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  • 1.
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ahnlund, Maria
    Moritz, Thomas
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    UHPLC-ESI/TOFMS Determination of Salicylate-like Phenolic Gycosides in Populus tremula Leaves2011In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, ISSN 0098-0331, E-ISSN 1573-1561, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 857-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associations of salicylate-like phenolic glycosides (PGs) with biological activity have been reported in Salix and Populus trees, but only for a few compounds, and in relation to a limited number of herbivores. By considering the full diversity of PGs, we may improve our ability to recognize genotypes or chemotype groups and enhance our understanding of their ecological function. Here, we present a fast and efficient general method for salicylate determination in leaves of Eurasian aspen that uses ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI/TOFMS). The time required for the liquid chromatography separations was 13.5 min per sample, compared to around 60 min per sample for most HPLC protocols. In leaf samples from identical P. tremula genotypes with diverse propagation and treatment histories, we identified nine PGs. We found the compound-specific mass chromatograms to be more informative than the UV-visible chromatograms for compound identification and when quantitating samples with large variability in PG content. Signature compounds previously reported for P. tremoloides (tremulacin, tremuloidin, salicin, and salicortin) always were present, and five PGs (2'-O-cinnamoyl-salicortin, 2'-O-acetyl-salicortin, 2'-O-acetyl-salicin, acetyl-tremulacin, and salicyloyl-salicin) were detected for the first time in P. tremula. By using information about the formic acid adduct that appeared for PGs in the LTQ-Orbitrap MS environment, novel compounds like acetyl-tremulacin could be tentatively identified without the use of standards. The novel PGs were consistently either present in genotypes regardless of propagation and damage treatment or were not detectable. In some genotypes, concentrations of 2'-O-acetyl-salicortin and 2'-O-cinnamoyl-salicortin were similar to levels of biologically active PGs in other Salicaceous trees. Our study suggests that we may expect a wide variation in PG content in aspen populations which is of interest both for studies of interactions with herbivores and for mapping population structure.

  • 2. Agostinelli, Marta
    et al.
    Cleary, Michelle
    Martin, Juan A.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Witzell, Johanna
    Pedunculate Oaks (Quercus robur L.) Differing in Vitality as Reservoirs for Fungal Biodiversity2018In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 1758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological significance of trees growing in urban and peri-urban settings is likely to increase in future land-use regimes, calling for better understanding of their role as potential reservoirs or stepping stones for associated biodiversity. We studied the diversity of fungal endophytes in woody tissues of asymptomatic even aged pedunculate oak trees, growing as amenity trees in a peri-urban setting. The trees were classified into three groups according to their phenotypic vitality (high, medium, and low). Endophytes were cultured on potato dextrose media from surface sterilized twigs and DNA sequencing was performed to reveal the taxonomic identity of the morphotypes. In xylem tissues, the frequency and diversity of endophytes was highest in oak trees showing reduced vitality. This difference was not found for bark samples, in which the endophyte infections were more frequent and communities more diverse than in xylem. In general, most taxa were shared across the samples with few morphotypes being recovered in unique samples. Leaf phenolic profiles were found to accurately classify the trees according to their phenotypic vitality. Our results confirm that xylem is more selective substrate for endophytes than bark and that endophyte assemblages in xylem are correlated to the degree of host vitality. Thus, high vitality of trees may be associated with reduced habitat quality to wood-associated endophytes.

  • 3.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gutierrez, Laura
    Fritz, Robert S
    Fritz, Robert D
    Orians, Colin M
    Does the differential seedling mortality caused by slugs alter the foliar traits and subsequent susceptibility of hybrid willows to a generalist herbivore?2007In: Ecological Entomology, Vol. 32, p. 211-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. 1. Many Salicaceae species naturally form hybrid swarms with parental and hybrid taxa that differ in secondary chemical profile and in resistance to herbivores. Theoretically, the differential mortality in the seedling stage can lead to changes in trait expression and alter subsequent interactions between plants and herbivores. This study examines whether herbivory by the generalist slug Arion subfuscus, which causes extensive mortality in young willow seedlings, causes shifts in (a) the foliar chemistry of F2 willow hybrids (Salix sericea and Salix eriocephala), and (b) the subsequent susceptibility to Japanese Beetles, Popillia japonica.

    2. In 2001, two populations of F2 seedlings were generated: those that survived slug herbivory (80–90% of seedlings placed in the field were killed by the slugs) were designated as S-plants, whereas C-plants (controls) experienced no mortality.

    3. Common garden experiments with cuttings from these populations, in 2001 and 2002, revealed extensive variation in the phenolic chemistry of F2 hybrids, but revealed no significant difference between S- and C-plants, although the levels of foliar nutrients, proteins and nitrogen tended to be higher in S-plants.

    4. Concentrations of salicortin and 2'-cinnamoylsalicortin explained 55 and 38% of the the variation in leaf damage caused by Japanese beetles, and secondary chemistry was highly correlated within replicate clones (salicortin R2 = 0.85, 2-cinnamoylsalicortin R2 = 0.77, condensed tannins R2 = 0.68).

    5. Interestingly, Japanese beetle damage and condensed tannins were positively correlated within the S-plants, but not in the C-plants, suggesting that slugs had selected for plants with a positive relationship between tannins and P. japonica damage. This is unlikely to be a consequence of a preference for tannins, but is suggested to be related to the elevated nutrient levels in the S-plants, perhaps in combination with the complex-binding properties of tannins.

    6. The damage was highly correlated within replicate clones and a model choice analysis suggested that Japanese beetle damage may be explained by four factors: concentrations of salicortin, condensed tannins, and nitrogen, as well as the specific leaf area (thick leaves were damaged less).

  • 4.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    From micro towards the macro scale2006In: New Phytologist, Vol. 172, p. 7-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Björkén, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Varad, Akkamahadevi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hagner, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wedin, Mats
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Endophytic fungi in European aspen (Populus tremula) leaves - diversity, detection, and a suggested correlation with herbivory resistance2010In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution (GMTC), clines of traits reflecting local co-adaptation (including resistance genes) should be common between a host and its parasite and should persist across time. To test the GMTC-assumption of persistent clinal patterns we compared the natural prevalence of two parasites on aspen Populus tremula trees: mining moths of the genus Phyllocnistis and leaf rust Melampsora spp. Damage data were collated from the Swedish National Forest Damage Inventory (2004–2006). In addition, occurrence of the parasites was scored in field conditions in two common gardens in the north and south of Sweden over five growing seasons (2004–2008), then related to biomass (stem height and diameter) and to concentrations of eleven leaf phenolics. Phyllocnistis mainly occurred in the northern garden, a distribution range which was confirmed by the countrywide inventory, although Phyllocnistis was more abundant on southern clones, providing evidence for possible local maladaptation. Melampsora occurred all over the country and in both gardens, but built up more quickly on northern clones, which suggests a centre of local clone maladaptation in the north. Stem growth also followed a clinal pattern as did the concentration of three phenolic compounds: benzoic acid, catechin and cinnamic acid. However, only benzoic acid was related to parasite presence: negatively to Phyllocnistis and positively to Melampsora and it could thus be a potential trait under selection.

    In conclusion, clines of Phyllocnistis were stronger and more persistent compared to Melampsora, which showed contrasting clines of varying strength. Our data thus support the assumption of the GMTC model that clines exist in the border between hot and cold spots and that they may be less persistent for parasites with an elevated gene flow, and/or for parasites which cover relatively larger hot spots surrounded by fewer cold spots.

  • 6.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ericson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lundberg, Per
    Nutrient addition extends flowering display, which gets tracked by seed predators, but not by their parasitoids2008In: Oikos, Vol. 117, p. 473-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although phenological matching between two and three trophic interactions has received some attention, it has largely been disregarded in explaining the lack of strong cascade dynamics in terrestrial systems. We studied the response of the specialist seed predator, Paroxyna plantaginis (Tephritidae) and associated generalist parasitoids (Chalcidoidea) to controlled fertilisation of individuals of naturally growing Tripolium vulgare (Asteraceae) on four island populations (Skeppsvik Archipelago, Sweden). We consistently found evidence of nutrient limitation: fertilised plants increased their biomass, produced more capitula (the oviposition units for tephritid flies), were more at risk of attack by the tephritids, and puparia were heavier in fertilised plants. During some parts of the season tephritids became more heavily parasitized, supporting the presence of cascade dynamics, however net parasitism over season decreased in response to nutrient addition. We found no evidence that capitulum size complicated parasitoid access to the tephritids, however the extended bud production prolonged the flowering season. Thus, tephritids utilized the surplus production of capitula throughout the entire season, while parasitoids did not expand their oviposition time window accordingly. Implications for top down regulation and cascade dynamics in the system are discussed.

  • 7.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Witzell, Johanna
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wulff, Sören
    Luquez, Virginia MC
    Ågren, Rickard
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Large scale geographic clines of parasite damage to Populus tremula L2010In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 483-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In conclusion, clines of Phyllocnistis were stronger and more persistent compared to Melampsora, which showed contrasting clines of varying strength. Our data thus support the assumption of the GMTC model that clines exist in the border between hot and cold spots and that they may be less persistent for parasites with an elevated gene flow, and/or for parasites which cover relatively larger hot spots surrounded by fewer cold spots.

  • 8.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Siddique, Abu Bakar
    Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Unterseher, Martin
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Both plant genotype and herbivory shape aspen endophyte communities2018In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 187, no 2, p. 535-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicinoid phenolic glycosides are common defence substances in salicaceous trees and specialist leaf beetles use these compounds for their own defence against predators. Salicinoids vary qualitatively and qualitatively in aspen (Populus tremula) and this variation has a genetic basis. The foliar endophyte mycobiome is plentiful and we hypothesised that it is related to plant genotype, potentially mediated by salicinoid composition, and that interactions with the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula may alter this relationship. We studied these three-way interactions in controlled greenhouse experiments. Endophytic fungi were isolated from sterilised leaf tissues with and without beetle damage, and from beetles. We confirmed that endophyte composition was influenced by host genotype. Beetle activity added generalist morphs to the mycobiome that overrode the initial host association. Yeast-like genera (Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula) were isolated only from beetle-damaged tissues and from beetles, whereas fast-growing filamentous fungi dominated beetle-free control plants. Competition experiments between filamentous fungi of plant origin and beetle-related yeasts suggested interaction of both stimulating and inhibiting modes of action amongst the fungi. As a result, we detected examples of amensalism, commensalism, parasitism and competition between the morphs tested, but we found no evidence of mutualism, and consequently no co-evolutionary relationship could be demonstrated, between yeasts carried by beetles, host genotype and associated filamentous morphs. Endophyte studies are method-dependent and high-throughput sequencing technology best define the fungal mycobiome, culturing however continues to be a cheap way to provide fundamental ecological insights and it is also required for experimental studies.

  • 9.
    Bandau, Franziska
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Differences in constitutive tannin-level influence Populus tremula genotypes’ responses to anthropogenic N-enrichmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bandau, Franziska
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Genotypic variability in Populus tremula L. affects how anthropogenic nitrogen enrichment influences litter decomposition2017In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 410, no 1-2, p. 467-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boreal forests can receive substantial nitrogen (N) enrichment via atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. While it is known that N enrichment can impact ecosystem properties, such as litter decomposition, it remains poorly understood how genetic variability within plant species modifies these impacts. We grew replicates of ten Populus tremula L. genotypes (GTs) under 3 N conditions; ambient, and levels representing atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. We measured leaf and litter physical and chemical traits, and conducted a litter decomposition assay. Leaf traits varied due to N treatment, GT, and constitutive tannin levels. Leaf traits were in some cases correlated with litter traits, and decomposition was influenced by single and interactive effects of N and GT. Nitrogen addition unexpectedly decelerated decomposition, potentially due to changes in specific leaf area (SLA). Variation in decomposition rates among the GTs was best explained by their differences in SLA, and lignin:N ratio. Nitrogen addition also caused a shift in which traits most strongly influenced decomposition. Our findings highlight that the considerable diversity present in tree species can have a strong influence on ecosystem processes, such as decomposition, and how these processes respond to environmental change.

