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  • 1. Adolfsson, Jan
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Andrén, Ove
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Hellström, Karin
    Hellström, Magnus
    Holmberg, Erik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Petterson, Bill
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Clinical characteristics and primary treatment of prostate cancer in Sweden between 1996 and 2005.2007In: Scand J Urol Nephrol, ISSN 0036-5599, Vol. 41, p. 456-477Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersén, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Bäckström, Torbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Dahlquist, Gisela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Engström-Laurent, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hjemdahl, Paul
    Korsgren, Olle
    Olsson, Håkan
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Hand Surgery.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensk medicinsk forskning behöver inte mer styrning2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 22-23, p. 980-981Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Andren, O.
    et al.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Falt, A.
    Ulvskog, E.
    Davidsson, S.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hjalm-Eriksson, M.
    Cabazitaxel followed by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improves time to progression in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC): A randomized, open label, phase III, multicenter trial2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Armstrong, Andrew J.
    et al.
    Anand, Aseem
    Edenbrandt, Lars
    Bondesson, Eva
    Bjartell, Anders
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sternberg, Cora N.
    Pili, Roberto
    Tuvesson, Helen
    Nordle, Örjan
    Carducci, Michael A.
    Morris, Michael J.
    Phase 3 Assessment of the Automated Bone Scan Index as a Prognostic Imaging Biomarker of Overall Survival in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2018In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 944-951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Prostate cancer commonly metastasizes to bone, and bone metastases are associated with pathologic fractures, pain, and reduced survival. Bone disease is routinely visualized using the technetium Tc 99m(Tc-99m) bone scan; however, the standard interpretation of bone scan data relies on subjective manual assessment of counting metastatic lesion numbers. There is an unmet need for an objective and fully quantitative assessment of bone scan data.

    Objective: To clinically assess in a prospectively defined analysis plan of a clinical trial the automated Bone Scan Index (aBSI) as an independent prognostic determinant of overall survival (OS) in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    Design, Setting, and Participants: This investigationwas a prospectively planned analysis of the aBSI in a phase 3 multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of tasquinimod (10TASQ10). Men with bone metastatic chemotherapy-naive CRPC were recruited at 241 sites in 37 countries between March 2011 and August 2015. The statistical analysis plan to clinically evaluate the aBSI was prospectively defined and locked before unmasking of the 10TASQ10 study. The analysis of aBSI was conducted between May 25, 2016, and June 3, 2017.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: The associations of baseline aBSI with OS, radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS), time to symptomatic progression, and time to opiate use for cancer pain.

    Results: Of the total 1245 men enrolled, 721 were evaluable for the aBSI. The mean (SD) age (available for 719 men) was 70.6 (8.0) years (age range, 47-90 years). The aBSI population was representative of the total study population based on baseline characteristics. The aBSI (median, 1.07; range, 0-32.60) was significantly associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.20; 95% CI, 1.14-1.26; P < .001). The median OS by aBSI quartile (lowest to highest) was 34.7, 27.3, 21.7, and 13.3 months, respectively. The discriminative ability of the aBSI (C index, 0.63) in prognosticating OS was significantly higher than that of the manual lesion counting (C index, 0.60) (P = .03). In a multivariable survival model, a higher aBSI remained independently associated with OS (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.11; P = .03). A higher aBSI was also independently associated with time to symptomatic progression (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.13-1.23; P < .001) and time to opiate use for cancer pain (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14-1.30; P < .001).

    Conclusions and Relevance: To date, this investigation is the largest prospectively analyzed study to validate the aBSI as an independent prognostic imaging biomarker of survival in mCRPC. These data support the prognostic utility of the aBSI as an objective imaging biomarker in the design and eligibility of clinical trials of systemic therapies for patients with mCRPC.

  • 5. Bosco, Cecilia
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Per
    Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy and Risk of Thromboembolic Events2017In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 97, no 5, p. 1026-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of thromboembolic disease (TED) after radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent for prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and Methods: We identified all men who received RT as curative treatment (n=9410) and grouped according to external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). By comparing with an age-and county-matched comparison cohort of PCa-free men (n = 46,826), we investigated risk of TED after RT using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The model was adjusted for tumor characteristics, demographics, comorbidities, PCa treatments, and known risk factors of TED, such as recent surgery and disease progression. Results: Between 2006 and 2013, 6232 men with PCa received EBRT, and 3178 underwent BT. A statistically significant association was found between EBRT and BT and risk of pulmonary embolism in the crude analysis. However, upon adjusting for known TED risk factors these associations disappeared. No significant associations were found between BT or EBRT and deep venous thrombosis. Conclusion: Curative RT for prostate cancer using contemporary methodologies was not associated with an increased risk of TED.

  • 6. Bossi, A.
    et al.
    Dearnaley, D.
    McKenzie, M.
    Baskin-Bey, E.
    Tyler, R.
    Tombal, B.
    Freedland, S. J.
    Roach, M. , I I I
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Dicker, A. P.
    Wiegel, T.
    Shore, N.
    Smith, M.
    Yu, M.
    Kheoh, T.
    Thomas, S.
    Sandler, H. M.
    ATLAS: A phase 3 trial evaluating the efficacy of apalutamide (ARN-509) in patients with high-risk localized or locally advanced prostate cancer receiving primary radiation therapy2016In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lerner, Ulf H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bone remodeling in relation to androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer bone metastases2018In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 78, no 16, p. 50-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Egevad, Lars
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Subgroups of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastases defined through an inverse relationship between androgen receptor activity and immune response2017In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 776-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Novel therapies for men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are needed, particularly for cancers not driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Objectives: To identify molecular subgroups of PC bone metastases of relevance for therapy.

    Design, setting, and participants: Fresh-frozen bone metastasis samples from men with CRPC (n = 40), treatment-naïve PC (n = 8), or other malignancies (n = 12) were characterized using whole-genome expression profiling, multivariate principal component analysis (PCA), and functional enrichment analysis. Expression profiles were verified by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in an extended set of bone metastases (n = 77) and compared to levels in malignant and adjacent benign prostate tissue from patients with localized disease (n = 12). Selected proteins were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. A cohort of PC patients (n = 284) diagnosed at transurethral resection with long follow-up was used for prognostic evaluation.

    Results and limitations: The majority of CRPC bone metastases (80%) was defined as AR-driven based on PCA analysis and high expression of the AR, AR co-regulators (FOXA1, HOXB13), and AR-regulated genes (KLK2, KLK3, NKX3.1, STEAP2, TMPRSS2); 20% were non–AR-driven. Functional enrichment analysis indicated high metabolic activity and low immune responses in AR-driven metastases. Accordingly, infiltration of CD3+ and CD68+ cells was lower in AR-driven than in non–AR-driven metastases, and tumor cell HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with nuclear AR immunoreactivity. RT-PCR analysis showed low MHC class I expression (HLA-A, TAP1, and PSMB9 mRNA) in PC bone metastases compared to benign and malignant prostate tissue and bone metastases of other origins. In primary PC, low HLA class I ABC immunoreactivity was associated with high Gleason score, bone metastasis, and short cancer-specific survival. Limitations include the limited number of patients studied and the single metastasis sample studied per patient.

    Conclusions: Most CRPC bone metastases show high AR and metabolic activities and low immune responses. A subgroup instead shows low AR and metabolic activities, but high immune responses. Targeted therapy for these groups should be explored. Patient summary: We studied heterogeneities at a molecular level in bone metastasis samples obtained from men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. We found differences of possible importance for therapy selection in individual patients.

  • 9.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Integrated DNA methylation and gene expression analysis of molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer bone metastasisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Excellent cabazitaxel response in prostate cancer xenografts expressing androgen receptor variant 7 and reversion of resistance development by anti-androgensManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11. Budäus, Lars
    et al.
    Bolla, Michel
    Bossi, Alberto
    Cozzarini, Cesare
    Crook, Juanita
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wiegel, Thomas
    Functional Outcomes and Complications Following Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: A Critical Analysis of the Literature2012In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 112-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: Prostate cancer (PCa) patients have many options within the realms of surgery or radiation therapy (RT). Technical advancements in RT planning and delivery have yielded different approaches, such as external beam, brachytherapy, and newer approaches such as image-guided tomotherapy or volumetric-modulated arc therapy. The selection of the optimal RT treatment for the individual is still a point of discussion, and the debate centres on two important outcomes-namely, cancer control and reduction of side-effects.

    OBJECTIVE: To critically review and summarise the available literature on functional outcomes and rectal sequelae following RT for PCa treatment.

    EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A review of the literature published between 1999 and 2010 was performed using Medline and Scopus search. Relevant reports were identified using the terms prostate cancer, radiotherapy, functional outcomes, external beam radiation, brachytherapy, IMRT, quality of life, and tomotherapy and were critically reviewed and summarised.

    EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Related to nonuniform definition of their assessed functional end points and uneven standards of reporting, only a minority of series retrieved could be selected for analyses. Moreover, patterns of patient selection for different types of RT, inherent differences in the RT modalities, and the presence or absence of hormonal treatment also limit the ability to synthesise results from different publications or perform meta-analyses across the different treatment types. Nonetheless, several studies agree that recent technical improvements in the field of RT planning and delivery enable the administration of higher doses with equal or less toxicity. Regardless of the type of RT, the most frequently considered functional end points in the published analyses are gastrointestinal (GI) complications and rectal bleeding. Established risk factors for acute or late toxicities after RT include advanced age, larger rectal volume, a history of prior abdominal surgery, the concomitant use of androgen deprivation, preexisting diabetes mellitus, haemorrhoids, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Similarly, mild acute irritative urinary symptoms are reported in several studies, whereas total urinary incontinence and other severe urinary symptoms are rare. Pretreatment genitourinary complaints, prior transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), and the presence of acute genitourinary toxicity are suggested as contributing to long-term urinary morbidity. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is not an immediate side-effect of RT, and the occurrence of spontaneous erections before treatment is the best predictor for preserving erections sufficient for intercourse. In addition, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits a reduction in the dose delivered to vascular structures critical for erectile function.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the future, further improvement in RT planning and delivery will decrease side-effects and permit administration of higher doses. Related to the anatomy of the prostate, these higher doses may favour rectal sparing while not readily sparing the urethra and bladder neck. As a consequence, there may be a future shift from dose-limiting long-term rectal morbidity towards long-term urinary morbidity. In the absence of prospective randomised trials comparing different types of surgical and RT-based treatments in PCa, the introduction of validated tools for reporting functional and clinical outcomes is crucial for evaluating and identifying each individual's best treatment choice.

  • 12.
    Bylund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Saarinen, Niina
    Zhang, Jie-Xian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Periodontology.
    Lundin, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Adlercreutz, Herman
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Mäkelä, Sari
    Anticancer effects of a plant lignan 7-hydroxymatairesinol on a prostate cancer model in vivo.2005In: Experimental biology and medicine (Maywood, N.J.: Print), ISSN 1535-3702, E-ISSN 1535-3699, Vol. 230, no 3, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical intervention studies and experimental studies with lignan-rich diets suggest that lignans may have inhibitory effects on prostate cancer, but no clinical or experimental studies with purified lignans have been published. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a plant lignan 7-hydroxymatairesinol (HMR) on LNCaP human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic mice. Athymic nude male mice were injected subcutaneously with LNCaP cells. Starting 3 days after tumor cell injections, a control diet or a control diet supplemented with 0.15% or 0.30% of HMR was administered to mice and the tumor take rate and growth was observed for 9 weeks. HMR diet inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors. Mice treated with HMR had smaller tumor volume, lower tumor take rate, increased proportion of nongrowing tumors, and higher tumor cell apoptotic index compared with controls. Furthermore, the cell proliferation index was reduced in mice receiving the 0.30% HMR diet compared with mice receiving the control diet. Our results suggest that dietary HMR started at the early phase of the tumor development inhibits the growth of the LNCaP human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic male mice.

  • 13. Carlsson, Sigrid
    et al.
    Drevin, Linda
    Loeb, Stacy
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Franck Lissbrant, Ingela
    Robinson, David
    Johansson, Eva
    Stattin, Pär
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Population-based study of long-term functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment2016In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 117, no 6B, p. E36-E45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate long-term urinary, sexual and bowel functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment at a median follow-up of 12 years (IQR 11-13).

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this nationwide, population-based study, we identified from the National Prostate Cancer Register, Sweden, 6,003 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (clinical local stage T1-2, any Gleason score, prostate specific antigen < 20 ng/mL, NX or N0, MX or M0) between 1997 and 2002 who were ≤70 years at diagnosis. 1,000 prostate cancer-free controls were selected, matched for age and county of residence. Functional outcomes were evaluated with a validated self-reported questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 3,937/6,003 cases (66%) and 459/1,000 (46%) controls. Twelve years post diagnosis, at a median age of 75 years, the proportion of cases with adverse symptoms was 87% for erectile dysfunction or sexually inactive, 20% for urinary incontinence and 14% for bowel disturbances. The corresponding proportions for controls were 62%, 6% and 7%, respectively. Men with prostate cancer, except those on surveillance, had an increased risk of erectile dysfunction, compared to control men. Radical prostatectomy was associated with increased risk of urinary incontinence (odds ratio; OR 2.29 [95% CI 1.83-2.86] and radiotherapy increased the risk of bowel dysfunction (OR 2.46 [95% CI 1.73-3.49]) compared to control men. Multi-modal treatment, in particular including androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), was associated with the highest risk of adverse effects; for instance radical prostatectomy followed by radiotherapy and ADT was associated with an OR of 3.74 [95 CI 1.76-7.95] for erectile dysfunction and OR 3.22 [95% CI 1.93-5.37] for urinary incontinence.

    CONCLUSION: The proportion of men who suffer long-term impact on functional outcomes after prostate cancer treatment was substantial.

  • 14.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for neurological recovery after surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 809-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Spinal cord compression is an oncological and surgical emergency. Delays in referral and diagnosis may influence functional outcome. It is therefore important to identify patients who will regain or maintain ability to walk after surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine current practice for referral and diagnosis of prostate cancer patients with spinal cord compression and to identify prognostic factors for neurological outcome after surgery.

    Patients and methods. The study includes 68 consecutive patients with prostate cancer who underwent surgery due to neurological compromise.  Intervals from onset of neurological symptoms to referral, diagnosis, and treatment were analyzed in relation to functional outcome. The prognostic significance of preoperative clinical parameters on gait function one month after surgery was evaluated.

    Results. Patients who were referred from local hospitals had longer delay to surgery than those who directly presented to the cancer centre (p=0.004). The rate of diagnosis with MRI increased through the week and peaked on Friday, with few patients being diagnosed during weekends. Ability to walk before surgery, hormone-naive prostate cancer, and/or shorter time from loss of ambulation were associated with more favorable neurological outcome. In patients with hormone-refractory disease who were unable to walk before surgery regaining of ambulation was associated with: duration of paresis <48 hours (p=0.005), good preoperative performance status (p=0.04), preoperative PSA serum level <200 ng/ml (p=0.03), and surgery with posterior decompression and stabilization (p=0.03).

    Conclusion. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment of spinal cord compression in prostate cancer patients is crucial for neurological recovery. Rising of awareness for the condition among patients at risk and among physicians is mandatory as well as improvement of local and regional guidelines for treatment.

  • 15.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Outcome after surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression in 54 patients with prostate cancer2012In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The criteria for selecting patients who may benefit from surgery of spinal cord compression in metastatic prostate cancer are poorly defined. We therefore studied patients operated for metastatic spinal cord compression in order to evaluate outcome of surgery and to find predictors of survival. Patients and methods We reviewed the records of 54 consecutive patients with metastatic prostate cancer who were operated for spinal cord compression at Umeå University Hospital. The indication for surgery was neurological deficit due to spinal cord compression. 41 patients had hormone-refractory cancer and 13 patients had previously untreated, hormone-naïve prostate cancer. 29 patients were operated with posterior decompression only, and in 25 patients posterior decompression and stabilization was performed. Results Preoperatively, 6/54 of patients were able to walk. 1 month after surgery, 33 patients were walking, 15 were non-ambulatory, and 6 had died. Mortality rate was 11% at 1 month, 41% at 6 months, and 59% at 1 year. In the hormone-naïve group, 8/13 patients were still alive with a median postoperative follow-up of 26 months. In the hormone-refractory group, median survival was 5 months. Patients with hormone-refractory disease and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of ≤ 60% had median survival of 2.5 months, whereas those with KPS of 70% and KPS of ≥ 80% had a median survival of 7 months and 18 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Visceral metastases were present in 12/41 patients with hormone-refractory tumor at the time of spinal surgery, and their median survival was 4 months-as compared to 10 months in patients without visceral metastases (p = 0.003). Complications within 30 days of surgery occurred in 19/54 patients. Interpretation Our results indicate that patients with hormone-naive disease, and those with hormone-refractory disease with good performance status and lacking visceral metastases, may be helped by surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression.

