umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Swedish Defence Research Agency, 906 21 Umeå, Sweden.
    Chernov, Yevgen A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK.
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ilver, Dag
    Moonens, Kristof
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Koeniger, Verena
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Liu, Hui
    Goldman, Matthew D.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Younson, Justine
    Kelly, Charles G.
    Gilman, Robert H.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.
    Nair, G. Balakrish
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Unemo, Magnus
    Danielsson, Dan
    Suerbaum, Sebastian
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Eldridge, Angela M.
    Chromy, Brett A.
    Hansen, Lori M.
    Solnick, Jay V.
    Linden, Sara K.
    Haas, Rainer
    Dubois, Andre
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Remaut, Han
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berg, Douglas E.
    Boren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence2017In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  • 2.
    Müller, Claudia M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Straseviçiene, Jurate
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Emody, Levente
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Balsalobre, Carlos
    Type 1 fimbriae, a colonization factor of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, are controlled by the metabolic sensor CRP-cAMP.2009In: PLoS pathogens, ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 5, no 2, p. e1000303-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 fimbriae are a crucial factor for the virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during the first steps of infection by mediating adhesion to epithelial cells. They are also required for the consequent colonization of the tissues and for invasion of the uroepithelium. Here, we studied the role of the specialized signal transduction system CRP-cAMP in the regulation of type 1 fimbriation. Although initially discovered by regulating carbohydrate metabolism, the CRP-cAMP complex controls a major regulatory network in Gram-negative bacteria, including a broad subset of genes spread into different functional categories of the cell. Our results indicate that CRP-cAMP plays a dual role in type 1 fimbriation, affecting both the phase variation process and fimA promoter activity, with an overall repressive outcome on fimbriation. The dissection of the regulatory pathway let us conclude that CRP-cAMP negatively affects FimB-mediated recombination by an indirect mechanism that requires DNA gyrase activity. Moreover, the underlying studies revealed that CRP-cAMP controls the expression of another global regulator in Gram-negative bacteria, the leucine-responsive protein Lrp. CRP-cAMP-mediated repression is limiting the switch from the non-fimbriated to the fimbriated state. Consistently, a drop in the intracellular concentration of cAMP due to altered physiological conditions (e.g. growth in presence of glucose) increases the percentage of fimbriated cells in the bacterial population. We also provide evidence that the repression of type 1 fimbriae by CRP-cAMP occurs during fast growth conditions (logarithmic phase) and is alleviated during slow growth (stationary phase), which is consistent with an involvement of type 1 fimbriae in the adaptation to stress conditions by promoting biofilm growth or entry into host cells. Our work suggests that the metabolic sensor CRP-cAMP plays a role in coupling the expression of type 1 fimbriae to environmental conditions, thereby also affecting subsequent attachment and colonization of host tissues.

  • 3. Skoog, Emma C.
    et al.
    Padra, Medea
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Obi, Ikenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Linden, Sara K.
    BabA dependent binding of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucins cause aggregation that inhibits proliferation and is regulated via ArsS2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 40656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucins in the gastric mucus layer carry a range of glycan structures, which vary between individuals, can have antimicrobial effect or act as ligands for Helicobacter pylori. Mucins from various individuals and disease states modulate H. pylori proliferation and adhesin gene expression differently. Here we investigate the relationship between adhesin mediated binding, aggregation, proliferation and adhesin gene expression using human gastric mucins and synthetic adhesin ligand conjugates. By combining measurements of optical density, bacterial metabolic activity and live/dead stains, we could distinguish bacterial aggregation from viability changes, enabling elucidation of mechanisms behind the anti-prolific effects that mucins can have. Binding of H. pylori to Leb-glycoconjugates inhibited the proliferation of the bacteria in a BabA dependent manner, similarly to the effect of mucins carrying Leb. Furthermore, deletion of arsS lead to a decrease in binding to Leb-glycoconjugates and Leb-decorated mucins, accompanied by decreased aggregation and absence of anti-prolific effect of mucins and Leb-glycoconjugates. Inhibition of proliferation caused by adhesin dependent binding to mucins, and the subsequent aggregation suggests a new role of mucins in the host defense against H. pylori. This aggregating trait of mucins may be useful to incorporate into the design of adhesin inhibitors and other disease intervention molecules.