  • 11.
    Bandau, Franziska
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE 90183 Umeå, Sweden.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK 1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
    Genotypic tannin levels in Populus tremula impact the way nitrogen enrichment affects growth and allocation responses for some traits and not for others2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 10, article id e0140971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root: shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype's baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a higher plasticity to nitrogen addition, and potentially an advantage when adapting to higher concentrations of soil nitrogen.

  • 12.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Univ Copenhagen, Sect Plant Biochem, Dept Plant & Environm Sci, DK-1871 Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Geographic structure in metabolome and herbivore community co-occurs with genetic structure in plant defence genes2013In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 791-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plantherbivore interactions vary across the landscape and have been hypothesised to promote local adaption in plants to the prevailing herbivore regime. Herbivores that feed on European aspen (Populus tremula) change across regional scales and selection on host defence genes may thus change at comparable scales. We have previously observed strong population differentiation in a set of inducible defence genes in Swedish P. tremula. Here, we study the geographic patterns of abundance and diversity of herbivorous insects, the untargeted metabolome of the foliage and genetic variation in a set of wound-induced genes and show that the geographic structure co-occurs in all three data sets. In response to this structure, we observe local maladaptation of herbivores, with fewer herbivores on local trees than on trees originated from more distant localities. Finally, we also identify 28 significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms SNPs from defence genes and a number of the herbivore traits and metabolic profiles.

  • 13.
    Bernhardsson, Carolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Abreu, Ilka N.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Population differentiation in arthropod community structure and phenotypic association with inducible defense genes in European Aspen (Populus tremula L., salicaceae)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant-herbivore interactions are known to vary across a landscape due to both variation in abiotic and biotic factors. Such spatial variation tends to promoting local adaption of plants to the prevailing herbivore regime. Here we use data from a common garden to look for patterns across populations in the abundance and diversity of herbivorous insects. We also screen for variation in the untargeted metabolome of the foliage of a subset of the same trees. We also search for phenotypic associations between genetic variation in a number of wound-induced genes and phenotypic variation in herbivore abundance, diversity and in metabolomes. We observe significant genetic variation in a number of herbivore-related traits but low correlations between traits. We do observe substantial genetic structure in both herbivore community structure and in metabolic profiles and this structure is aligned with genetic structure we have previously documented for a set of defense genes. We also identify a number of significant associations between SNPs from wound-induced defense genes and a number of the herbivore traits and metabolic profiles. However, these associations are likely not causal, but are rather caused by the underlying population structure we observe. These results highlight to the importance of historical processes and the need to better understand both the current-day geographic distribution of different herbivore species as well as the post-glacial colonization history of both plants and herbivores.

  • 14. Blumenstein, Kathrin
    et al.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Martin, Juan A.
    Hultberg, Malin
    Sieber, Thomas N.
    Helander, Marjo
    Witzell, Johanna
    Nutritional niche overlap potentiates the use of endophytes in biocontrol of a tree disease2015In: BioControl (Dordrecht), ISSN 1386-6141, E-ISSN 1573-8248, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 655-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asymptomatic endophytic fungi are often regarded as potent biocontrol agents in plants, but the competitive interactions between endophytes and other microbes within the same host plant are poorly understood. We tested a hypothesis that as compared to asymptomatic endophytes, an aggressive pathogen inhabiting the same host is able to utilize carbon substrates more efficiently. Using phenotype microarray, we determined the carbon utilization profiles of the highly virulent Dutch elm disease (DED) pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, and four asymptomatic elm (Ulmus spp.) endophyte isolates that were selected based on their differential association to the DED-susceptibility pattern of the host elms. The competitive interactions between isolates were evaluated using a niche overlap index. In contrast to our hypothesis, the studied endophytes exhibited extensive niche overlap with the pathogen, suggesting that some endophyte strains might protect elms against DED-pathogen through competition for substrates and provide new tools for biocontrol of DED.

  • 15.
    Blumenstein, Kathrin
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Macaya-Sanz, David
    Madrid, Spain.
    Martin, Juana A.
    Madrid, Spain.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Witzell, Johanna
    Joensuu, Finland.
    Phenotype MicroArrays as a complementary tool to next generation sequencing for characterization of tree endophytes2015In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 6, article id 1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing need to calibrate microbial community profiles obtained through next generation sequencing (NGS) with relevant taxonomic identities of the microbes, and to further associate these identities with phenotypic attributes. Phenotype MicroArray (PM) techniques provide a semi-high throughput assay for characterization and monitoring the microbial cellular phenotypes. Here, we present detailed descriptions of two different PM protocols used in our recent studies on fungal endophytes of forest trees, and highlight the benefits and limitations of this technique. We found that the PM approach enables effective screening of substrate utilization by endophytes. However, the technical limitations are multifaceted and the interpretation of the PM data challenging. For the best result, we recommend that the growth conditions for the fungi are carefully standardized. In addition, rigorous replication and control strategies should be employed whether using pre-configured, commercial microwell-plates or in-house designed PM plates for targeted substrate analyses. With these precautions, the PM technique is a valuable tool to characterize the metabolic capabilities of individual endophyte isolates, or successional endophyte communities identified by NGS, allowing a functional interpretation of the taxonomic data. Thus, PM approaches can provide valuable complementary information for NGS studies of fungal endophytes in forest trees.

  • 16. Caseys, Celine
    et al.
    Glauser, Gaetan
    Stoelting, Kai N.
    Christe, Camille
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lexer, Christian
    Effects of interspecific recombination on functional traits in trees revealed by metabolomics and genotyping-by-resequencing2012In: Plant Ecology & Diversity, ISSN 1755-0874, E-ISSN 1755-1668, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 457-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding the potential and limits of recombination in adaptive evolution is of great interest to evolutionary biology. New (ultra-) high-throughput technologies in metabolomics and genomics hold great promise for addressing these questions, but their use in interspecific hybrids remains largely unexplored. Aims: Our goal was to test if recombination between the highly divergent genomes of Populus alba and P. tremula has the potential to contribute to the standing variation for functionally important chemical traits. Methods: We studied the metabolomes of interspecific hybrids by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and initiated the characterisation of hybrid genomes by restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. Results: UHPLC-QTOF-MS indicated a complex 'mosaic' of chemical traits in recombinant hybrids and pointed to a heritable component for many of these. RAD sequencing confirmed the recombinant nature of natural hybrids previously characterised by microsatellites and suggested a complex history of recombination. Conclusions: It is likely that hybridisation has affected these species' genomes over several glacial cycles. Recombination holds great potential to create functionally relevant chemical variation in these trees. Nevertheless, correlations between chemical traits are not entirely broken up in recombinant hybrids, suggesting limits to adaptive evolution by genetic exchange.

  • 17. Crutsinger, G M
    et al.
    Sanders, N J
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wardle, D A
    Ecosystem retrogression leads to increased insect abundance and herbivory across an island chronosequence2008In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 816-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    1. Ecosystem retrogression, the decline-phase of ecosystem development, occurs during the long-term absence of catastrophic disturbance. It usually involves increased nutrient limitation over time, and leads to reductions in primary productivity, decomposition, and nutrient cycling.

    2. As a consequence, retrogression can alter the quality and abundance of host plants as food resources, but little is known about how these changes influence herbivore densities and foliage consumption.

    3. In this study, we used a 5000-year-old chronosequence of forested islands in northern Sweden on which retrogression occurs in the absence of lightning-induced wildfire. We asked whether retrogression affected the abundance and herbivory of a dominant herbivorous weevil (Deporaus betulae) and the quality and productivity of a dominant host-tree, mountain birch (Betula pubescens).

    4. Betula pubescens trees on retrogressed islands were less productive and produced smaller, tougher leaves that were lower in nutrients and higher in secondary metabolites than did those trees on earlier-successional islands.

    5. Despite the lower density and what ecologists might perceive as poorer quality of host plants, we observed several-fold higher weevil abundance and damage on retrogressed islands. This suggests that weevils might prefer the poorer quality leaves with higher secondary metabolites that occur on nutrient stressed host trees.

    6. Our results show that ecosystem retrogression increases susceptibility of B. pubescens trees to attack by herbivorous weevils.

    7. Our study provides evidence that ecosystem retrogression and associated shifts in the quantity and quality of available resources can operate as an important driver of abundance of a dominant insect herbivore.

  • 18.
    Decker, Vicki Huizu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Agostinelli, A
    Chen, SS
    Cleary, M
    Witzell, J
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Foliar fungal endophytes respond to nitrogen fertilization and herbivory in aspen genotypesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Decker, Vicki Huizu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Bandau, Franziska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Cole, Christopher T.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Aspen phenylpropanoid genes’ expression levels correlate with genets’ tannin richness and vary both in responses to soil nitrogen and associations with phenolic profiles2017In: Tree Physiology, ISSN 0829-318X, E-ISSN 1758-4469, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 270-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Condensed tannin (CT) contents of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) vary among genotypes, and increases in nitrogen (N) availability generally reduce plants’ tannin production in favor of growth, through poorly understood mechanisms. We hypothesized that intrinsic tannin production rates may co-vary with gene expression responses to soil N and resource allocation within the phenylpropanoid pathway (PPP). Thus, we examined correlations between soil N levels and both expression patterns of eight PPP genes (measured by quantitative-reverse transcription PCR) and foliar phenolic compounds (measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry) in young aspen genets with intrinsically extreme CT levels. Monitored phenolics included salicinoids, lignins, flavones, flavonols, CT precursors and CTs. The PPP genes were consistently expressed more strongly in high-CT trees. Low N supplements reduced expression of genes throughout the PPP in all genets, while high N doses restored expression of genes at the beginning and end of the pathway. These PPP changes were not reflected in pools of tannin precursors, but varying correlations between gene expression and foliar phenolic pools were detected in young and mature leaves, suggesting that processes linking gene expression and the resulting phenolics vary spatially and temporally. Precursor fluxes suggested that CT-related metabolic rate or sink controls are linked to intrinsic carbon allocation strategies associated with N responses. Overall, we found more negative correlations (indicative of allocation trade-offs) between PPP gene expression and phenolic products following N additions in low-CT plants than in high-CT plants. The tannin-related expression dynamics suggest that, in addition to defense, relative tannin levels may also be indicative of intraspecific variations in the way aspen genets respond to soil fertility. 

  • 20.
    Decker, Vicki Huizu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Siddique, A
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Specialist Leaf Beetles Enrich Diversity of Endophytic Fungi in Aspen Leaves, and Mask Intra-specific Host SpecificityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21. Fritz, Richard
    et al.
    Hochwender, Carl
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Czorsak, Martin
    Fitness and genetic architecture of parent and hybrid willows in common gardens2006In: Evolution, Vol. 60, p. 1215-1227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of inorganic phosphate (Pi) status, light/dark and sucrose on expression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) gene (Ugp), which is involved in sucrose/ polysaccharides metabolism, were investigated using Arabidopsis wild-type (wt) plants and mutants impaired in Pi and carbohydrate status. Generally, P-deficiency resulted in increased Ugp expression and enhanced UGPase activity and protein content, as found for wt plants grown on P-deficient and complete nutrient solution, as well as for pho1 (P-deficient) mutants. Ugp was highly expressed in darkened leaves of pho1, but not wt plants, daily tight exposure enhanced Ugp expression both in wt and pho mutants. The pho1 and pho2 (Pi-accumulating) mutations had Little or no effect on leaf contents of glucose and fructose, regardless of light/dark conditions, whereas pho1 plants had much higher Levels of sucrose and starch in the dark than pho2 and wt plants. The Ugp was up-regutated when leaves were fed with sucrose in wt plants, but the expression in pho2 background was much less sensitive to sucrose supply than in wt and pho1 plants. Expression of Ugp in pgm1 and sex1 mutants (impaired in starch/sugar content) was not dependent on starch content, and not tightly correlated with soluble sugar status. Okadaic acid (OKA) effectively blocked the P-starvation and sucrose -dependent expression of Ugp in excised leaves, whereas staurosporine (STA) had only a small effect on both processes (especially in -P leaves), suggesting that P-starvation and sucrose effects on Ugp are transmitted by pathways that may share similar components with respect to their (in)sensitivity to OKA and STA. The results of this study suggest that Ugp expression is modulated by an interaction of signals derived from P-deficiency status, sucrose content and dark/ light conditions, and that light/ sucrose and P-deficiency may have additive effects on Ugp expression. (c) 2004 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • 22. Gundale, Michael J.
    et al.
    Sverker, Jennie
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte
    Wardle, David A.
    Variation in protein complexation capacity among and within six plant species across a boreal forest chronosequence2010In: Plant Ecology, ISSN 1385-0237, E-ISSN 1573-5052, Vol. 211, no 2, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated among and within species variation in several litter chemical properties, including protein complexation capacity (PCC), for six plant species across a boreal forest chronosequence in northern Sweden across which stand fertility declines sharply with stand age. We hypothesized (1) that evergreen species which dominate in late-successional stands would exhibit higher PCCs than deciduous species that dominate in young stands, (2) that individual species would increase their PCCs in response to nutrient limitation as succession proceeds, and (3) that differences in PCC among litter types would determine their interactive effects with proteins on soil N and C mineralization. The data demonstrated a high PCC, but a low PCC per unit of soluble phenol, for two deciduous species that dominate in early-successional high fertility stands, providing mixed support for our first hypothesis. No species demonstrated a significant correlation between their PCC and stand age, which did not support our second hypothesis. Finally, a soil incubation assay revealed that litter extracts for three of the six species had negative interactive effects with added proteins on N mineralization rates, and that all six species demonstrated positive interactive effects with protein on C mineralization. This pattern did not provide strong support for our third hypothesis, and suggests that N immobilization was likely a more important factor regulating N mineralization than stabilization of proteins into tannin complexes. These data suggest that multiple interactive mechanisms between litter extracts and proteins likely occur simultaneously to influence the availability of N in soils.

  • 23.
    Keefover-Ring, Ken
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
    Ahnlund, Maria
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Umeå, Sweden.
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Umeå, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Moritz, Thomas
    Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Umeå, Sweden.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    No evidence of geographical structure of salicinoid chemotypes within Populus tremula2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 10, p. e107189-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicinoids are well-known defense compounds in salicaceous trees and careful screening at the population level is warranted to fully understand their diversity and function. European aspen, Populus tremula, is a foundation species in Eurasia and highly polymorphic in Sweden. We exhaustively surveyed 102 replicated genotypes from the Swedish Aspen collection (SwAsp) for foliar salicinoids using UHPLC-ESI-TOF/MS and identified nine novel compounds, bringing the total to 19 for this species. Salicinoid structure followed a modular architecture of a salicin skeleton with added side groups, alone or in combination. Two main moieties, 2'-cinnamoyl and 2'-acetyl, grouped the SwAsp population into four distinct chemotypes, and the relative allocation of salicinoids was remarkably constant between different environments, implying a highly channeled biosynthesis of these compounds. Slightly more than half of the SwAsp genotypes belonged to the cinnamoyl chemotype. A fraction synthesized the acetyl moiety alone (similar to 7%) or in combination with cinnamoyl (similar to 2%), and close to forty percent lacked either of the two characteristic moieties, and thus resemble P. tremuloides in their salicinoid profile. The two most abundant chemotypes were evenly distributed throughout Sweden, unlike geographical patterns reported for SwAsp phenology traits, plant defense genes, and herbivore community associations. Here we present the salicinoid characterization of the SwAsp collection as a resource for future studies of aspen chemical ecology, salicinoid biosynthesis, and genetics.

  • 24.
    Keefover-Ring, Ken
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Carlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    2 '-(Z)-Cinnamoylsalicortin: A novel salicinoid isolated from Populus tremula2014In: Phytochemistry Letters, ISSN 1874-3900, E-ISSN 1876-7486, Vol. 7, p. 212-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a combination of NMR and mass spectroscopic techniques, we have isolated a new salicinoid from the foliage of European aspen (Populus tremula) and identified it as 2'-(Z)-cinnamoylsalicortin. The relatively high amounts in foliage and the similarity in structure to bioactive salicinoids isolated from other salicaceous trees indicates that this compound may have implications for the study of P. tremulaherbivore interactions.

  • 25. Khaling, Eliezer
    et al.
    Papazian, Stefano
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Poelman, Erik H.
    Holopainen, Jarmo K.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK 1871, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
    Blande, James D.
    Ozone affects growth and development of Pieris brassicae on the wild host plant Brassica nigra2015In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 199, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When plants are exposed to ozone they exhibit changes in both primary and secondary metabolism, which may affect their interactions with herbivorous insects. Here we investigated the performance and preferences of the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae on the wild plant Brassica nigra under elevated ozone conditions. The direct and indirect effects of ozone on the plant-herbivore system were studied. In both cases ozone exposure had a negative effect on P. brassicae development. However, in dual-choice tests larvae preferentially consumed plant material previously fumigated with the highest concentration tested, showing a lack of correlation between larval preference and performance on ozone exposed plants. Metabolomic analysis of leaf material subjected to combinations of ozone and herbivore-feeding, and focussing on known defence metabolites, indicated that P. brassicae behaviour and performance were associated with ozone-induced alterations to glucosinolate and phenolic pools. 

  • 26.
    Kloth, Karen J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; Laboratory of Plant Physiology, Wageningen University, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; Bioscience, Wageningen University & Research, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline
    Wiegers, Gerrie L.
    Kruijer, Willem
    Buijs, Gonda
    Meyer, Rhonda C.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bouwmeester, Harro J.
    Dicke, Marcel
    Jongsma, Maarten A.
    SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 Restricts Aphid Feeding on Arabidopsis during Heat Stress2017In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 2450-2464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of phloem proteins in plant resistance to aphids is still largely elusive. By genome-wide association mapping of aphid behavior on 350 natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified the small heat shock-like SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 (SLI1). Detailed behavioral studies on near-isogenic and knockout lines showed that SLI1 impairs phloem feeding. Depending on the haplotype, aphids displayed a different duration of salivation in the phloem. On sli1 mutants, aphids prolonged their feeding sessions and ingested phloem at a higher rate than on wild-type plants. The largest phenotypic effects were observed at 26 degrees C, when SLI1 expression is upregulated. At this moderately high temperature, sli1 mutants suffered from retarded elongation of the inflorescence and impaired silique development. Fluorescent reporter fusions showed that SLI1 is confined to the margins of sieve elements where it lines the parietal layer and colocalizes in spherical bodies around mitochondria. This localization pattern is reminiscent of the clamp-like structures observed in previous ultrastructural studies of the phloem and shows that the parietal phloem layer plays an important role in plant resistance to aphids and heat stress.

  • 27.
    Luquez, Virginia
    et al.
    INFIVE, UNLP-CONICET, La Plata, Argentina.
    Hall, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Natural phenological variation in aspen (Populus tremula): the SwAsp collection2008In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, Vol. 4, p. 279-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Populus is currently the main model system for genetic, genomic, and physiological research in trees. Phenotypic variation in aspen (Populus tremula) populations growing in different environments across Sweden is expected to reflect genetic variation that is important for local adaptation. To analyze such natural phenotypic and genetic variation, the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) Collection was established. Trees were taken from 12 different populations across Sweden, from 56° to 66° latitude north and planted in two common gardens in Ekebo (55.9°N) and Sävar (63.4°N). Data related to phenological and growth traits were collected during the second year of growth. Some traits like the date of bud set and leaf area duration showed strong clinal variation patterns with latitude in both field trials, but the date of bud flush did not change along a latitudinal cline. The phenological traits showed moderate within-populations heritabilities, although growth traits showed weaker clinal patterns and lower heritabilities than the phenological traits. This research forms the starting point for the development of the SwAsp collection, a resource facilitating analysis of the natural genetic variation in aspen, the elucidation of the structure and dynamics of aspen populations, and the future identification of the genes controlling adaptive traits using association mapping of selected candidate genes.

  • 28. Orians, Colin M
    et al.
    Fritz, Robert S
    Hochwender, Cris G
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Czesak, Mary Ellen
    How slug herbivory of juvenile hybrid willows alters chemistry, growth and subsequent susceptibility to diverse plant enemies2013In: Annals of Botany, ISSN 0305-7364, E-ISSN 1095-8290, Vol. 112, no 4, p. 757-765Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Papazian, Stefano
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå Plant Science Centre.
    Girdwood, Tristan
    Ripszam, Mátyás
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Poelman, Erik H.
    Dicke, Marcel
    Moritz, Thomas
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Herbivore-Induced Metabolic Responses in Brassica nigra are Shaped by Leaf OntogenyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to defend, plants rely on quick metabolic reconfigurations. Here weinvestigated plant herbivore-induced responses asking: 1) how exposure to methyljasmonate(MeJA) and herbivory alter plant defence and growth metabolism, and 2)are herbivore-induced responses concentrated in tissues with higher fitness value, aspredicted by the optimal defence (OD) theory? We analysed the leaf metabolome of black mustard (B. nigra) in response to MeJAand/or feeding by specialist caterpillars of the large white cabbage butterfly (Pierisbrassicae). Shifts in defence-related (secondary) and growth-related (primary)metabolites were initially evaluated on fully expanded mature leaves and thenfollowed across leaf ontogeny. MeJA enhanced herbivore induced-responses and increased the plant resistanceagainst sequential herbivory. Responses were focused in young leaves andcharacterized by changes in defence- (glucosinolates, phenolics) and growth- (aminoacids, sugars, organic acids) metabolism, including asymmetric accumulation ofcentral tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates. MeJA application enhanced the plant resistance towards herbivory and, consistentlywith the OD theory, herbivore-induced responses were prioritized in young leaves.However, shifts in the plant were not limited to higher defences but affected growthmetabolism including regulation of energy pathways and increased leaf senescence.These effects deserve attention by future ecological and applied research on plantinsectinteractions.

  • 30.
    Papazian, Stefano
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Khaling, Eliezer
    Bonnet, Christelle
    Lassueur, Steve
    Reymond, Philippe
    Moritz, Thomas
    Blande, James D.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Central Metabolic Responses to Ozone and Herbivory Affect Photosynthesis and Stomatal Closure2016In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, no 3, p. 2057-2078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants have evolved adaptive mechanisms that allow them to tolerate a continuous range of abiotic and biotic stressors. Tropospheric ozone (O-3), a global anthropogenic pollutant, directly affects living organisms and ecosystems, including plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we investigate the stress responses of Brassica nigra (wild black mustard) exposed consecutively to O-3 and the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae. Transcriptomics and metabolomics data were evaluated using multivariate, correlation, and network analyses for the O-3 and herbivory responses. O-3 stress symptoms resembled those of senescence and phosphate starvation, while a sequential shift from O-3 to herbivory induced characteristic plant defense responses, including a decrease in central metabolism, induction of the jasmonic acid/ethylene pathways, and emission of volatiles. Omics network and pathway analyses predicted a link between glycerol and central energy metabolism that influences the osmotic stress response and stomatal closure. Further physiological measurements confirmed that while O-3 stress inhibited photosynthesis and carbon assimilation, sequential herbivory counteracted the initial responses induced by O-3, resulting in a phenotype similar to that observed after herbivory alone. This study clarifies the consequences of multiple stress interactions on a plant metabolic system and also illustrates how omics data can be integrated to generate new hypotheses in ecology and plant physiology.

  • 31. Ponzio, Camille
    et al.
    Papazian, Stefano
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dicke, Marcel
    Gols, Rieta
    Dual herbivore attack and herbivore density affect metabolic profiles of Brassica nigra leaves2017In: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1356-1367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant responses to dual herbivore attack are increasingly studied, but effects on the metabolome have largely been restricted to volatile metabolites and defence-related non-volatile metabolites. However, plants subjected to stress, such as herbivory, undergo major changes in both primary and secondary metabolism. Using a naturally occurring system, we investigated metabolome-wide effects of single or dual herbivory on Brassica nigra plants by Brevicoryne brassicae aphids and Pieris brassicae caterpillars, while also considering the effect of aphid density. Metabolomic analysis of leaf material showed that single and dual herbivory had strong effects on the plant metabolome, with caterpillar feeding having the strongest influence. Additionally, aphid-density-dependent effects were found in both the single and dual infestation scenarios. Multivariate analysis revealed treatment-specific metabolomic profiles, and effects were largely driven by alterations in the glucosinolate and sugar pools. Our work shows that analysing the plant metabolome as a single entity rather than as individual metabolites provides new insights into the subcellular processes underlying plant defence against multiple herbivore attackers. These processes appear to be importantly influenced by insect density.

  • 32. Randriamanana, Tendry R.
    et al.
    Nissinen, Katri
    Ovaskainen, Anu
    Lavola, Anu
    Peltola, Heli
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta
    Does fungal endophyte inoculation affect the responses of aspen seedlings to carbon dioxide enrichment?2018In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 33, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endophytes are microorganisms that live inside plants without causing visible symptoms, at least during some parts of their life cycle. We studied, for the first time, the combined effects of CO2 enrichment (700 ppm) and fungal endophyte inoculation on the growth, the concentrations of low-molecular weight phenolics, and condensed tannins of aspen (Populus tremula) seedlings. As expected, we found that the endophyte strain we inoculated was neutral to plant growth and was able to bypass major plant defences. In addition, CO2 enrichment alone boosted plant growth, but had only minor effects on plant phenolics. Neither did it affect the plant-endophyte relationship. Based on our findings, we suggest that the successful and asymptomatic colonization of endophytes that we found in aspen might be due to the endophytes' special attributes enabling them to thrive inside plant tissues and to avoid or counteract the plant's chemical defences.

  • 33.
    Robinson, Kathryn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Mahler, Niklas
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Önskog, Jenny
    Albrectsen, Benedicte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hvidsten, Torgeir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Populus tremula (European aspen) shows no evidence of sexual dimorphism2014In: BMC Plant Biology, ISSN 1471-2229, E-ISSN 1471-2229, Vol. 14, p. 276-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Evolutionary theory suggests that males and females may evolve sexually dimorphic phenotypic and biochemical traits concordant with each sex having different optimal strategies of resource investment to maximise reproductive success and fitness. Such sexual dimorphism would result in sex biased gene expression patterns in non-floral organs for autosomal genes associated with the control and development of such phenotypic traits.

    Results:

    We examined morphological, biochemical and herbivory traits to test for sexually dimorphic resource allocation strategies within collections of sexually mature and immature Populus tremula (European aspen) trees. In addition we profiled gene expression in mature leaves of sexually mature wild trees using whole-genome oligonucleotide microarrays and RNA-Sequencing.

    Conclusions:

    We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism or differential resource investment strategies between males and females in either sexually immature or mature trees. Similarly, single-gene differential expression and machine learning approaches revealed no evidence of large-scale sex biased gene expression. However, two significantly differentially expressed genes were identified from the RNA-Seq data, one of which is a robust diagnostic marker of sex in P. tremula.

  • 34.
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hauzy, Céline
    Loeuille, Nicolas
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
    Relative impacts of environmental variation and evolutionary history on the nestedness and modularity of tree-herbivore networks2015In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 5, no 14, p. 2898-2915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nestedness and modularity are measures of ecological networks whose causative effects are little understood. We analyzed antagonistic plant-herbivore bipartite networks using common gardens in two contrasting environments comprised of aspen trees with differing evolutionary histories of defence against herbivores. These networks were tightly connected owing to a high level of specialization of arthropod herbivores that spend a large proportion of the life cycle on aspen. The gardens were separated by ten degrees of latitude with resultant differences in abiotic conditions. We evaluated network metrics and reported similar connectance between gardens but greater numbers of links per species in the northern common garden. Interaction matrices revealed clear nestedness, indicating subsetting of the bipartite interactions into specialist divisions, in both the environmental and evolutionary aspen groups, although nestedness values were only significant in the northern garden. Variation in plant vulnerability, measured as the frequency of herbivore specialization in the aspen population, was significantly partitioned by environment (common garden) but not by evolutionary origin of the aspens. Significant values of modularity were observed in all network matrices. Trait-matching indicated that growth traits, leaf morphology, and phenolic metabolites affected modular structure in both the garden and evolutionary groups, whereas extra-floral nectaries had little influence. Further examination of module configuration revealed that plant vulnerability explained considerable variance in web structure. The contrasting conditions between the two gardens resulted in bottom-up effects of the environment, which most strongly influenced the overall network architecture, however, the aspen groups with dissimilar evolutionary history also showed contrasting degrees of nestedness and modularity. Our research therefore shows that, while evolution does affect the structure of aspen-herbivore bipartite networks, the role of environmental variations is a dominant constraint.

  • 35.
    Robinson, Kathryn M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ingvarsson, Pär K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Genetic Variation in Functional Traits Influences Arthropod Community Composition in Aspen (Populus tremula L.)2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e37679-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted a study of natural variation in functional leaf traits and herbivory in 116 clones of European aspen, Populus tremula L., the Swedish Aspen (SwAsp) collection, originating from ten degrees of latitude across Sweden and grown in a common garden. In surveys of phytophagous arthropods over two years, we found the aspen canopy supports nearly 100 morphospecies. We identified significant broad-sense heritability of plant functional traits, basic plant defence chemistry, and arthropod community traits. The majority of arthropods were specialists, those coevolved with P. tremula to tolerate and even utilize leaf defence compounds. Arthropod abundance and richness were more closely related to plant growth rates than general chemical defences and relationships were identified between the arthropod community and stem growth, leaf and petiole morphology, anthocyanins, and condensed tannins. Heritable genetic variation in plant traits in young aspen was found to structure arthropod community; however no single trait drives the preferences of arthropod folivores among young aspen genotypes. The influence of natural variation in plant traits on the arthropod community indicates the importance of maintaining genetic variation in wild trees as keystone species for biodiversity. It further suggests that aspen can be a resource for the study of mechanisms of natural resistance to herbivores.

  • 36. Saona, Nora M
    et al.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ericson, Lars E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bazely, Dawn R
    Environmental stresses mediate endophyte-grass interactions in a boreal archipelago2010In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 470-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Both evolutionary theory and empirical evidence from agricultural research support the view that asexual, vertically transmitted fungal endophytes are typically plant mutualists that develop high infection frequencies within host grass populations. In contrast, endophyte–grass interactions in natural ecosystems are more variable, spanning the range from mutualism to antagonism and comparatively little is known about their range of response to environmental stress.

    2. We examined patterns in endophyte prevalence and endophyte–grass interactions across nutrient and grazing (from Greylag and Canada geese) gradients in 15 sites with different soil moisture levels in 13 island populations of the widespread grass Festuca rubra in a boreal archipelago in Sweden.

    3. In the field, endophyte prevalence levels were generally low (range = 10–53%) compared with those reported from agricultural systems. Under mesic-moist conditions endophyte prevalence was constantly low (mean prevalence = 15%) and was not affected by grazing pressure or nutrient availability. In contrast, under conditions of drought, endophyte prevalence increased from 10% to 53% with increasing nutrient availability and increasing grazing pressure.

    4. In the field, we measured the production of flowering culms, as a proxy for host fitness, to determine how endophyte-infected plants differed from uninfected plants. At dry sites, endophyte infection did not affect flowering culm production. In contrast, at mesic-moist sites production of flowering culms in endophyte-infected plants increased with the covarying effects of increasing nutrient availability and grazing pressure, indicating that the interaction switched from antagonistic to mutualistic.

    5. A concurrent glasshouse experiment showed that in most situations, the host appears to incur some costs for harbouring endophytes. Uninfected grasses generally outperformed infected grasses (antagonistic interaction), while infected grasses outperformed uninfected grasses (mutualistic interaction) only in dry, nutrient-rich conditions. Nutrient and water addition affected tiller production, leaf number and leaf length differently, suggesting that tillers responded with different strategies. This emphasizes that several response variables are needed to evaluate the interaction.

    6. Synthesis. This study found complex patterns in endophyte prevalence that were not always correlated with culm production. These contrasting patterns suggest that the direction and strength of selection on infected plants is highly variable and depends upon a suite of interacting environmental variables that may fluctuate in the intensity of their impact, during the course of the host life cycle.

  • 37. Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y
    et al.
    Guy, Robert D
    Street, Nathaniel R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Robinson, Kathryn M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Silim, Salim N.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens2015In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 6, article id 528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (g(S)) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (delta C-13) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects.

  • 38. Viswanath, Venkatesh
    et al.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strauss, Steven H.
    Global regulatory burden for field testing of genetically modified trees2012In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, E-ISSN 1614-2950, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 221-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field trials are widely known to be essential for understanding the value and adaptability of trees produced via conventional and transgenic biotechnologies. However, obtaining permission for transgenic field trials is often considered to be very difficult in many countries. To understand the extent of regulatory requirements around the world and the burdens they impose, we surveyed 36 scientists and practitioners from 20 different countries who had experience or direct knowledge of regulatory compliance with field trials of transgenic trees. Results showed that permits and monitoring were universally required, and that public disclosure of field trial locations was required in three quarters of countries. Other major findings were that: separate approvals for different constructs, tree species, and trial locations were required in more than three quarters of the countries; characterization of each transgene insertion event was required as part of the application in four fifths of countries; and the application process itself was perceived as the largest single burden. Regulatory tiers that differentiate different kinds of transgenic trees based on perceived risk were present in only one fifth of countries. The data confirm the widespread perception among scientists that the costs and burdens of conducting field trials with transgenic trees are nearly universal substantial impediments to scientific and breeding progress.

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