  • 16.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Hörnberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lerner, Ulf H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Tieva, Åse
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nuclear androgen receptor staining in bone metastases is related to a poor outcome in prostate cancer patients2010In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 885-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Androgen receptors (ARs) are probably of importance during all phases of prostate cancer (PC) growth, but their role in bone metastases is largely unexplored. Bone metastases were therefore collected from hormone-naive (n=11), short-term castrated (n=7) and castration-resistant PC (CRPC, n=44) patients by biopsy (n=4) or at surgery to alleviate symptoms from metastases complications (metastasis surgery, n=58), and immunostained for nuclear ARs, Ki67, active caspase-3, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and chromogranin A, and results were related to serum PSA, treatments and outcome. Nuclear AR immunostaining was decreased and apoptosis was increased, but cell proliferation remained largely unaffected in metastases within a few days after surgical castration. In CRPC patients, nuclear AR staining of metastases was increased when compared to short-term castrated patients. The nuclear AR staining score was related to tumour cell proliferation, but it was not associated with other downstream effects of AR activation such as apoptosis and PSA staining, and it was only marginally related to the presence of neuroendocrine tumour cells. Serum PSA at metastasis surgery, although related to outcome, was not associated with AR staining, markers of metastasis growth or PSA staining in metastases. High nuclear AR immunostaining was associated with a particularly poor prognosis after metastasis surgery in CRPC patients, suggesting that such men may benefit from the potent AR blockers now tested in clinical trials.

  • 17.
    Crnalic, Sead
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Hildingsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Predicting survival for surgery of metastatic spinal cord compression in prostate cancer: a new score2012In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 37, no 26, p. 2168-2176Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design. We retrospectively analyzed prognostic factors for survival in prostate cancer patients operated for metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Objective. The aim was to obtain a clinical score for prediction of survival after surgery.

    Summary of background data. Survival prognosis is important when deciding about treatment of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The criteria for identifying prostate cancer patients who may benefit from surgical treatment are unclear.

    Patients and methods The study comprised 68 consecutive patients with prostate cancer operated for metastatic spinal cord compression at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden. The indication for surgery was neurological deficit; 53 patients had hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and 15 patients had previously untreated, hormone-naïve prostate cancer. In 42 patients posterior decompression was performed and 26 patients were operated with posterior decompression and stabilization.

    Results A new score for prediction of survival was developed based on the results of survival analyses. The score includes: hormone status of prostate cancer, Karnofsky performance status, evidence of visceral metastasis, and preoperative serum PSA. The total scores ranged from 0 to 6. Three prognostic groups were formulated: group A (n = 32) with scores 0-1; group B (n = 23) with scores 2-4, and group C (n = 12) with scores 5-6. The median overall survival was 3 (0.3 - 20) months in group A, 16 (1.8 - 59) months in group B, and in group C more than half (7 of 12) of patients were still alive.

    Conclusion We present a new prognostic score for predicting survival of prostate cancer patients after surgery for metastatic spinal cord compression. The score is easy to apply in clinical practice and may be used as additional support when making decision about treatment.

  • 18.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Franzen, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    The risk of secondary cancers in patients treated for prostate carcinoma: an analysis with competition dose response model2009In: IFMBE Proceedings, Berlin: Springer , 2009, p. 237-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk for radiation-induced cancers has become increasingly important as patient survival following radiotherapy has increased due to the advent of new methods for early detection and advanced treatment. Attempts have been made to quantify the risk of cancer that may be associated with various treatment approaches, but the accuracy of predictions is rather low due to the influence of many confouding factors. It is the aim of this paper to investigate the impact of dose heterogeneity and inter-patient anatomical heterogeneity that may be encountered in a population of patients undergoing radiotheray and are thought to influence risk predictions. Dose volume histograms from patients treated with radiation for the carcinoma of the prostate have been used to calculate the risk for secondary malignancies using a competition dose-response model previously developed. Biologically-relevant parameters derived from clinical and experimental data have been used for the model. The results suggested that dose heterogeneity plays an important role in predicting the risk for secondary cancer and that it should be taken into account throught the use of dose volume histograms. Consequently, dose-response relationships derived for uniform relationships should be used with care to predict the risk for secondary malignancies in heterogeneously irradiated tissues. Inter-patient differences could lead to considerable uncertainties in the shape of the relationship between predicted risk and average tissue dose, as seen in epidemiological studies. They also lead to rather weak correlations between the risk for secondary malignancies and target volumes. The results stress the importance of taking into account the details of the clinical delivery of dose in radiotherapy plan evaluation or for retrospective analyses of the induction of secondary cancers. Nevertheless, the levels of risks are generally low and they could be regarded as teh price of success for the advances in the radiotherapy of the prostate.

  • 19.
    Dasu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Dasu, Iuliana
    Franzén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    The risk for secondary cancers in patients treated for prostate carcinoma: an analysis with completion dose response model2009In: IFMBE Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, September 7 - 12, 2009, Munich, Germany / [ed] Olaf Dössel, Wolfgang C. Schlegel, Springer Verlag , 2009, p. 237-240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk for radiation-induced cancers has become increasingly important as patient survival following radiotherapy has increased due to the advent of new methods for early detection and advanced treatment. Attempts have been made to quantify the risk of cancer that may be associated with various treatment approaches, but the accuracy of predictions is rather low due to the influence of many confounding factors. It is the aim of this paper to investigate the impact of dose heterogeneity and inter-patient anatomical heterogeneity that may be encountered in a population of patients undergoing radiotherapy and are thought to influence risk predictions. Dose volume histograms from patients treated with radiation for the carcinoma of the prostate have been used to calculate the risk for secondary malignancies using a competition dose-response model previously developed. Biologically-relevant parameters derived from clinical and experimental data have been used for the model. The results suggested that dose heterogeneity plays an important role in predicting the risk for secondary cancer and that it should be taken into account through the use of dose volume histograms. Consequently, dose-response relationships derived for uniform relationships should be used with care to predict the risk for secondary malignancies in heterogeneously irradiated tissues. Inter-patient differences could lead to considerable uncertainties in the shape of the relationship between predicted risk and average tissue dose, as seen in epidemiological studies. They also lead to rather weak correlations between the risk for secondary malignancies and target volumes. The results stress the importance of taking into account the details of the clinical delivery of dose in radiotherapy for treatment plan evaluation or for retrospective analyses of the induction of secondary cancers. Nevertheless, the levels of risks are generally low and they could be regarded as the price of success for the advances in the radiotherapy of the prostate.

  • 20.
    Daşu, Alexandru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Toma-Daşu, Iuliana
    Franzén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Secondary malignancies from prostate cancer radiation treatment: a risk analysis of the influence of target margins and fractionation patterns2011In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 738-746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results have shown the complex interplay between the risk for secondary malignancies, the details of the treatment delivery, and the patient heterogeneity that may influence comparisons between the long-term effects of various treatment techniques. Nevertheless, absolute risk levels seem very small and comparable to mortality risks from surgical interventions, thus supporting the robustness of radiation therapy as a successful treatment modality for prostate carcinomas.

  • 21.
    Djusberg, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundberg, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    High Levels of the AR-V7 Splice Variant and Co-Amplification of the Golgi Protein Coding YIPF6 in AR Amplified Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases2017In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 77, no 6, p. 625-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The relation between androgen receptor (AR) gene amplification and other mechanisms behind castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), such as expression of constitutively active AR variants and steroid-converting enzymes has been poorly examined. Specific aim was to examine AR amplification in PC bone metastases and to explore molecular and functional consequences of this, with the long-term goal of identifying novel molecular targets for treatment. METHODS: Gene amplification was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in cryo-sections of clinical PC bone metastases (n = 40) and by PCR-based copy number variation analysis. Whole genome mRNA expression was analyzed using H12 Illumina Beadchip arrays and specific transcript levels were quantified by qRT-PCR. Protein localization was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The YIPF6 mRNA expression was transiently knocked down and stably overexpressed in the 22Rv1 cell line as representative for CRPC, and effects on cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion were determined in vitro. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) were isolated from cell cultures using size-exclusion chromatography and enumerated by nanoparticle tracking analysis. Protein content was identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. Blood coagulation was measured as activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Functional enrichment analysis was performed using the MetaCore software. RESULTS: AR amplification was detected in 16 (53%) of the bone metastases examined from CRPC patients (n = 30), and in none from the untreated patients (n = 10). Metastases with AR amplification showed high AR and AR-V7 mRNA levels, increased nuclear AR immunostaining, and co-amplification of genes such as YIPF6 in the AR proximity at Xq12. The YIPF6 protein was localized to the Golgi apparatus. YIPF6 overexpression in 22Rv1 cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation and colony formation, and in enhanced EV secretion. EVs from YIPF6 overproducing 22Rv1 cells were enriched for proteins involved in blood coagulation and, accordingly, decreased the APTT in a dose-dependent fashion. CONCLUSIONS: AR amplified CRPC bone metastases show high AR-V7 expression that probably gives resistance to AR-targeting drugs. Co-amplification of the Golgi protein coding YIPF6 gene with the AR may enhance the secretion of pro-coagulative EVs from cancer cells and thereby stimulate tumor progression and increase the coagulopathy risk in CRPC patients.

  • 22. Fossa, Sophie D.
    et al.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Klepp, Olbjørn Harald
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Angelsen, Anders
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Ten-and 15-year prostate cancer-specific survival in patients with nonmetastatic high-risk prostate cancer randomized to lifelong hormone treatment alone or combined with radiotherapy (SPCG VII)2014In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 32, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After a median observation time of 7.6 years, Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group VII randomized trial showed a significant 12% reduction of prostate cancer-specific mortality in patients with locally advanced or histologically aggressive prostate cancer who received three months of total androgen blockade followed by radiotherapy and continuous antiandrogen therapy compared to patients with hormonal treatment only (Widmark et al :Lancet [2009]; 373,1174). Here we provide the 10 (15)-year survival results after a median observation time of 10.7 years. Methods: Between February 1996 and December 2002, 875 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized (Randomization ratio 1:1). Primary endpoint was prostate cancer-specific survival analyzed by intention to treat. This updated analysis is based on death registry data of the Norwegian patients (2/3 of the population), and on data recorded in CRF database available for the Swedish patients. A Swedish death registry analysis is underway, and will be included in the final analysis at the meeting. Results: Prostate cancer death occurred in 118 out of 439 of the antiandrogen treatment group and in 45 out of 436 men in the combination treatment group (p< 0.0001), with death due to any cause in 210 out of 439 and 161 out of 436 men (p=0.0006), respectively. The 10 (15) year cumulative prostate cancer-specific mortality was more than halved after combined treatment: 18.9% (30.7%) and 8.3% (12.4%) (HR=0.35;[p<4.1E-10 for 15 year results]), and overall mortality was 35.3% (56.7%) and 26.4% (43.4%) (HR=0.70; P=0.0006 for 15 year results), respectively. Conclusions: Addition of local radiotherapy to hormonal treatment in patients with non-metastatic locally advanced or high-risk prostate cancer more than halved the 10 and 15 year prostate cancer-specific mortality and substantially decreased overall mortality.

  • 23. Fossa, Sophie D.
    et al.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Klepp, Olbjorn
    Angelsen, Anders
    Solberg, Arne
    Dumber, Jan-Erik
    Hoyer, Morten
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Ten- and 15-yr Prostate Cancer-specific Mortality in Patients with Nonmetastatic Locally Advanced or Aggressive Intermediate Prostate Cancer, Randomized to Lifelong Endocrine Treatment Alone or Combined with Radiotherapy: Final Results of The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-72016In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 684-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), no study with observation times beyond 10 yr has demonstrated survival improvement after addition of prostatic radiotherapy (RAD) to endocrine treatment (ET) alone. Objective: To compare mortality rates in patients receiving ET alone versus ET + RAD. Design, settings, and participants: From 1996 to 2002, 875 Scandinavian patients with high-risk (90%) or intermediate PCa were randomized to ET or ET + RAD (The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7). After 3 mo with total androgen blockade in all patients, all individuals continued lifelong antiandrogen monotherapy. Those randomized to ET + RAD started prostate radiotherapy (70 Gy) at 3 mo. Outcome, measurements and statistical analysis: PCa-specific 15-yr mortality represented the primary endpoint. Assessment of the combination treatment effect and prognostic factors was performed in competing risk analyses and Cox proportional-hazard models. Intervention: RAD added to ET. Results and limitations: With a median observation time of 12 yr, the 15-yr PCa-specific mortality rates were 34% (95% confidence interval, 29-39%) and 17% (95% confidence interval, 13-22%) in the ET and ET + RAD arms respectively (p < 0.001). Compared with the ET arm, the median overall survival in the ET + RAD arm was prolonged by 2.4 yr. Treatment with ET alone, age >= 65 yr and increasing histology grade independently increased the risk of PCa-specific and overall mortality. Limitations include nonformal evaluation of comorbidity, the inability to calculate progression-free survival, and lack of information about salvage therapy and toxicity. Conclusions: In patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced or aggressive PCa, ET + RAD reduces the absolute risk of PCa-specific death by 17% at 15 yr compared with ET alone; the comparable 15-yr PCa-specific mortality rates being 17% and 34%. The results warrant a phase 3 study comparing ET + RAD with radical prostatectomy in high-risk PCa. Patient summary: Adding prostatic therapy to lifelong antiandrogen therapy halves the absolute risk of death from prostate cancer from 34% to 17% 15 yr after diagnosis. 

  • 24.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergström, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Löfroth, Per-Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Five-year prospective patient evaluation of bladder and bowel symptoms after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer with the Beamcath (R) technique2006In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 430-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Late side effects were prospectively evaluated up to 5 years after dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and were compared with a previously treated series with conventional conformal technique.

    Methods and Materials: Bladder and bowel symptoms were prospectively evaluated with the Prostate Cancer Symptom Scale (PCSS) questionnaire up to 5 years posttreatment. In all, 257 patients completed the questionnaire 5 years posttreatment. A total of 168 patients were treated with the conformal technique at doses <71 Gy, and 195 were treated with the dose-escalated stereotactic BeamCath® technique comprising three dose levels: 74 Gy (n = 68), 76 Gy (n = 74), and 78 Gy (n = 53).

    Results: For all dose groups analyzed together, 5 years after treatment, urinary starting problems decreased and urinary incontinence increased in comparison to baseline values. No increase in other bladder symptoms or frequency was detected. When comparing dose groups after 5 years, both the 74-Gy and 78-Gy groups reported increased urinary starting problems compared with patients given the conventional dose (<71 Gy). No increased incontinence was seen in the 76-Gy or the 78-Gy groups. Bowel symptoms were slightly increased during the follow-up period in comparison to baseline. Dose escalation with stereotactic EBRT (74–78 Gy) did not increase gastrointestinal late side effects after 5 years in comparison to doses <71 Gy.

    Conclusion: Dose-escalated EBRT with the BeamCath® technique with doses up to 78 Gy is tolerable, and the toxicity profile is similar to that observed with conventional doses <71 Gy.

  • 25.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Department of Urology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tomic, Radisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Modig, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Department of Urology, Boden Hospital, Boden, Sweden.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Quality of life and symptoms in a randomized trial of radiotherapy versus deferred treatment of localized prostate carcinoma2001In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 92, no 12, p. 3111-3119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of localized prostate carcinoma (LPC) using radiotherapy (RT) can induce disturbances in a patient's quality of life (QOL) and urinary and intestinal function. Late symptoms and QOL were evaluated in a randomized trial between RT and deferred treatment (DT).

    METHODS: Quality of life was evaluated with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer's QLQ-C30 (+3) formula. Urinary and intestinal problems were evaluated with a validated symptom specific self-assessment questionnaire, QUFW94. The questionnaires were sent to 108 randomized patients with LPC and to an age-matched control group (n = 68). Mean age was 72 years. Mean total dose was 65 grays (Gy; 62.3-70 Gy). The median follow-up time from randomization was 40.6 months for the RT group and 30.4 months for the DT group.

    RESULTS: Social functioning was the only QOL scale in which a significant difference was found between the two patient groups and compared with the control group. Multivariate regression analysis showed that hematuria, incontinence, mucus, and planning of daily activities in response to intestinal problems caused this decrease in QOL in the RT group. A significant increase of intestinal problems was observed in the RT versus DT groups regarding mucus, stool leakage, intestinal blood, and planning of daily activity in response to intestinal problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: The RT patients showed increased levels of minor intestinal side effects compared with the DT patients and the controls, but the RT patients reported no decreased QOL except for decreased social functioning. This could be because this group developed coping skills or because of a low magnitude of side effects to influence the QOL.

  • 26.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Health-related quality of life 10 years after external beam radiotherapy or watchful waiting in patients with localized prostate cancer2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 119-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate long-term randomized comparisons of patient-reported outcome of symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in men with localized prostate cancer 10 years after external beam radiotherapy (RT) or watchful waiting (WW). Material and methods. Three-year HRQoL and specific symptoms in surviving patients recruited between 1986 and 1996 were previously evaluated in a randomized trial; definitive RT versus WW. Two questionnaires were used: the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the Prostate Cancer Symptom Scale (PCSS). The present study is a prolonged follow-up with the same cohorts. Results. Fifty-four of 72 eligible patients (75%) returned the questionnaires at the present follow-up. The median age was 77 years in the RT group and 78 years in the WW group. The median follow-up time from randomization was 10 years. No differences in HRQoL or bowel symptoms were measured between the RT and WW. Cognitive (RT) and physical function (WW) decreased between 4 years and 10years. Weak urinary stream differed between the RT and WW groups. Fatigue and nocturia were increased in the RT group, and erections decreased in the WW patients over time. No difference in erectile function was seen between the RT and WW groups (p=0.292). Conclusion. The pattern of urinary and bowel symptoms and sexual function was rather similar, independent of RT or WW. Treatment with RT had minimal influence on HRQoL, in comparison with that of WW, at 10-year follow-up.