  • 4.
    Åberg, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Fernández-Vázquez, Jorge
    Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avgda. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Cabrer-Panes, Juan David
    Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avgda. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Sánchez, Alex
    Departament d'Estadística, Universitat de Barcelona, Avgda. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Balsalobre, Carlos
    Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avgda. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Similar and divergent effects of ppGpp and DksA deficiencies on transcription in Escherichia coli2009In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 191, no 10, p. 3226-3236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concerted action of ppGpp and DksA in transcription has been widely documented. In disparity with this model, phenotypic studies showed that ppGpp and DksA might also have independent and opposing roles in gene expression in Escherichia coli. In this study we used a transcriptomic approach to compare the global transcriptional patterns of gene expression in strains deficient in ppGpp (ppGpp(0)) and/or DksA (DeltadksA). Approximately 6 and 7% of all genes were significantly affected by more than twofold in ppGpp- and DksA-deficient strains, respectively, increasing to 13% of all genes in the ppGpp(0) DeltadksA strain. Although the data indicate that most of the affected genes were copositively or conegatively regulated by ppGpp and DksA, some genes that were independently and/or differentially regulated by the two factors were found. The large functional group of chemotaxis and flagellum synthesis genes were notably differentially affected, with all genes being upregulated in the DksA-deficient strain but 60% of them being downregulated in the ppGpp-deficient strain. Revealingly, mutations in the antipausing Gre factors suppress the upregulation observed in the DksA-deficient strain, emphasizing the importance of the secondary channel of the RNA polymerase for regulation and fine-tuning of gene expression in E. coli.

  • 5.
    Åberg, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    The Helicobacter pylori sialic acid binding adhesin SabA is regulated via a network of two-component systemsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The acid-responsive signaling system ArsRS plays a key role in regulating factors important for survival in acidic conditions during infection of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori. In addition, ArsRS was suggested to control the disease-associated attachment protein SabA, however, mechanistic data is still lacking. We show that the repressing effect of the ArsRS system on SabA expression occurs both at acidic and neutral conditions and is mediated at the transcriptional level. Purified His6-ArsR binds PsabA DNA at several sites, with varying affinity and independent of phosphorylation status and H. pylori strains showed unique cognate PsabA sequences to tweak the ArsR binding ability, resulting in strain-dependent repression of SabA expression. By site-directed mutagenesis we reveal key amino acids for the binding activity of ArsR. Finally, we show that that ArsR binds to A/T-rich DNA as dimers or larger multimers, suggesting that ArsR has affinity for DNA structures rather than to a specific promoter DNA sequence. SabA expression is further influenced by the FlgRS and CrdRS two-component systems, illustrating a complicated crosstalk among regulatory networks in H. pylori.

  • 6.
    Åberg, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Vallström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhman, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A Repetitive DNA Element Regulates Expression of the Helicobacter pylori Sialic Acid Binding Adhesin by a Rheostat-like Mechanism2014In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e1004234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During persistent infection, optimal expression of bacterial factors is required to match the ever-changing host environment. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a large set of simple sequence repeats (SSR), which constitute contingency loci. Through a slipped strand mispairing mechanism, the SSRs generate heterogeneous populations that facilitate adaptation. Here, we present a model that explains, in molecular terms, how an intergenically located T-tract, via slipped strand mispairing, operates with a rheostat-like function, to fine-tune activity of the promoter that drives expression of the sialic acid binding adhesin, SabA. Using T-tract variants, in an isogenic strain background, we show that the length of the T-tract generates multiphasic output from the sabA promoter. Consequently, this alters the H. pylori binding to sialyl-Lewis x receptors on gastric mucosa. Fragment length analysis of post-infection isolated clones shows that the T-tract length is a highly variable feature in H. pylori. This mirrors the host-pathogen interplay, where the bacterium generates a set of clones from which the best-fit phenotypes are selected in the host. In silico and functional in vitro analyzes revealed that the length of the T-tract affects the local DNA structure and thereby binding of the RNA polymerase, through shifting of the axial alignment between the core promoter and UP-like elements. We identified additional genes in H. pylori, with T- or A-tracts positioned similar to that of sabA, and show that variations in the tract length likewise acted as rheostats to modulate cognate promoter output. Thus, we propose that this generally applicable mechanism, mediated by promoter-proximal SSRs, provides an alternative mechanism for transcriptional regulation in bacteria, such as H. pylori, which possesses a limited repertoire of classical trans-acting regulatory factors.

  • 7.
    Österberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Herrera Seitz, M. Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Genetic dissection of a motility-associated c-di-GMP signalling protein of Pseudomonas putida2013In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 556-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of the Pseudomonas putidaPP2258 protein or its overexpression results in defective motility on solid media. The PP2258 protein is tripartite, possessing a PAS domain linked to two domains associated with turnover of c-di-GMP - a cyclic nucleotide that controls the switch between motile and sessile lifestyles. The second messenger c-di-GMP is produced by diguanylate cyclases and degraded by phosphodiesterases containing GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains respectively. It is common for enzymes involved in c-di-GMP signalling to contain two domains with potentially opposing c-di-GMP turnover activities; however, usually one is degenerate and has been adopted to serve regulatory functions. Only a few proteins have previously been found to have dual enzymatic activities - being capable of both synthesizing and hydrolysing c-di-GMP. Here, using truncated and mutant derivatives of PP2258, we show that despite a lack of complete consensus in either the GGDEF or EAL motifs, the two c-di-GMP turnover domains can function independently of each other, and that the diguanylate cyclase activity is regulated by an inhibitory I-site within its GGDEF domain. Thus, motility-associated PP2258 can be added to the short list of bifunctional c-di-GMP signalling proteins.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf