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  • 1.
    Boekraad, Maria Doeke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ecological sustainability in traditional Sámi beliefs and rituals2016Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The book gives a detailed overview of relevant traditional indigenous Sámi myths, beliefs and rituals based on empirical findings. The author inquires whether and how they are related to an ecologically sustainable use of the natural environment. Her main sources are ancient missionary texts, writings by Sámi and contemporary interviews with Sámi individuals. The traditional value system included ecological sustainability as a survival strategy. Beliefs and rituals, transmitted via stories, incorporated these values and transmitted a feeling of a round life, despite the strict rules for right behavior and punishment for transgressions. The term round symbolized a sense of safety, interconnectedness, reliance on mutual help and respect, identification and empathy with all living beings.

  • 2.
    Boekraad, Maria Doeke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Reflections on ethic for ethnically non-indigenous researchers2016In: Agon Pohjoinen Tiede- ja Kulturuurilehti, ISSN 1799-1900, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What constitutes ethical behaviour within and among research related to First Nations? This text was born out of an urge to explore the challenges faced by ethnically non-indigenous researchers who wish to study a living indigenous culture in a way that contributes not only to increasing knowledge but also to improving indigenous communities' living conditions. The present article does not to seek to provide conclusive answers. Instead, it aspires to discuss some issues raised in relevant decolonizing literature and reflect on the challenges they raise.  The texts provides an overview over past and present critical discussions on research ethics in projects related to the indigenous Sami people in Scandinavia. It gives special attention to the perspectives of ethnically non- indigenous master- and doctoral students.

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