullah, Tatbeeq
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A systematic review of coopetition: levels and effects on different levels2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While the field of coopetition has grown the multi-level nature of the phenomena have not been systematically addressed. The purpose of this systematic review is to organize extant research by distinguishing between level of coopetition and the effects of coopetition. Through a search of two databases, 99 articles were identified addressing coopetition, or collaboration and competition. The articles were classified by the method used, the level of coopetition addressed and on what level the effects were described. Within the different combinations of level and effect a content analysis was made of the articles. We suggest that additional clarification of the concept is needed to consolidate the field and give direction for future research. 

  • 4.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Kock, Sören
    Hanken School of Economics, Department of Management and Organization, Finland.
    Lundgren-Henriksson, Eva-Lena
    Hanken School of Economics, Department of Management and Organization, Finland.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopetition research in theory and practice: growing new theoretical, empirical, and methodological domains2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 57, p. 4-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the theoretical rooting of present research on coopetition and point to the need for an integration of theories on competition dynamics, and cooperative interactions in social networks. We argue that the future growth of the coopetitive research field hinges on creatively combining existing theoretical approaches with novel research methods and contexts. In particular, we suggest that incorporating theories on the micro foundations of strategic action can substantially enhance the field. The aim of this paper is both to raise questions regarding the theory and practice of coopetition research and to give examples of new approaches and trends that may contribute to the advancement of the field in the future. We consider our research practice and explore avenues for further research starting from what, where and how we study coopetition, to when and who we study. In general, we call for a stronger focus on the centrality of multiple stakeholders in forming, executing, and developing coopetition, and on research methods that can investigate in depth the multitude of actors, interests, and interactions using a multi-level analysis, including the micro foundations of coopetition.

  • 5.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier Business School / i3-CRG, Ecole Polytechnique, France.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Small and large firms’ trade-off between benefits and risks when choosing a coopetitor for innovation2019In: Long range planning, ISSN 0024-6301, E-ISSN 1873-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research investigates the extent to which small and large firms differ when assessing the benefits and risks provided by competitors as partners in innovation. Scholars have shown that coopetition can provide both significant benefits and risks for participating firms. The risks associated with firm competition and the trade-off firms make between the risks and benefits that can be obtained through coopetition must be considered when choosing a partnering firm. In addition, we argue that the firm size could affect the evaluation of benefits and the willingness to take risks such that small and large firms differ in their decision making. Therefore, we address the following questions: First, when choosing a coopetitor with which to innovate, to what extent do small and large firms differ in their evaluation of the benefits and risks associated to coopetition? Second, how does this evaluation influence firms’ willingness to coopete? We draw on research on coopetition to hypothesize that small and large firms differ in their evaluation of the six most important benefits of coopetition. To test our hypotheses, we rely on an experimental research design based on a choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis applied to a sample of innovative Swedish firms. Our results confirm that small and large firms value the benefits and risks associated with coopetitors differently. We show that small firms are less reluctant to coopete than large firms, especially if coopetition allows them to reduce their costs and learn from their coopetitor. In contrast, we show that large firms agree to coopete if coopetition enables them to reduce their time-to-market.

  • 6.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopetition for innovation: Assessing the willingness to work with a competitor to innovate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although coopetition is seen as beneficial for innovation it also involves risks so that benefits of coopeting for innovation need to be balanced with these risks. Therefore the aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the tradeoffs made by firms in their choice of partners for new product development. We explore how firms evaluate key attributes in partner selection and highlight the trade-off they are willing to make in terms of risks of coopetition using a conjoint analysis. Results show that the level of competition is the most important attribute in managers’ decision when selecting a partner. When analyzing the trade-off, the reduction of costs, decreased time-to-market and increased learning opportunities are the attributes that make firms most willing to work with a competitor as a partner. This paper contributes with new insights about the critical decisions made in the process of partner selection for innovation.

  • 7.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A Conjoint Experiment for Partner Selection in Coopetition2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze partner selection decisions in coopetition for innovation. We study how much risk (related to competition) small and large firms are willing to accept to realize the potential benefits of cooperating with a competitor. We use a choice-based conjoint analysis to examine the importance of and trade-off between seven attributes associated with competitors as partners. We show that the level of competition is the most important attribute for small and large firms. SMEs are willing to partner with a competitor if that partnership can reduce costs and the time-to-market, while large firms place more value on the learning opportunities.

