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  • 1.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Astrology in the contemporary period in Sweden2016In: Western esotericism in Scandinavia / [ed] Henrik Bogdan, Olav Hammer, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 104-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Rationella val2007In: Social handling och sociala relationer, Natur och kultur, Stockholm , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Reception of integrative and complementary medicine (ICM) in scientific journals: a citation and co-word analysis2014In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 807-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even if integrative and complementary medicine (ICM) is a growing scientific field, it is also a highly contested area in terms of scientific legitimacy. The aim of this article is to analyze the reception of ICM research in scientific journals. Is this kind of research acknowledged outside the ICM context, for example, in general or specialized medicine? What is the impact of ICM research? and Is it possible to identify any shift in content, from the original ICM research to the documents where it is acknowledged? The material consisted of two sets: documents published in 12 ICM journals in 2007; and all documents citing these documents during the years 2007-2012. These sets were analyzed with help from citation and co-word analysis. When analyzing the citation pattern, it was clear that a majority of the cited documents were acknowledged in journals and documents that could be related to research areas outside the ICM context, such as pharmacology & pharmacy and plant science-even if the most frequent singular journals and subject categories were connected to ICM. However, after analyzing the content of cited and citing documents, it was striking how similar the content was. It was also evident that much of this research was related to basic preclinical research, in fields such as cell biology, plant pharmacology, and animal experiments.

  • 4.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Representation and Negotiation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Citation Context Analysis2012In: Science communication, ISSN 1075-5470, E-ISSN 1552-8545, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 299-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not only increasinglypopular and frequently used in Western societies, it is also a growing scientificfield. But how are results from clinical CAM studies received and representedby other researchers? This article discusses the migration and representationof three clinical CAM studies, published in high-impact medical journals, analyzedwith help from quantitative and qualitative citation context analysis. Theresults indicate a great variety concerning the migration of results and thatthis kind of research is subject to different kinds of boundary work, especiallyconcerning biomedical standards and design of the studies.

  • 5.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Samhällsvetenskaplig forskning om nyandlighet och nya religiösa rörelser ur ett bibliometriskt perspektiv2012In: Aura. Tidskrift för akademiska studier av nyreligiositet, ISSN 2000-4419, Vol. 4, p. 122-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Translation of complementary and alternative medicine in Swedish politics2018In: Complementary and alternative medicine: knowledge production and social transformation / [ed] Caragh Brosnan, Pia Vuolanto, Jenny-Ann Brodin Danell, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 165-191Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the political understanding—or translation—of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is analysed within the context of the Swedish parliament. This is achieved with help from an actor network approach, using motions written by parliamentary politicians during the time period 1980–2015. The main findings suggest that there are two types of translations. The first is focused on public health issues in which CAM is presented as a potential contribution to problems such as long-term sick leaves. The second is focused on more specific CAM issues, such as legal constraints and lack of knowledge, which might delimit the use and practice of CAM. In general, the debate is in favour of CAM and is dominated by liberal and conservative parties. It is also dominated by ideals of freedom of choice and free markets, although ideals of social justice also are recurrent. Another finding is that the political understanding of CAM follows scientific and medical norms.

  • 7.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Danell, Rickard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bibliometrisk kartläggning av komplementär och alternativmedicinsk forskning2019In: Komplementär och alternativ medicin och vård: säkerhet, kunskap, dialog : delbetänkande av KAM-utredningen. / [ed] Kjell Asplund, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik AB, 2019, p. 617-640Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Danell, Rickard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Development of scientific publications on acupunctur2011In: Acupuncture: concepts and physiology / [ed] Marcelo Saad, InTech , 2011, p. 219-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Danell, Rickard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Publication activity in complementary and alternative medicine2009In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 539-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse how research on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) break through into one established scientific arena, namely academic journals. With help from bibliometric methods we analyse publication of CAM articles, in the Medline database, during the period 1966–2007. We also analyse the general content of the articles and in what journals they get published. We conclude that the publication activity of CAM articles increases rapidly, especially in the late 1990s, and that the changing growth rate is not due to the general expansion of Medline. The character of CAM articles has changed towards more clinical oriented research, especially in subfields such as acupuncture and musculoskeletal manipulations. CAM articles are found both in core clinical journals and in specialized CAM journals. Even though a substantial part of the articles are published in CAM journals, we conclude that the increasing publication activity is not restricted to the expansion of these specialized journals.

  • 10.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Danell, Rickard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Spiritualised Medicine? A Bibliometric Study of Complementary and Alternative Medicine2007In: Proceedings of ISSI 2007, 2007, p. 154-161Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Brodin, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Bildanvändande på kristna webbplatser2004In: Bild och samhälle: Visuell analys som vetenskaplig metod, Studentlitteratur , 2004, p. 161-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Brodin, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Polariserad kärlek - ett utsnitt ur den nyandliga kärleks- och sexualitetsdiskursen2004In: FINYAR, ISSN 1404-6571, Vol. 1, p. 41-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Brodin, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Redaktören har ordet2004In: FINYAR, ISSN 1404-6571, Vol. 1, p. 2-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Brosnan, Caragh
    et al.
    Vuolanto, PiaBrodin Danell, Jenny-AnnUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Complementary and alternative medicine: knowledge production and social transformation2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines how complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) – as knowledge, philosophy and practice – is constituted by, and transformed through, broader social developments. Shifting the sociological focus away from CAM as a stable entity that elicits perceptions and experiences, chapters explore the forms that CAM takes in different settings, how global social transformations elicit varieties of CAM, and how CAM philosophies and practices are co-produced in the context of social change. Through engagement with frameworks from Science and Technology Studies (STS), CAM is reconceptualised as a set of practices and knowledge-making processes, and opened up to new forms of analysis. Part 1 of the book explores how and why boundaries within CAM and between CAM and other health practices, are being constructed, challenged and changed. Part 2 asks how CAM as material practice is shaped by politics and regulation in a range of national settings. Part 3 examines how evidence is being produced and used in CAM research and practice. Including studies of CAM in Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, and North and South America, the volume will appeal to postgraduate students, researchers and health practitioners.

  • 15. Brosnan, Caragh
    et al.
    Vuolanto, Pia
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Introduction: reconceptualising complementary and alternative medicine as knowledge production and social transformation2018In: Complementary and alternative medicine: knowledge production and social transformation / [ed] Caragh Brosnan, Pia Vuolanto, Jenny-Ann Brodin Danell, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction proposes new directions for the social science of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). It firstly reviews trends and gaps in the sociology of CAM, which has largely focussed on issues related to motivations for use, professionalisation struggles, and CAM’s relationship to biomedicine. CAM is more often treated as a signifier of social change than as a set of practices shaped by, and implicated in, epistemic and social transformations. By drawing on approaches from Science and Technology Studies (STS)—including actor-network theory and theories of boundary work, social worlds, co-production, and epistemic cultures—the chapter calls attention to CAM’s contingency, situatedness, materiality, and co-production within various spheres of governance and knowledge production. Such perspectives, it is argued, offer fruitful ways of comprehending what CAM is and how and why it is evolving.

  • 16.
    Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From disappointment to holistic ideals: a qualitative study on motives and experiences of using complementary and alternative medicine in Sweden2015In: Journal of Public Health Research, ISSN 2279-9028, E-ISSN 2279-9036, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 125-132, article id 538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent studies indicate increased use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in western societies, to ameliorate health problems. Even if there is substantial research on general patterns of use, there is limited knowledge on individual motives. This study contributes to a qualitative understanding of experiences of choosing and using CAM. Design and methods: This study consists of in-depth interviews with 10 CAM users in Sweden. The participants represent different backgrounds and experiences of using CAM. The interviews have been analysed in accordance with content analysis. Results: In analysing experiences of choosing and using CAM four main themes were identified: frustration and critique, values and ideology, individual responsibility, and combining treatments. In general, the participants were highly reflexive on issues concerning their health. They highlighted their own role and responsibility, combined a variety of treatments, and continuously dealt with questions on risks, even if they had relatively different approaches to if and when to use CAM. The results also show that motives may change over time. Even if initial choices were closely related to frustration and critique of conventional treatments (for example, by perceiving conventional health care as limited, not receiving proper diagnoses, or being critical to conventional drugs) was long-term use motivated by ideological characteristics of CAM (such as holistic and individualized treatments, and extensive interaction with practitioners). Conclusions: Four main themes, concerning experiences of choosing and using CAM were identified. This study also supports the idea that initial motives for choosing CAM may differ from those explaining long-term use.

  • 17.
    Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    "I Could Feel It!": A Qualitative Study on How Users of Complementary Medicine Experience and Form Knowledge About Treatments2019In: Journal of Holistic Nursing, ISSN 0898-0101, E-ISSN 1552-5724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The aim of this study was to examine how users of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) experience various forms of treatments, form knowledge about them, and understand the boundaries between CAM and conventional health care.

    METHOD:

    Semistructured qualitative interviews, with 10 CAM users in Sweden, analyzed with qualitative content analysis and quantitative network analysis, and subsequent network visualizations.

    FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION:

    The main findings stressed the importance to CAM users of bodies and physical experiences, both in experiencing and forming knowledge about treatments. Physical experience was often contrasted with theoretical understanding. Another key finding was that the CAM users seemed to set up different standards for conventional and public health care and CAM. Although scientific explanations were considered as generally important for legitimacy, and conventional health care was expected to be evidence based, they were less important to personal use and in the use of CAM. In these cases, firsthand experience of positive effects were decisive.

  • 18. Frisk, Liselotte
    et al.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Introduktion: Nya religiösa rörelser, auktoritet och demokrati2005In: FINYAR, ISSN 1404-6571, Vol. 2, p. 3-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19. Frisk, Liselotte
    et al.
    Brodin Danell, Jenny-Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Sociology.
    Nyreligiositet, nya religiösa rörelser och döden2008In: Finyar, ISSN 1653-6754, Vol. 3-4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 19 of 19
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