  • 27.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lund, Jo-Asmund
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Klepp, Olbjörn
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Fosså, Sophie
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Quality of life in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer given endocrine treatment with or without radiotherapy: 4-year follow-up of SPCG-7/SFUO-3, an open-label, randomised, phase III trial.2009In: The Lancet Oncology, ISSN 1470-2045, E-ISSN 1474-5488, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 370-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Androgen treatment for prostate cancer can adversely affect functional domains of quality of life. We aimed to assess quality of life in men with locally advanced prostate cancer in an open-label phase III randomised comparison between lifelong endocrine treatment with and without radiotherapy.

    METHODS: We obtained quality-of-life information from 872 (99%) of 875 eligible men with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3; 78%) who were randomly assigned, between 1996 and 2002, to 3 months of total androgen blockade followed by continuous endocrine treatment (439 patients) or the same hormonal treatment with radiotherapy 3 months after randomisation (436 patients). Prospective outcomes included patient-reported symptoms and quality of life assessed with questionnaires from baseline to 4 years after randomisation. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an international standard randomised controlled trial, number ISRCTN01534787.

    FINDINGS: 438 of 439 men assigned endocrine treatment and 434 of 436 assigned endocrine plus radiotherapy completed at least one questionnaire. Missing data at baseline and during follow-up was equally distributed between groups. At 4 years, 64 (18%) of 353 patients on combined therapy and 39 (12%) of 337 on endocrine-alone therapy had moderate to severe urinary bother (p=0.005), and 16 (4%) of 355 on combined therapy and five (2%) of 338 on endocrine treatment alone had pain while urinating (p=0.024). 37 (11%) of 350 in the combined group and 23 (7%) of 35 in the endocrine-only group had overall bother from all bowel symptoms (p=0.022). 281 (85%) of 332 in the combined-treatment group and 227 (72%) of 313 in the endocrine-only group had erectile dysfunction (p=0.0002). Quality of life at 4 years was similar, with the exception of decreased social function in patients receiving endocrine treatment plus radiotherapy.

    INTERPRETATION: Although addition of radiotherapy to endocrine treatment significantly increased some treatment-related symptoms, none were serious. Given the substantial survival benefit of combined treatment, the increase of symptoms seems acceptable and has little extra effect on quality of life after 4 years compared with endocrine treatment alone.

  • 28.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Olofsson, Sebastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Patient-reported gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity after prostate cancer treatment: A comparison between radiotherapy including pelvic nodes and prostate-only radiotherapy2015In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 33, no 7 SArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To evaluate side effects of radiotherapy (RT) including the pelvic nodes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: 143 patients with high risk prostate cancer (Pca) receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) was matched to a group of 142 patients receiving RT towards the prostate and seminal vesicles only (PORT). Both groups were given 78 Gy towards the prostate and 50 Gy towards the seminal vesicles. The WPRT group also received 50 Gy towards the pelvic nodes. WPRT was given with intensity modulated RT or volumetric modulated arc therapy technique and the group treated towards the prostate and seminal vesicles only was treated with 3-dimensional conformal RT. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects were evaluated with patient-reported questionnaires and with the RTOG scale, scored by treating physician, at baseline and one-year after RT. Results: Overall the side effects were mild. At one-year follow up there were significant differences regarding morning urgency, mucus- and blood in stool between the two groups (Table 1). The WPRT group expressed lesser complications in all of these cases. In the RTOG GU and GI scores there were no differences between the groups. About 20% had RTOG grade 2 GU score and 2%/1% had RTOG grade 3 score in the PORT and WPRT groups, respectively. The numbers for RTOG grade 2 GI scores were 11% and 5% in the PORT and WPRT groups, respectively. None of the groups reported RTOG grade 3 GI symptoms. Conclusions: Whole pelvic RT can be done with a very satisfying profile of side effects. Sometimes even lesser gastrointestinal reported side effects are seen with the newer techniques compared to prostate only radiotherapy with older techniques.

  • 29.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tavelin, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Reliability and responsiveness of a prostate cancer questionnaire for radiotherapy-induced side effects2001In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few self-assessment cancer-specific questionnaires / modules have yet been developed for radiotherapy-induced side effects. The aim of the present study was to test the reliability and responsiveness of a prostate cancer (PC)specific questionnaire. Thirty-one patients with PC graded their urinary and intestinal symptoms and their sexual function on the questionnaire. A doctor and a nurse performed a structured interview and graded the patient's symptoms with the same questions. The procedure was performed at both the start and the end of the treatment. A high concordance regarding symptom detection was seen between the patient, nurse and the doctor. The inter-rater test shows intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values above 0.60 in all scales. The internal reliability exceeded the lower limit (Cronbach alpha > 0.70) for all scales. The test-retest gave acceptable reliability for all scales (ICC greater than or equal to 0.60). All scales indicated increased problems during radiotherapy. The questionnaire was proven to be valid for the evaluations of urinary and intestinal problems and for sexual function in PC patients.

  • 30.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    15-year prospective follow-up of patient-reported outcomes of late bowel toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A comparison with age-matched controls2007In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 517-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously described patient-reported outcomes of late side effects induced by conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), 4 and 8 years after treatment, in 181 patients with localized prostate cancer compared with 141 age-matched controls. In the present study, we compare bowel side effects 15 years after EBRT with the same controls, and with the results of our previous 4-year and 8-year follow-ups. Of the 181 patients and 141 controls at the 4-year follow-up, 45 patients (25%) and 79 controls (56%) were still alive at the 15-year follow-up. Bowel symptoms were assessed using the symptom-specific questionnaire Prostate Cancer Symptom Scale (PCSS), which was sent to these 45 patients and 79 age-matched controls with a mean follow-up time of 15 years (162–197 months) after EBRT. The answer frequency was 64% in the patient group and 52% in the control group. The mean age was 78 years in both groups. At the 15-year follow-up, 39% of the patients and 84% of the controls reported no bowel problems (p <0.001), while 16% of the patients and 0% of the controls reported “Quite a few/many” problems with mucus in the stools (p <0.001). “Quite a bit/much” stool leakage was reported by 20% of the patients at the 15-year follow-up, in comparison to 4% of the patients at the 4-year follow-up (ns). The proportion of patients reporting late bowel symptoms was unchanged 15 years after EBRT in comparison to the 4-year follow-up. Increased bowel symptoms were seen in patients in comparison to the age-matched controls.

  • 31.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Does one have a sexual life 15 years after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer? Prospective patient-reported outcome of sexual function comparison with age-matched controls2011In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 137-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: We previously published research on 4- and 8-year follow-ups of patient-reported sexual function after conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer (LPC) compared with age-matched controls. The current study is a prolonged 15-year follow-up with the same cohorts.

    Material and methods: The cohort consisted of 29 men surviving from a group of 181 men treated between 1986 and 1989, and who were reported on previously. Of the originally reported 141 controls, 62 were eligible and 34 completed the questionnaires. Sexual function was assessed using two questionnaires, Prostate Cancer Symptom Scale (PCSS) and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5).

    Results: Twenty-three patients (78%) and 13 controls (38%) were not sexually active. None of the patients and 14 controls had enough of an erection to perform intercourse. Seventeen patients (94%) and 14 controls (64%) had severe erectile dysfunction. Patients with clinical progression and who had received hormone treatment had decreased sexual desire. No significant differences were measured between patients without progression/hormone treatment and the controls.

    Conclusion: The sexual activity 15 years after EBRT for LPC was very low, as was the probability of achieving an erection. Patients with a progressive disease and treated with hormones reported worse sexual and erectile function. The LPC free men showed higher sexual activity, lower sexual bother, and better erectile function than the patients.