  • 8.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Assessing Small and Large Firms' Willingness to Cooperate with Competitors for Innovation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coopetition provide both benefits and risks for firms developing joint innovation. But these benefits and risksdiffer for small and large firms. It thus seems essential to understand how small and large firms make a trade-offbetween benefits and risks when choosing a competitor to innovate with. We conduct an experimental researchdesign based on a choice-based conjoint analysis (CBC) applied to a sample of innovative Swedish firms. Ourresults confirm that small and large firms value the benefits and risks associated with coopetitors differently. Smallfirms are less reluctant to create alliances with competitors than large firms, especially if it allows them to reducetheir costs and learn from their competitor. Large firms are ready to coopete to reduce their time-to-market andtheir costs.

  • 9.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopetition for innovation: Assessing the willingness to work with a competitor to innovate2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although coopetition is seen as beneficial for innovation it also involves risks so that benefits of coopeting for innovation need to be balanced with these risks. Therefore the aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the tradeoffs made by firms in their choice of partners for new product development. We explore how firms evaluate key attributes in partner selection and highlight the trade-off they are willing to make in terms of risks of coopetition using a conjoint analysis. Results show that the level of competition is the most important attribute in managers’ decision when selecting a partner. When analyzing the trade-off, the reduction of costs, decreased time-to-market and increased learning opportunities are the attributes that make firms most willing to work with a competitor as a partner. This paper contributes with new insights about the critical decisions made in the process of partner selection for innovation.

  • 10.
    Chiambaretto, Paul
    et al.
    Montpellier BS / Ecole Polytechnique.
    Fernandez, Anne-Sophie
    University of Montpellier.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Learning from experience in coopetition: The impact of being able to learn from experience on the selection of a competitor as a partner for innovation2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more firms collaborate with competitors to innovate. While coopetition provides significant benefits, it is also a risky strategy, especially when the partners are close competitors. Recent research has shown that managing coopetition and developing a coopetition capability contributes to making coopetition a successful strategy. Companies with coopetition capability can benefit from the positive energy of coopetition while mitigating its potential harmful consequences, and alliance experience is an important part of such a capability. However, the key to experience is to be able to learn from it. This study focuses on how firms learning from experience affect the way they evaluate the benefits and risks of coopetition for innovation and aims to increase the knowledge of firms’ reasoning when selecting a competitor as a new partner for innovation. More precisely, we hypothesize that experienced (those with greater accumulated learning from experience) and inexperienced firms will value benefits and risk offered by potential partners differently. To test our hypotheses, we relied on an experimental research design based on a CBC analysis. Our results reveal that experienced firms are less reluctant to work with a close competitor than inexperienced firms. Companies who learn from experience will value a faster time-to-market and cost reduction provided by the partner more than inexperienced firms. In contrast, inexperienced firms look for coopetitors that can provide radical innovation opportunities, strong risk-sharing and learning opportunities more than experienced firms.

  • 11.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A comparison of two types of global careers: repeat expatriates’ and international itinerants’ subjective experiences2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While differences have been found between sent-out expatriates and those self-initiated little is known about differences between different types of global careerists. The purposeof this paper is to compare two types of global careerists and their subjective experiences; repeat expatriates sent out several times by the same company and international itinerants who work in several countries for different companies. Three relevant dimensions are identified; country and culture, organization and career, and other communities and networks. The career paths of twenty Swedish global careerists and how they narrate their careers are analyzed and the two types of global careerists are compared. Results show that the repeat expatriates and international itinerants differ in their subjective experiences of global careers and how they narrate them. This research contributes to our understanding of subjective experiences of different types of global careers and integrates a range of issues that are important to global careerists.

  • 12.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Managing multiple identifications in the context of coopetition2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals working on coopetitive projects are important to the success of a coopetitive relationship yet coopetition has rarely been studied on the individual level. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to conceptually examine (1) the consequences of coopetition for individuals by drawing on social identity theory and (2) how these consequences affect the balancing of coopetitive relationships. A conceptual model is developed that link experienced coopetition to individuals’ dual identifications, experienced tension and coopetitive behavior, which in turn affects the balance of coopetitive relationships. Implications for organizations’ coopetitive capabilities and how coopetitive relationships can be managed are discussed.

  • 13.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Burström, Thommie
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Experienced boundaries in intra-organizational global careers - an examination of boundary dynamics in boundaryless careers2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kostis, Angelos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The role of trust and distrust to manage interpartner uncertainty in the robotics and automation ecosystem2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms holding complementary knowledge and expertise increasingly engage in ecosystems to co-create and jointly deliver tailored-made solutions to industrial customers. Interdependencies inherent in ecosystems make partner alignment a unique challenge related to divergence in partners’ expectations about structure and roles. Such divergence in expectations gives rise to uncertainty in the interactions among the interdependent actors. Yet the level of interpartner uncertainty is heightened in ecosystems characterized by frequent coopetitive interactions and temporal alignment of a set of actors in multiple projects. To acknowledge this, we introduce the concept floating ecosystem. In floating ecosystems, besides uncertainty about how to align activities and actors within one project, there is also interpartner uncertainty about how partners will behave in other projects and relationships. Thus, the question about how to manage and navigate within these dynamic and complex ecosystems to manage the multifaceted nature of interpartner uncertainty is of critical importance. In light of uncertainty and interdependence, trust has been suggested as a unique organizing principle. Drawing on the idea that trust and distrust are distinct phenomena, we also argue that distrust is a distinct organizing principle that has been neglected. We conduct a case study of the Swedish robotics and automation ecosystem and explore the nature of interpartner uncertainty in this ecosystem and the mechanisms through which trust and distrust empower firms to deal with different facets of uncertainty. Our findings establish that trust and distrust work as complementary organizing principles, which operate based on distinct orienting and enabling mechanisms empowering firms to maintain fruitful interactions despite the presence of increased interpartner uncertainty.

  • 15.
    Kostis, Angelos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Uncertainty and interorganizational trust and distrust: Developing watchful blindness2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interfirm relationships involve uncertainty and risks, and scholars argue that trust is important to successfully manage them. Despite extensive attention to trust, relatively little is known about how distrust, as distinct from trust, affects firm’s ability to manage uncertainty in interfirm relationships. In this paper, we drew on a case study of the Swedish robotics and automation industry and explore the role of trust and distrust in relationships with elements of both cooperation and competitioncoopetition. In line with the stream of research that views trust and distrust as distinct, yet interrelated phenomena, we illustrate that they consist of distinct beliefs based upon perceptions of the other party, distinct behavioral manifestations, and each have their distinct positive and negative outcomes. We extend the research on trust and distrust as well as on coopetition by exploring the role of trust and distrust in coping with uncertainties while simultaneously realizing the benefits of coopetitive interfirm relationships. We suggest that by pursuing a balance of trust and distrust, a firm can experience the benefits of what we call the practice of watchful blindness. Watchful blindness enables firms to embrace uncertainty related to coopetition as it enhances foresightfulness and facilitates forbearance.

  • 16.
    Kostis, Angelos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Balancing Trust and Distrust in Strategic Alliances2018In: Managing Trust in Strategic Alliances / [ed] T.K. Das, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2018, p. 103-127Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic alliances are unstable, and answers have been sought to why they fail and how to successfully manage them. Inherent tension between contradictory forces, such as simultaneous cooperation and competition, can be a source of instability, yet can be an important part of what makes the alliance beneficial. To cope with tensions and risks trust has been argued as a way to reduce uncertainty, but too much trust can pose a risk in itself. While trust has been acknowledged as an important aspect in managing strategic alliances, less attention has been paid to the importance of distrust and the dynamics of how they interrelate. We argue that trust and distrust are distinct phenomena, each with distinct benefits and potential drawbacks. This chapter aims to advance the understanding of the potential synergies of trust and distrust in strategic alliances and to explain the reasons why pursuing balance between trust and distrust is desirable. We suggest that by pursuing a balance of trust and distrust, a firm can experience the benefits of what we call watchful blindness, which describes a practice of a firm accommodating and deriving the dual benefits of trust and distrust. Thereby uncertainty can be reduced as the ability to foresee future developments is strengthened, which facilitates alignment of the firms’ frames of reference.

  • 17.
    Kostis, Angelos
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Trust (and distrust) in coopetition: A review and directions for further research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While trust has been acknowledged as an important aspect of interorganizational relationships, less attention has been paid to the importance of trust in coopetitive relationships. Research on trust has started to acknowledge that more trust may not always be better, and that trust and distrust are separate and distinct phenomena. While researchers on coopetition have mentioned trust, the potential role of distrust is even less acknowledged, although it may be particularly relevant due to the risks involved.  The purpose of this paper is to systematically analyze how trust (and distrust) has been treated in coopetition. We outline the contributions made, and the limitations thereof, and thereby derive a well-grounded research agenda for research in coopetition focusing on trust and distrust. We argue that drawing on insights on the management of trust and distrust can contribute to our understanding of how to manage coopetition through balancing the levels of both trust and distrust.

  • 18.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A comparison of intra- and inter-organizational global careers: repeat expatriates’ and international itinerants’ subjective experiences2014In: Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, ISSN 2049-8799, E-ISSN 2049-8802, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Although research has shown differences between self-initiated experiences and expatriation, this differentiation has rarely been made when it comes to more long-term global careers. The purpose of this paper is to identify similarities and differences between repeat expatriates and international itinerants in their career paths, subjective experiences, and narratives of how they relate to their context.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A narrative approach was used and interviews were conducted with ten repeat expatriates and ten international itinerants. The career paths of the 20 Swedish global careerists and how they narrate their careers are analyzed, and the two types of global careerists are compared.

    Findings

    Results show that the repeat expatriates and international itinerants differ in their subjective experiences of global careers, and how they narrate them. Three broad domains are identified that integrate a range of issues that are important for global careerists. These domains are the organization and career domain, the country and culture domain, and the family, communities, and networks domain. The repeat expatriates and international itinerants differ in how they relate to these and what is important to them.

    Practical implications

    The differences found have implications for organizations in terms of recruitment, management, and retention of a global talent pool.

    Originality/value

    This research contributes to the understanding of subjective experiences of global careers and integrates a range of aspects in the context of global careerists that are important to them. Moreover, it contributes to the understanding of global careers by differentiating between those with intra- and inter-organizational global careers.

  • 19.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    An identity construction perspective on careers of international itinerants2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering an alternative approach to international assignments from an individual’s viewpoint and as part of a boundaryless career, this paper aims to increase our understanding of individuals working abroad, beyond the traditional expatriate assignment for a company. This study uses a narrative approach on four in-depth interviews with individuals working abroad for several longer periods throughout their careers while crossing organizational boundaries. An additional contribution lies in the identity construction perspective which can capture the impact on the individual and give a more nuanced image of common experiences and individual differences in experiences of international careers.

  • 20.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    An identity construction perspective on careers of Swedish international itinerants2009In: Management Revue, ISSN 0935-9915, E-ISSN 1861-9908, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 53-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering international assignments as part of an individual's career, beyond the traditional expatriate assignment as employed and sent out by a company, this paper focuses on international itinerants. the purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of individuals with multiple international work experiences, crossing the boundaries of a single employer, their experiences, identifications and identity construction. In the study an identity construction perspective is applied on four in-depth interviews with Swedish international itinerants. Categories of narratives are identified where the itinerants experience ambiguities and paradoxes in their identity construction, what they identify with and implications are discussed.

  • 21.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Construction of Transnational Identities?: a study of how multiple international assignments influence individuals' identity processes2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis examines multiple international assignments from an identity construction perspective, and identification or social identities as part thereof. A distinction is made between repeat expatriates, employed by the same company over several assignments abroad, and international itinerants, who move abroad working for several different companies. The main purpose of this thesis is to increase the understanding of how multiple international assignments influence individuals’ identity construction. This purpose is divided into two broad aspects where this thesis aims to contribute; the identity construction process as such, over multiple international assignments, and the more contextual aspect of social identities and what these individuals identify with. The thesis contains two essays, each with a different focus. The interviews in the first essay are with repeat expatriates and in the second essay international itinerants are in focus. As this is an exploratory study, a narrative approach is applied in order to reach in-depth understanding of a few cases. Brought together the essays contribute with new insights about the implications of multiple international work experiences from an individual’s point of view and illustrate the diversity of implications such a career can have for the individual. As these individuals go through transitions in their social context, experiencing ambiguities and paradoxes, they reflect on who they are and identity construction processes are engaged. This is contextualized in their narratives and they draw on different sources and contexts in their identity construction. Findings also indicate that there can actually be differences in repeat expatriates’ and international itinerants’ identity construction and what they identify with, which is identified as an interesting topic to research further.

  • 22.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Global careerists’ identity construction: A narrative study of repeat expatriates and international itinerants2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 804-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a thesis on global careers; a topic relevant to many project managers working internationally. The main purpose of the thesis was to contribute to the understanding of global careers through applying an identity construction perspective on narratives of global careerists' working lives.

    Design/methodology/approach – Through a narrative approach, 20 interviews with Swedish global careerists were analyzed and comparison of two types of global careerists was made – repeat expatriates and international itinerants.

    Findings – The repeat expatriates and international itinerants are shown to have different patterns in their identity construction and there are differences in their career orientations, in their identifications with the organizations they work for, with their careers and with what they do. They also differ in how they identify with their home country and culture and the countries and cultures in which they live. Circumstances such as the type of location, the time abroad, and if the work abroad is perceived as temporary, are significant in their identity construction.

    Practical implications – Both organizations and individuals benefit from understanding the implications of such careers. The results of this study can lead to the development of HRM practices to attract and maintain the relationship with these individuals and draw on their skills.

    Originality/value – By considering individuals' subjective experiences of global careers through an identity construction perspective, new understanding can be reached on individuals undergoing multiple transitions over the course of their careers.

  • 23.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Global careerists’ identity construction: A narrative study of repeat expatriates and international itinerants2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on international work experiences has to a great extent focused on an international assignment as a single event, and on how to optimize it from the organization’s perspective. This thesis addresses individuals’ subjective experiences of international work experiences and focuses on individuals with global careers, who see working abroad as a major element of their careers, involving several international assignments or international work experiences. With the recognition that individuals will work abroad on their own initiative a differentiation is made between repeat expatriates; expatriates with at least two international assignments for the same company, and international itinerants; working abroad for at least two different companies.

    The main purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of global careers through applying an identity construction perspective on narratives of global careerists’ working lives.

    To address this purpose the global careerists’ identity construction processes are explored, and their career orientation, their identification with the organization and career, and country and culture are considered more directly. An important sub-purpose of this thesis is to make a comparison of repeat expatriates and international itinerants, in terms of their identity construction and identifications.

    An individual’s identity, or sense of self, is seen as constructed in social interaction, encompassing dualities such as both differentiation from and identification with others. This thesis addresses social identities as part of an individual’s identity construction in the transition in social, cultural and organizational context that an international work experience involves.

    The approach taken is that the increased understanding aimed for can be reached through narratives. Interviews were made with twenty Swedish global careerists. Each interview was constructed as a narrative and structured according to elements of narratives to construct aggregate narratives of repeat expatriates and international itinerants. The narratives were analyzed and comparison of repeat expatriates and international itinerants was made.

    The findings in this thesis show that all the global careerists in this study have experienced shifts in their identities and identity reconstruction in the course of their careers. External circumstances such as the type of location, the time abroad, and if the work abroad is perceived as temporary, is important to the global careerists’ identity construction.The findings illustrate that there are differences in repeat expatriates’ and international itinerants’ career orientations, in their identifications with the organizations they work for, with their careers and with what they do. The two types of global careerists differ in how they identify with their home country and culture and the countries and cultures they live in. The repeat expatriates and international itinerants also show different patterns in their identity construction.

  • 24.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Globala karriärer, en resa mellan företag och länder: både utmanande och utvecklande för individer2011In: Projektvärlden, ISSN 1652-3016, Vol. 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Implications of careers with multiple international assignments on identity construction2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    A conceptual model of individual identifications in the context of coopetition2014In: International Journal of Business Environment, ISSN 1740-0589, E-ISSN 1740-0597, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 11-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individuals working on inter-organisational cooperative projects with their competitors are important to the success of a coopetitive relationship between firms, but the role of individuals has rarely been addressed in coopetition research. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model of individuals in coopetitive contexts and explore their identification with the organisation and the cooperative project. The developed model links experienced coopetition to individuals' dual, potentially conflicting, identifications which affects individuals' experienced tension and coopetitive behaviour. Secondly we will discuss how these consequences of coopetition for individuals affect the balancing of dyadic coopetitive relationships. Implications for organisations' coopetitive capabilities and how coopetitive relationships can be managed are also discussed.

  • 27.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Narrating city development: Umeå as a European Capital of Culture 2014 in the local newspaper2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Organizing by co-creation: emerging cultural projects2013In: 22nd Nordic Academy of Management Conference held at University of RIceland Reykjavik, 21-23 August, 2013: Final Program and Abstracts, Nordic Academy of Management , 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-creation can be seen as a form of organizing, building from the bottom-up, often within the structure of an open-source project. Previous studies on projects have often had the perspective that projects are organized through a top-down approach where a project, or a number of projects, is created for the development of a new product or service. In this study we take a perspective of co-creation and user involvement to show how projects can emerge from the bottom up. Umeå’s application to become the European Capital of Culture 2014 was successful, to a large extent due to its unique approach to organize the project through co-creation. The idea is that cultural projects forming the program should emerge from the community, but how can this be organized? The purpose of the paper is to illustrate how a large multi-project initiative is managed and organized through co-creation practices. Interviews with politicians involved, people from the Umeå 2014 project team and secondary data on the project will be analyzed to explore how the project is organized and the process by which cultural projects within it emerge. To illustrate, two cultural projects are analyzed more specifically. The Umeå 2014 project takes the role of a platform that makes meetings and interactions possible, and organizing by co-creation allows for creative cultural projects to emerge. The paper contributes to research on multi-project initiatives and illustrates that co-creation practices can be a fruitful, although challenging, approach that contradicts the traditional way of running programs.

  • 29.
    Näsholm, Malin H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Johansson, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopetition for SMEs2018In: The Routledge companion to coopetition strategies / [ed] Anne-Sophie Fernandez, Paul Chiambaretto, Frédéric Le Roy, and Wojciech Czakon, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 390-397Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Coopeting with other firms can be a necessary, but risky, strategy for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This chapter discusses specificities of small firms that make coopetition important for their growth and success, but also make them particularly vulnerable. Relationships with larger firms are especially challenging due to power asymmetry, and SMEs need to consider their entire portfolio of alliances to manage them. We explore capabilities needed by SMEs to cope with the challenges and define dimensions of alliance management and portfolio management capabilities. We also provide directions for further research.

  • 30.
    Näsholm, Malin H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Co-creation as a strategy for program management2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 58-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Little attention has been paid to the initial development of programs. The purpose of this paper is to explore co-creation as an alternative strategic approach for program management. Co-creation of programs means that the projects within the program are created by the users and producers of the projects.

     

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a case study of the co-creation approach of the Umeå 2014 European Capital of Culture program. The empirical material analyzed consists of qualitative interviews with members of the Umeå 2014 team and the politicians involved, as well as secondary data on the program.

     

    Findings – The Umeå 2014 Capital of Culture program takes the form of a platform that makes meetings and interactions possible. Co-creation allows for creative cultural projects to emerge, but the program becomes reliant on the different actors involved. Balancing dilemmas of multiple stakeholders and maintaining control while enabling the emergence of ideas is key.

     

    Practical implications – These findings have practical implications for the management of more emergent program structures. A flexible organization with guiding values and criteria to balance the different projects can be used to achieve program goals when multiple stakeholders have their own agendas.

     

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to research on program management by introducing the concept of co-creation as a strategic approach for program management. The creative and innovative benefits of co-creation can be reached in the development of programs but other challenges for their management are involved.

  • 31.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Jacobsson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Do Global Careers Imply Construction of Global Identities?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization is everywhere, new technological and organizational innovations havecompressed time and space. National as well as organizational borders have become permeable in favor of regions and networks. A broad spectrum of interlinked global forces has created a dynamic and fluid present that, in many ways, have changed the contemporary organizational prerequisites. The transformation of the organizational conditions have also changed the previous understanding of careers and facilitated new types of relationships between employer and employee that are more transactional and global. However, the current knowledge regarding these kinds of relationships and the individual workers perception of his/hers personal development and career in relation tothe global context, is limited. To address this issue this paper focuses on international itinerants, i.e. professionals with global careers who have been employed by at least two independent companies in foreign countries and thus arguably at the core of this fluid global context. The aim of this paper is to explore the identity construction process of international itinerants and what they identify with in the global context of their careers. In order to do this, an identity construction perspective will be applied, including social aspects of what these individuals identify with. Through a structural narrative analysis, presented as aggregated narratives of interviews, this paper shows the process of how three Swedish international itinerants construct their identity. To explore if a globalidentity is constructed, and what that might entail, three dimensions of what the itinerants identify with are in focus; the organization and career, the communities and networks, and the country and culture.