  • 32.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Late side effects unchanged 4-8 years after radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma: A comparison with age-matched controls1999In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 678-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. The authors of this study previously evaluated pelvic irradiation-induced late side effects in patients with localized prostatic carcinoma 4 years after external irradiation by administering a validated self-assessment questionnaire (QUFW94), and compared the results with those of age-matched controls. The current study was designed to evaluate prospectively the patients' problems 8 years after radiotherapy and to compare them with those reported by the same controls. METHODS. The questionnaire was sent out at a mean of 8 years (range, 72-104 months) after irradiation to 120 patients and 125 controls. For analysis of sexual function, the patient group was divided into two subgroups, one treated with radiotherapy only (RT) and one group treated with radiotherapy plus castration (RT+A). A value of >1 on a 0-10 scale indicated that the patient was having a problem. RESULTS, The mean age was 73 years for both patients and controls. No changes in urinary problems were seen between the 4-year and the 8-year follow-up in the 2 groups. Sixty percent and 54% of the patients (P = 0.096) and 24% and 31% of the controls (P = 0.988) reported urinary problems at the 4-year and 8-year follow-ups, respectively. No changes in gastrointestinal late side effects in the patient group were seen between the 4-year (65%) and the 8-year (62%) follow-ups (P = 0.490). However, there was a decrease in intestinal problems in the control group between the 4-year (12%) and the 8-year (9%) follow-ups (P = 0.001). The sexual problems did not change during the two periods, in the patient groups or in the control groups. Fifty-six percent and 65% of the RT group (P = 0.052), 67% and 54% of the RT + A group (P = 0.555), and 27% and 33% of the control group (P = 0.243) indicated some kind of sexual problem at the 4-year and 8-year follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS. The amount of pelvic irradiation-induced urinary late side effects, intestinal late side effects, and sexual function, evaluated with a self-assessment questionnaire, did not change between 4 and 8 years after RT. The age-matched controls reported no change in urinary or sexual problems despite advanced age, but there was a reported decrease in intestinal problems, Cancer 1999;85:678-88. (C) 1999 American Cancer Society.

  • 33.
    Fransson, Per
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Self-assessed sexual function after pelvic irradiation for prostate carcinoma: Comparison with an age-matched control group1996In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 78, no 5, p. 1066-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. Treatment of localized prostate carcinoma is often accompanied by disturbances in sexual function. The patient's own opinion and experience with these problems can be of great importance for his quality of life. In men older than 50 years, disturbances in sexual function are common. Treatment such as radiotherapy (RT), which can induce sexual dysfunction, should be evaluated in relation to the problems in an age-matched population without prostate carcinoma. METHODS. Sexual function was evaluated with a self-assessment questionnaire using linear-analogue scales. The questionnaire was sent to 199 patients with prostate carcinoma, median age 71 years (range, 51-86 years), who had received pelvic RT with curative intent and to 200 age-matched men in northern Sweden. Mean follow-up time after RT was 48 months (range, 24-56 months). RESULTS. The response rate was high: 141 (71%) and 181 (91%) in the control and patient groups, respectively. Field reduction and treatment pause during RT was not associated with decreased problems in the patient groups. A failure to achieve erection was indicated in 12% of the control subjects, 56% of the patients who had received (RT only) and 87% of the RT + castration (RT + A) patients. In general, patients < 70 years treated with RT + A indicated more sexual problems than the RT only patients < 70 years. There was a strong negative correlation between age and sexual problems in the RT 9 A < 70 years group. However, in patients < 70 years, sexual activity after RT only, was not significantly different from the age-matched control population. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with prostate carcinoma treated with RT only indicated higher levels of sexual dysfunction than age-matched controls. This was most obvious in patients younger than 70 years, although their sexual activity was comparable to age-matched controls. The addition of castration to RT tended to increase sexual problems, especially in patients < 70 years. In men between 70 and 74 years, the maintenance of sexual function seems to be very susceptible to disturbances. For patients older than 74 years, decreased sexual function was not perceived as such a significant problem, despite abolished desire and erection. (C) 1996 American Cancer Society.

  • 34.
    Fridriksson, Jón O.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Folkvaljon, Yasin
    Nilsson, Per
    Robinson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Urology, Ryhov Hospital, J€onk€oping, Sweden.
    Franck-Lissbrant, Ingela
    Ehdaie, Behfar
    Eastham, James A.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Karlsson, Camilla T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology. Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Long-term adverse effects after curative radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy: population-based nationwide register study2016In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the risk of serious adverse effects after radiotherapy (RT) with curative intention and radical prostatectomy (RP).

    Materials and methods: Men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1997 and 2012 and underwent curative treatment were selected from the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden. For each included man, five prostate cancer-free controls, matched for birth year and county of residency, were randomly selected. In total, 12,534 men underwent RT, 24,886 underwent RP and 186,624 were controls. Adverse effects were defined according to surgical and diagnostic codes in the National Patient Registry. The relative risk (RR) of adverse effects up to 12 years after treatment was compared to controls and the risk was subsequently compared between RT and RP in multivariable analyses.

    Results: Men with intermediate- and localized high-risk cancer who underwent curative treatment had an increased risk of adverse effects during the full study period compared to controls: the RR of undergoing a procedures after RT was 2.64 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.56–2.73] and after RP 2.05 (95% CI 2.00–2.10). The risk remained elevated 10–12 years after treatment. For all risk categories of prostate cancer, the risk of surgical procedures for urinary incontinence was higher after RP (RR 23.64, 95% CI 11.71–47.74), whereas risk of other procedures on the lower urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract or abdominal wall was higher after RT (RR 1.67, 95% CI 1.44–1.94, and RR 1.86, 95% CI 1.70–2.02, respectively).

    Conclusion: The risk of serious adverse effects after curative treatment for prostate cancer remained significantly elevated up to 12 years after treatment.

  • 35. Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn
    et al.
    Kjellen, Elisabeth
    Hagberg, Oskar
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Nilsson, Per
    Change in prostate volume during extreme hypo-fractionation analysed with MRI2014In: Radiation Oncology, ISSN 1748-717X, E-ISSN 1748-717X, Vol. 9, p. 22-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypo-fractionated external beam radiotherapy with narrow CTV-PTV margins is increasingly applied for prostate cancer. This demands a precise target definition and knowledge on target location and extension during treatment. It is unclear how increase in fraction size affects changes in prostate volume during treatment. Our aim was to study prostate volume changes during extreme hypo-fractionation (7 x 6.1 Gy) by using sequential MRIs. Methods: Twenty patients treated with extreme hypo-fractionation were recruited from an on-going prospective randomized phase III trial. An MRI scan was done before start of treatment, at mid treatment and at the end of radiotherapy. The prostate was delineated at each MRI and the volume and maximum extension in left-right, anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions were measured. Results: There was a significant increase in mean prostate volume (14%) at mid treatment as compared to baseline. The prostate volume remained enlarged (9%) at the end of radiotherapy. Prostate swelling was most pronounced in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusions: Extreme hypo-fractionation induced a significant prostate swelling during treatment that was still present at the time of last treatment fraction. Our results indicate that prostate swelling is an important factor to take into account when applying treatment margins during short extreme hypo-fractionation, and that tight margins should be applied with caution.

  • 36.
    Halin Bergström, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Adamo, Hanibal
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0157280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RTPCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1(+) macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1(+) macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1(+) macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1(+) macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1(+) macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  • 37. Harmenberg, Ulrika
    et al.
    Hamdy, Freddie C
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lennernäs, Bo
    Nilsson, Sten
    Curative radiation therapy in prostate cancer.2011In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no Suppl 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiotherapy has experienced an extremely rapid development in recent years. Important improvements such as the introduction of multileaf collimators and computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning software have enabled three dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3DCRT). The development of treatment planning systems and technology for brachytherapy has been very rapid as well. Development of accelerators with integrated on-board imaging equipment and technology, for example image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has further improved the precision with reduced margins to adjacent normal tissues. This has, in turn, led to the possibility to administer even higher doses to the prostate than previously. Although radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy have been used for the last decades as curative treatment modalities, still there are no randomized trials published comparing these two options. Outcome data show that the two treatment modalities are highly comparable when used for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  • 38.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing.
    Tomic, Radisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Living after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.: A qualitative analysis of patient narratives.2005In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 679-686Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hedestig, Oliver
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Meanings of prostate-specific antigen testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer after primary treatment2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To illuminate the meanings of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing as narrated by men with localized prostate cancer (LPC) after primary treatment.

    Material and methods: Fifteen men were interviewed in their homes. The narrative interview text was analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur.

    Results: Life after treatment for LPC means feeling unsafe because of being affected by a life-threatening and unpredictable disease, characterized by a lack of early signs of progression. In this situation, PSA testing is ascribed as providing a sense of control to enable one to achieve a feeling of safety. Thus one meaning of PSA testing is receiving a message about the status of the body; another is a tense waiting related to fear of the results. A low, stable PSA value is interpreted as a sense of being safe based on confidence in the PSA tests and a sense of having control over the LPC via regular PSA testing. A rising value of the PSA blood test is understood as an indication of progression of the disease, but confidence in PSA testing also means that when the PSA value rises there is a sense of catching the cancer in good time.

    Conclusions: The comprehensive understanding of the meaning of PSA testing can be understood in terms of a lifeline to cling to when wondering whether the cancer is still in progress in the body or whether the treatment has been curative. This lifeline creates a feeling of security in a post-treatment life situation which is experienced as being unsafe.

  • 40. Horti, József
    et al.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stenzl, Arnulf
    Federico, Miriam H
    Abratt, Raymond P
    Sanders, Nick
    Pover, Gillian M
    Bodrogi, István
    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study of vandetanib plus docetaxel/prednisolone in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.2009In: Cancer biotherapy & radiopharmaceuticals, ISSN 1557-8852, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 175-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vandetanib (ZACTIMA) is a once-daily oral anticancer drug that selectively inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and rearranged during transfection signaling. This randomized (1:1), double-blind study evaluated vandetanib (100 mg/day) or placebo in combination with docetaxel (D; 75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) and prednisolone (P; 2 x 5 mg/day) in 86 patients with metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (mHRPC). The primary assessment was prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response (confirmed reduction of >or=50% from baseline) and a greater number of patients showed a PSA response with placebo + DP (67%) versus vandetanib + DP (40%); hazard ratio = 2.23 (one-sided 80% confidence limit = 2.90; one-sided p = 0.99). More patients experienced progression events (disease progression or death from any cause) with vandetanib + DP (65%) versus placebo + DP (60%); hazard ratio = 1.13 (one-sided 80% confidence limit = 1.44; one-sided p = 0.67). The overall incidence of adverse events was similar in both groups, although more patients experienced adverse events, leading to permanent discontinuation with vandetanib + DP (28%) versus placebo + DP (12%). However, the safety and tolerability profile for vandetanib was similar to that previously reported; adverse events that occurred more frequently in the vandetanib + DP arm were hypertension (14% vs. 2%), erythematous rash (14% vs. 2%), and exfoliative rash (12% vs. 2%). In this study of patients with mHRPC, vandetanib + DP did not demonstrate any efficacy benefit, compared with placebo + DP.

  • 41.
    Hörnberg, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer bone metastases is associated with castration-resistance and short survival2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 4, p. e19059-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Constitutively active androgen receptor variants (AR-V) lacking the ligand binding domain (LBD) may promote  the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The expression of AR-Vs in the clinically most important metastatic site, the bone, has, however, not been well documented. Our aim was therefore to compare levels of AR-Vs in hormone-naive (HN) and CRPC bone metastases in comparison to primary PC and non-malignant prostate tissue, as well as in relation to AR protein expression, whole-genome transcription profiles and patient survival.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: Hormone-naı¨ve (n = 10) and CRPC bone metastases samples (n = 30) were obtained from  40 patients at metastasis surgery. Non-malignant and malignant prostate samples were acquired from 13 prostatectomized men. Levels of full length AR (ARfl) and AR-Vs termed AR-V1, AR-V7, and AR-V567es mRNA were measured with RT-PCR and whole-genome transcription profiles with an Illumina Beadchip array. Protein levels were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Transcripts for ARfl, AR-V1, and AR-V7 were detected in most primary tumors and metastases, and levels were significantly increased in CRPC bone metastases. The AR-V567es transcript was detected in 23% of the CRPC bone metastases only. A sub-group of CRPC bone metastases expressed LBD-truncated AR proteins at levels comparable to the ARfl. Detectable AR-V567es and/or AR-V7 mRNA in the upper quartile, seen in 1/3 of all CRPC bone metastases, was associated with a high nuclear AR immunostaining score, disturbed cell cycle regulation and short survival.

    Conclusions/Significance: Expression of AR-Vs is increased in CRPC compared to HN bone metastases and associated with a particularly poor prognosis. Further studies are needed to test if patients expressing such AR-Vs in their bone metastases benefit more from drugs acting on or down-stream of these AR-Vs than from therapies inhibiting androgen synthesis.

  • 42. Iglesias-Gato, Diego
    et al.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Mann, Matthias
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Flores-Morales, Amilcar
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The proteome of prostate cancer bone metastases2018In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 78, no 16, p. 91-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43. Iglesias-Gato, Diego
    et al.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tyanova, Stefka
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Santos, Alberto
    Lima, Thiago S.
    Geiger, Tamar
    Cox, Juergen
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Mann, Matthias
    Flores-Morales, Amilcar
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    The Proteome of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis Reveals Heterogeneity with Prognostic Implications2018In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 24, no 21, p. 5433-5444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Bone is the most predominant site of distant metastasis in prostate cancer, and patients have limited therapeutic options at this stage.

    Experimental Design: We performed a system-wide quantitative proteomic analysis of bone metastatic prostate tumors from 22 patients operated to relieve spinal cord compression. At the time of surgery, most patients had relapsed after androgen-deprivation therapy, while 5 were previously untreated. An extended cohort of prostate cancer bone metastases (n = 65) was used for immunohistochemical validation.

    Results: On average, 5,067 proteins were identified and quantified per tumor. Compared with primary tumors (n = 26), bone metastases were more heterogeneous and showed increased levels of proteins involved in cell-cycle progression, DNA damage response, RNA processing, and fatty acid b-oxidation; and reduced levels of proteins were related to cell adhesion and carbohydrate metabolism. Within bone metastases, we identified two phenotypic subgroups: BM1, expressing higher levels of AR canonical targets, and mitochondrial and Golgi apparatus resident proteins; and BM2, with increased expression of proliferation and DNA repair-related proteins. The two subgroups, validated by the inverse correlation between MCM3 and prostate specific antigen immunoreactivity, were related to disease prognosis, suggesting that this molecular heterogeneity should be considered when developing personalized therapies.

    Conclusions: This work is the first system-wide quantitative characterization of the proteome of prostate cancer bone metastases and a valuable resource for understanding the etiology of prostate cancer progression. (C) 2018 AACR.

  • 44. Iglesias-Gato, Diego
    et al.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Tyanova, Stefka
    Lavallee, Charlotte
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Carlsson, Jessica
    Hägglöf, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Cox, Juergen
    Andren, Ove
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Egevad, Lars
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bjartell, Anders
    Collins, Colin C.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Geiger, Tamar
    Mann, Matthias
    Flores-Morales, Amilcar
    The Proteome of Primary Prostate Cancer2016In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 942-952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical management of the prostate needs improved prognostic tests and treatment strategies. Because proteins are the ultimate effectors of most cellular reactions, are targets for drug actions and constitute potential biomarkers; a quantitative systemic overview of the proteome changes occurring during prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression can result in clinically relevant discoveries. Objectives: To study cellular processes altered in PCa using system-wide quantitative analysis of changes in protein expression in clinical samples and to identify prognostic biomarkers for disease aggressiveness. Design, setting, and participants: Mass spectrometry was used for genome-scale quantitative proteomic profiling of 28 prostate tumors (Gleason score 6-9) and neighboring nonmalignant tissue in eight cases, obtained from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostatectomy samples. Two independent cohorts of PCa patients (summing 752 cases) managed by expectancy were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of proneuropeptide-Y (pro-NPY) as a prognostic biomarker. Results and limitations: Over 9000 proteins were identified as expressed in the human prostate. Tumor tissue exhibited elevated expression of proteins involved in multiple anabolic processes including fatty acid and protein synthesis, ribosomal biogenesis and protein secretion but no overt evidence of increased proliferation was observed. Tumors also showed increased levels of mitochondrial proteins, which was associated with elevated oxidative phosphorylation capacity measured in situ. Molecular analysis indicated that some of the proteins overexpressed in tumors, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2, fatty acid transporter), coatomer protein complex, subunit alpha (COPA, vesicle secretion), and mitogen-and stress-activated protein kinase 1 and 2 (MSK1/2, protein kinase) regulate the proliferation of PCa cells. Additionally, pro-NPY was found overexpressed in PCa (5-fold, p < 0.05), but largely absent in other solid tumor types. Pro-NPY expression, alone or in combination with the ERG status of the tumor, was associated with an increased risk of PCa specific mortality, especially in patients with Gleason score <= 7 tumors. Conclusions: This study represents the first system-wide quantitative analysis of proteome changes associated to localized prostate cancer and as such constitutes a valuable resource for understanding the complex metabolic changes occurring in this disease. We also demonstrated that pro-NPY, a protein that showed differential expression between high and low risk tumors in our proteomic analysis, is also a PCa specific prognostic biomarker associated with increased risk for disease specific death in patients carrying low risk tumors. Patient summary: The identification of proteins whose expression change in prostate cancer provides novel mechanistic information related to the disease etiology. We hope that future studies will prove the value of this proteome dataset for development of novel therapies and biomarkers. 

  • 45.
    Jernberg, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Brattsand, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Lundberg, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Molecular features of prostate cancer bone metastases harboring androgen receptor gene amplificationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between AR amplification and other mechanisms behind castration-resistance in prostate cancer, such as increased expression of AR splice variants and steroid-converting enzymes in CRPC metastases, has been poorly examined. Specific aims of this study were therefore to examine AR amplification in hormone-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) bone metastases and to explore molecular and functional consequences of this, with the long-term goal of identifying molecular targets for treatment of CRPC bone metastases. AR amplification was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and verified in 16 (53 %) of the CRPC bone metastases (n=30), and in none of the untreated bone metastases (n=10). AR amplification was associated with increased expression of AR and its constitutively active AR-V7 splice variant as well as with co-amplification of genes in the AR proximity at Xq12, such as of YIPF6. Furthermore, gene expression pattern pointed at decreased osteoclast activity, and consequently decreased bone resorption and increased bone mineral density in AR amplified metastases. In conclusion, our results indicated a sclerotic phenotype in CRPC bone metastases with AR amplification that may be of both biological and clinical relevance. This is a novel hypothesis that requires to be thoroughly examined.

  • 46.
    Jernberg, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Rudolfsson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Characterization of prostate cancer bone metastases according to expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes and androgen receptor splice variants2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, p. e77407-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intra-tumoral steroidogenesis and constitutive androgen receptor (AR) activity have been associated withcastration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This study aimed to examine if CRPC bone metastases expressed higher levels ofsteroid-converting enzymes than untreated bone metastases. Steroidogenic enzyme levels were also analyzed in relation toexpression of constitutively active AR variants (AR-Vs) and to clinical and pathological variables.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: Untreated, hormone-naıve (HN, n = 9) and CRPC bone metastases samples (n = 45) wereobtained from 54 patients at metastasis surgery. Non-malignant and malignant prostate samples were acquired from 13prostatectomy specimens. Transcript and protein levels were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry andimmunoblotting. No differences in steroidogenic enzyme levels were detected between CRPC and HN bone metastases.Significantly higher levels of SRD5A1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, and HSD17B10 mRNA were however found in bone metastases thanin non-malignant and/or malignant prostate tissue, while the CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, SRD5A2, and HSD17B6 mRNAlevels in metastases were significantly lower. A sub-group of metastases expressed very high levels of AKR1C3, which wasnot due to gene amplification as examined by copy number variation assay. No association was found between AKR1C3expression and nuclear AR staining, tumor cell proliferation or patient outcome after metastases surgery. With only oneexception, high AR-V protein levels were found in bone metastases with low AKR1C3 levels, while metastases with highAKR1C3 levels primarily contained low AR-V levels, indicating distinct mechanisms behind castration-resistance in individualbone metastases.

    Conclusions/Significance: Induced capacity of converting adrenal-gland derived steroids into more potent androgens wasindicated in a sub-group of PC bone metastases. This was not associated with CRPC but merely with the advanced stage ofmetastasis. Sub-groups of bone metastases could be identified according to their expression levels of AKR1C3 and AR-Vs,which might be of relevance for patient response to 2nd line androgen-deprivation therapy.

  • 47.
    Karlsson, Terese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes from the Prostate Cancer Cell Line TRAMP-C1 Impair Osteoclast Formation and Differentiation2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 11, article id e0166284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal metastatic disease is a deleterious consequence of dissemination of tumor cells from numerous primary sites, such as prostate, lung and breast. Skeletal metastases are still incurable, resulting in development of clinical complications and decreased survival for cancer patients with metastatic disease. During the last decade, tumor cell-derived microvesicles have been identified and suggested to be involved in cancer disease progression. Whether cancer exosomes are involved in tumor and bone cell interactions in the metastatic site is still, however, a rather unexplored field. Here we show that exosomes isolated from the murine prostate cancer cell line TRAMP-C1 dramatically decrease fusion and differentiation of monocytic osteoclast precursors to mature, multinucleated osteoclasts. The presence of tumor cell-derived exosomes also clearly decreased the expression of established markers for osteoclast fusion and differentiation, including DC-STAMP, TRAP, cathepsin K, and MMP-9. In contrast, exosomes derived from murine fibroblastic cells did not affect osteoclast formation. Our findings suggest that exosomes released from tumor cells in the tumor-bone interface are involved in pathological regulation of bone cell formation in the metastatic site. This further strengthens the role of tumor cell-derived microvesicles in cancer progression and disease aggressiveness.

  • 48.
    Karlsson, Terese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sundar, Reshma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Osteoblast-derived factors promote metastatic potential in human prostate cancer cells, in part via non-canonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling2018In: The Prostate, ISSN 0270-4137, E-ISSN 1097-0045, Vol. 78, no 6, p. 446-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) functions as a double-edged sword in prostate cancer tumorigenesis. In initial stages of the disease, TGFβ acts as a growth inhibitor upon tumor cells, whereas it in later stages of disease rather promotes invasion and metastatic potential. One well-known cellular source of TGFβ in the bone metastatic site is the bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we have studied the effects by osteoblast-derived factors on metastatic potential in several human prostate cancer cell lines.

    Methods: Effects on metastatic potential in prostate cancer cells by osteoblast-derived factors were studied in vitro using several methods, including Transwell migration and evaluation of formation of pro-migratory protrusions. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate possible changes in differentiation state in tumor cells by analysis of markers for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The Matrigel-on-top 3D culture method was used for further assessment of metastatic characteristics in tumor cells by analysis of formation of filopodium-like protrusions (FLPs).

    Results: Osteoblast-derived factors increased migration of PC-3U cells, an effect less prominent in cells overexpressing a mutated type I TGFβ receptor (TβRI) preventing non-canonical TRAF6-dependent TGFβ signaling. Osteoblast-derived factors also increased the formation of long protrusions and loss of cell-cell contacts in PC-3U cells, suggesting induction of a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, treatment with TGFβ or osteoblast-derived factors of PC-3U cells in Matrigel-on-top 3D cultures promoted formation of FLPs, previously shown to be essential for metastatic establishment.

    Conclusions: These findings suggests that factors secreted from osteoblasts, including TGFβ, can induce several cellular traits involved in metastatic potential of PC-3U cells, further strengthening the role for bone cells to promote metastatic tumor cell behavior.

  • 49. Ladjevardi, Sam
    et al.
    Berglund, Anders
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Bratt, Ola
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Treatment with curative intent and survival in men with high-risk prostate cancer: A population-based study of 11 380 men with serum PSA level 20-100 ng/mL2013In: BJU International, ISSN 1464-4096, E-ISSN 1464-410X, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 381-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the influence of curative treatment on cause-specific mortality in men diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa) with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels between 20 and 100 ng/mL. Materials and Methods Patients with PCa (T1-4, N0/N1/NX, M0/MX), PSA 20-100 ng/mL and age <= 75 years were identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. Data on co-morbidity diagnoses were obtained from the National Patient Register and cause of death from the Cause of Death Register. Following adjustment for age at diagnosis, co-morbidity burden, Gleason score, T-category, PSA level and cause-specific mortality in relation to treatment were estimated using Cox regression analysis. Result A total of 11 380 men were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2008 and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The cumulative 10-year PCa-specific mortality was 36% for patients receiving only palliative treatment and 13% for those treated with curative intent. For the 8462 (74%) patients with PSA levels from 20 to 50 ng/mL at diagnosis, the hazard ratio for death from PCa was 0.23 (95% confidence interval 0.19-0.27) for those treated with curative intent compared with those given palliative treatment after adjusting for age, co-morbidity, T category, PSA level and Gleason score. The corresponding hazard ratio was 0.22 (95% confidence interval 0.17-0.30) for patients with PSA levels from 51 to 100 ng/mL. Conclusion Treatment with curative intent for men with high-risk PCa was associated with reduced cause-specific mortality and should be considered even when serum PSA exceeds 20 ng/mL. Keywords prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen, high-risk tumours, curative treatment, palliative treatment, population-based study

  • 50.
    Lindqvist, Olav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Experiences of symptoms in men with hormone refractory prostate cancer and skeletal metastases.2008In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 283-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced prostate cancer with skeletal metastases entails significant symptoms from both treatment and the disease itself. Although the diagnosis is a common one, knowledge of the symptom experience late in the disease trajectory is limited. The aim of the present study was to describe the experience of physical symptoms in men with hormone refractory prostate cancer and skeletal metastases. Twenty men answered a quality of life questionnaire before participating in semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative description. Findings show that the dominant symptoms were lack of energy and pain. Interestingly when talking about lacking energy the men described three different variants; lack of mental energy or initiative, lack of strength and stamina, and tiredness or sleepiness. Also, three different types of pain were described; pain from skeletal metastases, a diffuse moving pain, and pain not directly caused by the prostate cancer. Though a majority of the men scored being dissatisfied with their sex life; in the interviews, this was not described as a major distress. The findings also showed that the men experienced different symptoms despite the same diagnosis, skeletal metastases, stage, and androgen deprivation treatment, and that these symptoms are not necessarily experienced as problems or causing distress.

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