  • 32.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Tomas, Blomquist
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The meanings of co-creation of culture2015In: Culture and Growth: Magical Companions or Mutually Exclusive Counterparts? Proceedings / [ed] Britta Lundgren and Ovidiu Matiu, Sibiu: Lucian Blaga University​ Press , 2015, p. 10-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Umeå as European Capital of Culture 2014 had co-creation as a guiding value and as a strategy for the year. While co-creation has become a widely used concept, it can be interpreted in different ways as it is translated in new contexts. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of how co-creation is perceived in the context of developing a European Capital of Culture program. We explore the concept as interpreted in official documents, by politicians and members of the team as well as by different cultural actors with projects in the program. The findings show that the idea of co-creation is adopted but is translated over time (from application, to way of organizing, to project content, to legacy of the year) and enacted in the different contexts and practices (program development, activities in the team, applications for funding, and for small and large actors).

  • 33.
    Näsholm, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Wåhlin, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Career and identity travel routes on a transnational dance floor2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Vanyushyn, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    International coopetition: are the benefits worth the challenges?2017In: 7th GIKA Conference Proceedings, 2017, p. 557-558Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International coopetition has rarely been studied in relation to innovation, and further exploration of the international coopetition effects on firm´s innovation performance is especially important as such relationships are challenging with a high propensity to fail. This observation formed the departure point for this study, which aims to increase the understanding of the effects of international coopetition on firm innovativeness and how these effects are conditioned on the magnitude of the organizational adjustments a firm introduces. Using an unbalanced panel of firms that partook in the four waves of the Swedish Community Innovation Survey between 2008 and 2014, micro-matched with firm register and firm-specific employee data for the same time period, we find that firms cooperating with competitors internationally indeed exhibit a higher propensity to introduce new-to-market innovations. We further find that translating a broader scope of international partnerships into innovation introduction depends upon the magnitude of organizational changes a firm has to undergo through in conjunction with innovation development. Overall, our study contributes to the understanding of the implications of the international coopetition and what a firms needs to benefit from such coopetition.

  • 35.
    Vanyushyn, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Bengtsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    International coopetition for innovation: Are the benefits worth the challenges?2018In: Review of Managerial Science, ISSN 1863-6683, E-ISSN 1863-6691, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 535-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International coopetition has rarely been studied in relation to innovation. Further exploration of effects of international coopetition, i.e. the pursuit of simultaneous cooperation and competition, on a firm’s innovation performance is especially important as such a relationship is challenging with a high propensity to fail. This observation formed the point of departure for this study, which aims to increase the understanding of the effects of international coopetition on firm innovativeness and how these effects are conditioned on the magnitude of the organizational adjustments a firm introduces. We use an unbalanced panel of 9,839 firms that participated in four waves of the Swedish Community Innovation Survey between 2008 and 2014 as our empirical base. We illustrate that firms that cooperate with competitors internationally are more likely to exhibit higher propensity to introduce radical innovations, yet this effect is conditioned upon the magnitude of organizational adjustments. Overall, our study contributes to the understanding of the implications of international coopetition and what a firm needs to benefit from it.

  • 36.
    Vanyushyn, Vladimir
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Coopeting to Innovate – International Scope of Coopetition and Innovativeness2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Wåhlin, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Kapsali, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Materializing urban design through boundary spaces2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper involves an exploration of how architecture, landscape and construction spaces contribute in urban design by providing incentives for interaction and emergence of collaborative ventures during a large cultural development initiative. The paper contains an analysis of how spaces becomes boundary mechanisms facilitating the translation of a cultural vision. By elaborating on ‘boundary spaces’ to explain the materialization of an urban strategy we use a praxeological outlook as it is framed in the strategy-as-practice literature. When we more closely delves into how spaces can be set in motion and become generative platforms we use the notion of action nets. Methodologically, the paper investigates how such strivings are articulated, planned and implemented in a local context by using a narrative approach comprised by analyses of narrative infrastructures. By mediating different layers of interpretation, boundary spaces turn into artifacts exceeding strategic projections.

  • 38.
    Wåhlin, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Kapsali, Maria
    Hull University Business School, UK.
    Harryson Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Urban strategies for culture-driven growth: co-creating a European Capital of Culture2016Book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Wåhlin, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Kapsali, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Näsholm, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Blomquist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The case of a self-emerging cultural community2013Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 39 of 39
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf